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The Club Volume 3 Chapters 4 and 5

The Club Volume 3 Chapters 4 and 5

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Published by thelaurelbush
The sought after Bohemian Club Annals. Started in 1872 in San Francisco and the Redwood Forest, with members who are writers, some of the press, and politicians. Hard to find, even to those who study it. I found it in a college in California. Right under everyone's nose. Famous members included Ambrose Bierse, Mark Twain, and William Howard Taft. Known for performing Cremation of Care ceremony ever summer, where they burn an effigy of a child. You can read how this was started as I upload more. Just search on youtube, Alex Jones recorded it being performed in 2000.

I am not affiliated with him. I searched for six years to find this. I became interested because some of these men have been affiliated with Skull and Bones, and I know of one real child from a long time ago who was harmed by these type of men - her name was Annie Winchester, daughter of Sarah Wincester of the Winchester "Mystery" House in San Jose. Want to know more about my research? Here is my blog:

http://www.thewinchestermystery.com

Dark Secrets of Bohemian Grove:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxoF3dk8arQ
The sought after Bohemian Club Annals. Started in 1872 in San Francisco and the Redwood Forest, with members who are writers, some of the press, and politicians. Hard to find, even to those who study it. I found it in a college in California. Right under everyone's nose. Famous members included Ambrose Bierse, Mark Twain, and William Howard Taft. Known for performing Cremation of Care ceremony ever summer, where they burn an effigy of a child. You can read how this was started as I upload more. Just search on youtube, Alex Jones recorded it being performed in 2000.

I am not affiliated with him. I searched for six years to find this. I became interested because some of these men have been affiliated with Skull and Bones, and I know of one real child from a long time ago who was harmed by these type of men - her name was Annie Winchester, daughter of Sarah Wincester of the Winchester "Mystery" House in San Jose. Want to know more about my research? Here is my blog:

http://www.thewinchestermystery.com

Dark Secrets of Bohemian Grove:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxoF3dk8arQ

More info:

Published by: thelaurelbush on Aug 08, 2009
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THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

41

CHAPTER
1888-1889.
~"

IV.

~ISCORD reigns at the annual election in April, 1888; we find the Club rent into two contending factions. A Regular Ticket and an Opposition appear in the field. But the distressing spectacle of internecine strife is softened by the like the Siamese twins in an altercation, united the two tickets in a really

fact that,

a common interest

fraternal bond. Mr. George T. Bromley was at the head of both of them. While Mr. Bromley thus held the singular position of being violently opposed to himself he was ignominiously defeated on the Regular Ticket but triumphantly elected by an overwhelming majority on the Opposition Ticket. Peter Robertson was elected Vice- President ; John W. Pew, Secretary; and Colonel Frank W. Sumner, Treasurer. The Directors were Dr. H. J. Stewart, George D. Newhall (who afterwards resigned and was succeeded by Major George H. Wheaton), James A. Robinson, Dr. George Chismore and General John Hewston, Jr., the latter being for many years captain of the midsummer camp.

General

HC7f.lston

HIGH

]Jl\KS CARTOON:

"C01\I~IEl\CE\IEl\T
BY

EXERCISES"

FREDERIC};

L\TES.

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

45
I888

tude, those pure and noble sentiments, that general sub-limity of character which graduates invariably inculcate upon their parents and guardians with so much dignity, on such occasions. "The Salutatory will be called at 9 P. M. sharp. The Valedictory will be fired in time for a little bit of supper. The Bohemian University exercises will be taken first, and the Kindergarten later. The University Graduates' Color will be Shrimp Pink. The Kindergarten Color will be Boiled Lobster. There will be music to deaden the exhilarating effect. The scene will be painted by Our Special Artist, Fred Yates. No flowers." The program consisted of an "Invitation in Music," an address by the Chancellor, George \V. Nagle, LL. D.; "How to Account for the Music in Wine," an address by James D. Phelan, Vineta, "The Construction of the Greek Particle," a paper by Crittenden Thornton, Eureka; "The Origin, Development and Decay of the Vital Principle," a paper by E. B. Pomroy, Tomales; "The Reason for Believing Ham to have been Black," with the Valedictory, by George T. Bromley, Blackville, and finally the confer,ring of degrees by the Chancellor. Dr. H. J. Stewart had charge of the music. On the heels of this event came the Midsummer Jinks of which Mr. James D. Phelan was the Sire. His announcement is all that is left to us of this sylvan

THE
1888

ANNALS

OF

]1'[

idsH Inrner Jinks: "The Convention."

festival. Mr. Phelan begins his invitation by a quotation from Emerson and then goes on to say for himself : "Brother Bohemians:

"Verily large cities are the prison-houses of the world; each man has his dungeon; each man has his task. Trade is the treadmill he must travel; "politics and personalities" the bread and water diet for his thirsting soul! "Rarely is a glimpse of free Nature, his earliest friend, vouchsafed him. His very necessity drives her forth and mars her charm. The forest he reduces to board and lodging; the stream he imprisons in pipes, the atmosphere he defiles with the smoke of 'our manufactures.' He looks for the azure of the firmament and sees only an obscuration of gloom. He walks the hard streets, whose hard-visaged houses look down on him with a hundred eyes; he moves from curb to curb, and that is his span of life! "What is the cause of it? There is a social conspiracy. Good, easy man is the victim. Lest, like Bonnivard, he learns to love his chains, let us liberate him. "Once there met a self-constituted Assembly. It resolved how men should live and love, act and talk, dress and walk. Fashion it proclaimed King.

