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The Merciad, Nov. 12, 1969

The Merciad, Nov. 12, 1969

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Nov. 12, 1969
The Merciad, Nov. 12, 1969

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*
Mvtybuut College Litiaiy
»***
Pwmykania
Wi8
i>of.
XLI
NQ. 2
Mcrcyhurst College
ii
«
the college
WHAT'S NEW
ai'
AND ALSO.. ..Peggy Edwards is our Winter
C
a
rnival
Queen
Candidate!
AND ALSO... 1We have a Coffee House every Tues.
nitel
AND ALSO...
IThefGlee
Club
hadj
a beautiful concert
I'
AND ALSO... §
H
Thanksgiving is coming!
11
i
MORATORIUM
*2
I
by Linda
Maley
i
H
Do you remember
October ?
15 th?was a day on which this country wit-
^ssed
the largest movement for imme-
nate
withdrawal of troops from Vict
im
and PEACE! October 15th was the
s
art
and NOT the end!! Already plansave been made to encompass the
ovember 13th
and 14th "March againsteath -
A
Vietnam
Memorial."
I
*
On the local level Erie will also
Irticipate
in the continuing moratoriumstivities. Telephone canvassing
will i
be
Id
and when a sympathetic response is
{
tainedfa visiting |
pair (composed of
ults
and students) will follow up toptain petition signatures and discuss the
pr further^Leaflets
and addressed post
frds
will be passed out downtown to
*e
people along with National Peacejtfttons. The*
P°*t |cards
have
|been
^dressed,
however, they have blank
Wcs„ so
that people may address Presi-
Int
Nixon in their ownwords.
£
Last month many students shyed
pay
from attending the moratorium
Itiyities
because they were afraid
lof
pting. Well, it
wasfproven
that a rally
jn|be
held in a peaceful manner and
^11
get the point across! Were you one
i
*****
people who stayed away be-
P»
of this? If so,
iff
hopeful that
'uVe changed
your mind and will jointhe goal of the moratorium
-
"Peace
Vfe
t»«m
by immediate withdrawal ofpops!" Even you
|who|
joined in on
ptober
15th - your work is not done
-
u
are needed to continue: the
morator-
P-
Don't just fall back and say "Well, I
my
share." Your share is not done
il
that last soldier
is
home!
*n
Nixon's November 3rd speech
1
«te
war, he said the American people
r
£
8t
interest
-
well
let's
show him
!
°*
1*°**
are interested
-4
that
*
ey
f?
tired
of losing their loved ones
Vrf ii
Vear
°
W
war that
isn't
even an
iciauy
declared war. The Paris
peace
Italks have not been of any help
Nixonhimself admitted this in his speech
theonly thing accomplished was the* shapeof the table.The moratorium is an appeal forthe immediate withdrawal of our troopsfrom Vietnam. We want to see our menbrought home alive4- 39,000 men have
died
already
-
do 39,000 more have to
die * be
fore it ends? If you feel this waytake part, join us at the Vietnam
Mora
torium Headquarters at
|1031
StateStreet and make the November Moratorium call even better!
SPOTLIGHT
SERVING OUR BASIC NEED ...This week we salute Mr. PaulMcClaine, our new SAGA representative.He replaces Mr. Alan Dwyer, who is nowat Gannon College, also in Erie.Mr. McClaine comes fromSchenectady,
New*York,
and went toUpsala College^ in East Orange, NewJersey where he majored in History andPolitical Science. Graduating in 1966, hebegan working for
SAGA|and
was withthem for four months, before volunteering for the draft. He then served in VietNam for one year, returning in Octoberof 1968. IBack
in-the
States*Mr.
McClainereturned to SAGA. He was first assignedto Goucher College in
Towson,
Maryland. From there he has joined us here at
Mercy
hurst.
He and
his
.wife
reside onWest 50th Street in Erie.Asked his opinion of the 'Hurst,Mr. McClaine says: "I think the girls aretremendous. Unique in that they aremore sincere than any girls in the othercolleges I've been to.Welcome Mr. McClaine, we likeyoutoo!!
»»
Erie. PennsylvaniaNovember 12.1969
WHO'S WHO ANNOUNCED
It has become a ritual that everyyear across the nation senior collegestudents are placed in nomination for
WHO'S
WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. Mercyhurst isno exception. Recently the senior class
and
the
college
