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The Babylonian Woe

The Babylonian Woe

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Published by rebelnews
A Study of the Origin of Certain Banking Practices, and of their effect on the events of Ancient History, written in the light of the Present Day.
A Study of the Origin of Certain Banking Practices, and of their effect on the events of Ancient History, written in the light of the Present Day.

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Published by: rebelnews on Jul 03, 2008
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12/25/2012

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ΕΛΛΗΝ
 
ΤΗΕ
 
ΒΑΒΥ
LONIAN WOE
BY
DAVID ASTLE
http://Ellhn.e-e-e.gr
 
 
A Study of the Origin of Certain Banking Practices, and of their effect on the events of Ancient History, written in the light of the Present Day.
byThe intellectual faculties however are not of themselvessufficient to produce external action; they require the aid of physicalforce,
THE DIRECTION AND COMBINATION OF WHICH ARE WHOLLY AT THE DISPOSALOF MONEY
,
THAT MIGHTY SPRING BY WHICH THE TOTAL FORCE OF HUMAN ENERGIESIS SET IN MOTION
.
Augustus Boeckh ; Translated;
The Public Economy of Athens 
, P. 7; Book I. London, 1828.
FOREWORD
For money has been the ruin of many and has misled the minds of Kings.
Ecclesiacticus 8, Verse 2.
 
When I originally approached my study as best as I might,dealing with the growth in pre-antiquity and antiquity of what isknown as the International Money Power, and the particular derivative of the money creative activities of such InternationalMoney Power that might be defined as the Life Alternative Factor, Idid so with some diffidence. Perhaps I was overly conscious of whatseemed to be the inadequateness of my preliminary training inthese matters and that in no way could I describe myself as deeplyconversant with the languages of ancient times, or, in the case ofMesopotamia, their scripts.However, in my preliminary studies involving checkingthrough the indices of a number of those standard books ofreference dealing with the ancient civilizations, I soon found thatany feelings of inferiority in so far as the adequacy of my scholarshiprelative to my particular subject was concerned were unwarranted,and that qualms in these respects were by no means justified...In almost all of such books of reference, except those thatclassified themselves as economic or monetary histories, waspractically no clear approach to the subject of money and finance,or to those exchange systems that must have existed in order thatthe so-called civilizations might come to be. In the odd case wherethe translations of the texts might reveal some key clue, no morespecial emphasis was placed herein than might have been placed
2
 
on the mention of a gold cup, a ring, a seal, or some exquisite pieceof stone work.In Jastrow's
Assyria 
there was no reference to money at all; inBreasted's
History of Egyp
a volume of six hundred pages or so, onlybrief mention on pages 97-98. In
A History of Egypt 
by Sir William M.Flinders-Petrie, in the records of Sir John Marshall and E.J.C. McKay inrespect to the diggings at Mohenjo-Daro, and in the writings of Sir Charles L. Woolley and others on their findings from their studies ofthe exhumed archives of the city states of ancient Mesopotamia,little enough information exists on the matters referred to above. InChristopher Dawson who wrote widely on ancient times, particularlyin the
Age of the Gods 
which dealt with most cultures until thecommencement of that period known as antiquity, there is only onereference to money, casual and not conveying much to theaverage reader; this reference to be found on page 131... In King's
History of Babylon 
there was practically nothing on these matters.Thus in almost all of the works of the great archaeologistsand scholars specializing in the ancient civilizations, there is a virtualsilence on that all important matter, the system of distribution offood surpluses, and surpluses of all those items needed towards themaintenance of a good and continuing life so far as were requiredby climate and custom.In all the writings of these great and practical scholars, theworkings of that mighty engine which injects the unit of exchangeamongst the peoples, and without which no civilization as we knowit can come to be, is only indicated by a profound silence. Of thesystems of exchanges, of the unit of exchange and its issue byprivate individuals, as distinct from its issue as by the authority ofsovereign rule, on this all important matter governing in such totalitythe conditions of progression into the future of these peoples, not aword to speak of...While it is true that the average archaeologist, in beingprimarily concerned with the results of the forces that gave rise tothe human accretions known as civilizations, has little enough timeto meditate on these forces themselves, especially since so littleevidence exists of what created them, or of how they providedguidance to men in the earlier days, the widespread character ofthis omission borders on the mystifying. Virtual failure to speculate onthose most important matters of all: the structure of the machinery ofthe systems of exchanges which undoubtedly had given rise to theancient city civilizations, and the true nature of the energy source bywhich such machinery was driven, whether by injections of
money 
 as known this last three thousand years or so, or by injections of an
3

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