Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
8Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Obama Abdicates Constitutional Responsibility to Protect US Borders & Sovereignty

Obama Abdicates Constitutional Responsibility to Protect US Borders & Sovereignty

Ratings:

5.0

(1)
|Views: 77 |Likes:
Published by Levitator
Grim picture & vulnerability of US borders:

Of the 1,825-mile U.S.-Mexico border, only 129 miles, or 7%, are fully secure. There are another 744 miles in which the border patrol has established “an acceptable level of control.”
Of the 3,918-mile northern border, only 2 miles are fully secure, while another 69 miles have “an acceptable level of control.”
In 2010, $11.9 billion was appropriated for our overall border security. Just $3.9 billion was appropriated for border security efforts between points of entry.

In case you are confused about the distinction between the fully secure areas and the “acceptable” ones, the Border Patrol offers the following classification. The 129 most secure miles of the Mexican border are the ones in which CBP has “the ability to deter or detect and apprehend illegal entries at the immediate border”. An “acceptable level of control” (744 miles, in this case) is established when CPB is able to apprehend illegals after they have entered U.S. soil to “distances of up to 100 miles or more away from the immediate border.”


The fact that the Border Patrol, for the most part, can only detect illegal entry after they are deep into U.S. territory is extremely troublesome. In a sane world, we would be deporting those illegals who were apprehended even after the point of entry. Sadly, the Obama administration has granted amnesty by administrative fiat, thus rendering any deterrent capability ineffective. As long as illegals entrants are able to penetrate the border, they have an excellent chance of remaining in the country indefinitely. This is because Obama and Napolitano have ordered CPB to focus exclusively on violent illegals. Earlier this week, Obama told an illegal alien student that he will ostensibly never deport non-criminal aliens:

“We have redesigned our enforcement practices under the law to make sure that we’re focusing primarily on criminals, and so our deportation of criminals are up about 70 percent. Our deportation of non-criminals are down, and that’s because we want to focus our resources on those folks who are destructive to the community. “And for a young person like that young woman that we just spoke to who’s going to school, doing all the right things, we want them to succeed.” (emphasis added)

So Obama is admitting that he is knowingly disregarding a core responsibility of his presidency. He is also making it clear that once illegals are able to penetrate the border, they will remain in the country, irrespective of the dedicated and courageous efforts of our border agents. As long as they enter through the right 93% of the border, their claims on our welfare state will be irrevocable.

We are currently spending just $3.9 billion a year on the border patrol, one of the most fundamental responsibilities of government. Yet, we already spent over $500 million in one week fighting alongside Al-Qaeda in Libya!

Unfortunately, our border crisis is not an appropriations problem. It is an administrative problem. Much like Obama’s bureaucratic power grab over the internet, health care, environmental regulations, and labor laws; he has used the power of unelected officials to undermine our immigration laws. In each case, he has supplanted the authority of Congress and thwarted the will of the people in an effort to implement a radical agenda.

Maybe President Obama will teach Chuck Schumer the true definition of extremism.

http://www.redstate.com/dhorowitz3/2011/04/01/gao-report-limited-control-over-our-own-border/
Grim picture & vulnerability of US borders:

Of the 1,825-mile U.S.-Mexico border, only 129 miles, or 7%, are fully secure. There are another 744 miles in which the border patrol has established “an acceptable level of control.”
Of the 3,918-mile northern border, only 2 miles are fully secure, while another 69 miles have “an acceptable level of control.”
In 2010, $11.9 billion was appropriated for our overall border security. Just $3.9 billion was appropriated for border security efforts between points of entry.

In case you are confused about the distinction between the fully secure areas and the “acceptable” ones, the Border Patrol offers the following classification. The 129 most secure miles of the Mexican border are the ones in which CBP has “the ability to deter or detect and apprehend illegal entries at the immediate border”. An “acceptable level of control” (744 miles, in this case) is established when CPB is able to apprehend illegals after they have entered U.S. soil to “distances of up to 100 miles or more away from the immediate border.”