AUST1N CREEK. From a photograph.

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

49
I888

"This was
THE CONVENTION .

against

whose

work-the

conventionalities-faithful

Nature protested in vain. But the season has now come for you to declare for Nature or against her. There is no compromise. It is for you to answer. Will you bolt the convention, hie to the forest and take the stump? With outstretched hands she welcomes you. Her camp is on the shores of Austin. The Redwoods are her sentinels. The grove her hospitable home. The feeble gripe of artifice will yield in that mighty presence; the greed of avarice will be shamed by her prodigality, and the cant of the convention will be silenced forever. "I cannot but remind you that 'He who knows the most; he who knows what sweets and virtues are in the ground, the waters, the plants, the heavens, and how to come at these enchantments,-is the rich and royal man.' "Let us therefore, in full accord, on Saturday, the eighteenth, return to our old allegiance. There shall be bonfires and processions, and ceremonies, and oratory and music and more! Stewart shall lead the Glee Club, and Revelry shall rule. Remember that 'There is great joy in Bohemia over one repentant sinner,' and there shall be the greatest and wildest joy over the return of many."


1888

THE

ANNALS

OF

The Salon Picture.

M. Coquelin visits the Club.

In the latter part of 1887 an entry in the minutes of the Board reveals the fact that it was the intention of the Club to set aside periodically a certain sum of money for the purchase of a picture in Europe so that the Club might, in the course of time, acquire a valuable collection of paintings by well known foreign as well as home artists. This idea originated with Colonel Hawes, that veteran of the Club who was ever studying its interests. As a consequence of this decision, Mr. F. N. R. Martinez, who visited Europe in 1888, assisted by Mr. Horace P. Fletcher, purchased at the Paris salon "The Return of the Flock" by Charles Sprague Pearce. The arrival of this picture was made the occasion of a reception day for ladies and a special entertainment in the evening to which each member was bidden to bring his wife, if he had one, or his sweetheart, if he had only one, the invitations being limited. The picture was universally admired and became familiarly known as the Salon Picture, but it has remained the sole one of the projected foreign collection, succeeding boards having failed to make the necessary appropriation to carry out the original conception. In December of this year the famous French actor M. Coquelin visited San Francisco and was entertained by the Club. On December 29th President Bromley held the Christmas Jinks to which he gave the title

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.
r888

"Castles in the Clouds," prefacing his invitation with this dainty conceit from Thompson's "Castle of Indolence:"
"A pleasing land of drowsy head it was, Of dreams that wave before the half shut eye And of gay castles in the clouds that pass Forever flushing round a summer sky."

Christmas Jinks: "Castles

in the
Clouds."

Skipper Bromley then seizes the speaking trumpet hails the Club as follows: "Bohemians Ahoy!

and

"All hands on deck! Another beacon on the shores of time heaves in sight, and the 'Merry Christmas' headland stands out in bold relief on the far away horizon. OUf gallant ship 'Bohemia,' her streamers playing with the sky, her every sail drawing beautifully, her harness cask, scuttlebutt and bread barge full to overflowing, with as jolly a crew as ever trod ship's decks, will pass that headland on Saturday night, and the toast shall be 'Sweethearts and Wives.' "The wise ones will tell us of
CASTLES IN THE CLOUDS

and the wiser ones wiII 'splice the main brace.' "Costly presents from the Christmas tree will be distributed to the deserving by the original Santa Claus.

THE
]888

ANNALS

OF

"The Bohemian Owls will toot the Christmas Carols and Bohemian Rosewald will boss the harmonies and sweet cadences. hearts be glad. Joy will rule the hours and all our

"The Low Jinks will be run in the interests of charity and a baseball club, by Al Gerberding and George Nagle, who will make it mighty lively for any who get in the way of the ball. "So come early and get a good seat. "GEORGET. BROMLEY,Sire." That this occasion was fraught with delight was evident on the face of it, and if the reader desires an intermission in which to allow his imagination time to feast upon it, he is at perfect liberty to take it, this being all that the Historiographer can contribute. And now we approach a most stupendous event in this most eventful history. During the last decade the Club had increased considerably in membership, had grown prosperous financially and while to many of the members its residence over the market with the crowing of cocks in the small hours and the odor of cheese and Finnan haddies at all times, was not objectionable, there was a general feeling that the Club had outgrown its domicile and that once more the time had come to move. Inspired by this spirit of unrest, various projects for purchasing expensive corner lots and building a superb

The Club
movfS to Post Street.

f

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

53
I889

mansion of its own had arisen and been discussed from time to time by the Club, but as has been previously intimated, none of these plans had taken tangible form. Finally, in the beginning of 1889, the Pacific Club having made arrangements to amalgamate with the Union Club, offered to transfer the lease of its rooms on the corner of Post Street and Grant Avenue, to the Bohemian Club. This proposition was considered by the Bohemians at a general meeting February 15th and was accepted. The transfer included the purchase of the carpets and much of the furniture belonging to the Pacific Club, all of which was of a handsome and dignified character. The new Club house was a four story building most pleasantly situated on a sunny corner in the retail shopping district, with an animated view from its windows. The Club occupied the three upper floors, the first containing the dining room, sitting room (variously called "social room" and "cafe"), billiard room, wine room and office, while on the next floor was a beautifullibrary room extending the entire distance from the front to the rear of the house, while card and chess rooms, music room and breakfast room completed the equipment. The upper floor consisted of bed chambers, with the kitchen department in the rear. It was this palatial abode which now awaited the eager Bohemians and of which they were invited to take

54

THE

ANNALS

OF

possession on February 23d, according to the following circular:
The Summons.