faculty nominatedthirteen outstanding girls
for*the
honor.Their selection was based upon academicstanding, leadership qualities,
I
contributions made to the college,
j
and theirpotential to the community.Jeanne Baker is a History majorfrom
Warren,
Pennsylvania and the President of the Student Government Association. In the past she has served on everyexecutive position
onJS.G.A.,
as
vjpres
dent of her freshman class, as a memberof the Merciad
staff,
Y.C.S. and theSocial Science Club. Jeannie was alsopresented with a Mercyhurst Acheive-
ment
Award last year.The second nominee, RosemaryBliezner,
asf
from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and is a
Homev
Economics major.She has served as the Civic and National
£
Affairs Coordinator,* National
^Student
Affairs Coordinator, and in her
junior
year was regional secretary for N.S.A.Rosie, who has been active in the Home
|Economics
Club, was awarded theLydia-Terrant Scholarship.Sheila Boss from Kettering, Ohio,is the
Involvement
'70 Chairman and aChemistry major. As a member of
S.G.A.,
she served as Parliamentarian;she has been a member of ChemistryClub, Sodality, N.S.A. Committee, andwas a Dorm Council vice-president. Lastyear,
Sheila-was
also honored with an
bacheivement
award.(Another acheivement award wasgiven to Lisbeth Pallor, an ElementaryEducation major from Fryburg, Pennsyl
vania.
Liz was
co-editor
of the Praeterita,a member of
S.G.A.,P.S.E.A.,
DormCouncil and Policy Committee.The senior
class,president,
KarenDorney, is an
ArtNnajor
from
Bergen-y
field, New Jersey. She has been Civic
and*j
National Affairs
Coordinator,^and
the^Student Government secretary. Karen'sother activities include Exposure|'69,The
Tri-College
newspaper, Art Club
and|j
Y.C.S.Mary Horsington, a presentco-editor of the Merciad, is an Englishmajor from Marcellus, New York. Shehas actively participated in the Black
Enrichment|
Program,
^.CS.,
P.S.E.A.,Lit Club, Dorm Council, and Civic andNational Affairs Committee.A Latin major from Washington,
D.C.,
Alicia King has been Sodalitysecretary-treasurer and Prefect, secretaryof her junior class, sophomore
class
vice-president, a member of Dorm Counciland the Student
Tudor!
Society. Last
winter
she participated in the play THEBLACKS, and
Alicia
is the current president
of
A.B.C.As a Home Economics major,Kathleen Limber has participated in theHome Economics Club and was theclub's secretary. She has been a memberof N.S.A. Committee and during herjunior year was her class president.Kathie lives in Meadville, Pennsylvania.One of the
highest.honors
presented at Mercyhurst College is the
Saint
Catherine's Medal, and it was given toElaine Marsh, an English major fromErie. Elaine was the executive editor ofthe Merciad, a member of Sodality,D.S.C., Lit Club, and the Student TudorSociety, Cultural
Committee^and
Y.C.S.Beverly Miller, an English majorfrom
Fayetteville,
North Carolina, is thePresident of Dorm Council, a body shehas served throughout her four years atMercyhurst. In her sophomore year, Bevwas
vice-president
of the Literary Club;she has worked at
Booker
T.
WashingtonCenter, has been a member of A.B.C.and the Red Cross.Presently working on the Praeterita is Linda Peluso, a Sociology majorwho lives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.She has been a member of the SocialScience Club, Civic and National AffairsCommittee, and Y.C.S. Linda
hasijalso
been treasurer of her junior
class?
andsecretary of C.C.D.Another Sociology major, SandraPerruzi is from Greensburg, Pennsylvaniaand is serving on the present StudentGovernment. She has also been Civic andNational Affairs Coordinator, freshmanclass secretary, a member of the SocialScience Club and Y.C.S.Aside from currently working asone of the co-editors of the Praeterita,Nancy Pistone, has been sophomore classvice-president, Art Club secretary-
treasurer^
and an active member ofD.S.O. Nancy is an Art major from Erie.Each one of these people hascontributed actively to the student bodyand to
Mercyhurst
Congratulations!
*
 
