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The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1945

The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1945

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The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1945
The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1945

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05/31/2011

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•s««.
Pennsylvania
7
lister
Mary Rachelvisesmen
visorfer. Mary Rachel of the HomeEconomics Department has beenAppointedFreshman Glass ad-by the administration ofMercyhurst College.*In a letterSubmitted to the Editor, Sr,Mary Rachel sends to the student body thefollowingmessageabout "her Freshmen."
:
"From the East, from theWest, from the North and fromthe South, the Freshmen havecome to Mercyhurst with anaverage hacking of seventeenyears of experience |in fliving;Itwelve years of contact withbooks and scholastic environment; ten years of developedflunking powers. They havecome laden with ideas, ideals,objectives and the determination to carry these out. Theynave come equipped with a philosophy of
life,
born in form
a-
pve years and nurtured
\
andjde-Telopedalong the way.| "A four-year period is thenext significant unit in the livesjrf these Freshmen,—a period ofpeat opportunities, a period ofMvancement, both^in a materialWin a spiritualway.fThis is
F
e
time for amassing morewealth in the form of knowl-p&e and worthwhile experienc-Dnring the years stretchingM before them, these Freshen aregoing to give TIME,
EFF
ORT, ENERGY, ABIL-
*"K^
in order to improve self
^
todevelop possible latent
klents.
They are going to
co
operate and show good will inPy instance of college
life.
Mercyhurst is la very wise
M
°ther.
She?has much to give
u
is especially prone to beta*rous to those who give their
*
LL
to her. Why are theseAshmen then so determined toMeverythinginto College life?^use they want to reap a
^
harvest in
'49.
They have
teegun
well,—it is not presump-°
Us to
say they will end well!"is MotherAgnes Marie, new MotherSuperior of the MercyOrder and President ofthe College.At the right" is MotherM. Borgia, Foundress ofMercyhurst and! Dean ofthe College.
Active In
Docese
es
ev
Glee Club Announces
New
Program
Under the able and enthusiastic direction of Giovanni K'lopp,the Glee Club is making plans for another successful year. In orderto improve thelefficiency of the club, the members have establisheda system of section leaders. These are chosen for ear training andreading ability. Once a week each section leader meets with hergroup to rehearse its particular part of a piece in order that, whenthe whole club assembles for practice, the rehearsal will go morequickly and easily. The section leaders chosen for this semester
are:
high soprano, Helen^ Fabian; low soprano, Shirley Som-
merhof;
second soprano, NancySmith; first alto, Helen JeanWalters; and second alto, Barbara M. Fleming.In order to accomplish thework planned Mrs. Klopp islimiting the number of GleeClub members. Only fifteen new !freshmen have been accepted!*into the group, and each is capable of sight reading. Unlikethe Seniors
are:^
in choral work,the May Day ac-
Moth
er M. B
d
orgia
H
onore
other yearsparticipatingbut only untiltivities begin.
CALENDAR
October25—InvestitureOctober 31—(Hallowe'en PartyNovember
1—Feast
of AllSaintsNovember
3—Pumpkin
Ball
Welcome,
Class of
9
49
j
Jo w! ^ginning of the new school year brings many new facesvital
ghten the halls
of Mercyhurst—-faces that will become a
j^
Part of our college. To these Freshmen, we say: "Mercy-«*V»
1S
proud
*o welcome you and to number you among herIt
LiturgyBeginsThird Year
Undertheadvisorship ofMother M. Borgia, the Liturgical Movement has begun itsthird year at Mercyhurst. Thepurpose of this organization"-isto acquaint'its >members withthe rites and prayers of theChurch. A study of the Sacraments has been introduced thisyear.At the first meeting on October 15 it was decided thatthe chairmanship change each|month, with a Senior in charge.Miss Jeanne Roepke was appointed chairman for October.In succeeding months the chairmanship will be taken over bythe Misses Dolores Di Vincenzo,Virginia Walsh, Theresa Len-non, Ruth E. Sullivan, and JoanWadlinger. Miss Peg Dengatewas elected vice-chairman andsecretary; and Miss Stephie Me-lisz will take over the duties oftreasurer.On Wednesday, October 10,
1945,
the Feast of St. FrancisBorgia, the faculty and studentsof Mercyhurst College oncemore united to pay tribute totheir Dean, Mother M. FrancisBorgia.The formal ceremonies wereconductedtheyouwill
t^T
£
er
aim to assist you in fulfilling your desires forMil f
u have
Placed your confidence in Mercyhurst, and•tan
no
stro
*ger hand to guide you; for fMercyhurstthrou
v
nd
impire
you, will act as a torch of faith
*
and truth
^
Sfcout yourdays. Her standards of right will lead you to*wl
deci
sion to continue your education is a step which willlife
Y
e your
fu
*ure,
a step toward security on the paths ofS
*
have
rasped the opportunity to further your knowledge.I ^cation is valuable to you and will continually prove its
^ttcL
the
COmin
*
y
ea
rs.
u
^ation&fcoo
u~
,
a.