"Fellow Bohemian: "There is a law in Nature that heat expands. The Bohemian is nothing if not natural; and the warmth of that spirit of Goodfellowship, which is our pride and boast, has expanded our Bohemia until these still sacred walls can no longer hold it. "And so we move our shrine and altar to a more spacious Temple, and leaving our blessing on these halls where we have been so happy, let us drop a tear over the fate that dedicates them to a meaner service. Bohemians still, through all the prosperity which has been vouchsafed to us, we are not less devoted to our religion, than when we gathered in the old, old rooms. From those we leave, we wish to bear away the atmosphere of art, the geniality and loving-kindness of Bohemia. The furniture and the pictures we can carry away in vans, but those impalpable elements you must bear away for and with us. "So come to the old haunt, on Saturday night next, February 23, 1889, at 9 o'clock, and let us say a kind farewell. Thereafter, we will adjourn to the new Bohemia, 130 Post street, and with simple ceremonies, the High Priest will dedicate the House to Art, Litera-

THE

POST STREET

CLUB

HOUSE.

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

57
1889

tUfe, and Music, to the Owl, and to our own Bohemian Love and Friendship.
GEO.

T.

BROMLEY,

President. In response to this summons and promptly at the hour appointed, the members of the Club congregated for the last time in the Pine street rooms. President Bromley, who combined in his person also the office of High Priest, improved the solemn occasion in his customary wise, witty and benign manner, and after he had concluded his exhortation, he called upon the Vice- President, Peter Robertson, to express his ideas on the subject, which Mr. Robertson proceeded to do to the entire satisfaction of all who heard him. Then there was a universal demand for General Barnes, whereupon the General ascended the platform and spoke feelingly of the early days of the Club and of the men who had made it what it was. Memory took him back to that ancient time when the Club had rented its first and only room on Sacramento Street, and he told of how on the last day of the month, such was the chronic state of their poverty, the stoutest hearted of the directors quailed and turned pale before the dreadful gaze of their landlady, the redoubtable "Mrs. MacStinger." It was looked upon as little less than madness when an adjoining bedroom which had been lent to the Club on Jinks night, by its

Reminiscences.

THE
[889

ANNALS

OF

amiable occupant, was finally added to the Club's domain. From thence to the spacious suite on Pine Street, which they were now leaving for still finer surroundings, the General, in his inimitable way led his hearers, marshaling a host of pleasant fancies for their escort. Then Mr. Daniel O'Connell read the following verses written for the occasion as he had written the verses for the last flitting twelve years before:

"The Passing
of the Owl."

{(THE PASSING OF THE OWL" Oh for a quill, a sturdy quill from our loved Monarch's wing, That I in burning verse of truth his great career might sing; That I might tell how long ago, naught but a puny bird, His weak "too, hoo," when darkness fell, was scarcely to be heard; When, like the Christians in those days when grim Domitian reigned, His worshipers found every rite by bigotry restrained, When wives forbade their husbands to bow before his shrine And sweethearts to their lovers defamed his great design, And said his kingdom's pillars were riot, smoke and wine. He grew, he thrived, he flourished, he swelled from day to day, And Philistines who came to scoff remained with joy to pray, And ladies fair discovered that ever far above The jest, the song, the wine-cup, the great owl's creed was love, And, though his beak and claws were sharp, his heart was as the dove. Like shrines by visions sanctified these walls now cold and bare, For years to come will reverence claim, for once the owl was there, And once they were a fortress stout, impervious to care.

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

59
I889

And echoes of old laughter, and echoes of old songs, And ritual impressive which to the owl belongs, Will lend their consecration to all who follow here, But, oh, how stronger, friends, to us who hold Bohemia dear! For we this fancy cherished that when the wine was bright, And when our full hearts thrilled with all the glory of the night, The shades of those who in their time with us did drink and jest, When we cast the world from us, and each was at his best, Clustered about the friends they loved, and voiceless, unconfessed, They filled with tender memories the living brother's breast. Farewell the old, all hail the new, a grander loftier shrine, Oh, proud Bird of Bohemia, shall henceforth now be thine, And full of peace and pleasantry forever be its aisles, And those who frown outside be won within to happy smiles, And true and earnest be thy sons, those nearest to the throne, Till Philistia shall perish, and Bohemia reign alone.

The High Priest President then gave the order for the assembled Bohemians to fall into line, two by two, and heading the procession himself, he led the way down the stairs and out into the night, and thus was the pilgrimage begun. Solemnly Kearny street was traversed while the sordid keepers of the shops which in those days lined the way, were awed into silence and forbore to solicit trade in coats and hats and gents' neckwear; the suspender and collar button man stared in wonder ang even the small boy made his irreverent comments on the attire and personal appearance of the members, from a respectful distance. Up Post street the venerable leader conducted his flock and at last entered the portals

The Hegira.

60
1889

THE

ANNALS

OF

of the new abode. Ascending the unaccustomed marble steps, they emerged from the darkness into the light. Here they were greeted with a burst of music and revelry. The great, white plaster image of the Owl was reverently borne to its shrine at the head of the staircase, and in a few words the President dedicated the new horne to Art, Music, Literature and the Drama, and above and beyond all to the renewal of that friendship and good fellowship which was the divine spirit that had saved the Club from the scriptural fate of ordinary mankind that springeth up as grass in the morning, but withereth away and is cut down and made into the ordinary hay of commerce before night. After which everyone took a drink to the health of the Owl, then to each other and then to whatever occurred to them as being a sufficient reason therefor, and reasons there were in plenty. During the year thus happily and prosperously brought to a close, ex-President Swan, in accordance with the usual custom, presented his portrait, painted by Mr. Frederick Yates, to the Club. Mrs. Boalt presented to the Club a portrait of Judge Boalt, by Mr. Yates, in place of the one already owned. Mr. Evan J. Coleman gave the Club a collection of books. Sir Arthur Sullivan, the celebrated musical composer, and F. Bret Harte, the California author, were made honorary members of the Club, and likewise that eminent actor, Law-

GEORGE T. BROMLEY.