Paste
2
THE MALE MINORITY REPORT
by
Al
MessinaThere is no doubt that the educational system of our country is presentlyunder intensive review. Concerned students and progressive educators, moderates and radicals alike, are actively protesting many of the antiquated educational policies
^prevalent
in our schoolsand colleges.! It is important to note,however, that these people are notattempting to mitigate the importance orintegrity of our system, but rather initiate reforms
forjjits
progress and betterment Although their tactics are extremeand fanatical at times, their intentions
are,
for the most part, genuine. Essentially our educational
system^is
capable ofbeing a motivating and inspiring facet ofAmerican life. But to let it stagnate andrefuse to change it is doing a great injustice to the people, to ourselves, and tothe future of our country.The primary technique or methodin contemporary education is
the,'lecture.
The important question one mustconsider is whether it is the best method.
Thebasic
objection to the lecture is thatit creates^ situation where the student isrelegated to the role of a passive listener.In this type of atmosphere the studentreally doesn't have much time to thinkand to express himself because his learning experience consists essentially oflistening, to other people. He becomes arecorder of information not a thinker. It
is,
in effect, training not learning. Sufficeit to say, students spend an undueamount of time memorizing recordingsfor the sole purpose of reproducinglecture material to pass examinations.
So,
in an exaggerated sense, the educatoris doing nothing more than playing arhetorical game,
while-the
student seeksclues on how he can more productivelyplay the game.
BLACKAWARENESS
by Rochelle GeorgeWhy weren't there more candidpictures of blacks fraternizing togetherin the Mercyhurst college yearbook. Theonly major attribute we received for theMercyhurst fall production
was...
THEBLACKS ... masks. Now what the hamsandwich does that mean? I was in theplay and this vague statement awed me.Why couldn't they have placed picturestaken from the rehearsal in the yearbookto
"throw
a little color on the situation." When I did inquire, I was toldthat the staff did not accept
"colored"
pictures only black and
white.
:Now
youcan imagine how I took that
statements
This production was the first attempt bythe Mercyhurst
Little
I
Theatre and thenewly
formed.
Association of BlackCollegiates to bring the
questionsijand
problems of blacks to
the
Erie community.
Also,
just for the record, we readbooks
infthe
library. We sleep
in^class.
We talk
.with
teachers. We participate inItalian Night, Polish Night, HalloweenNight. We lay on our beds in our roomsand study. We wear curlers in our hair.We laugh - we cry.Out of
312
pictures in the year
book,
black girls were only in 3. And outof eight of us on campus, at that
time,]
only
4*rnanaged
to qualify for "candid"photos.May the oblong thigh of Africaraz your daz.The seminar or the discussion
group,
which is now playing a secondaryrole in education, will perhaps come to
the-forefront
in the near future. In thistype of atmosphere the student and professor will be able to establish a positivedialogue. The emphasis will be put onindependent study! with professionalassistance and guidance from
3the
teacher. Only then will the student beginto play a viable role in his education.Not only will he listen to the ideas andopinions, expressed' by his teachers andhis peers,|but more important, he willbegin to formulate conceptions of hisown.The present reform movement in
education-revolves
basically
around!the
concept of discovery. Discovery is
-in
essence rearranging or transforming ideasin such a way as to go beyond by formulating new insights. This can only occurwhen the student-teacher relationship isone of cooperation, where the studenttakes part in discussion and is able toexpress
alternated
ideas. The naturalexploratory nature of man is unmistakably a
great
impetus to the learningprocess.
;But
the school in many casesdisrupts the discovery behavior of thestudent. Typically, learning takes placein an environment where the teacherdecides the mode, pace, and style of thelearning |experience. Consequently, thestudents' role is that of passive listener.And by* the teacher's manipulation ofthe content, the conceptual alternativesin the mind of the listener are usuallyrestricted.
