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Discipline Update: Presentation to the board 5/13/13

Discipline Update: Presentation to the board 5/13/13

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Denver Public Schools staff provide the board with an update on its revised disciplinary policy after a 14-year-old girl was assaulted by another student in a classroom.
Denver Public Schools staff provide the board with an update on its revised disciplinary policy after a 14-year-old girl was assaulted by another student in a classroom.

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Discipline Update: Presentation to the Board 5/13/2013

1

Historic Trends in Student Discipline
• Background on BOE JK-R
– Efforts to reform JK-R began in January, 2006 with advocacy from Padres Unidos – The Denver Plan Discipline Work Group was created to meet the Denver Plan’s Goal III, Component C, Objective 2: “The district and each school community will embrace a code of conduct that supports student learning.”

2

Background on 2008 JK-R Revision
The Discipline Work Group’s Goal:
• Creation of a developmentally appropriate student discipline policy that:
– will be applied fairly and uniformly – will change undesirable student behavior while keeping students in school – will promote academic achievement

3

2008 Changes to BOE JK-R
Emphasis on using different types of interventions to address student misbehavior at school
– Restorative Justice – Behavior Intervention Plans to support academic and social emotional growth
• Especially for students engaged in disruptive behavior

– In-school suspension as an alternative to Out of School Suspension
4

2008 Changes to BOE JK-R
Consistency achieved through the standardization of offenses and consequences through the development of the “Matrix” and “Ladder ”
– Offenses grouped into five types with corresponding consequences
• Type One – least serious offenses, addressed in the classroom by the teacher using Ladder Levels A-C • Types Two through Four – increasing in seriousness and corresponding to Ladder Levels D-F • Type Five – most serious offenses that have the potential to seriously endanger other students or school personnel

– Consequences for the Types are specified and graduated
5

2008 Changes to BOE JK-R
• Efforts will be made to eliminate racial disparities in discipline • School personnel will monitor the impact of disciplinary decisions on racial and ethnic groups that have been over-represented in disciplinary measures • Students will have the right to complete their academic work without penalty while they are on suspension
6

2008 Changes to BOE JK-R
• Every effort will be made to address discipline concerns without involving law enforcement • Provide guidance for discipline building leaders when they must consider contacting DPD, DFD, DHS or submitting a Title IX report • Describes how to address misbehavior that occurs off school grounds, but has a strong connection to the school community
7

MH&A School Partner Supports
• Specific MH&A School Partners are assigned to each network and will assist networks and schools with:
– Strengthening bully prevention efforts – Strengthening use of behavior plans and interventions for students with significant behavior challenges – Strengthening use of Restorative Approaches, including development of student-led RA – Pregnant and Parenting Teen supports (High School) – Suicide prevention strategies – Threat/Violence mitigation – Prevention planning for students considered habitually disruptive
8

Middle School Listening Tours
Post-Secondary Readiness/Student Services Listening Tours to discuss needs to address student behavior
       Skinner Middle School (5/15/13) Merrill Middle School (5/20/13) Hamilton Middle School (5/23/13) Morey Middle School (5/28/13) Smiley Middle School (5/29/13) Henry Middle School (5/30/13) Hill Middle School (5/31/13)
9

Goals for Increased Mental Health Supports
• Support teacher’s ability to successfully educate students with significant behavior challenges • Provide targeted restorative interventions and skills to students with significant behavior challenges • Develop school-wide prevention programs to address positive school climate • Provide support strategies to caregivers • Strengthen alignment of community partners that provide mental health supports in schools (e.g., schoolbased health clinics, outside counseling groups, etc.).
10

Increase Mental Health Supports in SY 2013-14
• Increase Student-Based Budgeting Support to enhance school social work/school psychology supports for students. Dollars to purchase MH staff
– – – – – – $350,000 for Elementary School Networks $650,000 for OPSR Networks $50,000 for Innovation Network $151,000 for Division of Student Services $120,000 PACE program expansion $180,000 Outside providers (e.g., MHCD, Arapahoe House)
11

OPSR Increased Mental Health Supports
• Dollars for additional mental health supports (school psychologists, school social workers, school counselors) • Strategies include:
– Providing calibrated supports to students with significant behavior needs – Ensuring appropriate alignment of internal and external mental health services – Enhancing use of Restorative Approaches – Improving attendance rates to Denver Plan 2015 goal – Improving use of In-School Intervention as an alternative to Out of School Suspension
12

Elementary Network Supports
• Dollars for additional mental health supports (school psychologists, school social workers) to provide supports to students with significant behavior needs. • Strategies include:
– Providing additional funding for under-served elementary schools – Providing calibrated supports to students with significant behavior needs – Ensuring appropriate alignment of internal and external mental health services – Providing culturally-responsive behavior intervention strategies – Improving use of In-School Intervention as an alternative to Out of School Suspension

13

Innovation Network
• Dollars for additional mental health supports (school psychologists and school social workers) to provide supports to students with significant behavior needs.
– Providing calibrated supports to students with significant behavior needs – Enhancing use of Restorative Approaches – Improving use of In-School Intervention as an alternative to Out of School Suspension
14

Student Services
• Dollars for additional mental health supports (school psychologists, school social workers) to provide supports to students with significant behavior needs. • Strategies include providing district-level accountability and oversight on provision of mental health services, ensuring alignment of internal and external mental health resources, ensuring bully prevention programs are in place and strengthening use of Restorative Approaches

15

Additional Strategies to Support Students who are Habitually Disruptive
• Listening Conversations at middle school network • Strengthening In-School Intervention process at all middle and high schools • Focused behavior planning and interventions with data tracking • Verbal De-Escalation training for all middle and high school teachers • Consideration of 15-day out of school suspension process with home bound instruction in highest need cases • Professional development training for central employees on using data to create viable behavior plans for habitually disruptive students • Collaborating with MHCD, Denver Health, Arapahoe House, etc. on enhanced mental health service delivery options for schools • Alignment of internal and external mental health supports to ensure students who are habitually disruptive receive adequate supports • Enhanced training and support for students with disabilities served in Affective Needs Center-Based programs.

16

Intensive Pathways – Segment Segment Data Action Planning Guide Action Plan
Segment 1
“Incoming 9 ”
-incoming 9th graders demonstra ng risk factors in a endance, behavior, or course comple on
th

Segment 2.1

Segment 2.2
th

Segment 3
“Young & Far”
-16-17 yrs old -0-120 credits - 2 years off-track

Segment 4.1
“Old & Very Near”
-18+ years old - .5 year off-track

Segment 4.2
“Old & Near”
-18+ years old - .5-1.5 years off-track

Segment 5
“Old & Far”
-18+ years old -120 credits or less - more than 1.5 years off-track

th “9 Slightly Off Track” “9 Very Off Track”

Profile

-repeat 9th graders -30-59 credits 4.2 Segment - .5 year or less off-track

-repeat 9th graders

Segment 5

Segment 4.1 -more than .5 year
off-track

-0-29 credits

Segment 3

Recommended Action

Support at Current School

Support at Current School

Refer to Transi ons Team OR Support at Current School

Refer to Transi ons Team

Refer to Transi ons Team OR Support at Current School
-Cross-check segment data. -Perform transcript analysis to determine whether student has a viable gradua on pathway at current school:

Refer to Transi ons Team OR Support at Current School
-Cross-check segment data. -Perform transcript analysis to determine whether student has a viable gradua on pathway at current school:
IF YES: -Meet with student to discuss graduation plan. Determine whether a transition is of interest. If so, contact family and refer to appropriate Transitions Liaison. -If student will remain at current school: -Ensure that student's schedule aligns with graduation plan and student's needs -Utilize credit recovery options -Inform student that progress will be assessed at end of S1, and that a transition may be the best option at that time IF NO: -Contact family and refer to appropriate Transitions Liaison

Refer to Transi ons Team

Action Steps/ Possible Supports

-Cross-check segment data. -Plan & implement academic, behavior, and a endance interven ons accordingly. -Ensure that student's schedule aligns with academic abili es -Ensure that student has a posi ve rela onship with at least 1 adult at school -Iden fy factors that may limit student's success and connect to needed supports -Connect to school ac vites to promote student engagement -Implement a system of progress monitoring and evaluate success at end of S1.

Cross-check segment data. -Meet with student to discuss plan for becoming on-track, and inform student that progress will be assessed at end of S1 -Ensure that student's schedule aligns with credit needs -U lize credit recovery op ons -Iden fy factors that may limit student's success and connect to needed supports -Connect to school ac vites to promote student engagement -Implement a system of progress monitoring and evaluate success at end of S1.

Cross-check segment data. IF STAYING AT CURRENT SCHOOL: -Meet with student to discuss plan for becoming on-track, and inform student that progress will be assessed at end of S1 -Follow steps outlined in Segment 2.1.

-Cross-check segment data. -Contact student & family to let them know that a Transi ons Liaison will be reaching out to them soon. -Complete Transi ons Recommenda on Form. -Email completed form to appropriate Transi ons Liaison.

-Cross-check segment data. -Contact student & family to let them know that a Transi ons Liaison will be reaching out to them soon. -Complete Transi ons Recommenda on Form. -Email completed form to appropriate Transi ons Liaison.

IF YES: -Meet with student to discuss graduation plan. Determine whether a transition is of interest. If so, contact family and refer to appropriate Transitions Liaison. -If student will remain at current school: -Ensure that student's schedule aligns with graduation plan and student's needs -Utilize credit recovery options -Inform student that progress will be assessed at end of S1, and that a transition may be the best option at that time IF NO: IF TRANSITIONING:

IF TRANSITIONING: -Contact family and refer to appropriate Transi ons Liaison.

Transitions should be initiated as soon as possible to maximize students’ ability to earn credit at new school st during 1 semester.

Transitions should be initiated as soon as possible to maximize students’ ability to earn credit at new school st during 1 semester.

-Contact family -Contact family and and refer to appropriate refer to appropriate Transi ons Liaison. Transitions Liaison

Transitions should be initiated as soon as possible to maximize students’ ability to earn credit at new school st during 1 semester.

Options

-Intervention plan -Progress monitoring

-Intervention plan -Credit Recovery

-Intervention plan -Multiple/Intensive Pathways -Engagement Center -Multiple/Intensive Pathways -Transitions Team -Credit Recovery -Transitions Team

-Engagement Center -Transitions Team

-GED -Intensive Pathways -Transitions Team

17

IP Changes for 13-14
• Addition of grades 6-8 at Summit Academy • Tutoring support for middle school students at: Summit Academy, DC21, Vista Academy, Prep • Increasing seats/enrollment at Summit Academy, DC21, Vista Academy, PUSH • Excel Academy (Cynthia Navarro, Principal) and Compassion Road (Kim Ortiz, Principal) opening • Focus on increasing student access to CTE, AP and Concurrent Enrollment • Additional mental health supports • Focus on using blended learning at all schools • Implementation of CCCS 030-060-090 at all schools

18

5-year Trend Data Unduplicated OSS and Expulsion
School Year District Population White OSS Black OSS Latino OSS White Expulsion Black Expulsion Latino Expulsion

2012-13

84424

327

1057

1866

8

27

33

2011-12

81870

616

2402

4147

6

19

35

2010-11

79423

691

2744

5008

9

38

54

2009-10

78352

1192

3167

4956

18

63

100

2008-09

75269

1065

3172

4953

14

52

97

19

Unduplicated Out of School Suspension Trends
9000 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

8542 7145

5309

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Unduplicated OSS incidents continue to decline on a semestercomparison basis, with a 38% decrease from 2010-11 to 2012-13 (to date). To date, 79,095 DPS students (94%)have not received an Out of School Suspension. 20

Enrollment by Race & Ethnicity
(Source: October Counts 2012)
2.9% 0.2% 20.5%
American Indian or Alaskan Native

0.7% 3.3%

Asian Black (Not Hispanic) Hispanic

14.4%
Multiple races Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander White, not Hispanic

58.0%

21

OSS Race & Ethnicity Rates
2012-2013 Through April 30th
3% 0%

9%
53% 1% 1%

American Indian or Alaskan Native Asian Black (Not Hispanic) Hispanic Multiple races

33%

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
White, not Hispanic

22

Duplicated Out of School Suspension— Gender Breakdown (through 4/15/13)
286

Males

Females

1086

23

Duplicated Out of School Suspension— Event Breakdown (through 4/15/13)
800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100

672

263 186

95
49 1 40 22 11 4 2 3 2

0

24

Expulsion Trends
120

108

100

80

69

69

60

40

20

0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

To date, 70% of all expulsions in SY 2012-13 were for Dangerous Weapons or Drugs
25

Events Leading to Long Term School Removals (SY 2012-13)
Events that have resulted in an expulsion for SY 2012-13 continue to be overwhelmingly for drug distribution and dangerous weapons (77% of total expulsions).
35 30 25 20 15 10 5 5 1 0 Assault Behavior Weapons Fighting II Active/Ongoing Distribution Sexual Damage to Property 4 3 1 1 19 29

26

Enrollment by Race & Ethnicity
(Source: October Counts 2012)
2.9% 0.2% 20.5%
American Indian or Alaskan Native

0.7% 3.3%

Asian Black (Not Hispanic) Hispanic

14.4%
Multiple races Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander White, not Hispanic

58.0%

27

Expulsion Race & Ethnicity Rates
2012-2013 Through April 30th
10%
46% 2%
American Indian or Alaskan Native

Asian

0% 0%
Black (Not Hispanic) Hispanic Multiple races Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander White, not Hispanic

42%

28

SB 12-046 Amends Grounds for Suspension and Expulsion
JK-R Compliance and Application

29

SB 12-046 Item requiring Board action to be in compliance with statute
Firearm is the only mandatory expulsion offense required by statute
– student brings a firearm to school or a student who is determined to have brought a firearm to school/possessed a firearm at school

30

SB 12-046 in application
• Limit the use of out-of-school suspensions and expulsions to incidents that involve conduct that poses a serious and credible threat to the safety of pupils and staff
– Real and immediate, not conjectural or hypothetical

• Type Six offense (proposed)
– Firearm

• Type Five offenses
– Robbery – First or second degree assault, sexual assault – Sale, or distribution of, or intent to sell, unauthorized drugs or controlled substances – Carrying, bringing, using, or possessing a knife or dangerous weapon

• Type Four offenses
– If determined to be a serious and credible threat – Habitual Disruption – optional request for extended suspension and expulsion

31

SB 12-046 in application
Student discipline policy will address the misconduct by:
– implementing a graduated set of age-appropriate responses to misconduct (DPS Intervention Guide) – providing opportunities for students to learn from their mistakes (use of Restorative Approaches, behavior plan development and progress monitoring of behavior) – using prevention, intervention, restorative approaches, skill-building, mental health support, and other approaches
32

SB 12-046 in application
Consider the following when a student engages in a misbehavior:
– Student’s age – Disciplinary history – Student with a disability – Seriousness of misbehavior – Did the misbehavior threaten the safety of any student or staff member? – Is the consequence aligned with the misbehavior?