From tlze Painting in the Club by Benoni Irwin.

---------

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.
1889

rence Barrett. Nat C. Goodwin, the comedian, also a member of the Club, tells an amusing story in connection with the latter. Mr. Goodwin, as a young man, knew the refined and stately Mr. Barrett, of course, and in his youthful enthusiasm was proud of the great actor's acquaintance. Seeing him in company with Mr. Booth on the street one day in San Francisco he went up t·) him and, holding out his hand, with effusion exclaimed, "How do you do, Mr. Barrett? I am Mr. Goodwin, N at Goodwin." "Ah, yes," said Mr. Barrett, cordially shaking hands, "Glad to see you Mr. Goodwin. Have you met Mr. Booth? Edwin, this is Mr. Goodwin." Mr. Goodwin was charmed to meet Mr. Booth. "Are you here professionally, Mr. Goodwin?" continued Mr. Barrett. "Yes, sir," replied Goodwin, "I am playing an engagement here." "Ah, indeed," responded Mr. Barrett pleasantly, "So are we." And then inquiringly, "You are with the --," "With the 'Brass Monkey,' " replied Goodwin, cheerfully. "With theer-1 beg your pardon?" said Mr. Barrett. " 'The Brass Monkey,' " repeated Goodwin, looking at Mr. Barrett with that happy ingenuousness which is one of his charms. "The Brawss--," and again Mr. Barrett hesitated inquiringly, "Monkey," added

Mr. Goodwin and

Mr. Banett.

TIle HeE"ira -From a Newspaper

Cut

THE

ANNALS

OF

Goodwin. "Oh, Come, Edwin."

ah, yes.

Good day, Mr.

Goodwin.

Ml', Robertson and the "Brass Monhey,"

This is not all of the tale of the "Brass Monkey," the sequel being as follows: At the time of the first performance of that scholarly drama in San Francisco Mr. Peter Robertson, dramatic critic of the "Chronicle," expressed his professional opinion of it in a column of bourgeois. The plot of the play, as the reader may know, is based upon the theft of an idol, in the shape of a brass monkey, from a temple in India. It is a characteristic of this baleful, metal Simian that it brings ill luck upon its possessor, and as a consequence everyone in time tries to be rid of it. Mr. Robertson viewed the play from all the points of the compass; he dissected the motive, scoffed at the superstition, deprecated the heathenism, analyzed the plot, descanted upon the dramatic construction, considered the actors, and dealing with the whole subject from an ethical, spiritual and material stand, saturated it with a criticism composed of nine parts of kerosene and one of sulphuric acid, set fire to it and as it blazed he rested from his labors. The manager of the play was so well pleased with the manner in which Mr. Robertson had burnt the play up (which he declared had increased the door receipts fifty per cent) that he had an exquisite little "brass monkey" made of gold and presented it to

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

the critic for a watch charm.

vVithin two weeks after

1889

this ornament was added to his person Mr. Robertson was stopped on a dark night in a lonely place by two footpads. Valiantly resisting their demands to hand over his watch and purse, one robber grabbed his arms while the other felled him with a cruel blow. They then proceeded to beat and kick their victim into submission, rifled his pockets and disappeared. When Mr. Robertson emerged from the hospital a week later he candidly confessed to a change of belief in regard to the "Brass Monkey," declaring that the only consolation he had was the thought that those robbers had carried off his hoodoo and would surely come to grief in course of timt". As a matter of fact, one of them was apprehended and sent to the penitentiary and for the unities of the story we will presume that it was the one who had come into possession of the "Brass Monkey."

66

THE

ANNALS

OF

CHAPTER
1889-1890.

V.

'l'\ ~
--{I·r:~ ".;J~'"~{j,

8!fifil

HE election of officers on April 8, 1889, resulted in George Robertson becoming Peter President; H. Wheaton, VicePresident; F. N. R. Martinez, Secretary;

t~r

~;'~ ~

~

~'iii!i#7

~ ~ I~,-"'" Directors were L. L. Baker, A. G. Hawes, h~ and James D. Phelan, Treasurer. The .
~
The Annual
Election.

Raphael Weill, John A. Stanton and H. J. Stewart. During the year Mr. Martinez, Colonel Hawes, Mr. Stanton and Mr. Weill re-

signed and were succeeded by Mr. Albert Gerberding as Secretary, and Captain James M. McDonald and George 'iV. Beaver as Directors. General 'iV. H. L. Barnes was the Sire of the first Jinks that was held in the new Club house, on May 18th. General Barnes' contributions to the entertainment of the Club were of such an eloquent character that even the Historiographer was inspired to make many efforts to obtain them in permanent form. But it was the General's custom to speak without notes and while good naturedly agreeing in response to the urgent appeals of his fellow members to write out his remarks, the day of

The first Jinks in

the new
Club House.