-#--4— 4*.
imHiiAnninc
our na-
New Gym Director
in the true Mercy-hurst fashion of perfection. At8 p. m. the procession into theschool auditorium commenced.Upon|Mother Borgia's entrance,
the/
congregation lauded^ herwith "Hail |To Thee, DearMother Borgia/' which was followed by Handel's immortal"Holy Art Thou," sung by theCollege Glee Club, under the direction of Giovanni Klopp."Memories of Mercyhurst,"which portrayed historical andmemorable dates in* the estab-lishment and expansion of theschool, waspresentedby theJanus Club under the directionof Miss Mildred Curtin.Following the skit the GleeClub sang for Mother Borgiaher favorite Strauss waltz,"Tales from Vienna Woods."Ruth Elaine Sullivan, representing the student body, then honored the Dean with an oral felicitation and presented her witha (gift from the "Daughters ofMercyhurst."?
i
The singing of the Alma Mater brought the program
to"
a
close.
The Seniors entertainedthe faculty in the lounge.IThis year is a great year forthe Sisters of Mercy.^Each sac
rifice,
each improvement, eachundertaking is a record to theMercy Order^in this, its 75thanniversary.The Sisters of Mercy wereauthorized to institute Sunday,October 14, as Diamond Jubileeday throughout the diocese. For75 years they worked admirablyfor God and the ^Church. Onftheir Diamond Jubilee day
the*
Mercy Sisters solicited prayersand funds to help ^liquidate itsdebt on Mercyhurst and for anew motherhouse. In a letter tothe clergy of the Diocese seeking cooperation Mother AgnesMarie, the new Mother Superiorof the order, requested that onOctober 14 they should offer theHoly Mass for the community'sinterests and for the souls ofthe departed Sisters of Mercy.In 1870 the foundation of thework accomplished by the Sisters of Mercy was laid.£ A bandof seven Sisters left their mother-house in Pittsburgh andfounded a new frontier in Titus-
ville
at St. Joseph's Convent. Athree-story brick convent hadbeen built for their use. It isinteresting to note that thebuilding, which is still- stand
ing,
sis the center
of numerousextensions of St. Joseph's convent and academy. On Sept. 26,
1870,
less than three days aftertheir arrival, the Sisters begantheir teaching
duties.
In the following years moreschools were established and thelittle group grew. In 1926 theMercy Sisters, under the direc-tion of I Mother M. Borgia, opened Mercyhurst College andSeminary for women. To maintain a high faculty standard, itsteachers were sent for specialcourses to noted universities.The college building now requires additional resident student facilities and a library.This is but a small portion ofthe successful works that theSisters of Mercy have accomplished during their 75 years ofservice to God and the Church,To them we will ever owe adebt of gratitude.
Enthusiastic, friendly, and ef-
^stiffitleS
JHiedd!
Jtir
Porton has-been an important factor in influencing our^
v
elopment. Today, perhaps more than at any time in the°* the world, there is a growing consciousness of the
4^
ee
of definite preparations for all occupationsWithJfor professional education increased by the rfn-economic development of the country, you will beDr. M. J.
k^edT*
economic
development of the country,At
i
°
ta
ke your place in the world of toworrow.^Mi
L*?
tlture
e^rcises
tomorrow,' October 25, I%y
*
ni
ask you to pledge yourself to cap and gown.
