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Green Horn - Volume 30, Edition 2

Green Horn - Volume 30, Edition 2

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Published by Springfield VT News
Award winning student publication of Springfield High School in Springfield, VT
Award winning student publication of Springfield High School in Springfield, VT

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Published by: Springfield VT News on Nov 24, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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What’s Inside:
GreenHorn
The Award-Winning Student Publication of Springfield High School and the Tech Center 
November 23, 2009Volume 30, Edition 2
802 Music
Hip and Happening Venue Spins Debate
By Holly Hooke
L
oud music, tight spaces, and plenty of teens.Sounds like 802, the new music venue in
downtown Springfield which is creating somecontroversy among students at Springfield High School.
Will 802 haters end up the breakers?802 Music is a live music venue located atthe junction of Valley Street and Main Street in Spring-
field. “Bands and their fans come together to enjoy and
express their passion towards music,” said 802 manager 
and former SHS graduate Danny McChesney. “It’s also
a good place for everyone to hangout and be themselveswithout drugs or alcohol.”
“It took lots of hard work, petitioning, and
acquiring licenses to even get 802 up and running,” said
founder and owner of 802 Music, Dave Hinckley. “It’s a
lot harder than everyone thinks getting a place like thistogether. All the painting, cleaning, and booking bandsevery week is hard. Not to mention keeping up withadvertisement and technology today to be known as a21st century music venue. One of my favorite things
is the name 802 Music. It’s a pun since 802 is the areacode of Vermont and it sticks in everyone’s mind. It
also represents Vermont and provides publicity.”802 Music is one of the few music venues insouthern Vermont. Amateur bands used to have a varietyof places to play. Not anymore with the Underground in
See
802
page 22
 Who ya gonna call? Horror novelist and gothic nonfiction writer Joe Citro spokeabout his craft at SHS on October 16th. Citro began his career as a novelist, butnow compiles folk tales about the eccentric and the weird in Vermont.Cosmos keepthe Trophy,p. 14Kanye's BrokenHeart,
P.13
Closure forPark StreetSchool,p. 7The Main Street storefront of 802 Music, a music venue for local singers and bands, declares its positive, drug-free stance. Inset: The 802 sign.
 
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Green Horn Interview
Erika Anderson
,
Ryan Brady
,
John Forbes
,
Sarah Gray
,
 Sam Hensel
-
Hunter
,
Jalessah Jackson
,
Angelo Jardina
,
Maria Stern
,
 and Olivia Thayer
GREEN HORN STAFF
Co
-
EditorCo
-
EditorCo
-
EditorLayout EditorLayout EditorPhotography EditorSports EditorTech News EditorAshley Richardson
.....................
Olivia Johnson
...........................
Jenny Bradley
..........................
Samuel L
.
Benton
....................
Kelsey Christensen
....................
Laurel Porter
.............................
Courtney Downing
...................
Melissa Tarbell
............................----------------
REPORTERS
---------------
S
 pringfield High School has added a literacy coach,Kevin Coen, to its professional staff. This posi
-
tion is funded by a grant. “Our school district
realized that we are not meeting the AYP [AdequateYearly Progress]standards of the
 NCLB [No ChildLeft Behind] Act
of 2001,” said
Coen. “We are
hoping that im- provement willhelp lower thedropout rate at
Springfield HighSchool.” Coen
was hired froma grant based onthe number of 
SHS students on
free or reducedlunch.Stu-dents who willneed extra help
will be identified using the MAP (Measure of Aca
-demic Progress) test which took place in October. As
a literacy coach, Coen will target about 30-35 students
who struggle with reading and writing.
There has never been a literacy coach at SHS.Therefore, Coen was forced to develop his own literacycurriculum. “Students come to me to develop skills to better read and understand the text,” said Coen. “Thesekids don’t have a strategy to read well and my job is to
teach them those strategies. Students will be choosingtheir own books [with guidance] and hopefully realizethat reading is not a nemesis.”
Developing a literacy curriculum has been achallenge for Coen. “I had no guide to use from thisschool so I have been reading a lot to try to develop awell-balanced curriculum,” said Coen. “I will focuson the reading and writing. I have developed a modelof challenges for writing. I will be teaching about sixclasses, in which we will be writing authentically. This
means that they will write about something they reallycare about.”
He added, “For example, a question could be, ‘what is something you wish SHS had?’ and then
Coen Fills Position asLiteracy Coach
By Erika Anderson
See
Coen
page 23
.
Eliza PennellQuestBridgeScholarship Finalist
T
his autumn, Eliza Pennell and Jess Watkins
learned they were finalists in the QuestBridge National College Match Scholarship. This schol
-arship, which offers to cover complete college costs, is
for low-income senior scholars. Last year, QuestBridgeallowed 1000 students to attend college with financialaid and full scholarships. Founded in 1987, Quest
-
Bridge has been providing help to students for over 20
years. Recently,
Green Horn
talked with Pennell about
the Questbridge application process.
Green Horn: How do you apply for the QuestBridgescholarship?Eliza Pennell:
You apply online via Questbridge.organd submit 3 essays, a short answer, a section aboutfinance, a section about transcript (online and sent) anda section on test scores. Then 12 days after the applica
-tion, you send your high school rankings.
GH: How did you find QuestBridge?
EP:
They sent me mail. Luckily I got it early enoughthat I didn’t just throw it away. For that I am eternallygrateful. I wish everyone knew about it. It is definitely
not publicized enough.
GH: What are rankings and how do they work?EP:
With rankings, you have to submit a list of colleges
that you would like to go to in the QuestBridge umbrella(26). These colleges include Notre Dame, Yale, andPrinceton. Then you rank the choices, 1 to 8, of whereyou would like to go. If you become a finalist, thenQuestBridge will forward your application to these col
-leges in the hopes that one of them will accept you.
GH: Can you go to any college on the list if you getinto it?EP:
No. If you get into, for example, school 1, 2, and7, you must go to your top-ranked school. It is bind
-
ing. That is why you need to pick your rankings very
carefully.
GH: Would you have changed your rankings?EP:
I would have kept my top two schools the same,
 but would have switched my third and fourth school and
gotten rid of my fifth-ranked school.
GH: Are you happy that you found the QuestBridgeNational College Match scholarship?EP:
I am very excited I found the scholarship. Quest
-
Bridge makes it possible for some kids to attend collegewho wouldn’t have been able to go. It really opens doorsto people who haven’t had doors opened for them in the past. This is such a wonderful opportunity, and I am solucky to be a finalist. It really shows that college isn’t
 just for men, or for the rich or white. Something really
good is coming out of this scholarship. This is what
college is for: to help people add good to the world.
 By Erika Anderson
 
