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Literary Terms Study Guide I. Know These Words and Their

Literary Terms Study Guide I. Know These Words and Their

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02/01/2013

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Literary Terms Study Guide
I.
Know these words and their definitions:

conflict/plot
setting
theme/main idea
exposition
climax
resolution
genre
narrator
first person
second person
third omniscient
third limited
character
protagonist
antagonist
inner conflict
characterization
direct characterization
indirect characterization
static character
dynamic character

motivation
style
juxtaposition
repetition
imagery
simile
hyperbole
details
description
alliteration
consonance
assonance
metaphor
allegory
tone/mood
allusion
foreshadowing
anecdote
symbol
irony
sarcasm

II.

Make sure you know the basic plot and main characters for all of the
stories we\u2019ve read so far (\u201cThe Monkey\u2019s Paw\u201d, \u201cRules of the Game\u201d,
\u201cThe Most Dangerous Game\u201d, \u201cA Very Old Man with Enormous
Wings\u201d, \u201cThe Apple Tree\u201d, and \u201cA Handful of Dates\u201d.) Be able to

use the literary terms while talking about a story.
III.
Be able tosummarize one of these stories. Summarize in a couple
sentences. Use present tense.
IV.
Know whatt heme is. Be able to write a topic sentence and
paragraph about the theme of one of the stories.
V.
Be able to discuss thest yle seen in one of the stories we\u2019ve read.
VI.
Study the differenttypes ofconflict (three types)
Literary Terms Notes
conflict/plot
the struggle found in fiction.
Types of conflict

(1) character in conflict with another character
(2) character vs. Nature
(3) character vs. Self

setting
determines Time and Place

theme/main idea
the general idea or insight about life that a writer wishes to express.
A simple theme can often be stated in a single sentence.

exposition/rising action
the beginning of the plot which gives information about the conflict

climax
the turning point in the conflict
will the good guy or the bad guy win?

resolution/falling action
The part of a story or drama which occurs after the climax and which establishes a new

norm, a new state of affairs-the way things are going to be from then on.
genre
A literary type or form
Poetry, short story, novel
Within drama, genre include tragedy, comedy and other forms

narrator
who is telling the story

point of view
A piece of literature contains a speaker who is speaking
either in the first person, telling things from his or her own perspective,
or in the third person, telling things from the perspective of an onlooker

first person
The story is told from the point of view 'I,\u2019\u2026The I-narrator may be part of the action or an
observer
I want to tell you an unbelievable story. It is about how a storm changed my life forever\u2026
second person
This narrator speaks directly to the reader: "You walk in the room and what do you see? It's
Mullins again, and you say, 'Out. I've done with him.'" This point of view isr ar e primarily
because it is artificial and self-conscious.

third omniscient
omniscient = all-knowing
when the speaker knows everything including the actions, motives, and thoughts of all the

characters

Chris tried hard to concentrate but he couldn\u2019t remember which key opened the lock.
Meanwhile, Steve felt nervous; what if Chris couldn\u2019t open the safe? He wondered. The
storm was approaching them quickly and they didn\u2019t even know it.

third limited
the speaker is unable to know what is in any character's mind but the protagonist\u2019s

The school dance made Chris nervous. He didn\u2019t know what to wear and spent a long time in front of his mirror, trying out different hair styles. He wished he could find the perfect look for the dance and for high school in general.

character
A person, or any thing presented as a person, e. g., a spirit, object, animal, or natural force, in
a literary work
protagonist
The hero or central character of a literary work
antagonist
A person or force which opposes the protagonist in a literary work
inner conflict
character in conflict with self
characterization
How a writer reveals the personality of a character
direct characterization
character is revealed (1) by what the character says about himself or herself; (2) by what
others reveal about the character
He was a short man with balding hair. He didn\u2019t like riding the subway so he walked around
town.
indirect characterization
character is revealed by the character's own actions
With lightning speed Sarah expertly stopped the car right before the cliff\u2019s edge. She looked
out at the view; she wasn\u2019t sweating or breathing fast.
static character
a character who does not change throughout the story
dynamic character
a character who changes throughout the story
motivation
what drives the characters to act

style
How a work can be described, based on its different parts.
serious, simple, sparse, detailed

details
Carefully chosen by the author to create a certain effect and move the plot forward
description
A collection of details that create an effect and move the story forward
juxtaposition
putting two things side by side, sometimes to emphasize their differences
repetition
Repeating words, phrases, images, etc. in order to create a particular effect

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