[FACULTY
COMMENT])
by Sr. RaymondAnyone who writes
for j
publication, writes for the express purpose of beingheard. And one thing which is calculated to gain an audience is to comment on theintended reader. So my topic will be students
of the young adult, or nearly so,variety..They include both the male and female of the species. These are the peoplewith whom I have worked some twenty-odd
years.
I can truthfully say that this workhas been so stimulating and rewarding that I would be loathe to give it up. This mustsay, then, that students are essentially good and interesting people.
i
And why
shouldn't
they be good and interesting people? They are at the pointin their lives where they are realizing that they not only have existence, but apersonal
beingfto
create and other lives to help build. As they go
so goes thefuture. So they study the humanities and the sciences to
find
the tools and the skillsto do their creating and their building. History tells about the world man has made,but leaves no doubt that it is man's to make
for better or for worse. Literaturereflects the personal struggles, with triumphs and defeats, that have pieced togetherthe fabric of history and presents arguments that bid for the acceptance or rejectionof particular philosophies of life. Art recalls some triumphs, some near triumphs, andsome abortive fragments of human creation.
Science,jin
yielding up the secrets ofcreation, testifies that man, though small in size, can encompass the universe with hismind. Technology offers the opportunity; to free man for a more fruitful life, but atthe same time presents the temptation to lapse into indolence and the surrender ofthe creative process. What a challenging thing it is to be a student!!
'But
it is also a great deal of bother to try to fit it all together. It is so mucheasier to concentrate upon a small portion of the picture and students of each decadeseem prone to view some small part as the whole. Presently the portion which seemsto preoccupy some is the march of despair down the
road f
o Nihilism. They aresuccumbing to the somber, but fascinating tune of the piper and
are
joining the grimprocession rather than trying to divert it. Being caught in this lock-stop deprives themof the freedom to go where they will.True education must always try to break the spell which demands concentration on so small a part and recall the fuller picture to the attention of the studentso he may find where he truly fits into the whole. Building a life this way is anawesome thing, but not a
fearful,^forbidding
thing and its joys and sorrows alikecontribute to the making of the real person.
UAL'S
VICISSITUDES
Whether you;, are preparing foryour first departure from the city of Erieto the place
you
call home, or if home isnow a mere pitstop of emotions, leavingvia commercial transportation
can^be
aterrifying but mind expanding experi
ence.
This past summer I was partly living in a bookstore somewhere in Gren-wich Village, and I found something thatwas really living there. Howl and OtherPoems by Allen Ginsberg, occupied a topshelf in a dark corner. As
I^sat
on thefloor and read the poem "In the BaggageRoom at Greyhound," I couldn't helpbut associate the terminal described
witl
the similar one I've known for the pastfour years; a Greyhound terminal thatMercyhurst students never escape. Ginsberg captured many of the feelings thatstudents call their own
butt
can neverseem to adequately express; Before youdepart from
Erietthis
month, try tocure a copy of this poem and keep it inmind while waiting for plane, bus, ortrain. Stare through your own eyeglassesat millions of weeping relatives, harriedcommuters, semi-paralyzed old folk, andthose rushing off to see their loved ones
(1a
P
si
i
S
%
When student radicals rise up jactively protest an issue, the
majoriJ
Americans are appalled. They consithese
dissentors
as vile,
despica
traitors who are undoubtedly
piom
against the country. That is, this
disu
is more of a detrement to
oui &
heritage than it is a great loyalty.
R
only is this type of attitude narrow!subjective, but moreover it is the
&
danger to America. Dissent, for a
co
structive purpose, is the greatest
loytf
one can perform for his country.
In<W
\
it holds the key to the future of
^
 