The fact that the Border Patrol, for the most part, can only detect illegal entry after they are deep into U.S. territory is extremely troublesome. In a sane world, we would be deporting those illegals who were apprehended even after the point of entry. Sadly, the Obama administration has granted amnesty by administrative fiat, thus rendering any deterrent capability ineffective. As long as illegals entrants are able to penetrate the border, they have an excellent chance of remaining in the country indefinitely. This is because Obama and Napolitano have ordered CPB to focus exclusively on violent illegals. Earlier this week, Obama told an illegal alien student that he will ostensibly never deport non-criminal aliens:

“We have redesigned our enforcement practices under the law to make sure that we’re focusing primarily on criminals, and so our deportation of criminals are up about 70 percent. Our deportation of non-criminals are down, and that’s because we want to focus our resources on those folks who are destructive to the community. “And for a young person like that young woman that we just spoke to who’s going to school, doing all the right things, we want them to succeed.” (emphasis added)

So Obama is admitting that he is knowingly disregarding a core responsibility of his presidency. He is also making it clear that once illegals are able to penetrate the border, they will remain in the country, irrespective of the dedicated and courageous efforts of our border agents. As long as they enter through the right 93% of the border, their claims on our welfare state will be irrevocable.

We are currently spending just $3.9 billion a year on the border patrol, one of the most fundamental responsibilities of government. Yet, we already spent over $500 million in one week fighting alongside Al-Qaeda in Libya!

Unfortunately, our border crisis is not an appropriations problem. It is an administrative problem. Much like Obama’s bureaucratic power grab over the internet, health care, environmental regulations, and labor laws; he has used the power of unelected officials to undermine our immigration laws. In each case, he has supplanted the authority of Congress and thwarted the will of the people in an effort to implement a radical agenda.

Maybe President Obama will teach Chuck Schumer the true definition of extremism.

http://www.redstate.com/dhorowitz3/2011/04/01/gao-report-limited-control-over-our-own-border/

More info:

Published by: Levitator on Apr 03, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/13/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 
United States Government Accountability Office
 
GAO
TestimonyBefore the Committee on HomelandSecurity and Governmental Affairs,U.S. Senate
BORDER SECURITYDHS Progress andChallenges in Securing theU.S. Southwest andNorthern Borders
Statement of Richard M. Stana, DirectorHomeland Security and Justice Issues
For Release on DeliveryExpected at 2:30 p.m. EDTWednesday, March 30, 2011
GAO-11-508T
 
 
United States Government Accountability Office
Accountability • Integrity • Reliability
Highlights ofGAO-11-508T, a testimonybefore the Committee on Homeland Securityand Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate
March 30, 2011
BORDER SECURITY
DHS Pro
g
ress and Challen
g
es in Securin
g
the U.S.Southwest and Northern Borders
Why GAO Did This Study
As part of its mission, theDepartment of Homeland Security(DHS), through its U.S. Customs andBorder Protection (CBP) component,is to secure U.S borders againstthreats of terrorism; the smuggling of drugs, humans, and othercontraband; and illegal migration. Atthe end of fiscal year 2010, DHSinvestments in border security hadgrown to $11.9 billion and includedmore than 40,000 personnel. Tosecure the border, DHS coordinateswith federal, state, local, tribal, andCanadian partners. This testimonyaddresses DHS (1) capabilities toenforce security at or near theborder, (2) interagency coordinationand oversight of information sharingand enforcement efforts, and (3)management of technology programs.This testimony is based on relatedGAO work from 2007 to the presentand selected updates made inFebruary and March 2011. For theupdates, GAO obtained informationon CBP performance measures andinterviewed relevant officials.
What GAO Recommends
GAO is not making any newrecommendations in this testimony.However, GAO has previously maderecommendations to DHS tostrengthen border security, includingenhancing measures to protectagainst the entry of terrorists,inadmissible aliens, and contraband;improving interagency coordination;and strengthening technologyacquisition and deployment plans.DHS generally concurred with theserecommendations and has actionsunderway or planned in response.
What GAO Found
CBP significantly increased personnel and resources for border security atand between the ports of entry (POE), and reported some success ininterdicting illegal cross-border activity; however, weaknesses remain. At thePOEs, for example, CBP reported that deployment of imaging technology todetect stowaways or cargo had increased seizures of drugs and othercontraband, and between the POEs, increased staffing, border fencing, andtechnology have resulted in some success in reducing the volume of illegalmigration and increasing drug seizures. However, as GAO reported from 2007through 2011, weaknesses in POE traveler inspection procedures andinfrastructure increased the potential that dangerous people and illegal goodscould enter the country; and that currency and firearms could leave thecountry and finance drug trafficking organizations and sponsors of terrorism.CBP used a performance measure to reflect results of its overall borderenforcement efforts, which showed few land border miles where they havethe capability to deter or apprehend illegal activity at the immediate border infiscal year 2010. DHS is developing a new methodology and performancemeasures for border security and plans to implement them in fiscal year 2012.As GAO reported in 2010, federal, state, local, tribal, and Canadian lawenforcement partners reported improved DHS coordination to secure theborder, but critical gaps exist. For example, interagency forums helped inestablishing a common understanding of border security threats, while jointoperations helped to achieve an integrated and effective law enforcementresponse. However, significant gaps remained in sharing information andresources useful for operations, such as daily patrols in vulnerable areas, likeNational Parks and Forests. As GAO reported, and made relatedrecommendations, improved coordination provides opportunity to enhanceborder security efforts on the southwest and northern borders, includingthose to deter alien smuggling.CBP’s Border Patrol component is moving ahead with a new technologydeployment plan to secure the border, but cost and operational effectivenessand suitability are not yet clear. In January 2011, the Secretary of HomelandSecurity announced a new direction to deploying technology to assist insecuring the border. The decision ended the Secure Border Initiative Networktechnology program—one part of a multiyear, multibillion dollar effort aimedat securing the border through technology such as radar, sensors, andcameras and infrastructure such as fencing. Under a new plan, calledAlternative (Southwest) Border Technology, Border Patrol is to developterrain- and population-based solutions using existing proven technology,such as camera-based surveillance systems. However, the analysis DHSperformed to arrive at an appropriate mix of technology in its new plan raisesquestions. For example, the analysis cited a range of uncertainties in costs andeffectiveness, with no clear-cut cost effective technology alternative amongthose considered, as GAO reported in preliminary observations in March 2011.GAO will continue to assess this issue and report its results later this year.
ViewGAO-11-508Tor key components.For more information, contact Richard M.Stana at (202) 512-8777 or StanaR@gao.gov.
 
