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The University Times - January 21, 2010

The University Times - January 21, 2010

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Published by NinerOnline
Musical group Town Mountain are traveling all over the U.S. to bring back the classic sound of Bluegrass

page 4

The over indulgence of prescription drugs: there’s more to it than over the counter
page 3

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte • www.nineronline.com

January 21, 2010 Vol 22, No. 23

THURSDAY

Got a tip? Give us a call at 704.687.7148

partially Funded by Student Fees

published twice weekly

Harris sinks final blow to St. Louis
JoSh CArpenter Sports Editor jcarpe1@uncc.ed
Musical group Town Mountain are traveling all over the U.S. to bring back the classic sound of Bluegrass

page 4

The over indulgence of prescription drugs: there’s more to it than over the counter
page 3

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte • www.nineronline.com

January 21, 2010 Vol 22, No. 23

THURSDAY

Got a tip? Give us a call at 704.687.7148

partially Funded by Student Fees

published twice weekly

Harris sinks final blow to St. Louis
JoSh CArpenter Sports Editor jcarpe1@uncc.ed

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Published by: NinerOnline on Feb 08, 2010
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Anni SimpSon
 Sr. Staff Writer asimps27@uncc.edu
UNC Charlotte is not asmall campus, and i anythingprojected about our utureremains consistent, it is ourgrowth as a university. Growthcan mean a lot o dierentthings. One o the ways ourgrowth is expected to changeUNC Charlotte in the relativelynear uture is the expansion o programs on campus. Over thecourse o the next ew years,UNC Charlotte hopes to expandby including new undergraduate,graduate, and doctoral programso growing interest and demandto the student body.For example, some o the new programs beingconsidered currently includean undergraduate degree in Japanese, a master’s degree inanthropology, and a Ph.D inpublic health. “Those are someo the programs that we havealready conceptualized andset orward or approval to theboard o governors,” said Dr. Joan Lorden, the Provost andVice Chancellor or AcademicAairs.However, adding newprograms is an extensive process.“It doesn’t happen overnight,”said Dr. Lorden. “It involvesidentiying a possible area ora program, then developinga easibility study, a kind o preliminary proposal. Thatgets reviewed in the colleges. I it’s a graduate program, it alsogets reviewed in the graduateschool.” Feasibility can includethe monetary cost o additionalprograms, but that is only one o the many actors included whenunder consideration. Also o concern are aculty, new space,and new acilities.A demand and need has toexist or new programs createdto exist. Employment
Got a tip? Give us a call at 704.687.7148
partially Fuded by Studet Fees published twice weekly
The University of North Carolina at Charlotte •
www.nineronline.com
THURSDA
 January 21, 2010
Vol 22, No. 23
Got a tip? Give us a call at 704.687.7148
partially Fuded by Studet Fees published twice weekly
University to addnew degree programs
S
New programs
ag 2
 Japanese and Anthropology to be made available
JAmie Brown
 Staff Writer  jbrow13@uncc.edu
Noted author and U.S.deense expert Peter W. Singer will speak at UNC Charlotte,Thursday, Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. in theRowe Arts Buildings Auditorium,room 130. The lecture is ree andopen to the public.Singer is Senior Fellow andDirector o the 21st CenturyDeense Initiative at theBrookings Institution. He willbe speaking on behal o hismost recent book, Wired o War.Making the New York Times non-ction bestseller list in its rst week o release, the book looksat the implications o roboticsand other new technologies or war, politics, ethics and law inthe 21st Century.Singer received his PH.D.in Government rom HarvardUniversity and a BA rom theWoodrow Wilson School o Public and International Aairsat Princeton University. He hasdelivered speeches at venuesranging rom the U.S. Congressto over 40 universities aroundthe world. He has written or aull range o major media and journals, including the BostonGlobe, L.A. Times, New YorkTimes, Washington Post,Foreign Aairs, Current History,Survival, International Security,Parameters, Weltpolitik, and theWorld Policy Journal. Singer iscurrently a columnist on deenseissues or the WashingtonExaminer.Singer’s two previous bookshave also been as successulas his current. His rst book,published in 2003, CorporateWarriors: The Rise o thePrivatized Military Industrypioneered the study o the newindustry o private companiesproviding military services orhire, an issue that soon