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The Dying of Languages

The Dying of Languages

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Working For A Sustainable Future
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ORLDWATCH N S T I T U T E
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1776 Massachusetts Ave., NWWashington, DC 20036www.worldwatch.org
Last Words
Excerpted from May/June 2001
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by Payal Sampat
For more information about Worldwatch Institute and its programs and publications,please visit our website at www.worldwatch.org
© 2001, Worldwatch Institute
 
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 ARATHI
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NGLISH
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UTCHI
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In Bombay, where I grew up, I used these languagesevery day. To get by on the streets, to get directions,to interact with people—I had to be able to speak Marathi. To go to a corner store to buy rice or toma-toes for dinner, I had to speak a little Gujarati, thelanguage of many local shopkeepers. Kids in my school came from so many different linguistic back-grounds that we conversed either in English, the lan-guage of instruction, or Hindi, India’s most widely-spoken tongue. And my grandparents spokeKutchi, the language of our ancestors, who camefrom the deserts of western India.Despite their best efforts, I did anything I could toavoid responding to my grandparents in Kutchi. Afterall, they could converse fluently in a number of Bom-bay’s working languages. And I sensed from a very early age that Kutchi wasn’t useful in any obvious way.It couldn’t help me make friends, follow what was onTV, or get me better grades. So by default, I aban-doned the language of my ancestors, and choseinstead to operate in the linguistic mainstream.Marathi, Gujarati, Hindi, and English are eachspoken by at least 40 million Indians. Kutchi, on theother hand, has perhaps 800,000 speakers—and thatnumber is declining as more and more Kutchi-speak-ing young people switch to Gujarati or English. Thisdecline makes the language increasingly vulnerable toother pressures. Last January, western India suffereda catastrophic earthquake, which had its epicenter inKutch. Kutchi lost an estimated 30,000 speakers.India is a densely polyglot country. Estimates of the number of languages spoken there vary widely,depending on where one draws the line between lan-guage and dialect. But a conservative reckoning would put the number of native Indian tongues atroughly 400; of these, about 350 are rapidly losingspeakers. The same is true for thousands of other lan-guages all over the world. And most of these fadingtongues don’t come anywhere near Kutchi in termsof the number of speakers: of the world’s 6,800extant languages, nearly half are now spoken by fewerthan 2,500 people. At the current rate of decline,experts estimate that by the end of this century, atleast half of the world’s languages will have disap-peared—a linguistic extinction rate that works out toone language death, on average, every two weeks. And that’s the low-end estimate; some experts pre-dict that the losses could run as high as 90 percent.Michael Krauss, a linguist at the Alaskan Native Lan-guage Center and an authority on global languageloss, estimates that just 600 of the world’s languagesare “safe” from extinction, meaning they are stillbeing learned by children.
t’s believed that the human faculty for languagearose at some point between 20,000 and100,000 years ago. Many languages have comeand gone since then, of course, but it’s unlikely thatthe global fund of languages has ever before goneinto so extensive and chronic a decline. This processseems to have originated in the 15th century, as theage of European expansion dawned. At least 15,000languages were spoken at the beginning of that cen-tury. Since then, some 4,000 to 9,000 tongues havedisappeared as a result of wars, genocide, legal bans,and assimilation. Many anthropologists see thedecline as analogous to biodiversity loss: in bothcases, we are rapidly losing resources that took mil-lennia to develop.Today, the world’s speech is increasingly homoge-nized. The 15 most common languages are now onthe lips of half the world’s people; the top 100 lan-guages are used by 90 percent of humanity. Europeanlanguages have profited disproportionately from thistrend. Europe has a relatively low linguistic diversity— just 4 percent of the world’s tongues originatedthere—yet half of the 10 most common languages areEuropean (see figure, page 36). Of course, as a firstlanguage, the world’s most common tongue is notEuropean but Asian: Mandarin Chinese is now spokenby nearly 900 million people. But English is rapidly 
Last Words
by Payal Sampat
 As cultural homogeneity spreads over the Earth, thousands of human languages are headed for extension.
 
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gaining ground as the primary international mediumof science, commerce, and popular culture. Most of the world’s books, newspapers, and e-mail are writtenin English, which is now spoken by more people as asecond language (350 million) than as a native tongue(322 million). According to one estimate, English isused in some form by 1.6 billion people every day.Most languages, in contrast, have a very limited dis-tribution. Much of the world’s linguistic diversity isconcentrated in just a few regions—all of which areextremely rich in biodiversity as well (see map, pages38–39). The Pacific region in particular has producedan amazing diversity of the spoken word. The island of New Guinea, which the nation of Papua New Guineashares with the Indonesian state of Irian Jaya, hasspawned some 1,100 tongues. New Guinea is home to just 0.1 percent of the world’s people—yet those peo-ple speak perhaps one sixth of the world’s languages. Another 172 languages are spoken in the Philippines,and an astounding 110 can be heard on the tiny archi-pelago of Vanuatu, which is inhabited by fewer than200,000 people. Over all, more than half of all lan-guages occur in just eight countries: Papua New Guinea and Indonesia have 832 and 731 respectively;Nigeria has 515; India has about 400; Mexico,Cameroon, and Australia have just under 300 each;and Brazil has 234. (These figures come from the
Eth- nologue 
, a database published by the Summer Instituteof Linguistics in Austin, Texas; some totals may includelanguages that have recently gone extinct.)Some of these linguistic “hot spots” appear to beon the verge of a kind of cultural implosion. Take
PHOTOGRAPH BY ART WOLFE/ART WOLFE, INC.
Marie Smith, the only remaining speaker of Eyak 

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