33

SB 12-046 in application
Habitually Disruptive Students:
– Statutory definition changed to “student who has caused a substantial disruption … three or more times. . .” – Behavior intervention plan may be developed after first removal. Must be developed after second removal

34

SB 12-046 in application
• Student is allowed to make up coursework during the period of suspension for full or partial credit • Students who are expelled have 10 days to appeal the decision • Includes updated Bully Prevention and Education components (HB-1254)

35

BOE Changes Made to JK-R, since 2008 Approval
• Habitually Disruptive Student:
– Language amended in 2011 to align with state statute

• Unauthorized Drugs and Controlled Substances
– Drug Distribution, not tied to exchange of money, was amended in policy

Board Report

36

Proposed Changes to BOE JK
• Grammatical changes • Strengthened language around parent/community involvement • Strengthened language around sharing of school-level discipline data with community and students. *See Appendix for strike-through draft of BOE JK

37

Proposed Changes to BOE JK-R
• Grammatical Changes • Emphasis on interventions, including Restorative Approaches, for student behavior • Inclusion of language to align with SB 12-046 • Inclusion of Type Six category of Firearm, to align with SB 12-046 • Strengthened language on use of behavior plans for disruptive students, to align with SB 12-046 • Modify language of Out of School Suspension to Out of School Intervention; In-School Suspension to In School Intervention and Expulsion to Long-Term School Removal *See the Appendix for a Strike-Through draft of BOE JK-R

38

Public Input
Stakeholder meetings were held with building disciplinarians, principals, external stakeholder groups and with black parents. Primary themes included:
– – – – – JK and JK-R, as currently written, are supported by participants Discipline should be focused on teaching not on punishment Opportunity to learn from misbehavior Enhanced training of teachers to address the racial disparities in discipline Focus on hiring more faculty and staff that reflect the racial background of students – Importance of enhancing mental health supports in schools – Enhancing the training of teachers to address habitually disruptive behavior – Greater clarity at school level on discipline practices and sharing schoollevel discipline data

*See appendix for summary report
39

Appendices
• Policy JK-Student Discipline
– With strike-through

• Policy JK-R Student Discipline
– With strike-through

• Document A
– JK-R support document describing graduated response to student discipline

• Document B
– Matrix—Lists all offenses and graduated consequences

• Document C
– Ladder—Description of the role of teachers and principals in the discipline process

• Matrix with Intervention Guide • Student Discipline Stakeholder Groups Questions and Summary of Responses
― Overview of information from parent stakeholders and internal DPS stakeholders

40

Policy JK- Student Discipline
I. Introduction A. The Board of Education supports the mission of the Denver Public Schools ("District"), which is to provide all students the opportunity to achieve the knowledge and skills necessary to become contributing citizens in our diverse society. Students should have the opportunity to develop their skills, knowledge, and competencies in a nurturing and accountable school setting. Students should receive effective and engaging teaching, with differentiated curriculum, instruction, and assessment designed to address the needs of our diverse learners. Students have a right to attend schools that are safe and free from unnecessary disruption. The Board believes that proper student conduct, reinforced by an effective discipline program, is essential to create and maintain a positive school climate. This is the joint responsibility of students, staff, parents, and the community. II. Purpose A. The goal of student discipline is to supportteach students to behave in ways that positively contribute to academic achievement and school success, and to support a school environment where students and staff are responsible and respectful. B. The purpose of this policy is to support school discipline that: i. Maintains safe and orderly learning communities; ii. Assures consistency across all schools in the district; iii. Defines and communicates expectations for student behavior; iv. Defines and communicates expectations for staff responsibility related to school discipline; v. Balances the needs of the student, the needs of those directly affected by the behavior, and needs of the overall school community; vi. Assures equity in disciplinary practices across racial, ethnic, and cultural groups, as well as all other protected classes (gender, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity). III. General Principles A. School discipline is best accomplished by preventing misbehavior before it occurs, and using effective interventions after it occurs. B. School safety and academic success are formed and strengthened when all school staff and personnel build positive relationships with students and their families and are actively engaged in their lives and learning.

C. Effective school discipline maximizes the amount of time students spend learning and minimizes the amount of time students are removed from their classrooms due to misbehavior.cause disruption or are removed from their classrooms due to misbehavior. D. School discipline should be reasonable, timely, fair, age-appropriate, and should match the severity of the student's misbehavior. School discipline that is paired with meaningful instruction and guidance offers students an opportunity to learn from their mistakes and contribute to the school community, and is more likely to result in getting the student re-engaged in learning. E. Effective discipline is built on consistent and effective classroom management, and is supported by a positive school climate. The vast majority of disciplinary issues should be addressed at the classroom level by teachers; however, behaviors that cannot be addressed at this level should receive more targeted and intensive interventions, as determined by an individualized assessment. F. The District serves a diverse community. In order to serve all students and to prepare them to be members of an increasingly diverse community, school and staff must build cultural competence. We must strive to eliminate any institutional racism and any other discrimination that presents barriers to success or lead to disparate disciplinary outcomes. G. Student conduct which may be subject to disciplinary action includes those occurring during either curricular or extracurricular activities, in classrooms, in school buildings, on school grounds, or in school vehicles, when such conduct is detrimental to the school environment and to the welfare or safety of other students or school personnel. IV. General Statement of the Policy A. The District's system of discipline is built on personal accountability, which is understood to mean: i. Recognizing that misbehavior damages relationships between the person or persons who misbehaved, the person harmed by the behavior, and the community as a whole; ii. Having an opportunity to repair harm done and restore relationships whenever possible, as opposed to excluding the person who misbehaved; iii. Building personal responsibility by helping individuals develop empathy, self-control, and motivation. B. School discipline interventions should be guided by the following principles: i. Practicing early identification and assessment of struggling students before they fall behind; ii. Using a problem solving process to provide interventions matched to student needs;

iii. Ensuring timely, scientific and research-based interventions, progress monitoring and feedback and adjusting interventions when appropriate; iv. Delivering scientific, research-based interventions with fidelity. C. There are three types of intervention strategies that are available: Administrative/Legal, Restorative, and Skill-based/Therapeutic. Teachers and administrators should consider utilizing different types of strategies, or multiple strategies simultaneously, to deal with misbehavior., especially for 2nd or 3rd offenses. D. The District will make every reasonable effort to correct student misbehavior through schoolbased resources at the lowest possible level, and to support students in learning the skills necessary to enhance a positive school environment and avoid negative behavior. E. District employees must abide by all applicable federal and state statutes and city ordinances, plus all relevant Board policies and procedures when dealing with disciplinary matters. F. Every student is expectedrequired to follow this policy and accompanying procedures. Schools will provide this policy to students and parents on an annual basis. G. All students are held to high standards of behavior, and adults maintain such standards by teaching, modeling, and monitoring behavior, and by re-teaching appropriate behaviorcorrecting misbehavior as necessary. Students should have input in the development of discipline rules and procedures for their school and classrooms. H. Schools should minimize the use of out-of-school suspensions, recommendations for expulsion, and referrals to law enforcement, to the extent practicable while remaining consistent with state statute, local ordinances, and mandatory reporting laws. It is a goal of the Denver Public Schools and the Board of Education that the juvenile and criminal justice systems be utilized less frequently to address school-based misconduct. I. Discipline procedures must guarantee due process to all students and must be enforced uniformly, fairly, consistently and in a manner that does not discriminate on the basis of ethnicity, race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, gender, sexual orientation, age, or disability. J. This policy and accompanying procedures are intended to help the District eliminate racial and ethnic disparities, and any other protected class disparities, in school discipline, while improving behavior, school climate, and academic achievement for all students. K. Accurate and complete data collection is essential for administering an effective school discipline policy. It assists with identifying problems, crafting solutions, and monitoring progress. L. The Board of Education hereby adopts this policy and accompanying procedures / regulations as the safe schools plan for the District as mandated by C.R.S. 22-32-109.1. Schools are free to

implement their own Codes of Conduct so long as those plans are not in conflict with this policy, accompanying regulations, or other Board policies, and those codes have been approved by the Superintendent or a designee. M. The District shall post this policy on the District web site and in each school. A copy of this policy and accompanying procedures shall be readily available in each school's administration office, in both Spanish and English. Copies of this policy, its accompanying procedures / regulations, and school rules will be made available, upon request, to each student and parent/guardian, and, upon request, promptly translated in a language that the parent/guardian can understand. N. The Superintendent, or a designee, shall develop such procedures as may be needed for the implementation of this policy. Adopted January 14, 1994 Revised September 5, 1996 Revised June 18, 2000 Revised June 21, 2001 Revised November 15, 2001 Revised December 18, 2003 Revised August 21, 2008 LEGAL REFS: C.R.S. 18-12-105.5 C.R.S. 18-18-102 C.R.S. 18-18-406 C.R.S. 18-18-407(2) C.R.S. 22-32-102(1)(W) C.R.S. 22-32-209 C.R.S. 22-32-110(2)(3)(4) C.R.S. 22-32-126 C.R.S. 22-33-105 C.R.S. 22-32-106 C.R.S. 22-32-109.a(2)(a)X 20 USC 88921 C.R.S. 22-32-109.1 (adoption and enforcement of safe school plan including conduct and discipline code and disciplinary removal from classroom)

Policy JK-R- Student Conduct and Discipline Procedures
INTRODUCTION The following student conduct and discipline procedures are developed for the implementation of School Board Policy JK - Student Discipline. These procedures are designed to be consistent with the general purpose and principles outlined in Policy JK, as well as consistent with federal and state statutes, and local ordinances. SECTION ONE: SCHOOL DISCIPLINE ADMINISTRATION 1-1 Characteristics of Disciplinary Practices[D1] A. Successful disciplinary practices have the following characteristics: 1. They are explicit, reasonable, and timely. 2. They have logical, fair, consistent, and age-appropriate consequences. 3. They include a variety of prevention and intervention measures. 4. They provide the opportunity for significant parent/guardian and student participation. 5. They respond to individual differences among students with insight and sensitivity[D2]. 6. They ensure the opportunity for students to obtain an education. 7. They address the needs of the student who engaged in the misconduct, the needs of those who were affected by the misconduct, and the needs of the overall school community. 1-2 Staff Training A. Staff training will be provided as needed to ensure that the disciplinary program practices in each school isare effective and that relevant policies and procedures are equitably applied. 1-3 Non-Discrimination A. School district staff responsible for implementing this Policy shall do so without discrimination based on ethnicity, race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, or disability. B. Discipline for students with disabilities shall be in accordance with Board Policy JKF, Discipline of Students with Disabilities, and/or a student’s Section the student's individualized education program (IEP), any behavior intervention plan, 504 Plan., and Board Policy JKF (Discipline of Students with Disabilities). 1-4 Addressing Racial Disparities and Other Protected Class Disparities in School Discipline A. Efforts shall be made to eliminate any racial disparities in school discipline. Staff members are specifically charged with monitoring analyzing discipline data, interventions, and progress monitoring the impact of their actions on students from outcomes for students from racial and ethnic groups or other protected classes that have historically been over-represented among those students who are suspended, expelled, and/or referred to law enforcement. 1-5 Student Conduct Subject to Disciplinary ActionAction A. Student conduct during either curricular or extracurricular activities in classrooms, in school buildings, on school grounds, or in school vehicles may be subject to disciplinary action, if such conduct is detrimental creates a substantial impact to the school environment and to the welfare or safety of other students or school personnel.

1-6 Individual School Policies A. Schools may adopt their own school rules and Codes of Conduct so long as they are consistent with this policy. Any such rules or codes shall be approved by the Superintendent or a designated District official[D3] and will be made available to students and their parents/guardians in a manner consistent with Section 1-6 of this policy prior to implementation. 1-67 Distribution[D4] of Policy, School Rules or Codes of Conduct A. The District shall post this policythe School Board Policy JK-R on the District web site and in each school, in English and Spanish. Copies of this policythis policy and school rules will be made available, upon request, to each student and parent/guardian., and, uUpon request, all efforts will be made to translate this policy translated into a language that the parent/guardian can understand. The Communications Office provides translation services into the most used languages within DPS. B. School rules or codes of conduct must be distributed to all students and parents/guardians upon enrollment. B. Individual schools are encouraged to train their students on the contents of this policy and other school rules and Codes of Conduct they adopt. 1-7 Individual School Policies

Any school that elects to create their own school rules and codes of conduct must ground them in School Board Policy JK-R. Any such rules or codes shall be approved by the Superintendent or a designated District official[D5]. Approval must be received prior to implementing or distributing the school rules or codes of conduct.
I-8 Training[D6] Individual schools are expected to train their staff, students, and parents/guardians on the contents of School Board Policies JK and JK-R[D7], school rules and/or codes of conduct.