becameimportant with the use and abuseo these companies in Iraq. It wasnamed best book o the year bythe American Political ScienceAssociation, as well as amongthe top ve international aairsbooks o the year by the GelberPrize. The book is now listedas an assigned text at venuesranging rom Yale Law School tothe Army War College.Children at War waspublished in 2005 and exploredthe rise o another new orce inmodern warare, child solidergroups. Singer’s captivating work was the rst book tocomprehensively explore thecompelling and tragic rise o child soldier groups. It wasrecognized by the 2006 RobertF. Kennedy Memorial Book o the Year Award.Thursday night, Singer willcomment on his most recentbook and discuss new trendsin ghting war, and what lawsand ethics apply to engagingunmanned and autonomous
Author Peter W. Singer tospeak at UNC Charlotte
The director of the Brookings Institute’sdefense initiative will speak on ‘Wired of War.’
www.pwsinger.com
The over indulgence of prescription drugs: there’smore to it than over thecounter
page 3
Musical group Town Moun-tain are traveling all over theU.S. to bring back the classicsound of Bluegrass
page 4
JoSh CArpenter
 Sports Editor  jcarpe1@uncc.edu
With just under 10 secondslet in overtime, Charlotte 49erssenior point guard DiJuan Harrisbrought the ball upcourt and washaving déjà vu. Just like the rsttime, he stepped up and madethe shot when the 49ers neededit most.“Well um, I actually had hitthat same shot beore the hal ended,” Harris said o his game- winning jumper. “Time was winding down and coach waslike ‘make a play.’ At the worstI knew it was going into double-overtime. So I ound a sweetspot on the foor, got there likeI did beore the end o the hal,he backed up and I knocked theshot in.”Harris scored only sevenpoints in the game, but our o them came at crunch time whenit counted most. Harris gave the49ers a 26-25 lead at the end o therst hal when he crossed-overKwamain Mitchell and knockeddown a oul-line jumper. Inovertime, it was a mirror image.Harris dribbled inside the arc,used his patented crossover moveto create space rom Mitchelland buried the game-winner.Ater the Billikens’ hal-courtheave missed, Harris jumpedover press row, celebrating the63-61 victory.It was ironic that in a game where Charlotte lived by pointsin the paint, a jumper was thedeciding actor. Coming in as atop 10 deensive team nationally,the Billikens held Charlotte without a 3-pointer or the rsttime since 1989, a streak o 630games.The game was a series o ups and downs or Charlotte(12-4; 2-1), who moved to 7-1 atHalton Arena this season. The49ers started the game on a 12-2run, capped by Derrio Green’simpressive 3-point play in whichhe knocked in a one-handed shotrom the right side while beingouled.The Billikens (11-6; 2-1)couldn’t stay with the 49ersearly, but ater Green’s 3-pointplay, scored seven straightpoints to get right back intothe game. 49er’s head coachBobby Lutz has an unspokenrule; i one o his players picksup two ouls early in the rsthal, he’ll ride the pine or theremaining minutes o the hal.This was the case or Charlottereshman Chris Braswell, whopicked up his second oul with just over 10 minutes remaining.With Braswell on the bench, theBillikens took advantage andeventually took the lead late inthe rst hal on a 3-pointer romCody Ellis.In the second hal, theNiners once again jumped outto an early lead. And once again,the Billikens ought right back.Charlotte pushed their lead toas much as eight at 51-43 whenHarris knocked down a pair o ree throws. But the Billikenshad a counter-punch, answering with an 8-0 run to tie the gameat 51. Ater one ree throw orboth teams, the score was tied at 52 and ater An’Juan Wildernessmissed a driving layup with onesecond remaining, the game washeaded to overtime.In overtime, Charlotte jumped out to an early leadand led 61-56 with just over oneminute remaining. Ater a dunkby the Billikens’ Jon Smith, WillieReed went to the oul line with achance to cut the score to one.Ater Reed clanked o both reethrows, the long rebound wentto Kyle Cassity, who knockeddown the three with 17 secondsremaining, tying the score.Lutz opted not to call timeoutand allowed Harris made theclutch shot.“Big players step up in big-time moments,” Harris saidaterwards. “Me being the leadero the UNC-Charlotte basketballteam, whether I made it or missedit, I was willing to take the shotto end the game.”St. Louis, who ailed to moveto 3-0 in conerence play sincethe 1989-90 season was led by Jon Smith (15 points, eightrebounds).The Niners will try to gettheir rst A-10 road win this week as they travel to Richmondon Wednesday evening and LaSalle on Saturday aternoon.
Harris sinks fnalblow to St. Louis
S
Singer
ag 2
Photo/Jackson Sveen
 