THE

BOHENIIAN

CLUB.
r889

fulfillment was postponed indefinitely, until, alas! the day came when fulfillment became forever impossible. "Bohemian" (says the General in his invitation), "you are hereby bidden to the christening of the firstborn Jinks of the New Bohemian Palace. May fine feathers make fine birds! "I t is suggested chiefly to consider on the occasion, whether literature flourishes or languishes in these days of marvelous material advancement; whether poetry lags behind the scientific facts of the hour; whether the inventions of literature and the ancient cunningness of the imagination have become unfruitful beside those of stearn and electricity, of telephone and phonograph. Do you think the gigantic march of our half century has infused new life into the Cadmian gift, or has taken the measure of its grave? "To these questions there will be various replies. Each will be unanswerable, until the next is given. The subject will be gravely or lightly treated, with wisdom or with wit, and upon the stem of thought your orators will graft flowers of every hue. "Other 'dreadful notes of preparation' now being

pealed by the Committee of Arrangements, whose servant I am, promise you rare enjoyment. Merrier men, 'within the limits of becoming mirth,' will not soon be seen in Bohemia. We shall have old fires from ancient

68

THE

ANNALS

OF

I889

altars, old songs from ancient books, old wine from ancient casks; and at the end, we shall 'sit down to that reasonable nourishment which is called Supper.' "There will be Music under the direction of Bohemian Stewart, and Bohemian Rosewald will illustrate effect of Science on Grand Opera. "Come, then, happy Bohemian, to your grateful the Sire.

"W. H. L.

BARNES.))

The gentlemen who expounded their views on "The Effect of Science upon Literature" were, in addition to the Sire, General Lucius H. Foote, Dr. George Chismore, Mr. William Center, Mr. Edward H. Hamilton and Captain Robert H. Fletcher. Mr. George T. Bromley was the impresario for the Low Jinks, in regard to which he issued the following decree: "Privileged
"The Jinks: Low Influence the Fun on of Family." Human

Mortal: and here

"The Sire of Low Jinks sendeth greeting followeth his paternal message. "The 'Influence of Modern

Science on Literature'

will be worked for all it is worth by the great lights of Bohemia during the early evening of May 18th.
THE INFLUENCE OF FUN ON THE HUMAN FAMILY

will be wrestled with later on by lights of less candle power, but a more cheerful blaze.

PETER ROBERTSON.

Frol/l tlte PaiJitin/[ in tlte Club by F'-edend, Yates.

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

7I

"The great question of the Poet Lariat championship will be finally settled by a jury sworn to do justice to the contestants or perish in the attempt. "The high order of talent chosen for the intellectual repast is a guaranty that it will be fully up to the standard of the new rooms with the exception of the Library. "The sweetest of singers will sing, the most charming of players will play, moved by the inspiring baton of our beloved Bohemian H. J. Stewart. "The highest style of artistic art will be brought to bear on the Cartoon, by our esteemed Bohemian Thomas Nast. "Caterer Nicholls assures us that the nourishment for the body shall equal the food for the mind. "Hear ye, and fail not to be with us.
"GEO.

T.

BROMLEY)

"Low Jinks Sire." Among the notable productions of this famous Jinks was a "Grand Opera in Twenty Minutes," entitled "Cured Camille," the music being composed by J. H. Rosewald, who directed the orchestra at its production, and the libretto by Peter Robertson. As no description could adequately describe this great work it is allowed to speak for itself:
"Cured Camille," a r;rand opera in twenty minutes.

72

THE

ANNALS

OF

CAST OF CHARACTERS.

Camille Armand Doctor Comments, suggestions, and sympathetic selected chorus.

Charlesina Leonard Alfred Wilkie Barbour Lathrop interpolations by a

(There is no argument to this opera.)
[CAMILLE

is stretched on a couch, surrounded by sympathetic Chorus.]

CHORUS.

Hush! hush! see she sleeps! Oh, do not, I pray you, Wake her from her restful dreaming. How are you feeling to-day, Camille? Your cough seems passing away, Camille. It's not quite so bad as it was on Monday; It's very much worse than it was on Sunday; But still you seem better to-day, Camille.
CAMILLE. RECIT.

Ach Gott! So young to die! So young and so divinely fair! Alas! It must be so! Upon me falls the cold, cold hand of death, And strikes me down in all the flower of youth.

James A. Thompson the Midsummer

-From a Pictureat
Jinks

THE

BOHEMIAN
SOLO.

CLUB.

73

After the years of sorrow ere I knew This love without aHoy; When all the earth had grown so fair, so new, And love made life a joy! I know that heaven is full of bliss untold; There are no tears, no sighs; And angels sing sweet songs to harps of gold In golden summer skies. Peace, rest and sweet content are there, I know, All worldly bliss above. But my fond heart would linger here belowLive on this earth and Jove! Crowned am I now, my lover's heart my throne. Heaven hath no dearer charms, No more enchanting rest than I have known, Clasped in my lover's arms. And must I really die? Of what? I do not know. Death is 'Tis sad But thus And not at to to to best a sorry thoughtgo. fall into the dull, cold earth, know

What Greek or Latin weapon Fate put forth, 'Tis sadder so! Yes! 'Tis much sadder so!
CHORUS.

Here's a painful situation. And a field for speculation, Life is ebbing fast away, Some disease is gnawing at her Vitals; but what is the matter,

74

THE

ANNALS

OF

The poor victim cannot say. It is very sad, this worrying! Is the poor thing simply hurrying Exactly where we cannot tell? If she knew what was the matter, What it was, was gnawing at her Vitals, she might yet get well. She faints! Ah me! Here's Armand. Armand! She She has just fainted.
ARMAND.

falls on the sofa in a faint. Enter beside her.
ARMAND.
RECIT.