SECTION TWO: INTERVENTIONS AND CONSEQUENCES 2-1 General A. Effective school discipline policies promote disciplinary responsespractices that refrain from interrupting a student's education to the extent possible. Schools should minimize the use of outof-school suspensions, recommendations for expulsionLong Term School Removal, and referrals to law enforcement, in accordance with Student Discipline Policies JK and JK-R. to the extent practicable while remaining These practices must remain consistent with state statute, local ordinances, and mandatory reporting laws. 2-2 Reasonable Discipline Practices Consequences A. Consequences Practices should be reasonable, fair equitable, age-appropriate, and should match the severity of the student's misbehavior, as well as consider the impact on the victim and/or community. Consequences Practices that are paired with reflect meaningful instruction and guidance (corrective feedback and re-teaching) offer students an opportunity to learn from

their mistakes behaviors, re-engage in learning, and become positive members of the school community. contribute back to the school community, and are more likely to result in getting the student re-engaged in learning. B. For greatest impact, Any use of consequences disciplinary practices should include the following four components: identifying the function of behavior, defining the desired behavior(s), developing systems for progress monitoring, and assessing outcomes[D8]. be carefully planned with well-defined outcomes in order to provide the greatest benefit.

Positive consequences include systematic recognition for appropriate behavior and lead to an increase in that appropriate behavior. Negative consequences are designed to provide feedback to the student that his or her behavior is unacceptable and should not occur again. 2-3 Relevant Factors in for Making Discipline DecisionsPractices A. When choosing consequences a response to a for student’s ts' mis behavior, teachers, administrators, and staff must balance the District's goals of eliminating school disruptions and maximizing student instruction time[D9]. Prior to disciplining students, the following factors shall be considered should consider the following: 1. Age, health, and disability or special education status of the student 2. Appropriateness of student's academic placement 3. Student's prior conduct and record of behavior 4. Student's side of the story attitude 5. Level of parent/guardian's cooperation and involvement 6. Student's willingness to repair the harm 7. Seriousness of the offense and the degree of harm caused 8. Impact of the incident on overall school community. A. The availability of prevention and intervention programs that are designed to address student misbehavior should also be considered prior to disciplining students. 2-4 Interventions A. When misconduct occurs, s Schools shall will investigate the circumstances of an incident and gather facts that will help to determine appropriate interventions and consequences for that student, with emphasis on correcting student misbehavior through school-based resources at the lowest possible level. Interventions should provide students an opportunity to learn from their mistakes behaviors, and re-engage the student in learning. All interventions should balance the needs of the student and, the needs of those directly impacted affected by the behavior. , and needs of the overall school community. B. There are three types of intervention strategies that are available to teachers and administrators: Administrative, Restorative, and Skill-based/Therapeutic. 1. Administrative Strategies are statutory, rule-based, or contract-based interventions done "to" the offender, such as: a. Removal from classroom b. Detention c. Suspension d. ExpulsionLong Term School Removal.

2. Restorative Strategies[D10] are problem solving interventions done "with" the offender. They are driven by justice as much as is possible and focus on the harm caused and how it will be repaired. A successful restorative justice strategy may utilize collaboration in interventions with allied agencies and professionals. An assessment of the incident/conduct will be done, and a determination will be made by the school or District whether a face-to-face meeting with all parties is appropriate. Examples may include: a. Family group conferencing b. Victim-offender mediation c. Classroom peace circles d. Reparation of harm. 3. Therapeutic/Resource Strategies are done "by" the offender and require intrinsic motivational behavior change. Such interventions include: a. Mental health counseling b. Anger management classes c. Informal mentoring and behavior coaching. C. Teachers and administrators should consider utilizing engaging different types of strategies, or multiple strategies simultaneously, to deal with misbehavior, especially for 2nd or 3rd offenses. For example, in compliance with this Policy, the three types of interventions may be used in the following ways: 1. Independently (e.g., 1-day after-school detention) 2. As alternatives to each other (e.g., choice of mediation or 1-day suspension) 3. In conjunction with each other (e.g., 2-day in-school suspension along with anger management class and mediation). D. There is a continuum of I interventions listed in can range from reminders, redirection, student/teacher conferences to classroom removal, behavior contracts, suspensions, recommendations for expulsionLong Term School Removal, and/or referral to law enforcement. E. For examples of different types of interventions, see Attachment A. SECTION THREE: DISCIPLINARY OFFENSES 3-1 Offenses and Consequences A. The offenses listed below are violations of School Board Policy JK-R Student Discipline and may also be a violation of the law. consist of both rule violations and law violations. violationRule violations can be addressed through the various interventions described above in Section 2-4, and law violations can be addressed through those interventions or through the juvenile and criminal justice systems. B. The District and the Board of Education recognize that Ssome school-based offenses victimize other students, and respect the rights of those affected by such offenses. When a law violation occurs in which a student is the victim, the school must immediately notify a parent or guardian, of that student and notify him or her of describe the circumstances and how the school is responding to the incident the school’s response. In this instance If the incident is not a mandatory referral to law enforcement by the school, the parent or guardian has the option to of contacting law enforcement report the incident. , and may request that the school facilitate that process. With full respect for those rightsWhen appropriate and adequate to address the victim’s needs and the offender’s behavior, the District and the Board of Education District strongly

encourages informing parents and guardians of alternative strategies such as restorative justice approaches, mediation, and other interventions for addressing the incident. , and using such These strategies can be used instead of engaging the juvenile and criminal justice of contacting law enforcement. systems when appropriate and adequate to address both the victim's needs and the misconduct. C. 1. For the purpose of this section, those oOffenses listed below in 3-1(H) that victimize other students and are classified as Type Two or abovethrough Type Five may constitute law violations. If a school official is unsure whether a particular disciplinary offense constitutes a law violation, the DPS Safety and Security Office should be consulted. DC. When the victim of a law violation is a school or the District, or when there is no victim, incidents are to be resolved without the involvement of law enforcement whenever practicable, subject to the requirements listed below[D11]. ED. The potential consequences listed below include the appropriate references to the Discipline Ladder in Section 3-2, whether the offense can result in a recommendation of expulsionLong Term School Removal, and whether the offense can result in a "school referral." A school referral indicates when an offense may or shall result in the school contacting an outside individual or entity in response to the offense. There are five types of mandatory referrals: 1. Mandatory referral to law enforcement a. For these offenses, the student must be referred to law enforcement. i. Whenever the school notifies the police concerning student misconduct, the school must also immediately attempt to contact the parent/guardian of that student. For more information on the rights of students when being interrogated by law enforcement officials, see Policy JIH. ii. For incidents of suspected child abuse, unlawful sexual behavior, unlawful sexual contact, or indecent exposure, see also Policy JLF, JLF-R, and the DPS Child Abuse and Neglect Protocol Bulletin. Offenders under 10 years of age are referred to Denver Department of Human Services. Offenders 10 years of age or older are referred to law enforcement. b. These offenses are marked with an asterisk ("*") below. 2. Optional referral to law enforcement a. For these offenses, the student may be referred to law enforcement. However, these incidents are to be resolved without the involvement of law enforcement whenever practicable. The discretionary exercise of a school official's authority to notify law enforcement should involve the consideration of a variety of factors. Those factors include, but are not limited to: i. Whether the misconduct was particularly egregious; ii. Whether the student persists in misconduct after being told to cease such behavior, and continues to endanger the health, safety, or welfare of others; iii. The age of the student engaging in misconduct (e.g., students under the age of 10 should not be referred to law enforcement); iv. Whether the student has received prior warnings; v. Whether the student's misconduct is specifically intended to cause, or irresponsibly causes, others physical harm or endangers the health, safety, or welfare of others; vi. Whether the offense victimized another person, and that person expresses a desire to contact law enforcement. b. If a school official has any questions regarding the decision of whether to notify the police, he or she should contact DPS Safety and Security for consultation before notifying the police. c. Whenever the school notifies the police concerning student misconduct, the school must also immediately attempt to contact the parent/guardian of that student. For more information on the

rights of students when being interrogated by law enforcement officials, see Policy JIH. d. These offenses are marked with a double asterisk ("**") below. 3. Mandatory referral to Safety and Security a. For these offenses, the school shall contact DPS Safety and Security to determine whether the offense should be reported to law enforcement. b. These offenses are marked with a triple asterisk ("***") below. 4. Mandatory referral to Title IX Officer a. For these offenses, the District Title IX Officer should be contacted pursuant to DPS Policy JBB. b. These offenses are marked with a quadruple asterisk ("****") below. 5. Mandatory referral to the fire department a. For these offenses, the student must be referred to the fire department. b. These offenses are marked with five asterisks ("*****") below. DISCIPLINARY OFFENSE DISCIPLINARY OFFENSE Type One Offenses · Classroom disruption · Excessive tardiness · Picking on, bothering, or distracting other students · Use of profanity or vulgarity · Dress code violation - see Policy JICA · Minor disruption of school activity · Minor defiance of authority/disobedience (e.g., purposefully not following directions) · Verbal insults or put-downs · Use of cell phones, electronic gamesgameboys, and similar electronic devices at unauthorized times · Minor damage or defacement of school property · Tobacco offenses - see Policy JICG[WU12] · Unauthorized use of school equipment · Gambling[WU13] · Minor physical aggression with another student (e.g., pushing, shoving) · Scholastic dishonesty · Other minor school-based misconduct Type Two Offenses · False activation of a fire alarm***** · Possession of fireworks/firecrackers · Bullying: Level I (e.g., verbal and written aggression or intimidation)- see Policy JICDE CONSEQUENCES CONSEQUENCES For Type One offenses, school officials shall refer to Level A of the Discipline Ladder (see Section 3-2 of this policy). If similar violations occur during the same school year, the intervention moves to the next level on the ladder (e.g., from Level A to Level B, and so on). Students shall not be recommended for expulsionLong Term School Removal for Type One offenses. The only exception to this is that persistent misconduct resulting in suspensions can lead to the student being declared "habitually disruptive," for which the student will be recommended for expulsionLong Term School Removal. See Section 6-7 of this policy for more information.

For Type Two offenses, school officials shall refer to Level D of the Discipline Ladder (see Section 3-2 of this policy). If similar violations occur during the same school year, the intervention moves to a higher level on the

· Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level I (e.g., verbal and written harassment) - see Policy JBBA · Sexual harassment: Level I (e.g., verbal and written harassment)**** - see Policy JBB · Consensual but inappropriate physical contact · Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti (under $500) · Severe defiance of authority/disobedience (e.g., demonstrating gross disrespect for school personnel) · Trespassing · Theft from an individual (under $500) · Other school-based misconduct that disrupts the school environment · Recurring Type One offenses (after going through Levels A through C of the Discipline Ladder (see Section 3-2 of this Policy)) Type Three Offenses · Bullying: Level II (e.g., physical acts of aggression or intimidation and repeat Level I behavior) - see Policy JICDE · Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level II (e.g., acts of physical harassment and repeat Level I behavior) - see Policy JBBA · Sexual harassment: Level II (e.g., acts of physical harassment and repeat Level I behavior)**** - (Policies JBB and JLF should be referenced to determine whether the student's behavior rose to the level of an offense that must be reported to law enforcement or the Denver Department of Human Services.) · Fighting: Level I (may include incidents that result in minor injuries like cuts, scrapes, and bloody noses) · Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol - see Policies JICH, JICH-R · Possession of alcohol or unauthorized (but legal) drugs · Possession of illegal drugs** · Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti ($500 - $5000)**

ladder (e.g., from Level D to Level E, and so on). Students shall not be recommended for expulsionLong Term School Removal for Type Two offenses. The only exception to this is that persistent misconduct resulting in suspensions can lead to the student being declared "habitually disruptive," for which the student will be recommended for expulsionLong Term School Removal. See Section 6-7 of this policy for more information. A student may be referred to law enforcement for the offense of "trespassing" but only if, after being asked to leave the school campus, the trespassing student refuses.

For Type Three offenses, school officials shall refer to Level E of the Discipline Ladder (see Section 3-2 of this policy). If similar violations occur during the same school year, the intervention moves to a higher level on the ladder (e.g., from Level E to Level F). Students shall not be recommended for expulsionLong Term School Removal for Type Three offenses. The only exception to this is that persistent misconduct resulting in suspensions can lead to the student being declared "habitually disruptive," for which the student will be recommended for expulsionLong Term School Removal. See Section 6-7 of this policy for more information.

· Theft from an individual ($500 - $5000) · Other school-based misconduct that substantially disrupts the school environment · Recurring Type Two offenses For Type Four offenses, school officials shall refer to Level F of the Discipline Ladder. If the · Arson misconduct has seriously endangered the · Fighting: Level II (including incidents with welfare or safety of other students or school significant injuries, but which do not rise to the personnel, and the student's continued level of the Type Five offense "1st or 2nd degree presence in the school constitutes a significant assault")*** (Note: will be classified as 3rd safety risk, the student may be recommended degree assault for reporting purposes) for expulsionLong Term School Removal. · Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti (over $5000)** Persistent misconduct resulting in suspensions · Theft from an individual (over $5000) can lead to the student being declared · Possession of an explosive (non"habitually disruptive." "Habitual disruption" fireworks/firecrackers) that seriously endangers is not an independent offense, but rather refers the welfare or safety of other students or school to a classificaition under state law in which personnel* persistent misconduct at any level can result in · Willfully causing damage to the property of a the student being declared "habitually school employee* disruptive," for which the student may be · Assault, harassment, or false allegation of recommended for expulsionLong Term School abuse against a school employee* Removal. See section 6-7 of Policy JK-R for · Hazing activities (e.g., forcing prolonged more information. physical activity, forcing excessive consumption of any substance, forcing prolonged deprivation of sleep, food, or drink, or any other behavior which recklessly endangers the health or safety of an individual for purposes of initiation into any student group) ** · Child Abuse * · Unlawful Sexual Behavior and/or Unlawful Sexual Contact, and/or Indecent Exposure * · Witness Intimidation or Retaliation * · Other student behavior presenting an active or ongoing danger to the welfare or safety of school occupants* · Recurring Type Three offenses** Type Four Offenses · Habitual disruption (see Section 4-3 of this policy; habitually disruptive students are eligible for expulsionLong Term School Removal, though not for referral to law enforcement)

Type Five Offenses · Robbery* · First or second degree assault, and sexual assault* · Sale or distribution of, or intent to sell or distribute, unauthorized drugs or controlled substances* · Carrying, bringing, using, or possessing a knife or dangerous weapon without the authorization of the school or District (including any firearm or firearm facsimile that could reasonably be mistaken for an actual firearm, spring action or compressed air devices such as BB guns, fixed-blade knives with blades longer than 3", pocket knives with blades longer than 3.5", spring-loaded knives, and any other objects used or intended to be used to inflict death or serious bodily injury[WU14])* TYPE SIX OFFENSE  Firearm

The Discipline Ladder does not apply to Type Five Offenses. Students who commit these offenses are to be given a 3-10 day out-ofschool suspension and, as required by state law, there will be a recommendation for expulsionLong Term School Removal and notification of law enforcement.

