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Model of Formal Argument 2009

Model of Formal Argument 2009

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Published by BlueEELI
Level 5, Week 2, Model of a Formal Argument -- shows an organization strategy for writing argumentative essays in any class at any level of education. All argumentative essays follow this basic format. You can change the order of the elements, but all must be present.
Level 5, Week 2, Model of a Formal Argument -- shows an organization strategy for writing argumentative essays in any class at any level of education. All argumentative essays follow this basic format. You can change the order of the elements, but all must be present.

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Published by: BlueEELI on Jun 23, 2009
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Model of a Formal Argument
All formal writing should follow a basic pattern of organization, whether the topic is expository or argumentative in nature.I.
Introduction
– you will vary the order of the following three components, depending onyour chosen organization strategy (general-to-specific, specific-to-general, historical review,review of a controversy, statement of thesis, anecdote, etc).A.
Context
. This section sets forth background facts in a general way and prepares readersfor the main argument. The context, often called
narration
, if it is at all lengthy, should be orderly. Time-order, space-order, and order-of-climax are all likely patterns. Thenarration answers the question, “What is the topic?”B.
Thesis
. This crucial element states exactly what is to be proved and clarifies what is atstake. The thesis statement answers the question, “What is asserted about this topic?” Thethesis should NOT be self-reflexive, as in “I will show that…” The thesis, as well as theentire essay, should avoid the use of any personal pronouns (e.g., “we,” “our,” “I,” “my,”“you,” and “your”). Most theses are 2-part: assertion and preview of confirmation.C.
Definition
. Any key terms in your discussion should be clarified in this section. At this point, key words are named and defined by the use of synonyms, stipulation (meaning theauthor’s own definition, not from Webster or another bland dictionary source), byclassification, and/or by negation (what the term does NOT mean).II.
Confirmation
.A.
Proofs or Points
. This section sets forth the evidence and provides supporting matter through the use of illustrations, analogies, statistics, authorities, and/or anecdotes wiselygathered and cited from other sources. Each piece of evidence should clearly and directlysupport the original thesis somehow, and each illustration should contain clear transitions between points. This evidence should be arranged in the order of climax, usually startingwith a powerful piece of evidence and ending with the most convincing example.B.
Counterargument/Antithesis and Refutation/Rebuttal
. This section allows the author to acknowledge any form of opposition. It maturely and intelligently takes an opposingside into consideration without pointing fingers or belittling the opposing point of view. Itexposes the weaknesses of other points of view in order to gently push for the author’s perspective as best. It’s an attempt at objectivity.C.
Transitions
. Logical connections should be made explicit throughout the argument byway of transition words and phrases. A 2-part transition sentence should introduce eachnew part of the essay: in the first, provide a transition word/phrase and a brief summaryof the preceding parts of the essay (a backward glance); in the second, a mini-thesis or topic sentence should preview the next part of the essay (a look forward).III.
Conclusion
. The final portion of the paper attempts to rouse the reader’s intellectualcuriosity by summing up the main points of the author’s logic in a fairly succinct, memorableway, and it should show a confident control of the topic without sounding arrogant. Itanswers the question, “So what?”A.
So What?
The last few sentences or paragraphs of any essay leave an impression, so endthe paper with the ramifications or implications of your research. If you’ve offered a

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