Offi-
StftvV
111 be
come a part of Mercyhurst College. It is withN tJ
T
at
t^
loyal daughters of ourf Alma Mater welcome
clft
ss of '49. 2ficientlf These qualities certainly describe our new physicaleducation director, Miss HelenWherry, a graduate of SargeantCollege, Boston, Mass. Duringthe summer months she actedas ^playground supervisor atOceanside, Long Island.Besides! herUove for sports,especially! horseback riding,Miss Wherry likes good mu-
sic,
and, as she-says, "anythingfrom Harry^ James to Chopin.The facultyandstudents extend a hearty welcome to ournew faculty| member. May sheenjoy the coming year.Come on, kids. Grab your pumpkins, bring out your goblins, donyour costumes, and let's have fun. Hallowe'en is fast approaching,and the Janus Club needed no coaxing to plan its annual party.Already preparations are under way for entertainment,! games,prizes and refreshments. October 31 has been set as the date.Two days later,Mercyhurst'sSodality is opening its social yearwith a dance. More fun if The committees are "racing theirmotors"trying to make this event a success. Their biggest task is centeredaround those of the opposite sex. A list has been posted on thecollege bulletin board for our "dreamboats" to sign, if they canhave that friend or brother come from home. For those, undated,our prefect and her aides are promising "blind dates." We're surethere's a good time ahead.The Science Seminar has reserved November 9, for a good old-fashioned "bam dance." Swing your partner left and right, dosey-doe and promenade
t
the middle. Slip on the old blue jeans, plaid
shirts,
loafers, and make way for the frolics in store.
 
Page 2
k
J/.
raa
J
t
I
1
K
|i
*
October 24
ik
j
v^Ae
Jntrcuw \
Editor—Jean
RoepkeH Assistant
EditorsRuth E. Sullivan
M/wpp^
f Mary
LIKinnerney
iwi¥iiFlI>
Lillian Writer 1 ^Inu^
I
Barbara FlemingArt Editor
_
Jean ErwinBusiness
Editor
Virginia WalshEditorial Staff J. Videtto, N. Ferraro, M. E. Pugh, S.Brigham, J. Wirges, S. Melisz, B. Ahlgren, B. Norton, M.
Mohr,
H. Martin,
f
*•
Art
Staff
R. Hitchcock, R. Morey, C. Schneider.Business Staff H. Fabian, P. Ferry, M. J. Masterson,
D.
Donatelli, M. Doyle. J
m
f
ADVANCE
WHMtlNfttLITNO
CO • f»lC, M,
undoubtedlythe peoplesin prayerful
QfitJi
ovie
onscious.
When we heard it, we couldn't believe fit! It didn'tseem credible that our own Mercyhurst girls had no
pref-
erence as to
what
type of movie they liked to see. Theyput on a best dress; they don a new
hat;
they spraythemselves with Chanel No, 5;
^their
fingernails are
painted,
and their hair is curled. They do all this fussing and primping, whichvis, of course, expected
from
anywell-dressed college woman
;fyet,|they
make these fancy
|
the world a
peac
^,i
f
happierpreparations
only|to
ride downtown to stand in front of
p
i
ace
.
w
e
must practice Christ-the theatre and say, with unaffected surprise, "Oh, is
ian
principles
at all times, withthat what is showing." They then walk up to the ticket
f
a
i
t
^
an(
j
tolerance.
We
CAM
Succeed
For most people Tuesday August 14, 1945 wasthe happiest day of their lives. Around the worldof the
'victorious
Allied Nations cheered and wept
|_
thanksgiving. The war was over. The day for which we hadworked, waited, and prayed had come at last.That was two long months ago. Since then, enthusiasm has died.We have tended to forget how exuberant, happy, and thankfulwe were on the
V~J
day. To think that the long, dark, hours ofanxiety, loneliness, and waiting were at last over! To
realize
thatnot only would our friends and relatives be returning to us, butthat humanity at large? was again comparatively at rest! Ourfeelings have changed since then* Already we
>have
begun towonder how long it will be before we can buy nylon hose or anew car.
We
$
complain because the whole country seems to bestriking, or because a boyfriend hasn't been discharged yet.But now that we have blessed peace in our hands, are we goingto give it up so easily, treat it so materially? We wanted peaceso badly. Under pressure we worked so hard for it. We
wustn't
let it slip away from us now by sitting down on the job.
fWe
can keep the peace for which we gave so much only bycontinuing to work and sacrifice for it. We must pray to Godjust as hard in peace as we
Leisure Time
It seems that while
edj
disagree on many thin*
£
nearly all agree
on
the Jthat among the major
£
tives of education is
that k ?
as "activitiesworthy use ofUpon firstdid in
jwar.