Mandatory request for an Long Term School Removal hearing review, mandatory Long Term School Removal hearing

E. DPS Safety and Security shall develop a list of school-based offenses that also constitute criminal violations. These violations must be reported to law enforcement to comply with statutory requirements. Each school, through its principal and/or designee, shall submit a written report of all such crimes, or suspected crimes, and submit them to DPS Safety and Security for District-wide compilation and prompt reporting to law enforcement[WU15]. F. What follows is a list of disciplinary offenses and the consequences that shall result from them. 3-2 Discipline Ladder A. Six levels of intervention are defined in the discipline ladder. Disciplinary action should begin and be resolved at the lowest level possible, consistent with the nature of the violation. If similar violations continue, the intervention moves to a higher level on the ladder (e.g., from Level A to Level B). It is the intent of this policy that disciplinary offenses or violations are cumulative for a current school year. Past school years' referrals of a student should generally not be considered in determining the maximum consequence or ladder level for a disciplinary offense or violation during a current school year. B. The discipline ladder is used to provide students with support so as to avoid future disciplinary actioninterventions for students to increase classroom engagement and prosocial behavior. At all levels of the disciplinary referral ladder, interventions considered may include any of the types referenced above in Section 2-4 of this policy. C. See Attachment A for examples of different types of interventions, Attachment B for a simplified version of the Discipline Matrix, and Attachment C for a simplified version of the Discipline Ladder.

Discipline Ladder Level A - Teacher/Student • The student is provided an opportunity to tell his/her version of the incident. • The teacher or designated staff counsels with the student. • One or more interventions are initiated as appropriate. • Any interventions will be documented. Level B - Teacher/Student/Parent • The student is provided an opportunity to tell his/her version of the incident. • The teacher or designated staff notifies the student's parent/guardian. • The teacher counsels with the student and, if possible, the parent/guardian. • One or more interventions are initiated as appropriate. • Any interventions will be documented. Level C - Teacher/Support Staff/Student/Parent • If intervention at Level B has not been successful, the teacher or designated staff can determine whether to involve a social worker, nurse, guidance counselor, psychologist, or any other member of the school's support staff. • The student is provided an opportunity to tell his/her version of the incident. • The parent/guardian is notified. • The teacher and any member of the support staff who has been involved will conference with the student and, if possible, the parent/guardian to provide support for correcting the misbehavior. If possible, all of the student's teachers will be included in the conference. • One or more interventions are initiated as appropriate. • Any referrals or interventions will be documented. Level D - Administrative Level Referral • The student is referred to the appropriate administrator or designated staff person. • Documentation of the steps taken to intervene and change the student's behavior is provided. • The student is provided an opportunity to tell his/her version of the incident. • The administrator or designated staff person schedules a conference with the parent/guardian and determines if further consultation with support personnel is necessary. • One or more interventions are initiated as appropriate. • If necessary, in-school suspension of up to three days may be utilized (see Section 6-2 of this policy for more details). • School officials should consider developing a behavior intervention plan for the student (in some cases, such a plan might be mandatory; see Section 5-3 of this policy). • Referrals and interventions will be documented. Level E - Suspension Options • The student is referred to the appropriate administrator or designated staff person. • Documentation of the steps taken to intervene and change the student's behavior is provided. • The student is provided an opportunity to tell his/her version of the incident. • The administrator or designated staff person schedules a conference with the parent/guardian

and determines if further consultation with support personnel is necessary. • One or more interventions are initiated as appropriate. • If previous interventions have not been successful, the principal or principal's designee may consider the use of an in-school suspension of 1-3 days or a one-day out-of-school suspension (see Sections 6-2, 6-3, and 6-4 of this policy regarding the use of suspensions). • Elementary school students shall not receive out-of-school suspensions for Type One offenses. • School officials should consider developing a behavior intervention plan for the student (in some cases, such a plan might be mandatory; see Section 5-3 of this policy). • Upon return to school after suspension, further steps to encourage positive behavior are to be considered. Level F - Additional Suspension Options • The student is referred to the appropriate administrator or designated staff person. • Documentation of the steps taken to intervene and change the student's behavior is provided. • The student is provided an opportunity to tell his/her version of the incident. • The administrator or designated staff person schedules a conference with the parent/guardian and determines if further consultation with support personnel is necessary. • One or more interventions are initiated as appropriate. • If previous interventions have not been successful, the principal or principal's designee may issue an additional 1-3 day in-school suspension and/or a 1-3 day out-of-school suspension (see Sections 6-2, 6-3, and 6-4 of this policy regarding the use of suspensions). • Elementary school students shall not receive out-of-school suspensions for Type One offenses. • School officials should consider developing a behavior intervention plan for the student (in some cases, such a plan might be mandatory, see Section 5-3 of this policy). • Persistent misconduct can result in the student being declared "habitually disruptive," for which the student will be may be recommended for expulsionLong Term School Removal. See Section 6-7 of this policy for more information. • Upon return to school after suspension, further steps to encourage positive prosocial behavior are to be consideredmust be considered. SECTION FOUR: DISRUPTIVE STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM 4-1 Removal from Classroom[WU16] A. The District acknowledges the important role and responsibility of teachers in an effective discipline plan. A classroom free of disruption is essential for learning. When a teacher judges it necessary to protect the instructional process, he or she may remove a disruptive student from class to an alternative setting. The Board of Education defines "Classroom Disruption" as a willful and substantial disobedience or open and persistent defiance, or repetitive interfering with the school's or teacher's ability to provide an appropriate learning environment in the classroom which cannot be managed through effective classroom management and/or the intervention strategies identified in this policy. B. In the event a student is removed from the classroom, the teacher shall see that the student has his or her textbooks and class work to complete assignments. Each School Leadership Team ("SLT[WU17]") should collaborate with the school's principal to formulate a plan regarding alternative setting(s) for students removed from a classroom by a teacher. The student will be returned to class only after the teacher has been consulted and a conference has been held

with the student. As soon as reasonably possible the teacher or school principal (or designee) will contact the parent or legal guardian regarding the removal and request his or her attendance at a conference, if appropriate. C. A behavior plan may be developed at this time, but must be developed after the second removal of the student from the class. The plan should be consistent with the building disciplinary plan. Conditions under which students will be returned to class after the second removal, including the time period which should expire before the student is returned, shall be part of the behavior plan if developed. A referral to the school intervention team (with adequate documentation) is appropriate. The student will be returned to class only after the teacher has been consulted and a conference has been held with the student. D. Upon the third removal (with the exception of students with an active IEP), the student may be removed from the teacher's class for the remainder of the term. A referral to the school intervention team (with adequate documentation) is appropriate. Whether the student will be placed in a different education setting or suspended shall be consistent with this policy and IDEA regulations. E. In the disciplinary plan the SLT (or designee) will incorporate the requirements of CRS 22-32-109.1 and Board policy concerning disorderly conduct toward, harassment of and making knowingly a false accusation of child abuse against a teacher. In implementing the disciplinary plan a teacher shall be protected from civil or criminal liability as provided by CRS 22-32-109.1 (9). F. If a principal has evidence a teacher is referring an excessive number of students for disciplinary reasons, the principal shall review the classroom practices with the teacher and try to determine if a more preventive approach is possible through change in practice, or if the teacher would benefit from staff development. However, this concern shall not be utilized as a reason for returning a student to class who has been excluded by the teacher without the conference referred to above. SECTION FIVE: SUSPENSION AND EXPULSIONLONG TERM SCHOOL REMOVAL PREVENTION 5-1 General A. Alternatives such as restorative or therapeutic interventions should be utilized to help students who are at risk of suspension or expulsionLong Term School Removal before such disciplinary measures become necessary. B. The principal of each school or a designee shall work with the professional staff to[WU18] identify students who are at risk of suspension or expulsionLong Term School Removal. Among those students who may be at risk are those who have been or are likely to be declared habitually truant or habitually disruptive. C. At-risk students could be defined as those students with previous behavioral problems incidents or students who were have been suspended, and/or expelled, or removed from class at any point in the last calendar year.. 5-2 Behavior Intervention Plans A. The use of behavior intervention plans (Behavior Contract or Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan) to prevent or correct persistent discipline problems is strongly encouraged. The goals of the plan are to address the student's disruptive behavior and

educational needs, and emphasize the importance of maintaining the child's enrollment in school. B. To develop the plan, the principal or a designee will arrange for a meeting with the student, the student's parent/guardian, and any members of the staff whom the principal or designee believes should attend. The purpose of the meeting will be to address the reasons for the student's disruptive behavior and cooperatively to establish goals, objectives, and timelines to modify such behaviorfor modifying behavioral progress. C. A written behavior plan will be prepared that addresses the student's disruptive behavior, educational needs, and the steps necessary to keep the child in school. Functional behavioral assessments (see Attachment D) are encouraged in developing the plan. The plan will include incentives for good behavior and consequences if the student is disruptive in violation of the plan. The behavioral plan shall include a description of the support and educational services that will be provided by the school to help the student avoid future suspensions and expulsionLong Term School Removal. Functional behavioral assessments (see Attachment D) are necessary for developing the plan for a special education student. The Behavior Contract is the plan developed for general education students (Attachment E[WU19]) 1. The District must work with the student's parent or guardian in providing these services. 2. Such services may be provided through agreements with appropriate local governmental agencies, community-based organizations, and institutions of higher education[WU20]. D. Every effort will be provided for parent/guardian and teacher(s) input and involvement in the contract's development of the behavior plan. Notification of the plan will be presented to the parent/guardian in a language he or she understands. E. The parent/guardian, student, and the principal or designee should sign the plancontract. F. Every effort will be made to ensure that a plan of services is in place and acted uponimplemented before any action is taken to suspend or expel a student, barring emergency situations in which immediate disciplinary action is necessary to ensure the safety of the school and its occupants. 5-3 Mandatory Behavior Intervention Plans A. There are two situations in which a behavior intervention plan must be developed: when a student has been twice removed from class for being disruptive; and when a student receives a suspension that counts toward being declared a "habitually disruptive student." 1. See Section 6-7 for more information on "habitually disruptive students." SECTION SIX: SUSPENSIONS OR AND EXPULSIONLONG TERM SCHOOL REMOVALS 6-1 General A. Suspensions, both in-school and out-of-school, are only to be given in accordance with Section 3-1 of this policy. B. A student may not be suspended for conduct that occurs off of school property and outside the school day unless the conduct substantially disrupts, or will substantially disrupt, the school environment, or seriously endangers the welfare or safety of other students or school personnel. In this instance, the provisions in Section 3-1 of this policy shall be followed. C. Students who are suspended may not participate in extracurricular activities or school sponsored events during the period of the suspension. However, students on suspension during the administration of state assessments shall be provided an opportunity to take the test and may be allowed to participate in related test preparation activities, upon approval by the school

principal or a designee. D. The school shall provide the student with the opportunity to earn equivalent grades and credits as other students during the student's suspension, and the ability to make-up tests, final examinations, and complete class and homework assignments without penalty while on suspension or within a reasonable time following the completion of the suspension. The intent of this provision is to provide an opportunity for the student to successfully reintegrate into the educational program of the district following the period of suspension. 6-2 In-School Suspensions A. Students with consistently problematic behavior patterns should not be allowed to disrupt the educational process; yet when these students are suspended from out-of school it often adds to the problems of the students, the school, and the community. Therefore, the District and the Board of Education endorse the concept of in-school suspension. B. In-school suspensions allows students the opportunity to complete coursework and receive appropriate interventions. The purpose of in-school suspension is to provide a more effective means of discipline than detention or out-of-school suspension. By using in-school suspension, students should not fall behind on school assignments, but should still learn from their mistakes and misbehavior. All in-school suspensions shall be imposed in a manner that is consistent with students' due process rights, as outlined in this and other policies. The following guidelines shall be observed: 1. Students shall be assigned to a designated in-school supervisor. special class, if available, where they shall be adequatThey will be adequately supervised at all times. The in-school suspension supervisor shall ensuresee that each student has appropriate assignments, necessary and materials, and identified supports from his/her regular teachers. 2. The principal or a designee shall notify the parents/guardians immediately at once by telephone if their child has been assigned to anplaced under in-school suspension. If the parent/guardian cannot be reached by phone, or if requested by the parent/guardian, there shall be a written notification in a language the parent/guardian can understand[WU21]. Reasons for the in-school suspension shall be given, and a conference may be scheduled prior to the student's readmission to regular class. 6-3 Out-of-school Suspensions A. Students can only be suspended out-of-school if they commit a Type Three, Type Four, or Type Five offense (see Section 3-1 of this policy), or if they have reached Level E in the Discipline Ladder (see Section 3-2 of this policy). B. Elementary school students shall not receive out-of-school suspensions for Type One offenses (see Section 3-2 of this policy[WU22]). 6-4 Procedures for Out-of-school Suspensions A. The Board of Education delegates to each school principal, or to a person designated in writing by the principal, the authority to suspend a student out of school in a manner consistent with this policy. In exercising this authority, the principal or designee must follow the procedures prescribed to afford due process. B. Before a student is suspended, he or she has the right to an informal conference with the principal or designee. At the conference, the student must: 1. Be allowed to call a parent or guardian, and have the parent or guardian attend the conference