United States. It
made;America a gn
democratic nation, and its
perpetuate li
will allow
A merica
the
 flexibility
o cq
 
tinue to be a great nation.The activist, in particular,
is
m
protesting that there is an
element i
authoritarianism in our system
of edua
 
tion. They contend this authority
is a
 
characterized
by the overt rigidity
i
 former historical periods, but rather fbenevolent authority where
pedanti i
supersede genuine attempts to
motivi
students to learn. That does not
me
education harbors an irrational authoity, but more often this authority
*
rational and not repressive in
natui
 
Yet, its presence even in a
ration
 
degree is not the best environment
i;.
which to develop intellectually.
Also,}
 
label the teaching profession as
pedantr*
 
in character is wholly unwarranted,
k
 
in many instances and in varying
degree
t
this attitude
exists.
i
It is evident that I have
exaggel
ated and oversimplified the
arguments
l
this essay. But essentially, or at
leastt
some degree, the ideas presented
wei•
valid and definitely need to be
review
Iin the future.
CertainlyrI
did
notjjresei
all the arguments relative to the situatio
 
and perhaps I
didn't
treat the subject:
n
objectively as I could have, but
my
bas j
intention was only to present
some
(the
inconsistencies
in
contemporaiI
education. To label teachers as
pedant)
to criticize the lecture as inhibiting,
l
say that the authority element in eduction is repressive, and to refer |education in general as a rhetorical
gam
is a grave injustice. However,
all
of
thcj-
elements do exist in some degree
and
jl
varying intensities. Hopefully the
futuji
1
varying intensities. Hopefullylearning environment in
America
schools will stress creativity not
irniw
tion, individual humanism not
autho) |
itarianism, and above all more
thinki&l
and less listening.
i
_ I
|for
i
the holidays. Haven't you too, tflGinsberg, seen the cynical Red
Ca
i
counting quarters? Maybe the
Negi
 Operating Clerk is not called Spade,
bi
isn't he there all the same?
Somewhei
 near the vicinity of the men's room
thai
will, no doubt, be a "fairy Sam."Ha'
 
you ever really stopped to look at
all
^
J
^baggage?
Each suitcase is "full of
traged
jrocking back and forth waiting to
bjl
opened ..." Buffalo, Cleveland,
Kaflj]
St. Mary's, Unipntown, Pittsburgh,
W*J
ren - no difference. You know so manflbut so few. Forty other people, all aloof]like you.
I
Not all of Ginsberg's feelings,apply, but many are inescapable:... to hold the bags to send on
tl*
roads,
to carry our luggage from
pl^B
to place looking for a bus to ride
 
