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Recipes from Real Cajun by Donald Link

Recipes from Real Cajun by Donald Link

Ratings: (0)|Views: 33,229|Likes:
Published by The Recipe Club
Recipes included in this excerpt:
Fried Chicken and Andouille Gumbo
Cast-Iron Hush Puppies

An untamed region teeming with snakes, alligators, and snapping turtles, with sausage and cracklins sold at every gas station, Cajun Country is a world unto itself. The heart of this area—the Acadiana region of Louisiana—is a tough land that funnels its spirit into the local cuisine. You can’t find more delicious, rustic, and satisfying country cooking than the dirty rice, spicy sausage, and fresh crawfish that this area is known for. It takes a homegrown guide to show us around the back roads of this particularly unique region, and in Real Cajun, James Beard Award–winning chef Donald Link shares his own rough-and-tumble stories of living, cooking, and eating in Cajun Country.

Link takes us on an expedition to the swamps and smokehouses and the music festivals, funerals, and holiday celebrations, but, more important, reveals the fish fries, étouffées, and pots of Granny’s seafood gumbo that always accompany them. The food now famous at Link’s New Orleans–based restaurants, Cochon and Herbsaint, has roots in the family dishes and traditions that he shares in this book. You’ll find recipes for Seafood Gumbo, Smothered Pork Roast over Rice, Baked Oysters with Herbsaint Hollandaise, Louisiana Crawfish Boudin, quick and easy Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits with Fig-Ginger Preserves, Bourbon-Soaked Bread Pudding with White and Dark Chocolate, and Blueberry Ice Cream made with fresh summer berries. Link throws in a few lagniappes to give you an idea of life in the bayou, such as strategies for a great trip to Jazz Fest, a what-not-to-do instructional on catching turtles, and all you ever (or never) wanted to know about boudin sausage. Colorful personal essays enrich every recipe and introduce his grandfather and friends as they fish, shrimp, hunt, and dance.

From the backyards where crawfish boils reign as the greatest of outdoor events to the white tablecloths of Link’s famed restaurants, Real Cajun takes you on a rollicking and inspiring tour of this wild part of America and shares the soulful recipes that capture its irrepressible spirit.

To read more about Real Cajun or Donald Link please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.
Recipes included in this excerpt:
Fried Chicken and Andouille Gumbo
Cast-Iron Hush Puppies

An untamed region teeming with snakes, alligators, and snapping turtles, with sausage and cracklins sold at every gas station, Cajun Country is a world unto itself. The heart of this area—the Acadiana region of Louisiana—is a tough land that funnels its spirit into the local cuisine. You can’t find more delicious, rustic, and satisfying country cooking than the dirty rice, spicy sausage, and fresh crawfish that this area is known for. It takes a homegrown guide to show us around the back roads of this particularly unique region, and in Real Cajun, James Beard Award–winning chef Donald Link shares his own rough-and-tumble stories of living, cooking, and eating in Cajun Country.

Link takes us on an expedition to the swamps and smokehouses and the music festivals, funerals, and holiday celebrations, but, more important, reveals the fish fries, étouffées, and pots of Granny’s seafood gumbo that always accompany them. The food now famous at Link’s New Orleans–based restaurants, Cochon and Herbsaint, has roots in the family dishes and traditions that he shares in this book. You’ll find recipes for Seafood Gumbo, Smothered Pork Roast over Rice, Baked Oysters with Herbsaint Hollandaise, Louisiana Crawfish Boudin, quick and easy Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits with Fig-Ginger Preserves, Bourbon-Soaked Bread Pudding with White and Dark Chocolate, and Blueberry Ice Cream made with fresh summer berries. Link throws in a few lagniappes to give you an idea of life in the bayou, such as strategies for a great trip to Jazz Fest, a what-not-to-do instructional on catching turtles, and all you ever (or never) wanted to know about boudin sausage. Colorful personal essays enrich every recipe and introduce his grandfather and friends as they fish, shrimp, hunt, and dance.

From the backyards where crawfish boils reign as the greatest of outdoor events to the white tablecloths of Link’s famed restaurants, Real Cajun takes you on a rollicking and inspiring tour of this wild part of America and shares the soulful recipes that capture its irrepressible spirit.

To read more about Real Cajun or Donald Link please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.