if they are able to within a reasonable amount of time. 2. Be informed of the charges and evidence against him or her. 3. Have an opportunity to respond to the charges, verbally or in writing, and present his or her version of events. 4. Be informed of the right not to submit a written statement, if a written statement is requested. 5. Have an opportunity to present evidence in his or her defense, including the right to have his or her witnesses interviewed by the principal or designee. C. It is best practice for the principal, or principal's designee, to interview all known witnesses and to review all evidence prior to making a determination regarding suspensions. D. If, after the informal conference, the principal or designee decides to suspend the student out of school, the school must make a reasonable attempt to contact the parent or guardian at once by phone. The school must also provide a written notice of suspension in a language[WU23] that the parent/guardian can understand. Both the oral and written notices must inform the parent/guardian that the student has been suspended, and must include the grounds for the suspension, the period of the suspension, and offer to schedule a time and place for the parent/guardian to meet with the principal or designee to review the suspension prior to or concurrent with reinstatement. It must also state that make-up work will be provided during the period of suspension, and that the student has the right to appeal the suspension and how to do so. E. If an emergency requires immediate removal of the student from school, the informal hearing shall follow as soon after the student's removal as practicable. If immediate removal from school is necessary, the school shall immediately notify the parent/guardian to determine the best way to transfer custody[WU24] of the student to the parent/guardian. F. If the suspension will count toward declaration of the student as "habitually disruptive," the parent/guardian and student must be so notified in writing, as discussed in Section 6-7 of this Policy. G. Upon reinstatement from suspension of any student, the principal or designee shall attempt to meet with the student's parent or legal guardian to discuss the student's behavior and the possible need for a behavior intervention plan (as discussed in Sections 5-2 and 5-3) for the student in an effort to increase school engagement and prosocial behavior.prevent further disciplinary action. H. For Type Three offenses (see Section 3-1 of this policy), if the student's presence in school presents a danger or severe disruption to the school and its occupants or additional time is needed to further investigate the incident, the principal has the option of extending the maximum oneday out-of-school suspension available under Section 3-1 by up to two days, for a total of three days. I. For Type Four offenses (see Section 3-1 of this policy), if there has been a recommendation for expulsionLong Term School Removal, or a request for an extension of the suspension period made to the Superintendent or designee through Section 6-6 of this policy, the principal has the option of extending the maximum three-day out-of-school suspension available under Section 31 by up to two days, for a total of five days, if deemed necessary for the safety of the school. 6-5 Out-of-school Suspension Appeal Rights A. The student must be informed of his or her right to appeal an out-of-school suspension with the principal or designee in the notice of suspension.

B. The student shall have the following rights in the suspension appeal process: 1. The right to request a meeting with the principal or designee[WU25]. 2. The right to a representative to be present at the meeting. 3. The right of the student, parent/guardian, and/or representative to address the principal or designee on the evidence and the appropriateness of the penalty. 4. The right to submit, or have a parent, guardian, or representative submit, a dissenting opinion regarding the suspension, and have it included in the student's disciplinary file. 5. The right to review, or have a parent, guardian, or representative review, any evidence relied upon in the suspension decision and which is reasonably available for production. The district shall not be obligated to produce evidence which would be in violation of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act or without an individual(s) consent or Court order. C. The principal or designee will: 1. Review all written documents. 2. Make a determination of whether there was sufficient evidence to find: a. That the alleged violation occurred, and b. Whether the penalty imposed was appropriate. 3. Provide a written decision within five days of the meeting. 4. If it is determined that no violation occurred, all school records pertaining to the suspension will be expunged from the student's file, and a corrected copy of the student's file will be provided to the student's parent or guardian by mail. 5. If the penalty was not appropriate to the violation, all school records will be revised to indicate only the facts leading to the reduced penalty imposed by the principal or designee. D. If the principal or designee denies the appeal, the student may pursue a second appeal of the suspension to a Superintendent designee. E. The student shall have the following rights in the second appeal process: 1. The right to request a meeting with a Superintendent designee. 2. The right to a representative to be present at the meeting. 3. The right of the student, parent/guardian, and/or representative to address the Superintendent designee on the evidence and the appropriateness of the penalty. 4. The right to submit, or have a parent, guardian, or representative submit, a dissenting opinion regarding the suspension. F. The Superintendent designee will: 1. Review all written documents. 2. Make a determination of whether there was sufficient evidence to find: a. That the alleged violation occurred, and b. Whether the penalty imposed was appropriate. 3. Provide a written decision within five days of the meeting. 4. If it is determined that no violation occurred, all school records pertaining to the suspension will be expunged from the student's file, and a corrected copy of the student's file will be provided to the student's parent or guardian by mail. 5. If the penalty was not appropriate to the violation, all school records will be revised to indicate only the facts leading to the reduced penalty imposed by the Superintendent designee.

6-6 General Education Student Extensions toof Out-of-school Suspensions[WU26]

A. The Board of Education delegates to the Superintendent or a designee the authority to extend a student's out-of-school suspension by up to ten (10) days as necessary for general education students, upon recommendation of the principal. The total period of suspension for general education students shall not exceed twenty-five (25) days per school year. B. A suspension shall only be extended if the student committed a Type Four or Type Five Offense (see Section 3-1 of this policy), the student's presence in school presents a danger or severe disruption to the school and its occupants, and either additional time is needed to further investigate an incident or there has been a recommendation to the Superintendent or designee to expel the student. C. If an extension of the suspension is to be recommended, the principal or a designee shall make a reasonable attempt to notify a parent/guardian immediatelyat once by telephone and shall follow up with a written notification in a language the parent/guardian can understand. Through this oral and written notification, the principal or designee shall attempt to schedule a conference with the parent/guardian to explain the reason for the extension. D. If the suspension has been extended so that the total suspension is ten (10) days or more, and there has not been a recommendation of expulsionLong Term School Removal, the student is to receive the same right to a hearing as described below in Section 6-8 of this policy. E. If a student's suspension is extended beyond a total of ten (10) days, the student must be provided with an alternative learning environment in which he or she shall have the opportunity to earn equivalent grades and credits as other students during the suspension period. 6-7 Habitually Disruptive Students A. A "habitually disruptive student" is a childa child who has been suspended out-of-school by the principal or a designee three (3) times during the course of a school year for causing a disruption in the classroom, on school grounds, in school vehicles, or at school activities or sanctioned events. B. For violations which are counted toward declaration as a habitually disruptive student, consideration will be given to whether a change in the student's schedule is appropriate to address the disruptive behavior. C. The student and parent/guardian must be notified in writing of each suspension counted toward declaring the student as habitually disruptive. The student and parent/guardian must be notified in writing and by telephone or other means at the home or the place of employment of the parent/guardian of the definition of "habitually disruptive student" and the option to recommend expulsionLong Term School Removal of such students. This written notification must be provided in a language[WU27] that the parent/legal guardian can understand. 6-8 Procedures for ExpulsionLong Term School Removal A. The Board of Education delegates to the Superintendent the authority to expel for any period up to one (1) calendar year a student who does not qualify for admission to or continued attendance in the public schools of the district. B. Procedures for expulsionLong Term School Removal of a student will be initiated by the school principal's recommendation to the Superintendent or a designee. The principal will, at the time of making such recommendation, give to the student and the student's parent/guardian written notice of the recommendation in a language that they can understand[WU28]. The notice will contain: 1. A statement of the reasons for the recommended action.

2. A statement that a hearing on the question of expulsionLong Term School Removal will be held unless waived by the student or the parent/guardian within ten (10) days after the date of the notice. 3. A statement that the student may be present at the hearing to hear the evidence, may have an opportunity to present relevant evidence, and may be accompanied by a parent/guardian and a representative of choice. C. Unless the student or parent/guardian expressly waives their right to a hearing, the Superintendent or designee shall not expel any child without a hearing at which evidence may be presented in the child's behalf by the parent, an attorney or an advocate of the parent/guardian's choice. D. Hearings will be conducted by a hearing officer, who may not be a current employee of the school, the District, or the Board of Education. At the hearing, testimony and information will be presented under oath. Technical rules of evidence will not apply. The student, parent/guardian, or representative may question individuals presenting information. 1. Written statements made by the student may not be used as evidence unless his or her parent/guardian was present at the time it was signed by the student, or school officials had made reasonable attempts to have the parent/guardian present at the time of signing. E. The Superintendent or designee will, following review of the recommended action and the report of the hearing officer take action on the recommended expulsionLong Term School Removal. A written opinion notifying the student and his or her parent/guardian of the action taken shall be issued within five (5) days of the hearing. The notice shall be in a language that the parent/guardian can understand[WU29]. F. The Superintendent or a designee will notify the student and his or her parent/guardian of their right to appeal the decision to the Board of Education within ten (10) days of the receipt of the notice. The notice shall be in a language that the parent/guardian can understand[WU30]. G. If an appeal is timely requested[WU31], the Board of Education will review the record and offer the opportunity for representatives of the District and the student to make statements to the Board of Education. The Board of Education will: 1. Make a determination of whether there was sufficient evidence to find: a. That the alleged violation occurred, and b. Whether the penalty imposed was appropriate. 2. Provide a written decision within five days of the meeting. 3. If it is determined that no violation occurred, all school records pertaining to the expulsionLong Term School Removal will be expunged from the student's file, and a corrected copy of the student's file will be provided to the student's parent or guardian by mail. 4. If the penalty was not appropriate to the violation, all school records will be revised to indicate only the facts leading to the reduced penalty imposed by the Board of Education. H. Information will be provided to the parent/guardian of every expelled student regarding educational alternatives available during the period of expulsionLong Term School Removal. If the parent/guardian desires a home-based educational program, curricula at the appropriate grade level will be made available. SECTION SEVEN: ANNUAL REVIEW AND DISCIPLINE COMMITTEES 7-1 Annual Review and Report A. Both individual schools and the District will evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of the

school discipline plan using school disciplinary data disaggregated by race, ethnicity, and sex of student. This will allow schools and the District to: identify areas of need; target areas of concern; access professional development, supports, and services; and revise school procedures as needed. B. State required annual data will align to the state reporting requirements. Schools will annually review their school climate and submit a written report in a form to be prescribed to the Board of Education, the Superintendent, and the District School Improvement and Accountability Council; based on the review, schools will make changes consistent with the intent of this and other policies. C. The review will include the following: 1. Intervention and prevention strategies. 2. The number of referrals, in-school suspensions, out-of-school suspensions, expulsionLong Term School Removals, tickets, and arrests, disaggregated by race, ethnicity, age, grade, disability, and gender of the students, where available. 3. Differences in referrals among staff members. 4. The extent to which the policy, including but not limited to disciplinary action,action is consistently applied to all students. D. Based on the review, schools will make changes consistent with the intent of this and other policies. 7-2 Discipline Committees A. Schools are also encouraged to establish a discipline committee of school personnel, parents, and students to develop, monitor, and evaluate school discipline policy and school climate. The use of school discipline data is recommended in this process B. DPS will request any information that government agencies may be required to collect around student referrals to law enforcement on an annual basis EFFECTIVE DATE October 1, 1996 Adopted September 19, 1996 Revised: August 21, 2008 Revised: October 15, 2009 Revised: September 15, 2011

LEGAL REFERENCES: C.R.S. 22-32-109.1 (general policies on student conduct, safety, and welfare) C.R.S. 22-32-126(5) (disclosure of disciplinary information) C.R.S. 22-33-105 (suspension, expulsionLong Term School Removal, and denial of admission) C.R.S. 22-33-106 (grounds for suspension, expulsionLong Term School Removal, and denial of admission) C.R.S. 22-33-106.3 (student statements used in expulsionLong Term School Removal hearings) C.R.S. 22-33-202 (identification of at-risk students) C.R.S. 18-3-202 through 204 (definitions of first, second, and third degree assault) C.R.S. 18-8-704 through 706 (witness intimidation and retaliation)

C.R.S. 19-3-304 (Persons Required to Report Child Abuse / Neglect) C.R.S. 19-1-103 (Child Abuse) C.R.S. 16-22-102 (Unlawful Sexual Behavior, Unlawful Sexual Contact, Indecent Exposure) Family Educational and Privacy Rights (FERP) 20 U.S.C. 1232g(h))

Document A
There are three types of interventions for student misbehavior: Administrative/Legal, Restorative, and Skill-based/Therapeutic. When misbehavior occurs, the circumstances must be investigated and facts gathered to determine appropriate interventions and the type of response. Interventions should provide students with an opportunity to learn from their mistakes, and to quickly and successfully reengage in the learning process. The interventions should balance the needs of the student, the needs of those directly affected by the behavior, and the needs of the overall school community.