He stands

How fair the picture! Ah! But woe is me ! The wan face bears the ensign of despair: Angel she always was, Will always be, On earth, in heaven, an angel bright and fair. And must I see thee pass away from me, So beauteous and so rare? Oh, witness my despair, Ye elements of air! What course is left me to pursue? To have thee still what can I do? N ought, save to die with thee.
SOLO.

Gladly, my own soul's idol, would I lay My lifeless head on thy cold heart of death! Gladly by poison or some other way,

Mr. Charles L. Leonard

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

75
1889

Would I cut off my unavailing breath! Gladly, my own soul's idol, in the grave I'd bury all this wild heart-rending sorrow! Think not, my darling, falsely I behave, But I have some engagements for to-morrow. Oh, sweet pale face! Thou art not quite so fair As thou wert when the red blood tinged thy cheek. Oh, beauteous form! Thy beauty's not so rare As when its moving lines of grace could speak. Dearest, I still would have thee live for me, Since I'm too busy, love, to die for thee.
CHORUS.

He loves her very dearly, But he's a busy man; The man who loves sincerely, Will do the best he can. But though he suffer terribly, And even give way to dizziness, lIe cannot be expected To neglect his regular business No! no! no!
CAMILLE

wakes and raises herself from sofa.
DUET.

And must the maiden die? We do not know. Death is 'Tis sad But thus And not at to to to

Of what?

best a sorry thought. go! fall into the dull, cold earth, know

What Greek or Latin weapon Fate put forth, 'Tis sadder so !

Enter

DOCTOR.

THE

ANNALS
CHORUS.

OF

'Tis sadder, -sadder so! The end is near, Here comes the doctor! He'll examine her tongue with a microscope, And list to her lung with a stethoscope, And tickle her throat with a laryngoscope. There isn't much hope, 'Tis the end of her rope, When the doctor tackles her horoscope.
ARMAND AND CAMILLE.

Sweet healing messenger, I pray you, tell your thought! Must this maiden die? Tell us, of what?
DOCTOR.

Oh! sad and bitter is the maiden's case. Her death I fear me most precipitate is. From the pale signs upon her beauteous face, I think it is cerebro-digitatis.
BOTH.

Oh! Agony! Oh, dread and fatal name! How cruel this our fate is! Oh, wouldn't it be just the same, If you would give some other name Than dread cerebro-digitatis?

But the doctor declines to alter his diagnosis to please the patient and indulges in a song descriptive of the joys

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

77

of a doctor's life. Camille thoughtfully postpones her death until the doctor has finished, and then exclaims:
CAMILLE.

1889

Ah, me! This pain!
ARMAND.

Love of my life! Look up! I pray you, see! She dies!
DOCTOR.

A bitter case, inde<>:d,this maiden here, And quite pathetic, too, her fate is; But, pardon me, I cannot interfere With this cerebro-digitatis.
CAMILLE.

Ah, me! I faint! Close to your heart, my own! Clasp me as you have clasped me oft In days of yore. One farewell kiss! One fond, one last embrace, E'er through death's mist I reach the shining shore!
CAMILLE AND ARMAND.

Farewell! Farewell! A last farewell! True in this last hour, Here at death's portal, Swear we our love, For love is immortal! Farewell !

THE
1889

ANNALS

OF
on the

ARMAND takes her in his arms.

back.

He slaps her vigorously She is seized with a fit of coughing, and coughs out a dollar.
DOCTOR.

What's this?
He picks up the money.
CAMILLE.

Dearest! I know no pain! See! I am well! Death is no longer near. I feel my life returning! Joy! Again My pulse is strong, my feeble brain is clear!
ARMAND.

She lives! She lives! Oh, joy! Oh, rapture! Heaven is not cruel! She is mine once more!
DOCTOR.

This unexpected wellness! I'm not sure My diagnosis too precipitate is. Still, I am much inclined to think that your Complaint was true cerebro-digitatis.
DOCTOR

rings the money and puts it in his pocket.
FINALE. CAMILLE.

Oh, happy hour!

Restored to life and thee!

THE BOHEMIAN
ARMAND.

CLUB.

79

Oh, happy hour!

Restored

to life and me!
DOCTOR.

Unhappy hour!

She's got away from me!
CHORUS.

Oh, happy hour!

She's got away from he.
FINIS.

The reference made by the Sire of the Low Jinks to the contest for the "Poet Lariat" championship was based on a conspiracy against Mr. Charles Elliott, whose remarkable productions in verse as related in a previous volume had earned for him the title of "Poet Lariat." Various other members of the Club put forward alleged claims for this title and a jury was appointed to decide as to whom the wreath of thistles belonged. Each claimant read aloud his verses and while some of the contributions were very funny, probably the best part of the "contest" was the cartoon by Thomas Nast. This famous caricaturist, who had done so much for the cause of the Union during the Civil War, and who had afterwards helped to overthrow the rule of Tweed in New York, was visiting San Francisco at this time and was made a member of the Club. He entered with the greatest enjoyment into the spirit of the Jinks, for which
The Poet Lariat Contest.