back home to Eternity where the
heajfl
A
 
C^f
AN
ACTOR'S OPINION
by Paul J. Clancey, Jr.I The sensitive actor sometimes°*finds himself
in a
difficult position
in
*
attempting
to
discuss
his
art,
or, if
you*> prefer,
his
trade. There
are
those
who
d>
theatre
is an
educator only
Jwy
that
rJW
^.«
IsheddingUgh*
u
P
on
a universal
^"^
»-andthere
are
those
who
hold that
*
theatre
is an
entertainer
- a
rather
*
sophisticated song
and
dance; stand-up(comedy routine. These two positions are^generally found
on the
extreme outer^periphery
of the
theatre world;
the
former, typically held
by
pseudo-•lintellectual English J professors,
and the
blatter, generally
by
unthinking
TV
^
viewers.The theatre person, who
is
truely^dedicated
to his art,
holds neither** ofttfhese positions
for he
realizes
thatf
:
all%ood
art
does
not
necessarilyIconvey
a
fimessage
of
cosmic magnitude, nor does
t
only *stimu ate
the
audience
to
laughter, but that good theatre art gives both:
tot
least
a
pause
for
thought, and entertainment, in its broadest construction.Well-done comedy
is a
most"Warding experience
for a
performer
-
"there
is an
indescribable satisfaction,"Which
is not Ego
gratification
-' in
drawing laughter from
an
audience,
andftn
realizing that
for at
least
two
hours>omepeople have enjoyed themselves.°Snd with all due apologies to the "Pinterteople", et. al., there
is
nothing wrongPwith people having a good time*II
The
purely subjective,
and
intellectually sophomoric, judgements
on
el
3aiefoot
in
the Park as poor theatre, arej fotally unfounded.I That "Barefoot iilfthe Park
is far
pResssignificant
in the
field
of
drama
is
l%>t
for one
college student
to
say,
nor
'J^ven for a Ph.
D. in
Dramatic Literatureyko say. This is a judgement that must be,)ftmd can only
be,
made by the audiencesP*-
the
audiences
of
today
and of
fiftydrears from today.it
'NSA
RELEVANCY
?
by Rosemary BliesznerIn my sporatic visits
to the
HurstWcampust during
my
student teaching
I
fi
xpenence,
I
caught bits and snatches
of
"crisis"
\
campus cnsis^ concerningS.G.A.-*U.S.-N.S.A.
-
the main question beingWhether or not our school should retainmembership
in the
National StudentAssociation. Jeanne Andraska,
my
sub
stitute, capably organized
a
coffee hour
Jo
grvefthe questioning* students
an
^portumty to learn about N.8.A„ voicetheirquestions, express their opinions,Pecome involved.
She
even imported
a
A
Waff member from
the
national office,
|
*hoexplained allN.S.A.'s programsandUP°uited
out how
they might help our
*S?L
IF
THE
STUDENTS TAKEADVANTAGE OF THEM.
\tf ~
As
U8Ual
»
the
ef
fect
of
the whole^tort was minimal, since less than
7%
of
IT
stud
«
nt
body bothered
to
come,
G*
t
Wh
°
did attend
were neither
the
Kafr
the
«"Phh" I i
I
merely
^
1
°
f
hterested
indents. Whathappened to the issue?
I
|Lll
Typictl
'espon«?il
t
would hope
•••••••Mi
f
wonder
if
things
ffou
nd»ef*will ever change?
lot
°ut suppose
so
Andnolue»tio„ MwhT
u
answered my
***
win
-
fhat
hap
P
ens
t0 N
-
s
-
A
-
torn 2h
"
J
Ust
***
oi
vriffl
it
ever
^ass?
omfTo
PROVE
Theatre
is not for
Drama Criticswho play their games
of
"kill the show"and "Pan
the
Actors^'.ibut
it is for the
people,
the
unknown, unseen individualsin
the
house who laugh and cry or thinkalong with the performers, the crew, andthe writer.
*
If
it is
wrong
i
forjpeople
to
havefun
in the
theatrethen
the
mediumshould
be
dying
- for
theatre is a representation
of
life,
and if
life
is no
fun,
then
no one has any
right
to
take timeout from the grisly and morbid strugglefor survival only
to
enjoy himself.One final word
to all
critics,drama
and
otherwise,
-
"Those
who
can,
do, Those who can't, criticize." Wein
the
cast
can do,
and
we
are doing'-Join
us in
our
fun at the
Little Theatre,for Barefoot on Nov.
13,
14 and
16.
Remember, Life should
be fun
and happy and enjoyable
- let
yourselfgo and,ignore
the
fools who tell you
to
suffer.
LETTER
to
theEditorTo the Editor
I was very interested in your criticism
of
the play "Barefoot
in the
Park*
9
by Neil Simon.
It is so
comforting
to
knowithat
you
have Mercyhurst staffand student body
at
heart! when
you
speak, for them.