FEW STUDENTS (1-5% WHO NEED INTENSIVE INTERVENTIONS
Administrative / Legal        In-School Intervention Out-of-School Planning Expulsion Request Referral to Denver Department of Human Services - for under the age of 10 yr. old Referral to Denver Police Department – for 10 yr. old and over PACE (middle school) 15-day referral    Restorative Family/community group conferencing Intentional Restorative Approach for reintegrating a student into the classroom Attendance Mediation Workshops  Skill-based / Therapeutic Student meets with school psychologist/school social worker/school counselor Design, implement and progress monitor a behavior plan Student works 1:1 with a mentor Student works with a school-based agency works individually with student

  

SOME STUDENTS (5-10%) WHO NEED TARGETED INTERVENTIONS
Administrative / Legal    Short-Term removal from classroom In-School Intervention Out-of-School Planning     Restorative Restorative Approaches Class meeting Mediation/Conflict resolution Intentional Restorative Approach for reintegrating a student into the classroom      Skill-based / Therapeutic Research-based social skill curriculum No-Nonsense Nurturing Cultural Pedagogy Small group for interpersonal skill-building Behavior plan

ALL STUDENTS (100%) NEED UNIVERSAL INTERVENTIONS
Administrative / Legal     Develop and implement policy governing student conduct and discipline Use SB Policies JK and JK-R as the foundational documents for student conduct Provide information on BOE JK-R Develop Multi-tiered Systems of Support     Restorative Restorative Approaches Mediation/conflict resolution In-class peace circles Mentoring    Skill-based / Therapeutic Multi-tiered Systems of Support Bully Prevention Teaching school-wide expectations

Attachment B (Draft)

Denver Public Schools Discipline Matrix
Discipline Ladder Offense Type Six Firearm N/A Type Five Robbery First or second degree assault, and sexual assault Sale or distribution of, or intent to sell, unauthorized drugs or controlled substance Dangerous Weapon: Pellet gun, BB gun, or other device, whether operational or not, designed to propel projectiles by spring action or compressed air Dangerous Weapon: Fixed blade knife with a blade that exceeds three (3.0) inches in length Dangerous Weapon: Spring-loaded knife or a pocket knife with a blade that exceeds three and one-half (3.5) inches in length Dangerous Weapon: Any object, device, instrument, material, or substance, whether animate or inanimate that is used or intended to be used to inflict death or serious bodily injury Type Four Arson
7 2

1

Reference

Recommendation For Expulsion
Mandatory Expulsion Hearing & 5 Expulsion

School Referral Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Mandatory Review Mandatory Review Mandatory Review Mandatory Review Mandatory Review Mandatory Review Mandatory Review

5 5 5 5

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement
5

5 5

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5

5

Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F
6

Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement & 5 Fire Department Mandatory Referral to Safety and Security Optional Referral to Law Enforcement N/A
10 5 4 4

Fighting: Level II (including incidents with significant injuries, but which do not rise to the level of the Type Five offense “1st or 2nd degree assault”) Destruction or theft of school property (over $5000) Theft from an individual (over $5000) Possession of an explosive (non-fireworks/firecrackers) that seriously endangers the welfare or safety of others Willfully causing damage to the property of a school employee Assault, harassment, or false allegation of abuse against a school employee Hazing activities Child Abuse Unlawful sexual behavior, unlawful sexual contact, and indecent exposure Witness Intimidation or Retaliation Other student behavior presenting an active or ongoing danger to the welfare or safety of school occupants Habitual disruption3 Recurring Type Three offenses
8

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement Optional Referral to Law Enforcement
4

5 5

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement 11 and/or Denver Dept. of Human Services Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement and/or Denver Dept. of Human Services 11 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement N/A
10 4 5 5 5

5

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement Optional Referral to Law Enforcement N/A N/A
10 10

Level F Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C

Type Three Bullying: Level II - see Policy JICDE Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level II - see Policy JBBA Sexual harassment: Level II - see Policy JBB Fighting: Level I (may include incidents that result in minor injuries like cuts, scrapes, and bloody noses, etc.) Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol - see Policies JICH, JICH-R Possession of alcohol or unauthorized (but legal) drugs Possession of illegal drugs Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti ($500 - $5000) Theft from an individual ($500 - $5000) Other school-based misconduct that substantially disrupts the school environment Recurring Type Two offenses Type Two False activation of a fire alarm Possession of fireworks/firecrackers Bullying: Level I - see Policy JICDE Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level I - see Policy JBBA Sexual harassment: Level I - see Policy JBB Consensual but inappropriate physical contact Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti (under $500) Severe defiance of authority/disobedience Trespassing Theft from an individual (under $500) Other school-based misconduct that disrupts the school environment Recurring Type One offenses (after going through Levels A through C) Type One Classroom disruption Excessive tardiness Picking on, bothering, or distracting other students Use of profanity or vulgarity Dress code violation - see Policy JICA Disrupting school activity Minor defiance of authority/disobedience Verbal insults or put-downs Use of cell phones, Gameboys, and similar electronic devices at unauthorized times Minor damage or defacement of school property Tobacco offenses - see Policy JICG Unauthorized use of school equipment Gambling Minor physical aggression with another student (e.g., pushing, shoving) Scholastic dishonesty Other minor school-based misconduct
1 2 3

Mandatory Referral to Title IX Officer 10 N/A N/A
10 10

N/A Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement 4 Optional Referral to Law Enforcement N/A N/A N/A
10 10 10

Mandatory Referral to Fire Department 10 N/A N/A N/A
10 10

Mandatory Referral to Title IX Officer 10 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
10 10 9

N/A

10 10 10

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Levels A-C Note that this sheet is merely a summary of Section Three of Policy JK-R. Please refer to the full policy for more detail. Gang-related activity at school is covered under the offenses listed in Type One through Type Five.

"Habitual disruption" is not an independent offense, but rather refers to a classification under state law in which persistent misconduct at any level can result in the student being declared “habitually disruptive,” for which the student will be recommended for expulsion. See Section 4-2 of Policy JK-R for more information. For these offenses, incidents are to be resolved without the involvement of law enforcement whenever possible. See Section 7-3 of Policy JK-R for more information. This consequence is required under state law. Recurring Type One offenses can eventually proceed to Type Two and Type Three, but shall never result in referral to law enforcement.

4 5 6 7

For Type Four offenses, if there has been a recommendation for expulsion, or a request for an extension of the suspension period made to the Superintendent or designee through Section 6-6 of this Policy, the principal has the option of extending the maximum three-day out-of-school suspension available under Section 3-1 by up to two days, for a total of five days, if deemed necessary for the safety of the school. See Section 6-4. 8 For Type Three offenses, if the student’s presence in school presents a danger or severe disruption to the school and its occupants or additional time is needed to further investigate the incident, the principal has the option of extending the maximum one-day out-of-school suspension available under Section 3-1 by up to two days, for a total of three days. See Section 6-4. If, after being asked to leave the school campus, the student refuses, then law enforcement may be notified. 10 Note that this column refers to the actions available to the school in response to a disciplinary incident, and does not address or limit the options available to individuals who may be victims of criminal activity. See Section 3-1 for more information.
11 9

See Policy JLF, JLF-R, and DPS Child Abuse and Neglect Protocol Bulletin. Offenders under 10 years of age are referred to Denver Department of Human Services. Offenders 10 years of age or older are referred to law enforcement.

Document C

Denver Public Schools Discipline Ladder
Building Leader Managed Levels Type Four Offenses Level F 1. Repeat Level D steps 1 through 3 2. Refer to and utilize the Intervention Guide for the intervention for the specific offense 3. Engage the student in a restorative approach (as appropriate) 4. Construct and implement a Behavior Plan (general education students) or Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan (students with a disability) 5. Building Leader may give 0 to 3 days In-School Intervention (ISI) and/or 0 to 3 days Out-of-School Planning (OSP) when safety concerns exist and planning time is needed to reintegrate student into learning setting 6. Building Leader may request approval of an extension to an Out-of-School Planning and a review request for a possible expulsion hearing if the incident warrants the request Type Three Offenses Level E 1. Repeat Level D steps 1 through 3 2. Refer to and utilize the Intervention Guide for the intervention for the specific offense 3. Engage the student in a restorative approach (as appropriate) 4. Construct and implement a Behavior Plan (general education students) or Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan (students with a disability) 5. Building Leader may give 0 to 3 days In-School Intervention and/or 0 to 1 day Out-of-School Planning when safety concerns exist and planning time is needed to reintegrate student into learning setting (If an OSP is given, only 0 to 1 day ISI can be given) Type Two Offenses Level D 1. Documentation of interaction and intervention is provided to Building Leader by classroom teacher and/or support staff 2. Student tells his or her side of the story 3. Building Leader conferences with parent/guardian 4. Refer to and utilize the Intervention Guide for the intervention for the specific offense 5. Engage the student in a restorative approach (as appropriate) 6. Construct and implement a Behavior Plan (general education students) or Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan (students with a disability) 7. Building Leader may give In-School-Intervention of 0 to 3 days when safety concerns exist and planning time is needed to reintegrate student into learning setting

Classroom Teacher Managed Levels Type One Offenses Level C – Teacher, Support Staff, Student, Parent/Guardian 1. Level A and B have been completed 2. Teacher or designed staff member decides whether to request the support of the school psychologist, school social worker, school nurse, counselor, or any other member of the support staff 3. Teacher notifies the parent/guardian and invites them to a conference 4. Student tells his/her side of the story 5. Teacher conferences with other staff members as appropriate 6. Engage the student in a restorative approach (as appropriate) 7. Modify or construct and implement interventions as appropriate 8. Document all interactions and monitor all interventions Level B – Teacher, Student, Parent/Guardian 1. Level A has been completed 2. Student tells his/her side of the story 3. Teacher notifies the parent/guardian 4. Engage the student in a restorative approach (as appropriate) 5. Modify or construct and implement interventions as appropriate 6. Document all interactions and monitor all interventions Level A – Teacher, Student 1. Student tells his/her side of the story 2. Teacher counsels with student 3. Construct and implement interventions as appropriate 4. Document all interactions and monitor all interventions

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Attachment B

Denver Public Schools Discipline Matrix1
Discipline Ladder Offense2 Reference N/A Recommendation For Expulsion Intervention Guide Reference

School Referral Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5

Type Six
Firearm Mandatory Expulsion Hearing & Expulsion5 Request process

Type Five
Robbery First or second degree assault, and sexual assault Sale or distribution of, or intent to sell, unauthorized drugs or controlled substance Dangerous Weapon: Pellet gun, BB gun, or other device, whether operational or not, designed to propel projectiles by spring action or compressed air Dangerous Weapon: Fixed blade knife with a blade that exceeds three (3.0) inches in length Dangerous Weapon: Spring-loaded knife or a pocket knife with a blade that exceeds three and one-half (3.5) inches in length Dangerous Weapon: Any object, device, instrument, material, or substance, whether animate or inanimate that is used or intended to be used to inflict death or serious bodily injury Type Four7 Arson N/A N/A N/A N/A Mandatory Review5 Mandatory Review5 Mandatory Review5 Mandatory Review5 Request process Request process Request process Request process

N/A N/A

Mandatory Review5 Mandatory Review5

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5

Request process Request process

N/A

Mandatory Review5

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5

Request process

Level F

Optional Review

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement & Fire Department5 Mandatory Referral to Safety and Security4

1

Fighting: Level II (including incidents with significant injuries, but which do not rise to the level of the Type Five offense “1st or 2nd degree assault”) Destruction or theft of school property (over $5000) Theft from an individual (over $5000) Possession of an explosive (non-fireworks/firecrackers) that seriously endangers the welfare or safety of others Willfully causing damage to the property of a school employee Assault, harassment, or false allegation of abuse against a school employee

Level F

Optional Review

2

Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F

Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review

Optional Referral to Law Enforcement4 N/A10 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5

3 4 5 6 7

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Hazing activities Child Abuse Level F Level F Optional Review Optional Review Optional Referral to Law Enforcement4 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 and/or Denver Dept. of Human Services Unlawful sexual behavior, unlawful sexual contact, and indecent exp Level F Optional Review
11

8 9

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 and/or Denver Dept. of Human Services
11

10

Optional Review Witness Intimidation or Retaliation Other student behavior presenting an active or ongoing danger to the welfare or safety of school occupants Habitual disruption 3 Recurring Type Three offenses
6

Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement5 N/A10 Optional Referral to Law Enforcement4

11 12 13 14

Level F Level F Level F Level F

Optional Review Optional Review Optional Review

Type Three8 Bullying: Level II - see Policy JICDE Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level II - see Policy JBBA Sexual harassment: Level II - see Policy JBB Fighting: Level I (may include incidents that result in minor injuries like cuts, scrapes, and bloody noses, etc.) Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol - see Policies JICH, JICH-R Possession of alcohol or unauthorized (but legal) drugs Possession of illegal drugs Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti ($500 $5000) Theft from an individual ($500 - $5000) Other school-based misconduct that substantially disrupts the school environment Recurring Type Two offenses Type Two False activation of a fire alarm Possession of fireworks/firecrackers Bullying: Level I - see Policy JICDE Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level I - see Policy JBBA

Level E Level E

No No

N/A10 N/A10

15 16

Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level E Level D Level D Level D Level D

No No No No No No No No No No No No No

Mandatory Referral to Title IX Officer N/A10 N/A10 N/A10 Mandatory Referral to Law Enforcement Optional Referral to Law Enforcement4 N/A10 N/A
10

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

N/A10 Mandatory Referral to Fire Department N/A10 N/A N/A
10 10

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Sexual harassment: Level I - see Policy JBB Consensual but inappropriate physical contact Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti (under $500) Severe defiance of authority/disobedience Trespassing Theft from an individual (under $500) Other school-based misconduct that disrupts the school environment Recurring Type One offenses (after going through Levels A through C) Type One Classroom disruption Excessive tardiness Picking on, bothering, or distracting other students Use of profanity or vulgarity Dress code violation - see Policy JICA Disrupting school activity Minor defiance of authority/disobedience Verbal insults or put-downs Use of cell phones, Gameboys, and similar electronic devices at unauthorized times Minor damage or defacement of school property Tobacco offenses - see Policy JICG Unauthorized use of school equipment Gambling Minor physical aggression with another student (e.g., pushing, shoving) Scholastic dishonesty Other minor school-based misconduct
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D

No No No No No No No No

Mandatory Referral to Title IX Officer N/A10 N/A10 N/A10 N/A N/A N/A
9 10 10

30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

N/A10

Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C Levels A-C

No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No

N/A10 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
10 10 10 10 10 10

38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53

N/A10 N/A10 N/A10 N/A N/A N/A N/A
10 10 10 10

N/A10 N/A10

Note that this sheet is merely a summary of Section Three of Policy JK-R. Please refer to the full policy for more detail. Gang-related activity at school is covered under the offenses listed in Type One through Type Five. "Habitual disruption" is not an independent offense, but rather refers to a classification under state law in which persistent misconduct at any level can result in For these offenses, incidents are to be resolved without the involvement of law enforcement whenever possible. See Section 7-3 of Policy JK-R for more This consequence is required under state law. Recurring Type One offenses can eventually proceed to Type Two and Type Three, but shall never result in referral to law enforcement. For Type Four offenses, if there has been a recommendation for expulsion, or a request for an extension of the suspension period made to the Superintendent or For Type Three offenses, if the student’s presence in school presents a danger or severe disruption to the school and its occupants or additional time is needed to If, after being asked to leave the school campus, the student refuses, then law enforcement may be notified. Note that this column refers to the actions available to the school in response to a disciplinary incident, and does not address or limit the options available to See Policy JLF, JLF-R, and DPS Child Abuse and Neglect Protocol Bulletin. Offenders under 10 years of age are referred to Denver Department of Human