80
1889

THE ANNALS

OF

he made two of his clever and characteristic tions.

illustra-

It has been said elsewhere that from the beginning the Bohemian Club found some of its most enthusiastic
ANrmyoalffild avy

cers.•

and loyal members among the officers of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. A special provision in the By-laws permitted gentlemen of these professions to join the Club as transient members whenever their duties brought them to San Francisco. And not infrequently when they were away serving their country in the remote places of the earth, some testimonial arrived to prove their allegiance to the Owl. In this year came a splendid albatross from the officers of the United States SteamshipAlbatross in the South Pacific and some Indian trappings from an Army officer on the plains. And it was with equal pleasure that the Owl noted the return of its military disciples from time to time with increased rank and girth, slim-waisted, youthful lieutenants and captains gradually letting out their belts as the years went by and becoming stout, grey-haired admirals and gen·· erals. And even as the Great Bird applauded the writing of a successful book, the painting of a great picture or the production of fine music by its civilian votaries, sO' did it gladly take every opportunity to recognize and applaud exceptionally good service or acts of heroism on the part of its soldier and sailor devotees.

LOW JINKS C.\RTOON:

"THE
BY

POET LARL\T

CONTEST"

THOMAS NAST.

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.
1889

Such an opportunity arose on the occasion of the return to San Francisco from Samoa of Lieutenant James W. Carlin, U. S. Navy, after the disastrous storm which wrecked the German and American fleets in the harbor of Apia. It will be remembered that in this historical hurricane the German ship Eber was capsized, while the Adler and the Olga, together with our own ship, the NiPsic, were cast up on the beach, with considerable loss of life; the United States ship Vandalia was carried on to a reef, many of those who tried to swim ashore being drowned, while many of the others who clung to the wreck were injured or swept away by the Trenton, which crashed alongside of her on her own calamitous way to the shore. The only one of the entire fleet that escaped was the British ship Calliope, whose engines were sufficiently powerful to enable her to hold her own against the tempest. While the American ship Trenton was tossing helplessly toward the reefs she drifted close by the British ship in the latter's desperate struggle to make the entrance of the harbor. The Trenton's crew, forgetful of their own approaching doom. watched with generous interest the efforts of the British ship as she was buffeted back and forth, and when finally she was seen to gain headway and slowly forge toward the open sea and safety, they gave her cheer after cheer, while the Trenton's band paraded on the quarter

The dinner to Lieutenant
Carlin.

THE
I889

ANNALS

OF

deck, played "God Save the Queen." Then to the music of the "Star Spangled Banner" the Trenton went to her own inevitable end. Lieutenant Carlin was the executive officer of the Vandalia) which was totally wrecked with a loss of five officers and thirty-nine of the crew. And it was in this fearful chaos of wind and water and crashing timbers that Mr. Carlin, who was a large and powerful man, did such effective service as to call forth the admiration of his no less heroic shipmates and of his fellow members of the Bohemian Club. And thus it was that the latter gave him a "Wekome Home Dinner" on June 5th, 1889. As may be imagined, the Club was gorgeously decorated with national emblems, particularly of a nautical character; the Stars and Stripes, blocks and tackles, laurel wreaths, boat howitzers, stands of arms, anchors, ships' cutlasses and signal flags made up a glittering scene of military beauty, while the various stuffed Owls of the Club gazed peacefully out upon this warlike show from various points of vantage. Many were the fine speeches that were made and inspiring were the songs. But perhaps the most interesting description of the affair, if not the most accurate, is that given by an outsider, that outsider being no less a person than the distinguished author, Rudyard Kipling. Mr. Kipling had only a few days before landed from the steamship that

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.
r889

had brought him from India, and having a letter of introduction to one of the members, Mr. George W. Spencer, was given a card to the Club and invited to this dinner. But the effulgent sun of Mr. Kipling's fame had not yet risen above the literary horizon to dazzle the eyes of his associates, and so he sat throughout the dinner inconspicuous but nevertheless thoroughly enjoying himself, and from subsequent developments it appears that he took notes, mental notes, between the courses, and these are the comments as afterwards published in "American Notes," New York, by M. J. Ivers & Co.: "Do you know the Bohemian Club of San Francisco? They say its fame extends over the world. It was created somewhat on the lines of the Savage by men who wrote or drew things, and has blossomed into most unrepublican luxury. The ruler of the place is an owl-an owl standing upon a skull and cross-bones, showing forth grimly the wisdom of the man of letters and the end of his hopes for immortality. The owl stands on the staircase, a statue four feet high; is carved in the wood-work, flutters on the frescoed ceiling, is stamped on the notepaper, and hangs on the walls. He is an ancient and honorable bird. Under his wings 'twas my privilege to meet with white men whose lives were not chained down to routine of toil, who wrote

Mr. Rudyard Kipling attends the Carlin dinner.

Lieu/.James W. Carlin

86
1889

THE

ANNALS

OF

magazine

articles instead of reading them hurriedly

in

the pauses of office work; who painted pictures instead of contenting themselves with cheap etchings picked up at another man's sale of effects. Mine were all the rights of social intercourse, craft by craft, that India, stonyhearted stepmother of collectors, has swindled us out of. Treading soft carpets and breathing the incense of superior cigars, I wandered from room to room studying the paintings in which the members of the club had caricatured themselves, their associates and their aims. There was a slick French audacity about the workmanship of these men of toil unbending that went straight to the heart of the beholder. And yet it was not altogether French. A dry grimness of treatment, almost Dutch, marked the difference. The men painted as they spoke-with certainty. The club indulges in revelries which it calls 'jinks'-high and low-at intervals, and each of these gatherings is faithfully portrayed in oils by hands that know their business. In this club were no amateurs spoiling canvas, because they fancied they could handle oils without knowledge of shadows or anatomy-no gentleman of leisure ruining the temper of publishers and an already ruined market with attempts to write 'because everybody writes something these days.' "My hosts were working or had worked for their daily bread with pen or paint, and their talk for the most

