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Grade 3 Culminating Task Description: Early Canada Exhibition (A1.3, B1.1, D1.3, 2.

5) Students will showcase their collected work in the manner of a fair, demonstrating one piece of work from each of the unit activities. They will also prepare a short monologue, accompanied by a unique costume. Success Criteria: Citizen role and tasks; lifestyle characteristics Geographical location, environment and structures Assessment: Exhibition Recording Device: Rubric What is it? What are early Canadian communities? (17801850) Activity 1: A2.4, A2.6, A1.1, A1.2, A1.3
Activity 2: A2.3, A2.4, A2.6 Expectation(s): Activity 1 A3.6 describe some key aspects of life in selected First Nations, Mtis, and settler communities in Canada during this period, including the roles of men, women, and children A3.4 describe some of the major challenges facing communities in Canada during this period Activity 2 A3.1 identify various First Nations and some Mtis communities in Upper and Lower Canada from 1780 to 1850, including those living in traditional territory and those who moved or were forced to relocate to new areas in response to European settlement, and locate the areas where they lived, using print, digital, and/or interactive maps or a mapping program A3.2 identify various settler communities in Canada during this period, and locate the areas where they lived, using print, digital, and/or interactive maps or a mapping program A3.3 identify some of the main factors that helped shape the development of settlements in Canada during this period and describe how the physical features of the land and the availability of goods and services can facilitate settlement and enhance community life Activities: Activity 1 Have the students break off into expert groups for each of the topics (Aboriginals, Metis, or Pioneers) to find and summarize information from an assigned book on their topic. Activity 2 Students will learn the regions where different aboriginal people lived and where Europeans settled. They will work on computers on http://education.nationalgeographic.com/.../... to create a map of where these people were located before and after contact. They will examine the topography, vegetation and physical features of these societies.

Early Canada and Around the World


What are the characteristics of Early Canada & Early Civilizations around the world? Overall Expectations for Main Units

Grade 4

Grade 3 Expectations
A1. compare ways of life among some specific groups in Canada around the beginning of the nineteenth century, and describe some of the changes between that era and the present day A2. use the social studies inquiry process to investigate some of the major challenges that different groups and communities faced in Canada from around 1780 to 1850, and key measures taken to address these challenges A3. identify some of the communities in Canada around the beginning of the nineteenth century, and describe their relationships to the land and to each other

Grade 4 Expectations
A1. compare key aspects of life in a few early societies (3000 BCE1500 CE), each from a different region and era and representing a different culture, and describe some key similarities and differences between these early societies and present-day Canadian society A2. use the social studies inquiry process to investigate ways of life and relationships with the environment in two of more early societies (3000 BCE1500 CE), with an emphasis on aspects of the interrelationship between the environment and life in those societies A3. demonstrate an understanding of key aspects of a few early societies (3000 BCE1500 CE), each from a different region and era and representing a different culture, with reference to their political and social organization, daily life, and relationships with the environment and with each other

Culminating Task Description: Early Civilizations Exhibition (A1.4, B1.1, D1.3, 2.5) Students will showcase their collected work in the manner of a fair, demonstrating one piece of work from each of the unit activities. They will also prepare a short monologue, accompanied by a unique costume. Success Criteria: Citizen role and tasks; lifestyle characteristics Geographical location, environment and structures Assessment: Exhibition Recording Device: Rubric What is it? What are early societies around the world (Maya, Ancient Egypt & Medieval Times)? (3000 BCE 1500 CE)
Activity 1: A2.4, A2.6, A1.1, A1.4 Activity 2: A2.3, A2.4, A2.6 Expectation(s): Activity 1 A3.3 describe significant aspects of daily life in two or more early societies A3.2 demonstrate the ability to extract information on daily life in early societies from visual evidence A3.7 describe how two or more early societies were governed A3.8 describe the social organization of some different early societies and the role and status of some significant social and work-related groups in these societies Activity 2 A3.1 identify the location of some different early societies on a globe or on print, digital, and/or interactive maps, and demonstrate the ability to extract information on early societies relationship with the environment from thematic maps Activities: Activity 1 Have the students break off into expert groups for each of the topics (Mayans, Ancient Egyptians, and Medieval) to find and summarize information from an assigned book on their topic. Activity 2 Students will learn the regions where different early societies lived. They will work on computers on http://education.nationalgeographic.com/.../.... They will examine the topography, vegetation and physical features of these societies to determine potential reasons for their decline.