10 11

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Preface Use of In‐School Suspension and Out‐of‐School Suspension The Use of In‐School Suspension (ISS) and Out‐of‐School Suspension (OSS) are to provide planning time for  school leaders, parents, teachers, and students to investigate misbehaviors and to plan for the student's re‐ entry into school.  ISS and OSS can range between 0 and 5 days, except in situations where the  Superintendent's Designee has granted an extension of OSS.  When considering the use of ISS and OSS, strong  consideration should be given to:  a) the age of the student, b) the disciplinary history of the student, c)  whether a student has a disability, d) the seriousness of the alleged misbehavior, e) whether the alleged  violation threatened the safety of any student or staff member, f) whether a lesser intervention would  appropriately address the alleged misbehavior, and g) whether the interventions in place for the student are  reasonably calculated to address the alleged misbehavior.   Intervention Types Five and Six Mandatory All Type Five Offenses Request Process Discipline Ladder reference is not applicable.  All offenses are Mandatory Recommendations for Expulsion
Student is placed in a supervised location while the incident is being investigated (DPD may take custody of student) 

Address all safety concerns Make contact to DPS Safety & Security, DPD, or DFD (see Student Discipline Matrix for guidance) Complete OSS of Up to Five Days form Complete Mandatory Request for Extension of Suspension and Possible Expulsion Hearing form

Intervention Type Four 1

Arson 

For all Type Four Offenses, refer to Level F on the Discipline Ladder for general procedure reference Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once the extent of the damage is assessed, student and parent/guardian work with the school to  create a plan to pay for the damages and for the response of the Fire Dept to the school (if any) Student assists with the clean‐up process while being supervised Student engages with relevant members of the school community in a restorative approach. Student participates in DFD Juvenile Fire Setters Intervention Program Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

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2 Fighting: Level II Student is placed in ISS while the incident is being investigated Loss of a privilege, such as passing period if fight occurred in the hall Participation in conflict management skill building group  Student engages with relevant members of the school community in a restorative approach Create Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to avoid repetition  of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

3

Destruction of/or  Theft of School Property (over $5000)

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once the extent of the damage is assessed, student and parent/guardian work with the school to  create a plan to pay for the damages Student assists with the repair process under supervision  Student engages with relevant members of the school community in a restorative approach Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

4

Theft from an  Individual (over $5000)

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once the dollar value of the theft is established/ or the stolen items identified, a plan for paying  for the loss/or replacing the items is made with the student and parents/guardians Student participates in aggression reduction/prosocial skills builidng group Student participates in restorative approaches with appropriate members of the school community Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior

DRAFT
If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

5

Possession of an Explosive

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once dangerousness has been established, a consideration for returning the student to school  with an alternative can be made.  If serious endangerment to the welfare of others has been  determined (imminent safety risk), then consideration of continuing ISS, or for OSS, or for OSS with Request  for Extension and Possible Expulsion Hearing can be made Student's belongings are searched for explosive paraphernalia (randomly or regularly) If returning the student to school, student will particpate in an aggression reduction skill building group Student will participate in restorative approach with appropriate members of the community Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

6

Willfully causing Damage to School Employee Property

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once extent of damage is determined, plan for repayment is created with student and  parent/guardian Student participates in restorative approaches with relevant members of the school community Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

7

Assault, Harassment or False Allegation 

Student is placed in ISS during investigation (This incident type is specifically referred to in SB Policy JK‐R, Section 4‐1, paragraph E.  Please

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of Abuse Against School Employee refer to policy for specific information)

8

Hazing Activities

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once dangerousness has been established (i.e. imminent safety risk), a consideration for returning the student  to school with an alternative can be made.  If serious endangerment to the welfacre of others has been  determined, then consideration of continuing ISS, or for OSS, or for OSS with a Request for Extension and  Possible Expulsion hearing can be made If returning the student to school, student will particpate in an aggression reduction skill building group Student will participate in restorative approach with appropriate members of the school community.  NOTE:   alleged victim should not participate in a restorative approach with the offender. Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

9

Child Abuse

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once dangerousness has been established, a consideration for returning the student to school  with an alternative can be made.  If serious endangerment to the welfare of others has been  determined, then consideration of continuing ISS, or for OSS, or for OSS with request for  extension and possible expulsion hearing can be made If returning the student to school, student will particpate in an aggression reduction skill building group Student will participate in restorative approach Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior

DRAFT
If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

10

Unlawful Sexual Behavior, Unlawful  Sexual Contact, Indecent  Exposure

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once dangerousness has been established (i.e. imminent safety risk), a consideration for returning the student  to school with an alternative can be made.  If serious endangerment to the welfare of others has been  determined, then consideration of continuing ISS, or for OSS, or for OSS with Request for Extension and  Possible Expulsion Hearing can be made. If returning the student to school, student will particpate in an aggression reduction skill building group Student will participate in restorative approach with relevant members of the school community.  NOTE:   alleged victim should not participate in any restrorative approach with the alleged prepetrator Create and implement Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

11

Witness Intimidation or Retaliation

Place student in ISS while the incident is being investigated Once the investigation is complete, depending upon the severity of the aggression against the witness/es, consideration for returning the student to his/her regular schedule will be made.  If not possible, consider ISS or OSS, or OSS with Request for Extension and Possible Hearing If it is possible to return the student to the regular schedule, create and implement a Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan Consider student's participation in aggression reduction skill building group If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

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12 Other Student Behavior Presenting an Active or Ongoing Danger Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once dangerousness has been established, a consideration for returning the student to school  with an alternative can be made.  If serious endangerment (i.e. imminent safety risk) to the welfare of others has been determined, then consideration of continuing ISS, or for OSS, or for OSS with Request for  Extension and possible Expulsion Hearing can be made If returning the student to school, student will participate in a restorative approah, if deemed appropriate in  the specific case If returning the student to school, student will particpate in an aggression reduction skill building group Student's belongings are searched for items related to the incident (randomly or regularly) Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan constructed and  implemented to avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

13 14

Habitual Disruption Recurring Type  Three Offenses

Please refer to Guidance Document for Addressing Habitual Disruption Please refer to Guidance Document for Addressing Habitual Disruption

Intervention Type Three 15 Bullying: Level II2 See SB Policy JICDE

For all Type Three Offenses, refer to Level E on the Discipline Ladder for general procedure reference Student is placed in ISS while issue is being investigated Once scope of incident is established, consider returning student to class with Behavior Contract or Functional  Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that targets aggression reduction and prosocial skills  building Student participates in bullying prevention skills group Student engages in activities that contribute positively to the community (such as assisting an  adult with an office work activity) Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan constructed and  implemented to avoid repetition of this behavior

DRAFT
If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and provide parent and classroom supports for  bully prevention.  Ensure the Behavior Contract or FBA/BIP takes into account the needs of those who have  been bullied.  

16

Harassment Based on Protected Classes: Level II See SB Policy JBBA

Student is placed in ISS while issue is being investigated Once scope of incident is established, consider returning student to class with Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that targets aggression reduction and  prosocial skills building Student participates in bullying prevention skills group Student engages in activities that contribute positively to the community (such as assisting an  adult with an office work activity) Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan constructed and  implemented to avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and provide parent and classroom supports for  bully prevention.  Ensure the Behavior Contract or FBA/BIP takes into account the needs of those who have  been harassed.  

17

Sexual Harassment: Level II See SB Policy JBB

Student is placed in ISS while issue is being investigated Once scope of incident is established, consider returning student to class with Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that targets aggression reduction and  prosocial skills building Student participates in bullying prevention skills group Student engages in activities that contribute positively to the community (such as assisting an  adult with an office work activity)

If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and provide parent and classroom supports for  bully prevention.  Ensure the Behavior Contract or FBA/BIP takes into account the needs of the alleged victims.  

DRAFT
18 Fighting: Level I Student is placed in ISS while scope of incident is being investigated Loss of a privilege, such as passing period if fight occurred in the hall Participation in conflict management skill building group  Student will participate in a restorative approach, if deemed appropriate for the specific case Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan constructed and  implemented to avoid repetition of this behavior If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan and develop a re‐entry with restorative  approach.

19

Under the Influence of Drugs or Alcohol
See Policies JICH, JICH‐R

Contact school nurse or DPS Nursing Services for consultation regarding intoxication/influence If class time is lost, student will make up the lost time on the student's time Student will be referred to no‐cost/low cost drug/alcohol intervention services Create and implement a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  monitor coping Student and belongings will be searched randomly for alcohol/drugs and paraphernalia If behavior is repeated, recalculate Behavior Contract or Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior  intervention Plan.  Consider implementation of more intensive no‐cost/low‐cost services.

20

Possession of Alcohol or  Unauthorized (but legal)  Drugs

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Student will be referred to no‐cost/low cost drug/alcohol intervention services Create and implement a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  monitor coping Student and belongings will be searched randomly for alcohol/legal and illegal drugs, paraphernalia If behavior is repeated, recalculate Behavior Contract or Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior  intervention Plan.  Consider implementation of more intensive no‐cost/low‐cost intervention.

21

Possession of  Illegal Drugs

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Student will be referred to no‐cost/low cost drug/alcohol intervention services

DRAFT
Create and implement a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan to  monitor coping Student will participate in a restorative approach Student and belongings will be randomly searched for alcohol/legal and illegal drugs, paraphernalia If behavior is repeated, recalculate Behavior Contract or Functional Behavior Assessment/Behavior  intervention Plan.  Consider implementation of more intensive no‐cost/low‐cost intervention.

22

Destruction or Theft of School Property ($500 ‐ $5000)

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once the extent of the damage/theft is assessed, student and parent/guardian work with the school to  create a plan to pay for the damages Student assists with the repair/replacement process under supervision  Student engages with relevant members of the school community in a restorative approach Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan is contructed and  implemented to avoid repetition of this behavior

If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Behavior Intervention Plan/Function Behavioral Assessment and develop re‐entry with restorative approach

23

Theft from an  Individual ($500 ‐ $5000)

Once the dollar value of the theft is established/ or the stolen items identified, a plan for paying  for the loss/or replacing the items is made with the student and parents/guardians Student participates in aggression reduction group Student participates in restorative approaches with appropriate members of the school community Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan is contructed and  implemented to avoid repetition of this behavior

If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Behavior Intervention Plan/Function Behavioral Assessment and develop re‐entry with restorative approach

24

Other School‐Based

Student is placed in ISS while the scope of the incident is being investigated

DRAFT
Misconduct that  Substantially Disrupts School Environment Student engages is a restorative approach with relevant school community members Create and implement a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Behavior Intervention Plan/Function Behavioral Assessment and develop re‐entry with restorative approach

25

Recurring Type Two Offenses

Please refer to Guidance Document for Addressing Habitual Disruption

Intervention Type Two 26

False Activation of a Fire Alarm

For all Type Two Offenses, refer to Level D on the Discipline Ladder for general procedure reference Student is placed in ISS while the scope of the incident is being investigated Once the cost of the false activation of a fire alarm is established with the Denver Fire Department, the  student and parents/guardians make a plan to pay this cost back to the school Student participates with relevant school community members in a restorative approach Student paricipates in the relevant Denver Fire Department Juvenile Fire Setter Intervention Program Create and implement a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan

If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Behavior Intervention Plan/Function Behavioral Assessment and develop re‐entry with restorative approach

27

Possession of  Fireworks/ Firecrackers

Student participates in the relevant Denver Fire Department Juvenile Fire Setter Intervention Program Student participates with the relevant school community members in a restorative approach Student and belongings are randomly searched for contraband Create and implement a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan

If behavior is repeated, consider OSS for planning purposes, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or  Behavior Intervention Plan/Function Behavioral Assessment and develop re‐entry with restorative approach

DRAFT
28 Bullying: Level I See SB Policy JICDE Student is placed in ISS while the scope of the incident is being investigated Create and implement a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that targets prosocial skills builidng Student participates in bullying prevention skills group (not with alleged victim(s)) Student engages in activities that contribute positively to the community (such as assisting an  adult with an office work activity) If behavior is repeated, review and recalculate the Behavior Contract or Behavior Intervention Plan/Function  Behavioral Assessment

29

Harrassment Based on Protected Classes:  Level I See SB Policy JBBA

Student is placed in ISS while issue is being investigated Once scope of incident is established, consider returning student to class with Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that targets aggression reduction and  prosocial skills building Student engages in activities that contribute positively to the community (such as assisting an  adult with an office work activity) If behavior is repeated, consider recalculating Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral  Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan Behavior Plan

30

Sexual Harassment: Level I See SB Policy JBB

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once scope of incident is established, consider returning student to class with Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that targets aggression reduction and  prosocial skills building Student engages in activities that contribute positively to the community (such as assisting an  adult with an office work activity) If behavior is repeated, consider recalculating Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral  Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan Behavior Plan

31

Consenual, but Inappropriate,

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Create Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan 

DRAFT
Physical Contact Reinforce demonstration of appropriate citizenship at school.  Consider curricular intervention including  Good Touch/Bad Touch . If behavior is repeated, consider recalculating Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral  Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan

32

Destruction or Theft of School Property, including graffiti (under $500)

Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once the extent of the damage/theft is assessed, student and parent/guardian work with the school to  create a plan to pay for the damages Student assists with the repair/replacement process under supervision  Student engages with relevant members of the school community in a restorative approach Create Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan  If behavior is repeated, consider ISS for planning purposes, and revision of the Behavior Contract or Functional  Behavioral Asssessment/Behavior Intervention Plan