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3
 News
osencrantz, Fortinbras, Hamlet, and Laertes en-gage in a talkback session with Springfield HighSchool students after the matinee of 
 Hamlet 
on
 Wednesday, October 21. Nearly 40 SHS students viewedthe Northern Stage Theatre's production of 
 Hamlet 
at the
Briggs Opera House in White River Junction. The VermontTelephone Company (VTel) donated the cost of the tick-ets and transportation, about $600.00, giving students achance to see Shakepeare's classic play.
AP Scholars at SHS
L
ast school year, Springfield High School was
honored with the distinction of having two Ad-
vanced Placement (AP) Scholars. One of thesescholars, Dan Kendall, graduated this past spring and
now attends UVM on the Green and Gold scholarship.
The other scholar, Brittany Adnams, who received this
honor as a junior, is now a senior enrolled in more APclasses.
AP Scholar is a title recognized by the Col
-
lege Board as someone who has scored a 3 or higher on
three or more AP exams. Scores on the exams range from
1 to 5. Five (5) represents the highest possible score.
Adnams took AP Stats her sophomore year 
and received a 4 on the exam. During junior year, shetook U.S. History and English Language & Compositionand received a 3 on both of those exams.
Although students are not required to take APclasses in order to take the corresponding exam, the ten
AP courses currently offered at SHS assist in preparing
students for the exams.
Angelo Jardina (U.S. History) and John Dean(Statistics),who taught Adnams, provide past exams for 
their students to study. Adnams found this to be helpful.When one takes an exam, it is useful to know ahead of 
By Melissa Tarbell
Achievement Starts With a Challenge
See
 AP Scholars
page 23
Brittany Adnams was honored as an AP Scholar for exemplary scores on AP exams including Statistics, U.S.History, and English Language andComposition.
time how to approach the test. It is especially useful because the AP exams vary. “[There is] no certain, set
way of studying because each exam is different,” Ad-
nams said. "If you know the content well and you know
how the test is set up it makes it easier to pace yourself during the exam which is only 40 minutes long."Advanced Placement is a copyrighted term.
Every AP course has to be approved by the CollegeBoard. Jardina refers to this AP audit and the resultingclass as a “course-in-a-box.” This is why some teachersdon’t volunteer to teach an AP class. With Advanced
Placement, everything must be taught A to Z.
John Dean describes the process of creatingan AP course. You’re “required to give them [the Col
-
lege Board] a syllabus” which they must approve. Andyou are “given a whole list of items [you’re] required
to teach,” hence the A to Z part.
Besides producing the courses, every APteacher must be certified during a summer trainingcourse. Despite the tedious work involved with teach
-
ing AP, both Jardina and Dean enjoy the rigorous AP

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