We must thankHim for the many blessings Hegave us. We must pray for thesuccess of the United NationsOrganization just as we prayedfor its formation. We mustthank God for being able toutilize atomic energy, to make
l^efrante
c
window, hand the girl sixty cents, and walk nonchalantly into the theatre without any forethought aboutwhat they are seeing.A good peace is just as hardto keep as a bad war is hardto win. It requires infinite pa-And that is the point! This is where we deviate from! tience, hard work, prayer, andthe course a well-educated Mercyhurst woman should sacrifice,
if
we work hard intake. We are women, not silly adolescents. As women, we
peace
as in war, with as muchshould think, and think like women; then actaccordingly,feeling and hope for a betterHere at school we have been trained to think and act as world, we can succeed.Christians. Christian books are available to us in the
^li
brary; our conversation is Christian-like; our academicsubjects are taught to us from aChristian!viewpoint.Yet, in the entertainment we seek, especially motionpicture entertainment,
wefseem|to
forget our Christiantraining.
Because her bucking cart-muleShowed
'scant
respect for asaint,
|
There rose from a ditch -nearMediaDel
Campo
this complaint:"Why do you treat me thus,dear Lord?I'd willingly shed my blood,But I balk at the prospect ofmartyrdom—
In
this Castilian
mud."
Smiled Christ — "Thus do Itreat My friends,So must I thus treat you.""No
iwonder, 'Lord,"
sighedTeresa
I
"No
wonder!
You have so
few!"—Alfred
Barett S. J.
M.
E.J
Pugh.
J
urn
j
n
g of the Tassel
As long as Humphrey Bogart or Van Johnson stars in
the^movie
we
^anticipate
seeing, it makes no differencewhether or not that
^movie
is
dedicated!
to un-Christianprinciples or to
lewd^scenes
not fit for any decent-mindedperson to witness. We rationalize our lack of aversion tothis by saying, "But I would never do 'those things, so,^therefore,
%t
can't harm me just to look at them." And
©then
we
follow
with that well-worn,funintelligible phrase,
i"W.e
must be broad-minded about such things, you^know."
Now,?we
ask, what kind of thinking is that? It
j
isn't so much a question of walking directly from the
itheatre
to imitate the actions of our favorite movie stars.But these lewd scenes and
un-Christian-like
principleswill eventually alter our Christian viewpoint. Thefpro-cess is slow but sure. We begin to tolerate such thingsin the world, and
theyf
are no longer repugnant to us asthey should be.
|
That is why the Catholic Church is putting up sucha
fight
with Hollywood producers to induce them to improve their motion picture standards.
That as
why intelligent, Christian women like ourselves should help in
2
that
fight.
Not until the producers are shown by smallerbox-office receipts that America does not want theirtype of pagan entertainment will they make movies thateveryone will feel free to attend. Only then will our
objectionable-irt-part movtes
be a thing of the past. Wecan help by giving a little
forethought before
going tothe motion pictures Saturday afternoon. We must actlike Christian women, not pagan children. We must thinkbefore we act!
Let
Him Win
While waiting for a bus theother morn, I was curiouslyeyeing the passing public whenmy eyes were drawn to a ladwho sat alone, nervously crossing and uncrossing his scrawny
legs.
He was unconsciously staring off into space, and occasionally would wipe cold perspiration from his brown brow,
and!
would then bite into hisfingers as if to
deaden
somephenomenal
\
pain. He was a ladabout 22; a
ladlwho
wore thegallant eagle
ononis
lapel. Hewas another faithful son whohad done his duty.
"He
had suffered, He had wonA solemn peace forever more."
Yes,
he has suffered, buthas he, in truth, won his peace?
No,
the horrors of war havemuddled
his-immature
mind; hecan not see truth, which is
thelight
of the world.How can he be helped? Bythe candles of Christianity,our
war-time .neurotics
and un-
j
fortunates can be made to see.By love and devotion to ourGod Almighty, they can gainnew hope, new strength, andeverlasting happiness.God has appointed us, Christian college women, to helpthose
we
love
4to
carry Hislight to the blind and to openunto them eternal peace.What can. we do? Visit theBlessed Sacrament every evening. Since this is the month
ox
the
Holy
Rosary, we canbe in chapel
* for
the recitationof the Rosary with ourclassmates. Remember, Our Lady
will
intercede to her Son
for
you and for our returning
he-roe's.
'
f
—S.