PAGE 2
 
 
January 21, 2010
 
 
THE UNIVERSITY TIMES
positions being available,people looking to hire graduates with degrees in those programs,and a growing student interestbase are all major actors increation. In some cases, theattraction is already there.Around twenty studentsare already interested in abioinormatics specialization asa Ph.D. program.That is one o the reasonsbehind the consideredundergraduate major in Japanese. “We have a verylarge undergraduate minorin Japanese,” she said. “Wetypically have between 200 and300 students a year studying Japanese.” Japanese can be useulto students seeking employment,but students have shown theirown interest in a Japanese B.A.The expansion o programs would providevarious new opportunities orundergraduates, and in the caseo master’s programs and newPh.D. programs, potentiallyattract new students lookingor those specic degrees andspecializations. “It wouldn’tchange undergraduate tuition,”said Dr. Lorden, quelling theear that comes with a tuitionthat is already increasing withother university changes, such as with the ootball team.While there are talks o a newscience building in the works oncampus, potentially having newprograms isn’t a direct resulto the new building. The newbuilding is being built or theneed o additional laboratoryspace, as well as an adequateresearch base or chemistry inparticular.“We want to createopportunities to study the thingsthat they’re interested in andenable them to have rich andproductive careers,” Dr. Lordensaid. “With every new program, we look at what the need isand what the demand is or theprogram.”
cud  ag 1
New Programs
JAmie Brown
 Staff Writer  jbrow13@uncc.edu
Chick-l-A will nowtemporarily re-locate to the ConeCenter over spring break, asremodeling begins in Prospector.The original plan was to movethe Chick-l-A during Christmasbreak, but several actors playedin the delay. Part o the setback was caused by the review processat the state construction level.The approval has to be met bythe state construction and thedepartment o insurance beoreany remodeling takes place. Thedinning service also elt it was inthe best interest or the studentsnot to disrupt ood service inProspector until constructionocially starts.Chartwell’s Resident DistrictManager, Andrew Lipson, said“The delay is actually not a badthing or our guest as the currentChick-l-A operation will notchange and be less capable o serving guest.”According to Lipson,Prospector is three times busierthan it was ve years and they want to make sure to take the timeand do everything properly.The Chick-l-A currentlyserves anywhere rom 800 to1,100 students a day, and willtransition to a grab-in-go at thetemporary location. The Chick-l-A Express will serve ready togo sandwiches or a quick lunch.The Main St. Market willexpand the number o registersand credit card machines inpreparation or more students.Although, the hours will staythe same, opening at 10:30and closing at 3 p.m. Lipson,however, said that i there weredepend or the Chick-l-A tostay open longer they wouldaccommodate.Raymond Galleno, directoro auxiliary services, said, “(We) want to make sure we service thepopulation what they want.”While the Cone Center allready has the seating capacity orextra students, part o the projectat Prospector is to expand theamount o seating.When the lower level o Prospector is complete, theseating capacity will seat between160 to 200 people. Otheradditions include six registers,bathrooms and an elevator.Breakast will also be servedat the new Chick-l-A, which will extend the hours rom 7 or8 a.m. to 8 p.m. The new hoursmay have some impact on thehours o the other ood optionsin Prospector.The new timeline now hasthe Chick-l-A temporarily re-locating during spring break, with remodeling to begin atProspector, with the lower-levelbeing completed by late all.Lipson likes the new timelinebetter “because the weather willbe much nicer or people to (wantto) walk to the Cone Center.”The upper part o Prospector, which includes Coyote Jack’sGrill, Salsaritas, Mondo Subsand Mamma Leone’s Pizza, willclose during the summer to alsoreceive an upgrade. Part o theconstruction will be upgradingthe re suspension systems, there alarm systems and access tothe building.The building also has to beupgraded to meet modern code,including the relocation o allthe electrical panels, becausethe current ones interer with where the new elevator will beplaced. Since the lower level wasnot designed or a kitchen o theinstallation o a bathroom, thesanitary sewer lines need to beupgraded, and kitchen acilitiesneed to be installed.The remodeling to the upperlevel will consist o upgradesto the back o the kitchen, newequipment and more storage.The upgrading to the upper levelis expected to be nished in timeor the all semester.Galleno understands that theProspector is “a prime location.”The academic core is there, which means the need or quickservice is really there. Thereore,the sooner construction begins;the sooner students can enjoyan expanded Chick-l-A and anupgraded Prospector. weapons. He will present what message it sends whenthe U.S. deploys unmannedmachines, how enemies mayinterpret being attacked by these weapons and how humans willremain masters o weapons thatare aster and more intelligentthan they are.Barnes and Noble at UNCCharlotte will provide copies o his book, where a signing willollow Singer’s lecture.The lecture is sponsoredby the College o Liberal Arts& Sciences, the Oce o International Programs, theCharlotte Research Institute,the College o Computing andInormatics, the College o Engineering and Marcia andPaul Simon.Singer’s appearance is therst o two events that will launchUNC Charlotte’s new centeror Applied CounterterrorismStudies. The center wascreated to provide citizens andpolicy-makers with a betterunderstanding o the multi-aced causes and consequenceso terrorist acts. The rstCounterterrorism Conerenceor proessionals and students will be held on Friday, Jan. 29at UNC Charlotte’s UptownCenter.
Singer
cud  ag 1
niner
news
Chick-Fil-A to remain in Prospector
 What’s going on?
 Who
Author and deense ex-pert Peter W. Singer
 Where
 