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Categories:Types, Recipes/Menus
Publish date: Apr 21, 2009
Added to Scribd: Mar 03, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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114 j
Fried hicken and ndouille Gumbo
svs 10 t 12
Where I grew up in ouiiana, here were only wo kind of gumbo: chicken and auage, andeafood. I loe boh, of coure, bu hi recipe in paricular hold a pecial place becaue i’imilar o my granny’. nabahedly ruic, hi gumbo ha chicken bone and kin in he po, woingredien eenial for deph and aor (ru me on hi, I’e ried leaing hem ou). Frying hechicken r eaon he oil for making he roux, adding anoher layer of aor. the choice of auage i imporan becaue he gumbo ake on i characer. I ue picyandouille auage or anoher moked auage a long a i in’ oerly moky. You can ue anyauage ha you like, bu you’ll wan o adu he eaoning accordingly (be ure o ae ibefore adding i o your gumbo).
1 (3- o 4-pound) chickenhicken eaoning2 eapoon al1 eapoon ground black pepper½ cup all-purpoe our1¼ cup plu 2 ablepoon egeable oil1½ cup all-purpoe our1 medium onion, cu ino mall dice3 celery alk, cu ino mall dice1 poblano chile, emmed, eeded, and cuino mall dice1 green bell pepper, cored, eeded, and cuino mall dice1 alapeño pepper, emmed, eeded, andnely chopped3 garlic cloe, minced1 ablepoon al1 ½ eapoon ground black pepper1 eapoon cayenne pepper1½ eapoon chili powder1 eapoon ground whie pepper1 eapoon paprika1½ eapoon lé powder3 quar chicken broh1 pound andouille auage, liced ino½-inch half-moon3 cup liced (½-inch lice) okra(abou 1 pound)
u he chicken ino eigh piece wih he kin on. u he brea mea from hebone and chop ino 2-inch piece. ay he chicken on a plae or hee pan and eaoneenly on boh ide wih al and pepper. Du wih our and hake off exce.Hea 1¼ cup of he oil in a large ca-iron kille o 350°F oer medium-highhea (a pinch of our hould izzle in he oil when i’ ready). Fry he chicken inbache o a no o oercrowd he pan, abou 3 minue on each ide, unil lighgolden (he chicken doe no need o cook all he way hrough; i u need o color). tranfer he chicken o a plae lined wih paper owel.
 
FIY GtHIGs115
dd he our o he oil and ir genly wih a whik, preferably one wih a longhandle (ee oe). eae he hea on medium-high for he r 10 minue.  heroux ar o darken, lower he hea in incremen. When he roux reache a lighbrown color, reduce he hea o low and coninue cooking unil i ake on a moohdark brown color, abou 40 minue oal.arefully and lowly ir he onion, celery, pepper, garlic, al, black pepper,cayenne, chili powder, whie pepper, paprika, and lé powder ino he roux and irwih a wooden poon. (Don’ ue he whik becaue he roux will be ery hick ahi poin.) Be careful when adding he egeable o he roux becaue i will creaea bur of eam. llow he roux o cool briey. tranfer he roux o a large oup po. Hea he roux oer medium-high hea, irin he chicken broh, and bring o a boil. Whik he ock frequenly a i come o aboil becaue roux can ick o he boom of he po. educe hea o low and immerfor abou 30 minue. ery now and hen kim off he oil ha rie o he urface;a good bi will oa o he op a he oup cook.dd he chicken and coninue o immer, irring occaionally, for 45 minue.dd he auage and immer ery lowly for abou 1 more hour, kimming all hewhile, unil he chicken fall away from he bone. tae he ock. If i ill ha arong roux aor, add a few more cup of ock or waer.Hea he remaining 2 ablepoon oil in a medium kille oer medium-highhea. dd he okra and aué, irring or ipping he okra in he kille, for abou8 minue unil i’ lighly browned and he gooey lime ha cooked ou. dd heokra o he gumbo and immer an addiional 15 minue. the gumbo i nihed when here i no more oil riing o he op.  wih alloup and ew, gumbo i alway beer he econd day, o you’ll be happy o haepleny of lefoer.t:lhough you can ir he roux wih a meal poon, I highly dicourage i. poon collec liquid and make i eaier o plah ou of he pan and burn you. Byconra, a whik allow he roux o pa hrough i and reduce he poibiliy of plahing, a well a geing ino he ide of he pan. I’ imporan ha you whik he enire boom of he pan when cooking roux; if you mi a po he our canick and burn, which will gie he enire po an acrid aor. emember o irlowly—roux ha been called “aun napalm” becaue, if i ge on your kin, iick and burn. oux will cach on re if lef unaended!!!

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Delbert Ricardo added this note
Andouille gumbo is the most amazing thing ever. I can only imagine what it'll be like with fried chicken added.
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