Melisz.The academic cap is one ofthe most cherished symbols ofcollege life. It designates itswearer as a student just asthe nurse's uniform marks herprofession. By the turning ofthe tassel, the cap traces thedevelopment of a college career.At Mercyhurst when a Freshman dons the symbolic cap, shereceives, in return for a pledgeof loyalty and love, all thatthe college has to offer. Shebecomes a
part 1
 of the school,sharing in its development andsuccess. This is the first of jfour steps toward the final |goal; it marks the beginningof real womanhood.The Sophomore, advancingwith great dignity, has finishedhalf of her college course. Shehas many memories to lookback on, but there is muchmore ahead of her.When the tassel is turned to
signify
the Junior year, manynew responsibilities are added.To the Junior falls the pleasure of being a
"big
sister,"affording her the opportunityof guiding and helping somegirl who is Just beginning. Asan
upperclas
sworn an, the Juniorassumes an even more activepart in the functions
5
of theschool in preparation for herfinal year.leisure
tjJ
thought,
1^time in our present
busy J
a-day
world may
seem
Jmuch out of place
and
serving of recognition,
J
busiest
life
does and
mus
flsome
leisure
in it The fa
step,
then, is to find
it
1What to do with it
becj
the second problem.
Thisl
be another way of
asking 2
question,
"Do
you
have a 1
by?"
What do you do
on
a J
afternoon?' That will give]a clue. What do you
do
1waiting for the bus? Honyou occupy your time
beM
trains
when
making
a jouraj
You have, no doubt,
heard
the young lady whose
tnj
stopped for thirty
mnues 1
Albuquerque. She stepped fi
her
Pullman, looked
abou is
vacant manner, and
started.
board the train again.
The p
ter said, "Have you
1
enough of Albuquerque
"Yes,"
she said,
"Towns are 1
alike." That young
woman
fijed to see the classic
arch
ture of the New
Mexico sta
The colorful baskets,
mocca
blankets, and potteries
hed
the Indians for
inspection ǤwastedSupon
her
unseeing «J
Since
^worthy
use
oi
time is classed
among
the
jor objectives of educatio|is obvious that it is
W*
to contribute Ho the indW"
1
improvement. It is
not
a Jnym
for "killing tfoe*is sinful.
—Sr.
Mary &>
leis
Sympathy
The faculty
and
students,Mercyhurst College wish Mtend their deepest syml*Dorothy Chimenti on
the*"
of
her
father
and to
ft*jGustafson whose motl»
e
recently.The Seniors have resellgoal; this,step
is
thec"1tion
of
their college »
l
Jview
of
their position. t»1
10
rs have earnedthe
whfcM
other|pecial privilegesthem
out
from
the
dents.
For
them the «"*
i
women open doors
8
U
them precedence in
al
^
Such small attentions•edge
not
superiority*deavor.But,
as
always,irt*wished
for is
attain*
bui
t*
*1,
r
sire reaches
out
fo*
else.
As her
college
SO^J
winfl
to
a
close,
she is
K^*
ward
to
turning herJher experience to
c0
A
Christian living
itt
L/
With reluctant
jpy» \* Idoffs
her academic
^
better
to
the tsoitor
»
Dear Editor,
f
V
|A
|
'
I
was
just thinking
of
that excellent courtesy
P
1
e
nJuniors
put on
last spring.
I
certainly wish
the
F**
s
#
have seen
it.
They|would
have learned that t|»o
re
^
n
(Jclassmen's rights such
as
passing
out of
Chapelffr^
{ll
,
through
the
cafeteria line first. There
is
enough f°°one. 1 •.»•£
{Of course,
I
understand that
the
Freshmen are new.
.
m
time
to
become adjusted,
so I
thought they'd
»
cce
£
$tf
If they're. in doubt
as to
what
to do
they should
aS
Sisters." Let's respect
the
rights
of all
upperclassme
1
 
October 24, 1945
CfeU/
rcia
9
[Over
a
V.OKC
With
my
"4:20" class
at
an end, my tummy telling
me
I'd like
to
eat and the lilting strains
of
"No
Can Do" floating ovev thedio
I
guess I'll relax "Over A Coke" with you.
[This
rainy weather
. . .
don*t
you wish
it
would stop
? The
Leather bureau titles these torrential downpours
as
equinoctialJ storms.
J
} }
.
:
;I pjj you
know that we have three horses, some chickens and pigs
n
the farm this
year?
If
you don't believe
it,
stroll across theback campus and take
a
look for
yourself.
|
Gee! The
dorm
rooms look like "Good Housekeeping:" ads. Menlook for cleverness
in a
woman. From what this news-hound hasseen, she's got the authority to commend most Mercyhurst cuties
for
their artistic taste. How| about this ?Discussing:the artistic tendencies
of
you, girls, prompts me
to
toss
a
few more
bouquets
your way. At dinner recently, the
treschic
coiffures were very noticeable.
It
seems that you, fair damsels,, are running competition with the latest "Vogue" models.Hubba, hubba, hubba
. . .