Rowe Arts room 130
 When
  Jan. 28 at 7 p.m.
File Photo
 
 
THE UNIVERSITY TIMES
 
January 21, 2010
 
❚
PAGE 3
view 
point
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DeVin phiLLipS
 Staff Writer dphilli@uncc.edu
Mixed martial arts or MMA is currentlybecoming one o the astest growing sports inAmerica. MMA is a sport which consists o combination dierent types o ghting styles.Traditional greco roman wrestling, boxing, karate, jiu jitsu, muay thai, and american kickboxing areincorporated into MMA. It’s popularity has evencurrently surpassed boxing in America.A lot o the growth o MMA is due to thepopularity o the Ultimate Fighting Championship,or the UFC. The president o the UFC, DanaWhite, recruited some o the top names in the world o MMA to UFC. Since then popularity andrevenue generated by the sport has been steadilyincreasing. Merchandise generated rom the UFCalso actored into its growth in popularity. “I thinkone o the biggest aids to the MMA world is theclothing brand Tap Out. They brought out a lot o ans in the earlier days with their eccentric clothinglook,” said UNC Charlotte junior Scott Syrett, alocal MMA ghter.“The UFC has been around or quite a while;it was just looked down upon. It was looked at asmore like pit ghting or human chicken ghts”,said Syrett. The popularity o the UFC thoughis causing misconceptions o mixed martial arts tobe reverse.MMA has even in infuential in eecting area o politics. In 1997, ormer Gov. o New York GeorgePataki banded MMA in New York, eeling thesport was “barbaric” in nature. On Jan. 11, presentGov. o New York David Patterson said that he wanted to reverse the ban o MMA or his state.Currently, New York State is acing a $7 billiondollar budget decit, and the revenue producerom MMA completions can help solve New York’sscal problem. Patterson hopes the prots rommix martial arts can solve the problem withoutorcing severe spending cuts to the stated budget.MMA is gaining attention locally in Charlotteas well. “The MMA scene around Charlotte isdenitely growing, especially now with localRodney Walace signing with UFC. I train withabout eight pros at my gym here in Charlotte,” saidSyrett.It is recommended that i an individual getsinvolved in MMA, that they pursue wrestlingthen progress on to other ghting techniques. Butmastering MMA comes down to nding the righttraining camp or you. “Find a camp with some pros with outstanding records and then you’re probablyon to something,” said Syrett. There are severalcamps that train authentic martial arts includingBlack Belt Usa and Alliance.MMA have emerged as a popular new aspecto American culture. “Fans have probably gone up10000 percent. Its unreal how popular its getting,”said Syrett. Other MMA organizations besidesUFC which include the WEC, IFL, and Strikeorceare beginning to get notarized as well. “I coulddenitely see MMA being an Olympic sport andmaybe the top sport in the world,” said Syrett.
erin reeVe
 Staff Writer ereeve@uncc.edu
Everyday, prescription drugs circulate throughthe hands o uture addicts, drug-induced corpses,and children.The main cause o death and addiction are thedoctors who prescribe and hand patients thesemedicines out like Halloween candy. I you haveever been to high school or college, you havebeen around some sort o drug or alcohol endthat overboard their dosage and make a mess o themselves and inevitably, the party.It is evident that these people like most, enjoythe escape that drugs and alcohol bring into theirlie a little too much. And who would not? Usingthese escapes are more or less the easy way out o abusy day, a bad day, a break up, and even help someto cope with deaths.But i we know how hard we can all victim tothese drugs, doctors must, too. They have not beenstudying their lives away, and closing their eyeso to the world completely. In this diverse reality,every amily has a relative or riend o a riend thathas experience drug or alcohol addiction.So why prescribe us such a high dosages o prescription drugs that we may die weaningourselves rom them? Once we have drugs in ourhands, it is hard to know what to do with them.They are worth so much money, why not sell themto our peers to make an even greater prot? Or, why not keep taking them? The thought o thishappening to kids is unreasonably disturbing.I they start so young, they’ll die or becomeaddicted at too early o an age. It’s