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

87
1889

part was of the shop-shoppy-that is to say, delightful. They extended a large hand of welcome and were as brethren, and I did homage to the owl and listened to their talk. "They bore me to a banquet in honor of a brave lieutenant-Carlin, of the 'Vandalia'-who stuck by his ship in the great cyclone at Apia and comported himself as an officer should. On that occasion-'twas at the Bohemian Club-I heard oratory with the roundest of o's, and devoured dinner the memory of which will descend with me into the hungry grave. "There were about forty speeches delivered, and not one of them was average or ordinary. It was my first introduction to the American eagle, screaming for all it was worth. The lieutenant's heroism served as a peg from which the silver-tongued ones turned themselves loose and kicked. "They ransacked the clouds of sunset, the thunderbolts of heaven, the deeps of hell, and the splendor of the resurrection for tropes and metaphors, and hurled the result at the head of the guest of the evening. Never since the morning stars sung together for joy, I learned, had an amazed creation witnessed such superhuman bravery as that displayed by the American navy in the Samoa cyclone. Till earth rotted in the phosphorescent star-and-stripe slime of a decayed universe that God-like

88
1889

THE

ANNALS

OF

gallantry would not be forgotten. I grieve that I cannot give the exact words. My attempt at reproducing their spirit is pale and inadequate. I sat bewildered on a coruscating Niagara of blatherumskite. It was magnificent -it was stupendous-and I was conscious of a wicked desire to hide my face in a napkin and grin. Then, according to rule, they produced their dead, and across the snowy table cloths dragged the corpse of every man slain in the Civil War, and hurled defiance at "our natural enemy" (England, so please you), "with her chain of fortresses across the world." Thereafter they glorified their nation afresh from the beginning, in case any detail should have been overlooked, and that made me uncomfortable for their sakes. How in the world can a white man, a sahib, of our blood, stand up and plaster praise on his own country? He can think as highly as he likes, but this open-mouthed vehemence of adoration struck me almost as indelicate. My hosts talked for rather more than three hours, and at the end seemed ready for three hours more. "But when the lieutenant-such a big, brave, gentle giant-rose to his feet he delivered what seemed to me as the speech of the evening. I remember nearly the whole of it, and it ran something in this way: " 'Gentlemen-It's very good of you to give me this dinner and to tell me all these pretty things, but what I

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.
1889

want you to understand-the fact is, what we want and what we ought to get at once, is a navy-more shipslots of 'em-' "Then we howled the top of the roof off, and I for one fell in love with Carlin on the spot. Wallah! He was a man. "The prince among merchants bade me take no heed to the warlike sentiments of some of the old generals. 'The skyrockets are thrown in for effect,' quoth he, 'and whenever we get on our hind legs we always express a desire to chew up England. It's a sort of family affair.' "And, indeed, when you come to think of it, there is no other country for the American public speaker to trample upon. France has Germany, we have Russia, for Italy Austria is provided, and the humble Pathan possesses an ancestral enemy. Only America stands out of the racket, and therefore to be in fashion makes a sand-bag of the mother country and hangs her when occasion requires. 'The chain of fortresses' man, a fascinating talker, explained to me after the affair that he was compelled to blow off steam. Everybody expected it. When we had chanted 'The Star Spangled Banner' not more than eight times, we adjourned." Mr. Kipling's impression of the number of orators speaks well for the Club's hospitality, but as a matter of fact there were not forty. General Barnes spoke, and

THE
1889

ANNALS

OF

Crittenden Thornton, and Colonel Stuart Taylor and Lieutenant Commander Chenery and the President, and one or two others, maybe, whose names do not appear. Indeed, Mr. Kipling privately offered to increase the number and if the Club had known him then as it has since, he undoubtedly would have been given ample opportunity. Perhaps some of the speeches in the matter of length may, under the circumstances, have seemed to Mr. Kipling like five or six; then again, if some of them were inflammatory, others were charged with patriotic statistics of a cooling and soporific character calculated to allay all feverish symptoms. Nor was the Star Spangled Banner sung more than once. Mr. Kipling's notes coruscate out of reason in this particular. But all this is of no importance. The bright and shining truth is that the Club gave Jim Carlin a dinner that night and it was a great dinner and the Club is glad that Mr. Kipling was there. One of the members of the Club, a young man, a very young man, was editor of the Sunday Supplement of one of the big daily papers at this time, and to him came the unlooked-for distinction of refusing a Kipling story. What one it was, whether "The Incarnation of Krishna Mulvaney," "The Courting of Dinah Shadd," or "The City of Dreadful Night," is not known, but having just landed, as

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

91
r889

already stated, a stranger and almost unknown, Kipling sent a story to the editor of this Sunday Supplement who, glancing at it, replied : "You say this man is just from India? W ell, send this back and ask him to do us a snake story." Perhaps after all there was a journalistic instinct in this Sunday Supplemental youth's fatuity, for did not Kipling afterwards produce "Kaa's Hunting," the greatest snake story ever written? Kipling liked the Club, as his "Notes" amply testify, and frequented the big, sunny library a good deal during his stay, and before he went away he wrote some verses to the Owl. These lines, according to Mr. Robertson, who received them, were very fine, and in an unusual spasm of prudence and caution they were not placed with the other archives of the Club, wherever that may have been, but locked up in the office safe. Then came a change of secretaries, 3 general clearing up, and much to everyone's regret the verses were lost.

~(~ I])
~u~ ~

I@

F,.oln .. The Redwood Ba,.k"

-Dickman

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