The end
of
the war has found ouryounger sets ready to
start the old ball rolling. Gannon Collegeushered in its social season with
a
dance for us. We all had funand are looking forward
to
more get-togethers
in
the future. Already, the Freshmen are filling the mailman's pack with lettersto their brothers and friends back home inviting them
to
ourSodality's dance.
It is
rumored, too, that the Junior and Sopho-more classes are hoping
to
have the traditional Junior
\
Prom
and[Sophonade this year. Plans are really "cooking"
for
the revivalof those good
ole
college times.
*
|
The
upperclassmen
are still reminiscing the joy of
?
seeing their"big sisters." Alumnae Week-end gave
5the
lassies an opportunity
to
be together again. The underclassmen were
wonderfulfin
offer-ing their rooms to their
"big
sisters," and
I
ami
speaking for all
| the
upperclassmen when
I
say, "Thanks, kids."I Shall
I or
shall
I
not? Those words will
ssoon
be
repeatingthemselves over and over again
in
the minds
of
our youngerbrothers and sisters.
Halowe'en
is
just around the corner! Re-
member
the fun you had
throwing
horse chestnuts
on
people's
]
porches, ducking for apples and going
on
scavenger hunts
at a
friend's party? More fun!
I
know.
I
i
My studies need attention, so until coke time roils around again
%
so-long ...
-{
l
M.
I.
Kinnerney
R
Page
3
Sub
L*
I
WHO CALLS?
|
There
it
goes again! Yes,
I
mean that noisy little device called
ispecw'nL
8
SEWS ^
my
r
°°
m
h
°
ping
ferventI
y
that
some
CwLSTSl
"^T
2
*-
N
°
°
ne
doe3
'
The
ri^ng
con-
V
eoursefSL >f ,
t0Wards
^ *
oal
(answering the phone,
e*
st
T
D
j^
2
y
°\
k
TV
T made 5t before a
^one
else.
TheK black
1°
dC
I
de
;
ll
.
Ch
P
,
hone is
™S™e-
I
P**
my ear to the
"
I 2?
P
r
Ah
'
th,S is
*'
l
^
essed
right the first
time.
Lte
«Th^
e
r
,?
Cei
Tfr
d
Say
"* ^
most cl
™ing
voice I can
t«LIw
fl00r!
1
Then
I wait for
« answer, all theiSn?
r
,1*
Wi
"
be Type A voice or
Type
B voice,
"otudn
t
you
know ?
It
was '
""stake. The operator wanted
**
floor.
I
shuffle back
to
r*
r
<>oin
resolving, that "I'll
""»
answer
it
again."
|*»
study hour now, and
as
Sit Q*
1 ,
timeroomie,"
a
cute little
[i
!'
m
r
r
y
gra u-
at my desk
thinking
of
Joh
formulas
>
Potato chips,
Tv
and
Chri
stmas,
I
begin
P
lng
f
or
something — any-
 to na
PPen
to break theLonotony. As
if in
answer
to
6
m
0pes
> ^e
phone rings. This
Lj
hurr
y
out
to
answer.
L j *
Voice
(a man's) booms
Weas »
him
' "
Just a moment
'
L
in6
'
and walk
down the hall
kail?
t0 walk
°y
the
one
in
last
I
T°
ticed
'
1
*»t get
|and «
when a voice de
"
Nl*
T*
^
at a long
distance
lo
J**
isn,
t
tell the person
Tknl
Ck
*\
9s4B
"
I really
Know
whether
it
is
a
long
fack ^
cal1 or n
°t
so I
trot
y
J°
th
e phone
to find out.L
at
'
after
f
moment
of
de
ft
loj^J' answered that
it
was
Sbttd v
nce calL
Fr
ankly,
I
I tat ,
ver
acity, but
I
had
Nail
his
f*
yj^M
fun
i
\
ft
word
for it.
This«
running
around
I
we
others were studying.
k*
k
.
ed down
the hall, again
^e
hv
*° Pass by
unnoticed.
N,i
oct
»**
or was still
on the
f
ound
out. When she
See
\
the cal1
was long dis-
k
\^
doubtful look mustJ<*
W*J
because
she
got up
f*Wv
u ^e
Phone
herself.
, * tw
ut
finally, she told
jNed
t8tu
dents
were not^al-V'
1
%
v
Pt
Ph0Ile Calls dur
"
i*
of
«.
P
'
I
heard
the
tile
receiver,
as
I
re-
Introducing... 1
Entered this year in the juniorclass
i
Like her
"lassl
Inhabits
a
room so-called 63-B,Never
is it
closed to!company.On switchboard we
findiher
occasionally buzzin'Regularly writes Bill
. .
