Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
301 RP FAll 08

301 RP FAll 08

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4|Likes:
Published by Soc202UNCG

More info:

Published by: Soc202UNCG on Oct 15, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/16/2009

pdf

text

original

 
1. Citation2. What is the primary research question or thesis of this article?
How will housing conditions
now
likely affect long term incorporation of immigrants?
Do recent Latino immigrants to Georgia aspire to American housing deficits?
Faced with normative housing deficits, do Latinos make adjustments consistentwith those of Morris and Winter’s Theory?
Are the deficient housing conditions available to Latinos in rural Georgia limitingtheir incorporation into society in a way that points to potential downwardassimilation in the future?3. What are the characteristics of the population studied? How many people, age,genders, race/ ethnicity/nationality, professions, etc?How were these people selected?
The influx of Latinos to the southeastern United States in the 1990’sLatinos have few ethnic resources to draw upon
4 large counties in Georgia which are Colquitt, Hall, Liberty and Whitfield
Latinos emerge in Georgia due to the demand for workers in low- paying low-skilled jobs in the 1990’s4. What research method (s) was employed by the researchers? Was this appropriate for the population and the research question? Were there limitations to this method?
Morris and Winter Theory- a framework for understanding U.S. housing normsand the typical responses of families who lack the resources to meet these norms.
Two year qualitative study in four Georgia counties---Colquitt, Hall, Liberty andWhitfield—selected because these counties had the largest Latino populations asof the 1990 consensus.
A hour long in depth semi-structured interview with key informants in eachcounty—Informants frequently interface with the Latino population in their county
Focus group participants conducted from each county identified by keyinformants
Ages ranged from 19 to 65
Women and men currently living in Georgia
All groups were encouraged to talk freely about their housing needs, problemsand aspirations-Instructed to comment on what they observed among Latinos in their community
Standardized questions
Illegal immigrants responses were also taken into consideration
Generated general questions about housing conditions of Latino immigrants fromnewspaper articles
Verbal communication was recorded and transcribed
 
5. What were the primary findings of the research?
Incorporation is facilitated by the presence of longer-term and second-generationimmigrants who can serve as advisors and work as political advocates.
The transition to American life is different.Residential segregation “residential assimilation” (process that occurs over time andacross generations) and home ownership will determine how well immigrants haveadjusted in their new society.Housing quality
Immigrant incorporation in the United States does not necessarily result inacculturation and absorption into the white middle class.
Downward assimilation results in permanent poverty.
Immigrants living in poor housing conditions especially those associated withdisadvantaged minorities—risk the permanent underclass identification of their group and the resultant outcomes of such labeling.
Many Latino immigrants have housing that does not meet the American norms.-Consequently, Latinos adapt and adjust to the available housing, regardless of satisfaction levels.
Americans hold housing norms for space (bedrooms vary depending on age andsex of all household members)-tenure (favor homeownership over renting but it is permissible for low income singlemothers to rent)-expenditures (housing cost should not exceed thirty percent of the monthlyhousehold gross income) and-neighborhood (should be consistent with the socioeconomic status of the familyneighborhood norms cal for attractiveness and access to good schools services andtransportation (many more just a few listed)
U.S. norms are widely held and are constant despite diversity in the country.
U.S. government defined overcrowding as more than one person per room
Recent Latin American immigrants are not satisfied with their current housingconditions in the U.S. they refer to them as camas calientes “warm beds”—slangfor overcrowded housing conditions; people must sleep in shifts and the bed never gets cold.—a indicator of dissatisfaction with their current housing and desire for living conditions closer to the American housing norms
Ability for upward mobility diminishes if and when immigrants accept “black  jobs” (agriculture work)-May serve as a barrier being unable to leave those houses—may have long-termconsequences-Immigrant groups that have distant themselves from African Americans have beenthe most successful
Growth is expected to continue
9-12 an hour wages are not so low to preclude home ownership
Homes are over 87,000 on the market for 3 bedroom two baths the basic necessityfor Latinos
 
Housing is the basic shelter were essential activities take place to satisfy the needsfor sleeping, eating, grooming, entertaining, and other activities
The fact that families do not conform to a given cultural norm may not be usedscientifically as evidence that the norm does not apply to them6. Critique this article, discuss method, findings, analysis, writing style, or other elementsof the research project1. Citation2. What is the primary research question or thesis of this article?
Does the processes of socioeconomic and cultural incorporation influence maritaldisruption in the Mexican-origin population?3. What are the characteristics of the population studied? How many people, age,genders, race/ ethnicity/nationality, professions, etc?How were these people selected?
Marital disruption in the Mexican –origin population of the U.S.
Female education of Mexican origin has a positive correlation of maritaldisruption among Mexican Americans.
Women and men responses are pooled together from a standardized interviewsurvey
U.S. census data is used that recorded marital separation, disruptions and maritalcontracts
Mexican origin persons aged 26-35 in the U.S.4. What research method (s) was employed by the researchers? Was this appropriate for the population and the research question? Were there limitations to this method?
Developing and testing alternative hypothesis about how the processes of culturaland structural incorporation apply to the explanation of marital-disruption patternsamong Mexican immigrants and their descendants compared to non-Hispanicwhites and African Americans.
Discrete-time proportional hazard models of marital disruption using data from1979 -1992 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)—alongitudinal data that recorded samples of Mexican immigrant and MexicanAmerican women and men marital disruption histories.
Limitation - interview methods were used in which men and women could beseeking divorce5. What were the primary findings of the research?
Immigrants who received their education in Mexico were least likely toincorporate with Mexican American and other races

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->