1 was
totally unawarethat
you
were
so
gifted
in the
"arts"
as
to assume
the
coveted position
of
"critic". Criticism
is a
two edged sword;it does good
but it can
also
do
harm.What can
the
director be expected
to do
now?
In
your
own
fashion
you
havedestroyed
her
right
to
freely choose
"-
forthcoming plays.
You
have,j inyourcritical- position, declared that differentsides should
be
created.
I
trust you
are
very happy
in
what you have done. Likemost people
on
campus tod ay
.
wouldsay: "Nothing like
a
little dissension
to
make progress, is there?"Signed,A Diplomat
DEAR DIPLOMAT
f1
We do not agree thatwe have
destroyed)
the
director
1
s
rightto freely
choose
forthcoming
plays*
After
all
f
we do notlimit our reviewer'sright |to freely cri-ticizeNor can wedestroy our
reader
1
a
right to freely cri-ticize us. Thank youfor writing.
KL>.
Page
3
AN EDITORIAL
g
Let your mind wander
and
focus
injion
a
scene
f..,
60% studentvote
is
needed
to
pass
the new
constitution which underlies
the
entirepurpose
and
power
of the
student body and only a handful more than
the
bare minimum vote
is
received
..
..
The Cultural Committee shells
out a
few hundred dollars
for a
nationally known string quartet
and not
eventwo busloads from
the
entire school attend Newsletters
on the new
Student Government
and
the^relevancy
of
NSA
areidiligently
worked
on
by dedicated students only
to be
lost
in the
shuffle
of
hundreds
of
feet
in
the cafeteria
line
don't
let
anything
interfere with
the
needs
of the
stomach....meetings^
publicized weeks
in ^advance
are
attended
by a
minimal amount
of
students
(the
workers)
in a
nation-wideMoratorium
for
Peace, only about
50 out of
689 students take part
in the
actual march
for
peace.Stop wandering
now and
come back
to
earth,
that's*
right,
you
haven't gone
far,
you're still
at
Mercyhurst.
It's
about time that people
in
this institution began
to
realize
that'about "5
per
cent
of the
schoolpopulation
is
doing
the
actual behind-the scenes work
for
everything thatis going
on in
this School. After the work is complete, everyone else enjoysthe results
and
then follows
it up
with complaints, gripes
and
all-arounduninvolvement.
•3'
f
What difference does
it
make?
^In
all
reality,
it
probably doesn'tmake
any
difference. Workers
and
dedicated students will come
and go,
somehow
the
institution will still thrive
on the
efforts
of the few.
Eventhough
the
apathetic
pressuregfrom
the majority is great, some mysteriouselement will keep Mercyhurst moving. Unethical, unjust
it
be. J
may
...
still,
it
continues.However, that
uninvojved
majority must come
out of its
shell
- if
not
for!
the better
^interests!
of
Mercyhurst,
at
least
for the
interests
of
world peace.On November 14 and 15 the second Moratorium Day will take place.
Again^the
nation will observe
the
deep-rooted
(Jesire
for
peace in Vietnam.And again,
we
will
be
asked to
^participate
as a
college,
as an
institution, as individuals.Don't
sit
back
and let
your
room-mate'rally for peace^Think
of
yourself
as the
number
one
dominoe.-
through your effort, stimulationfor
peace-wilfrbitoeh
out io all
thosejwho
are contacted by
yourBo
yourpart
asjan
individual, even if you have contrary
reactions.
At least react,
so
that your vitalness to society will not be wasted.Every human being has
a
part. Don't
let
anyone else do
your^hingj
However
you
feel,
at
least come
out on the 14th and
15th andjtell
thoseaffected by you what
you
feel.Before
it's
your|ast chance, take this opportunity
to
speak
for
our
self.
i
\
THE MERCIADMERCYHURST COLLEGEERIE, PA.Co-Editors £
.
(
. . .
L
{
i .Joanne Kleinhenz, Mary Horsington
A
;-•-
VAUL*
'
" "
T
' ^"
. . .
3
. .
Louise Durr, Valerie ManginAssociate Editors<*g
*
Christa Vaughen
t^i^.7
":::
AM* M AI
Me**,
Editorial staii
. ..
Lynda Brooks, Sheila Boss^LindaMarcinko,KathyMadigan, SueWillardson, Flo Golembeski,Brenda Frattlone^Linda Maley
ni
_
A
.
|
George Hughes, MikePhotography
.
.
y
-^ |J |
Moryc
*
Maiy
Ann
Pleak
A
g.
_ ..
TinaGeordeBusiness Editor
.
g
.
y ]
.'.'..
Mr. Barry McAndrewAdvisor
....-•••
*3 jM
• • • -
*
*
t

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