. |(Heisn't her cousin!)Did you notice the new Sophomore,Easiliy located on second floor?Neat, black
|hair.
brown eyes,and petite
Every
one knows
by?
her tapping
^feet.
Eager and lively, anxious
to
please,Need one more hint? She hastwo roomies.Recently
I
came across
a
verycharming "Gal."In photography she does excel;to all she
is a
pal.To
f indf
success through business is her one important aimAnd ten to one this lovely
lass
will win
albit
of fame.
Many
I
 an evening in room 64,
,A
pretty young
miss?awaits
thesports score.Recently
we
found this blue-eyed brunette,Interested
$
in Academy's business set.Everyone knows now,
I
bet!|
s.
Brighamturned reluctantly to my room,but
I
knew that there was morefun ahead
the
next time
the
phone rang! —M.
Mohr
m
The
S.
0.
S., under Miss JaneKelly, welcomed the Freshmeninto the club
at a
picnic supperon October 3. The first businessmeeting was devoted to the accounts
of
practice teachers
in
the Home Economics field.Art ClubThe October meeting
of
theArt Club, which was recentlyorganized, was devoted
to
outlining plans for the coming year.In the election
of
officers, Connie Schneider was named president; Lillian
Writer*
vice-president;
j
and Natalie Cooper, treasurer. Fashion illustrations
by
Blanche Rothchild, noted artist,were
commentedlupon
by SisterM. Angelica, club
advisor.S^H
fo.
G. A. JH|
Thirty new
1
members! werewelcomed into the 0. G. A. Sorority
at
its October 17 meeting.With Joan Wadlinger presiding,members told
of
experiences! insummer positions and {practice
teaching.!Awards
earned
at!the
close
of
school llast
year were
distributed.!
A
J socials
meeting
followed.
-|il|mBCT^^^^^^^^^^
pl
Science Seminar|^^Bp|The Barn Dance scheduled forNovember
9
was discussed as
a
club project
at
the initial meeting] of the Science| Seminar onOctober
3.
With f
Ruth ElaineSullivanjin charge, members
of
fered reports
fon8
their summerwork inllaboratories.
^f^^-P^y-:
mB
English
I
Club '
October
9,
the English Clubheld Sits* first meeting of
jf
theyear. Under Joan Videtto, president,
linitiati on
of
tlieS
newj*
members
wasfthe
main feature^of the get-together. As part
ofi
the entertainment program
sev-|£eral
seniors
]
gave tributes
%
to g
Franz Werfel, Alexanders Wool-^cott, and John McCormick.
lk%S£
d
About Education
yCtfsute
Sports
Miss Helen Wherry has takenover the duties of physical education ^directress,
and she is
getting things started
in a
bigway.
%
What's that noise in the gymevery evening? Why, haven'tyou heard? The girls have beenthronging
to the
gym everynight
at
nine forty-five
to
rolloff those extra pounds.
You
may lose
all
this
I
weight
for
only ten cents
a
week; and thisfee will be put
to j
good use bytheiA. A.^Something new has been added to Mercyhurst. No, we .haven't that Senior house yet, butdid you get
a
look
at the gym?.The upperclassmen have manymemories
of
the former
%
audi-,.
torium
but they seem overjoyedwith the change of things.
Isn't
it
a
dandy? Here are threecheers for those who made ournew auditorium possible.I came upon
it
unexpected
1
y—a
final
philosophy,
a
basic psychology of education.
I
found
it
in Chapter
II of
the first epistleof St.:Peter.
I
was not aware of
it
until
I
had almost finished thechapter. And
I
have often wondered since' whether St. Peter himself realized that while he was preaching Christ's gospel he wasalso describing the foundations
of
sound education
in
theory^and
in practice.Education, whether much
or
little,
must,|in
all cases when incorporated into our lives, contribute to the realization of St. Peter's.words: "that you may declare His virtues, who hath called youout
of
darkness into His marvellous
light"
Where education informs,
it
makes manifest; and,
as
St. Paulsays, "all that
is
manifest
is
light." Where education trains
or
|prepares
one for action,
it
must in every instance serve the inter-
gests
of
his virtuous life,
for«6t.
Peter's precept is: "that you may
declare»His
virtues."
