Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
P. 1
Shifting Sands: The Commercialization of Camels in Mid-altitide Ethiopia and Beyond

Shifting Sands: The Commercialization of Camels in Mid-altitide Ethiopia and Beyond

Ratings: (0)|Views: 668 |Likes:
Although pastoralists in Ethiopia are often characterized as unresponsive to market opportunities, the bulk of Ethiopia’s growing formal and informal livestock and meat exports are supplied from pastoralist areas of the country. This report describes a relatively new trend in pastoralist livestock marketing, being a dynamic response to increasing demand for camels in mid-altitude areas of Ethiopia, and in neighboring Sudan. In response, a camel trade network has evolved that covers about 2000km, involves more than six ethnic groups, and is served by 24 markets. Within Ethiopia, the rising demand for camels by mid-altitude farmers is associated with the drought-tolerant nature of camels and their multiple uses as pack animals, and reflects an important cultural shift among Orthodox Christians. Emerging in the absence of aid or government programs, the camel trade shows how economic synergies between pastoralist and non-pastoralist areas can develop, and provides further evidence of the market responsiveness of pastoralists, even when faced by drought and other constraints.

This document is available for download at https://wikis.uit.tufts.edu/confluence/display/FIC/Shifting+Sands.
Although pastoralists in Ethiopia are often characterized as unresponsive to market opportunities, the bulk of Ethiopia’s growing formal and informal livestock and meat exports are supplied from pastoralist areas of the country. This report describes a relatively new trend in pastoralist livestock marketing, being a dynamic response to increasing demand for camels in mid-altitude areas of Ethiopia, and in neighboring Sudan. In response, a camel trade network has evolved that covers about 2000km, involves more than six ethnic groups, and is served by 24 markets. Within Ethiopia, the rising demand for camels by mid-altitude farmers is associated with the drought-tolerant nature of camels and their multiple uses as pack animals, and reflects an important cultural shift among Orthodox Christians. Emerging in the absence of aid or government programs, the camel trade shows how economic synergies between pastoralist and non-pastoralist areas can develop, and provides further evidence of the market responsiveness of pastoralists, even when faced by drought and other constraints.

This document is available for download at https://wikis.uit.tufts.edu/confluence/display/FIC/Shifting+Sands.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Feinstein International Center on May 02, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/24/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Strengthening the humanity and dignity of people in crisis through knowledge and practice
April 2011
Shiting Sands:
The Commercialization o Camels inMid-altitude Ethiopia and Beyond
Yacob Aklilu and Andy Catley
 
©2011 Feinstein International Center. All Rights Reserved.Fair use o this copyrighted material includes its use or non-commercial educationalpurposes, such as teaching, scholarship, research, criticism, commentary, and newsreporting. Unless otherwise noted, those who wish to reproduce text and image flesrom this publication or such uses may do so without the Feinstein InternationalCenter’s express permission. However, all commercial use o this material and/orreproduction that alters its meaning or intent, without the express permission o theFeinstein International Center, is prohibited.Feinstein International CenterTuts University200 Boston Ave., Suite 4800Medord, MA 02155USAtel: +1 617.627.3423ax: +1 617.627.3428fc.tuts.edu
 
Acknowledgements
The study was nanced by USAID Ethiopia under a CooperativeAgreement with the Feinstein International Center, Tuts University,or the PLI Policy project. We especially appreciate the support o  John Graham, USAID Ethiopia, in the materialization o the study.We also express gratitude to Dr. Berhe Gebregziabher, ormer Director o the Animal and Plant Health Regulatory Directorateat the Ministry o Agriculture in Ethiopia, or acilitating contactswith regional authorities. We extend our appreciation to all thoseinormants whose cooperation and contribution was critical or the production o this report.The views expressed in this report do not necessarily reect thoseo USAID Ethiopia or the Ministry o Agriculture in Ethiopia.
Note
The mid-altitude regions in this report reer to those areas adjacentto Aar, Kereyu, Ittu, Alla, and Hawiya pastoral production areas andlocated immediately above the central and northeastern escarpmentswithin altitude ranges o between 1,100 and 2,000 meters above sealevel, with the exception o Shiraro, which is located in northwestEthiopia.Photographs by Yacob Aklilu.

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->