33

Severe Defiance of Authority/ Disobedience

Student is placed in ISS while the scope of the incident is being investigated Determine the causes of the behavior Create a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that examines  the needs of the student and how those needs are being met in the school setting Student will participate in a restorative approach with relevant members of the school community If the behavior is repeated, re‐examine the Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan, student's needs, and how those needs are being met in the school setting

34

Trespassing

If the student is on school grounds during a suspension or expulsion, have an administrator or Campus Security ask the student to leave If the student is resistant, call DPS Safety and Security to have student escorted off school grounds If student is not co‐operative, call Denver Police Department

DRAFT
35 Theft from an Individual (under $500) Student is placed in ISS while incident is being investigated Once the extent of the theft is assessed, student and parent/guardian work with the school to  create a plan to pay for the loss or to replace the items taken Student engages with relevant members of the school community in a restorative approach Create Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan  If behavior is repeated, consider ISS for planning purposes and a revision of the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan

36

Other School‐Based Misconduct that  Disrupts the School Environment

Student is placed in ISS while the scope of the incident is being investigated Student engages is a restorative approach with relevant school community members Create a Behavior Contract or Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan that  addresses the concerns driving the disruptive behavior If behavior is repeated, consider ISS for planning purposes and a revision of the Behavior Contract or  Functional Behavioral Assessment/Behavior Intervention Plan

37

Recurring Type One Offenses

Please refer to Guidance Document for Addressing Habitual Disruption

Intervention Type One 38 ‐ 53

For all Type One Offenses

For all Type One Offenses, refer to Discipline Ladder Levels A, B, and C for general procedure reference All Type One behaviors are classroom managed. The following are suggested interventions: Make changes in the setting so the behavior does not have a reason to show itself Stick to a routine Build the relationship with the student by greeting them by name, make eye contact, and smile Reteach the skill or reteach the rules, then model, provide opportunities for practice, and praise the student Teach a replacement behavior Use a restorative approach Implement a program of positive reinforcement Create a safe space in the classroom Allow movement alternatives

DRAFT
Please refer to Type One Offenses (Levels A, B, C) on the Guidance Document for Addressing Habitual  Disruption

DRAFT
Offense Type Six IC Behavior Event Name Disc. Structure Expulsion3 Intervention OSP/ISI*

Firearm Type Five Robbery First or second degree assault, & sexual assault Sale or distrib of, or intent to sell, unauthr drugs or controlled substance Dangerous Weapon: Pellet gun, BB gun, or other device, whether operational or not, designed to propel projectiles by spring action or compressed air Dangerous Weapon: Fixed blade knife with a blade that exceeds three (3.0) inches in length Dangerous Weapon: Spring-loaded knife or a pocket knife with a blade that exceeds three and one-half (3.5) inches in length Dangerous Weapon: Any object, device, instrument, material or substance whether or animate or inanimate that is used or intended to be used to inflict death or serious bodily injury Type Four Arson Fighting: Level II (including incidents with significant injuries, but which do not rise to the level of the Type Five offense "1st or 2nd degree assault") Destruction or theft of school property (over $5000) Theft from an individual (over $5000) Possession of an explosive (non-fireworks/firecrackers) that seriously endangers the welfare or safety of others Willfully causing damage to the property of a school employee Assault, harassment, or false allegation of abuse against a school employee Hazing activities Child Abuse Unlawful sexual behavior, unlawful sexual contact, and indecent exposure Witness Intimidation or Retaliation

Dangerous Weapon Robbery Assault Drug Violation Dangerous Weapon

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Mandatory Expulsion Hearing and Mandatory Expulsion

Request process Request process Request process Request process Request process

OSS* OSS* OSS1, ISS1* OSS* OSS*

Mandatory Mandatory Mandatory Mandatory

Dangerous Weapon Dangerous Weapon Dangerous Weapon

N/A N/A N/A

Mandatory Mandatory Mandatory

Request process Request process Request process

OSS* OSS* OSS*

Other Felonies Other Violations of Code of Conduct

Level F Level F

Optional Optional

1 2

OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS*

Destruction of School Property Other Felonies Dangerous Weapon Other Violations of Code of Conduct Other Violations of Code of Conduct Detrimental behavior Other Violations of Code of Conduct Detrimental Behavior Other Violations of Code of Conduct

Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F Level F

Optional Optional Optional Optional Optional Optional Optional Optional Optional

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS*

DRAFT
Other student behavior presenting an active or ongoing danger to the welfare or safety of school occupants Habitual disruption Recurring Type Three offenses Type Three Offense Bullying: Level II2 - see Policy JICDE Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level II - see Policy JBBA Sexual harassment: Level II - see Policy JBB Fighting: Level I (may include incidents that result in minor injuries like cuts, scrapes, and bloody noses) Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol - see Policies JICH, JICH-R Alcohol Violation or Drug Violation Possession of alcohol or unauthorized (but legal) drugs Possession of illegal drugs Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti ($500 - $5000) Theft from an individual ($500 - $5000) Other school-based misconduct that substantially disrupts the school environment Recurring Type Two offenses Type Two False activation of a fire alarm Possession of fireworks/firecrackers Bullying: Level I - see Policy JICDE Harassment based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion: Level I - see Policy JBBA Sexual harassment: Level I - see Policy JBB Consensual, but inappropriate, physical contact Destruction or theft of school property, including graffiti (under $500) Severe defiance of authority/disobedience Trespassing Theft from an individual (under $500) Other school-based misconduct that disrupts the school environment Recurring Type One offenses (after going through Levels A through C) Type One* Classroom disruption Excessive tardiness Picking on, bothering, or distracting other students Use of profanity or vulgarity Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* No No No No 38 39 40 41 N/A N/A N/A N/A Detrimental Behavior Other Violations of Code of Conduct Destruction of School Property Disobediant/Defiant Other Violations of Code of Conduct Other Violations of Code of Conduct Repeated Imterference or Disob/Defiant Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D Level D No No No No No No No No 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 ISS* ISS* ISS* ISS* ISS* ISS* ISS* ISS* Other Violations of Code of Conduct Other Violations of Code of Conduct Detrimental Behavior Detrimental Behavior Level D Level D Level D Level D No No No No 26 27 28 29 ISS* ISS* ISS* ISS* Other Violations of Code of Conduct Disobedient/Defiant Repeated Interference Level E Level E Level E No No No 23 24 25 ISS* ISS* ISS* Alcohol Violation or Drug Violation Drug Violation Destruction of School Property Level E Level E Level E Level E No No No No 19 20 21 22 ISS* ISS* ISS* ISS* Detrimental Behavior Detrimental Behavior Level E Level E No No 17 18 ISS* ISS* IC Behavior Event Name Detrimental Behavior Detrimental Behavior
3 Dscpln Ldr Expulsion

Detrimental Behavior Same as the 3rd incident Repeated Interference

Level F N/A Level F

Optional Optional Optional

12 13 14 Alternative 15 16

OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS, ISS* OSS/ISS* ISS* ISS*

Level E Level E

No No

Disobediant/Defiant or Detrimental Behav Level D

DRAFT
Dress code violation - see Policy JICA Disrupting school activity Minor defiance of authority/disobediance Verbal insults or put-downs Use of cell phones, Gameboys, and similar electrronic devices at unauthorized times Minor damage or defacement of school property Offense Tobacco offenses - see Policy JICG Unauthorized use of school equipment Gambling Minor physical aggression with another student (e.g., pushing, shoving) Scholastic dishonesty Other minor school-based misconduct Superscripts 1 For students being accused of an alleged sexual assault, refer to page 10 "Dear Colleague Letter: Sexual Violence." US Dpt of Education: OCR. 2 Bully: Level II. Ensure compliance with HB 11 -1254 3 For students with disabilities: May not be expelled if the behavior is a manifestation of the disability Conference Tab IC Behavior Event Name Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Lvls A-C* No 3 Dscpln Ldr Expulsion Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* No No No No No No 47 Alternative 48 49 50 51 52 53 N/A OSS/ISS* N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Conference Tab Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* Lvls A-C* No No No No No 42 43 44 45 46 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

* Reference the Discipline Ladder for specific instructions regarding the procedure for addressing the misbehavior/offense and the possible number of days of ISS or OSS.

1
Abstract - Discipline Policy Survey Discipline Building Leaders and Parents Introduction Over the course of this spring semester, DPS discipline building leaders and representatives from the African American parent community offered valuable insight into the process of student discipline. Each of the discipline building leaders in DPS received a Survey Monkey essay questionnaire requesting their thoughtful consideration of issues concerning student discipline and the student conduct and discipline policies JK and JK-R. Thirty-four responses were received. Four evening discussion groups with representatives from the African American parent community were held. Forty parents participated. The discussion focused on the same questions asked of the discipline building leaders. This abstract synthesizes the responses of all of the discipline building leader and parent participants. The survey questions can be found following this abstract. Abstract The respondents were asked to define discipline. The most frequent response among discipline building leaders described discipline as a set of behavioral expectations and consequences that allow the teaching/learning process to occur unhindered. The most frequent response among parents indicated student discipline is teaching students to manage their own behavior and to extend support to them when their behavior indicates they are upset. The respondents were asked to state their values and expectations around student discipline. The majority of responses from both parents and DPS faculty, focused on the importance of providing the student with the opportunity to learn from the misbehavior, learn what the behavioral expectations are, and be able to engage in appropriate behavior in the future. The respondents valued and expected student discipline to establish and maintain safety, and be consistent, fair, and restorative. They advocated for student discipline to change the situation so the student can learn the skills to be a positive engaged member of the community. The respondents were asked to share their thoughts around the disparate discipline outcomes for the same behavior based on race, for African American students specifically, and for students with disabilities. They were asked to elaborate upon the outcome they would prefer to see, how to achieve it, and what resources would be needed. The responses called for more training of teachers and other faculty members in cultural responsiveness, behavior management, and the student discipline policy and procedure. They also reflected the need for the hiring of teachers from the same minority backgrounds as the students they will be teaching, In addition to teacher resources, the respondents advocated for the resources to provide mental health intervention and prevention efforts, beginning intensively in the elementary grades, and continuing through high school. The strategies the respondents listed to prevent and intervene with misbehavior to eliminate disparate discipline outcomes included: restorative approaches, Positive Behavior Intervention and Support; bully prevention, counseling, mental health support, and academic remediation for students. The importance of teachers communicating with one another about the needs of individual students, such as students with disabilities, was endorsed by the respondents. The respondents were asked to offer their thoughts on students whose behavior is disobedient and defiant, and habitually disruptive. By far, the most frequent response indicated habitually disruptive behavior can be attributed to the teacher/teacher team’s lack of skill in connecting with a particular student or managing classroom behavior in general. Far fewer responses called for the student to be removed from the classroom, although it was clear that the respondents felt disruptive students negatively impact the learning environment for everyone. The African American parents also pointed out that SB Policy JK-R is vague in its description of a habitually disruptive student, making the suspension of a student for habitually disruptive behavior subjective, especially when the pattern of behavior is for disobedient/defiant behavior. The parents also pointed out the importance of giving an African American student a command to gain compliance. The questionnaire asked respondents to comment on what they thought was critical to include in an update of the student discipline policy. Many respondents appreciated JK and JK-R as written. They would like to add: a clear definition of bullying, incorporation of the use/misuse of technology by students, and an offense that deals with small pocket knives and other blades with shorter-than-criteria cutting surfaces. They would also like to add a component that addresses the responsibility of parents/guardians in the discipline process and the successful outcome with a student. Many respondents asked for clarification of disobedient/defiant behavior and of

2
habitual disruption. Parents asked for it to be written into policy that a student’s IC Behavior Tab can be expunged at the time they are applying to colleges or other post-secondary options. Independent of the survey items, several respondents voiced the need for student discipline policy to be determined at the building level, rather than centrally through School Board policy. Building level discipline policy would be established through the collaboration of community, parents, school faculty, and students. The proponents of this view would like to address each student’s misbehavior separately so the student’s age, history, and needs could be taken into consideration when deciding on the consequences. There were several patterns of responses that emerged regardless of the question being asked. Throughout all of the items on the questionnaire, the importance of communication between students, teachers, parents/guardians, and the community emerged as a strong value. Many respondents proposed a retreat forum to be held at each school to bring people together to create relationships and to have a way of celebrating successes and sharing concerns. Many respondents emphasized the lack of clearly stated parent/guardian roles and responsibilities in the student discipline process. Respondents also stated the value of bringing the community into the discipline process. Also, throughout all of the items, all respondents cited the importance of being knowledgeable about the culture of the students and being a culturally responsive educator. Getting to the root cause of the student’s behavior and creating a plan for intervening is another response that appeared as a response to many questions. The Questions 1. What are your values around student discipline in the schools? 2. 3. What are your expectations around student discipline in the schools? How do students, parents, and schools identify and agree on shared expectations for student discipline? a. What is the role of each of these stakeholders? b. What is the responsibility of each of these stakeholders? As a building leader responsible for student discipline, how would you define discipline? African American students are being suspended in DPS at twice the rate they occur in the student population. a. Considering this outcome as detrimental, what is a preferred outcome? b. How can the preferred outcome be achieved at your school? c. What resources would you need to achieve the preferred outcome? Many suspensions are the result of behavior that is considered to be disruptive, disrespectful, and/or defiant in the classroom. a. What are your thoughts about this? b. What are your thoughts about how these behaviors could be better addressed at school? (inschool suspension, out-of-school suspension, or another consequence) There are significant differences in student discipline outcomes for the same behavior depending on the student’s race. a. What are your suggestions to the school district to better address the racial disparities/disproportionality in student discipline outcomes? b. What are your suggestions for the community to better partner with neighborhood schools to address this concern? There are significant differences in student discipline outcomes for students with disabilities. This is more pronounced for students of color with disabilities. a. What are your suggestions to the school district to better address the racial disparities/disproportionality in discipline outcomes for students with disabilities? b. What are your suggestions for the community to better partner with neighborhood schools to address this concern? What do you think is critical to include in the updated student discipline policy?

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