 Page 1 GAO-11-508T
Chairman Lieberman, Ranking Member Collins, and Members of theCommittee:I am pleased to be here today to address the Department of HomelandSecurity’s (DHS) efforts to secure U.S. land borders with Mexico andCanada against threats of terrorism; the smuggling of drugs, humans, andother contraband; and illegal migration since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11). At the end of fiscal year 2004, the first full yearDHS existed as an agency, it had about 10,500 agents assigned to patrol theU.S. land borders and about 17,600 officers inspecting travelers at air,land, and sea ports of entry (POE),
1
amounting to a total of about $5.9billion (for personnel, infrastructure, and technology) that had beenappropriated to secure the entire U.S. border.
2
At the end of fiscal year2010, both the number of personnel and amount of resources dedicated toborder security had significantly increased, with almost 20,000 agentsassigned to patrol the U.S. land borders and 20,600 officers assigned to air,land, and sea ports of entry, amounting to about $11.9 billion appropriatedto secure the entire U.S. border (for personnel, infrastructure, andtechnology).
3
DHS has also reported that about $4.4 billion has beeninvested since fiscal year 2006 in border technology and infrastructureunder the Secure Border Initiative (SBI) program—a multiyear,multibillion dollar effort to help secure U.S. borders using a mix of radars,sensors, and cameras (called SBI Network, or SBInet) along with borderfencing, roads, and lighting.DHS reported that the increased resources have resulted in fewer numbersof apprehensions, and that this stronger enforcement presence was one of several reasons fewer people were attempting to illegally cross the border.However, challenges remain at and between the POEs as DHS data showthat several hundred thousand violators enter the country illegally andundetected through the nation’s POEs and several hundred thousand
1
POEs are the facilities that provide for the controlled entry into or departure from theUnited States for persons and materials. Specifically, a POE is any officially designatedlocation (seaport, airport, or land border location) where DHS officers or employees areassigned to clear passengers and merchandise, collect duties, and enforce customs laws.
2
The number of border agents includes only those assigned to northern and southwestborder sectors. The number of officers assigned to POEs does not include thoseperforming trade or agricultural inspections. The $5.9 billion includes all fundsappropriated to DHS for border security in fiscal year 2004.
3
The $11.9 billion is the amount of funds DHS reported as appropriated for border securityfor fiscal year 2010.

Activity (8)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
PRMurphy added this note
Have no fear, Clownitano says the border is secure. I believe her. Don't you?
Levitator liked this
Levitator liked this
Levitator liked this
Levitator liked this
PRMurphy liked this
PRMurphy liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->