devastating tohear about the deaths, the drama and the worriedparents o those kids who die in their sleep, die insports, rom overdosing on prescription drugs.In this lie we only get one chance. One chanceto be here, one chance to experience all we can.But or some whether children and adults, theyears can only be lessened by the dependence onthese drugs.Sometimes, we stereotype drugs with bad kids,or kids that have had a ‘troubled past’. But indeed,drugs circulate through everyone, and more kids who you would not expect are getting involved.Athletes are among the supported outlier. Wesometimes view athletes as being heavenly, withthe bodies o greek gods. But, in act, they are moreor less, the same as us.Athletes can become addicted to drugs whenthey tear their ACL, or have other sport injuriesthat victimize them into using prescription drugs.Like us, they become addicted, and like us, theydie, or struggle weaning rom them.The drug dealing and compulsion sometimesbegins with our pharmacy which the doctorrecommends. One could believe that this wasall to a way to wrap the patients back into beingobsessed and shaking, with addiction that theyhave to circulate their money right back into themedical industry and seek proessional help romthem, once again. Medical industries are stillbusinesses that prot rom your bad health.Someone else could argue that they over-prescribe drugs due to the dierent needs o patients. The doctor wants the patient to eelcomortable and not have any pain, so they over-prescribe. Although this is understandable,the majority o people will never use all theirprescription drugs, leaving room or selling, orexperimenting and inevitable dependence.Also, i doctors overprescribe, more money isused to damper our health care economically that we don’t actually need. This may sound like a smallproportion, but i they were so inexpensive, why would people sell them or good amounts o money?And, since our health care is already in desperateneed o some sort o evolution and economic boost, wouldn’t this be the perect time?It’s time to stop closing our eyes. Adults andkids whom you’d never believe to sell, are. It’s timeto let ourselves see the world or what and how itreally is, and start making changes. Our rst shouldbe prescribing the right amount o prescriptiondrugs.
A prescription doesn’t always make it sae
MCT Campus
Let’s get ready to rumble
 Mixed Martial Arts and UFC has more to offer the Queen City than most give them credit for 
Scott Syrett (right) training with another MMA fghter at Black Belt USAPhoto/ Scott Syrett
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
In regards to the tragedy in Haiti
I am very grateul andthankul in behal o all Haitiansto see how the American’scommunity and all over the world who had come together and helpHaiti in her darkest day.Nonetheless, since Haiti didnot have any type o mechanismin place, we still going to needhelp and volunteer to rebuildand put a type o inrastructurein place so all Haitian can besucient in their community.This is the reason, I would liketo encourage the community tospread the word to amily andriends and with their help wecan achieve anything. Like theHaitian mottos say that “Minanpil chaye pa lou” which itmeans “with a lot o hand theload is not heavy” and the othermotto says that “L’ Union FaitLa Force” it means that “Unitedmake us strong”. I know we shallovercome with the grace o Godand with everyone that God hasput in our path.I would like to spread the word, so people can keep givingo what ever they can, it might bea can o tuna, a blanket, Spring/summer cloth that is easily canbe wash by hand to be hang todry under the sun, shoes can beplastic sandals, fip-fop, toiletry.Or their can donate money toSamaritan Purse so they canprovide the victims a kit thatinclude a tent which is cost about$100 or a kit and also they canstill donate money by texting90999 to RED CROSS and keepdonating blood also.I just want to spread the words and thanking everyone who had been very generous andcompassion toward the Haitianpeople. Thank you again and letme know how I can keep the storyo the Haiti Disaster or a whileso people can keep helping in thesecond stage o our Recovery andthe rst stage is the Acute care. I would like to say thank youor your time.Sincerely,Jeanne Delva-PierreBSPH Candidate 2012

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