?|
Education, |then,
is
not merely |for
service—the
humanitarianideal; not merely for
Democracy—the
political ideal;
Vnot
merelyfor
the|increase£of|wealth—the
economic ideal; not merely
for
leaving the world
a
better place in which to
live—the
sociologicalideal;
notfmerely
for improving the
race^—the
evolutionary
ideal.l
True education embraces all
of
these ideals. But, remember,
thel
true and final purpose is|"that you may declare His virtues."
Kfl
g|
hi
their practicallapplication,the truths made {known by
edu-j
cation should point out the right things to do
in'the
general
con-fl
duct
of
life.
Alllof
our deliberate free acts
in
specialized ^fields
1
should
be
fin harmony with! the
morejgeneral
and final purpose!of man's
conduct.|It islnot
surprising,
then,,that
St. Peter
con-1
trasts such action with ignorance: "by doing well
youjmay putito
1
silence
the ignorance
of
foolish
men/'J^SB^^^^^^^H I
HHGHI
|We|have£often
heard
it;said that J
"the
truthIshalljmake
you
1
free."
The|freedom
that comes with
truthfis
various in its kinds.
1
Certainly, one kind must consist in the
fact j
that,
being liberated
i
from|.t|e
darkjhess^ of
^ignorance
through^education,
wef
achieve
8
more
intellectual
^freedom.
|^We
discern| truth
fromierror
with
a
greater accuracy; we distinguish
fright
from wrong with greater
1
skill.;The uses-;to whi^h wefishould
put this intellectual freedom^must
not:"vary;from?
St. Peter's philosophy
of
education, for
heB
insists
that-in
our actions we, freed from ignorance, should
actfi
"as free, and not as making
liberty
a
cloak for malice, but as
theW
servants
of
God."
 
^W'
;
^
:
p&^
^ SIM Modern
texts
in
general psy-
H
'
i|
chology
give considerable space
Hgp to &
the learning process.
To J
in-
]SB sure Ithat
the learning! process
HBr
shall bef successful, these
texts
§^|
pr
describe
I this
process and give
Ej£j
much sound advice
|
concerning
^3
its most effective organization.
jijMuch
is
written about "inter-
»|est,"
I
"preparatory set," |"dis-Sjtractions," j "the objective
ap-
gK)roach,"l
"harnessing
of the
I emotions,'^ "reorganization
of
I habits,"
"feehng
factors," "mo-I tivation,"
and so on
almostj without end. All these matters,
I
treated
at
great length by the
S
moderns, are
fbriefly
and
bothfe|
f
explicitly
and implicitly summed
jup
by. St. Peter
in two
.
paragraphs
:I
"Wherefore laying away
all
malice,
land
all guile, and dissimulations, and envies, and
all
idetractions, As newborn babes,desire
Ithe
rational milk with-
^_
out guile, that thereby you maygrow unto salvation."His psychology
of
educationUnless weather permits, our
is
not allowed
to
stand apartfhockey games will have
to
be from his philosophy
of
educa-sacrificed this year. However, tion. For
in^the
last clause, thevolley ball will replace this philosophic
refrain-once
againsport. Already practices are be- is heard: "that thereby you mayling held every Tuesday, Wed- grow unto salvation!"nesday,
and
Thursday
after-
^
noons, Games will be played
be-
tween thel classes
and the win-
f
ner will* get
a
banner.Freshies!
No
doubt you'veheard about the A. A. For membership
it is
necessary to havetwenty points, earned by participating in various sports suchas
volley-ball
and basket-ball.Ten points
are^had
by practic
ing
regularly and twenty
for
making the team.
.Presto
-you
are
official members
of taw
fine club in no time flat.
^
Everything seems to be
poind
ing to
a
busy year. Those ideasmentioned will probably soonblossom forth. In the meantime,we'll
see you atj
volley-ballpractice.
J
Answers to Introducing
£||l.
Elinor
KeelerBHH^
2. Deneen Troglione
gj$!
t
3. Rita Curtis
£
gfe>;
&
4.^Marie;;Gould
&J%M£<M\
f^JZappy.'
LPlrtnaay
iJ
• • •
Mercyhurst
had quite
a
few
:
of her
daughters celebrating
birthdays
this month. The Mer-ciad wishes each of you
a
veryhappy- ^irthday.Peg Dengate
• Mary
I. Kinnerney
>
Teresa*
Sick
t
1
Marion McLeanJeanne'
Boes
Marilynn Miller' Lorna' Garlick Gertrude SinnsJoan
Uyzle •
Nancy Schneider
JildajBersanj
Dorothy ChimentiColetta CrawfordEsther Morey
*?.
:
Marian TraversNancy Smith-Mary Jones
AnhrHaidldck

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