Grade 3 Subject Area: The Arts

Integrated Expectations Subject Area: The Arts

Grade 4

B1.1 engage in dramatic play and role play, with a focus on exploring themes, ideas, characters, and issues from imagination or in stories from diverse communities, times, and places D1.3 use elements of design in art works to communicate ideas, messages, and understandings

B1.1 engage actively in drama exploration and role play, with a focus on exploring drama structures, key ideas, and pivotal moments in their own stories and stories from diverse communities, times, and places D 1.3 use elements of design in art works to communicate ideas, messages, and understandings

Subject Area: Language

Subject Area: Language

1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing in a variety of ways and/or from a variety of sources 2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine if their information supports their own view

1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing using a variety of strategies and oral, print, and electronic sources 2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine whether their information sufficiently supports their own view

Process/Product Expectations A2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into some of the major challenges facing different groups and communities in Canada from around 1780 to 1850 and measures taken to address these challenges A2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into ways of life and relationships with the environment in two or more early societies, with an emphasis on aspects of the interrelationship between the environment and life in those societies

Success Criteria: Activity 1 Describe one of the early Canadian communities' lifestyles (health, housing, food, religion, culture). Describe the citizens roles (roles of men, women and children) in one of the early Canadian communities. Describe the challenges they faced (disease, racism, landownership) in one of the early Canadian communities. Activity 2 Locate three specific First Nations groups in Ontario, Southern Quebec, and Manitoba before and after contact with European settlers. Examine the topography, vegetation and physical features of one of these societies. Assessment: Activity 1 Observation Activity 2 Performance Task Recording Device: Activity 1 Anecdotal Record Activity 2 Rubric

A2.2 gather and organize information on major challenges facing different groups and communities, and on measures taken to address these challenges, using a variety of primary and/or secondary sources
A2.3 analyse and construct print and digital maps, including thematic maps, as part of their investigations into challenges facing different groups and communities in Canada during this period, and measures taken to address these challenges

A2.2 gather and organize information on ways of life and relationships with the environment in early societies, using a variety of primary and secondary sources in both print and electronic formats A2.3 analyse and construct print and/or digital maps, including thematic maps, as part of their investigations into interrelationships between the environment and life in early societies A2.4 interpret and analyse information relevant to their investigations, using a variety of tools
A2.5 evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about ways of life and relationships with the environment in early societies, with an emphasis on aspects of the interrelationship between the environment and life in those societies

Success Criteria: Activity 1 Describe one early societys lifestyle (health, housing, food, religion, culture). Describe citizens roles and hierarchy (roles of men, women, children and government) in one early society. Describe the challenges they faced (disease, racism, land ownership and environmental issues) in one early society. Activity 2 Locate 3 specific early societies around the world. Examine the topography, vegetation and physical features of one of these societies. Assessment: Activity 1 Observation Activity 2 Performance Task Recording Device: Activity 1 Anecdotal Record Activity 2 Rubric

A2.4 interpret and analyse information relevant to their investigations, using a variety of tools A2.5 evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about some of the major challenges facing different groups and communities in Canada during this period, and measures taken to overcome these challenges A2.6 communicate the results of their inquiries using appropriate vocabulary
A1.1 describe some of the similarities and differences in various aspects of everyday life (e.g., housing, clothing, food, religious/spiritual practices, work, recreation, the role of children) of selected groups living in Canada between 1780 and 1850

How does it work? How did society function in early societies? (A2.2, A2.4, A2.5, A1.1)
Expectation(s): A3.9 describe some key reasons why different groups in early societies cooperated or came into conflict at different times A3.10 describe some attempts within early societies to deal with conflict and to establish greater cooperation Activity: Have students research reasons for conflict and cooperation within each early society and create a Venn diagram comparing the ways each culture solved their conflicts. Success Criteria: Describe three key reasons why early societies experienced conflict (territorial expansion, religious reasons, etc.). Describe three ways they dealt with conflict (intermarriage, treaties, alliances, etc.). Assessment: Performance Task Recording Device: Rubric

How does it work? How did society function in Canada in the beginning of the nineteenth century? (A2.2, A2.4, A2.5, A1.2)
Expectation(s): A3.7 describe how some different communities in Canada related to each other during this period, with a focus on whether the relationships were characterized by conflict or cooperation Activity: Have students research reasons for conflict and cooperation between early Canadian Communities and create a Venn diagram comparing the ways they solved their conflicts. Success Criteria: Describe the relationships between the Metis and Europeans, Aboriginals and Metis, and Aboriginals and Europeans. Describe the relationships when sharing technologies and medicine, intermarriages, and through the establishment of farms/villages for each of the 3 groups. Describe 2 conflicts between the 3 groups over land, different religions/ethnicities. Assessment: Performance Task Recording Device: Rubric

A2.6 communicate the results of their inquiries, using appropriate vocabulary A1.1 compare social organization in two or more early societies A1.2 compare aspects of the daily lives of different groups in an early society and explain how difference were related to the social organization of that society A1.3 describe some of the ways in which their daily life differs from the lives of young people from different backgrounds in two or more early societies
A1.4 compare two or more early societies in terms of their relationship with the environment and describe some key similarities and differences in environmental practices between these societies and present- day Canada

What are its interesting characteristics? What were the lifestyle characteristics of early Canadian communities? (A2.4, A2.6, A1.1) Expectation(s):
A3.6 describe some key aspects of life in selected First Nations, Mtis, and settler communities in Canada during this period, including the roles of men, women, and children D1.3 use elements of design in art works to communicate ideas, messages, and understanding

A1.2 compare some of the roles of and challenges facing people in Canada around the beginning of the nineteenth century with those in the present day A1.3 identify some key components of the Canadian identity, and describe some of the ways in which communities were in Canada around the early 1800s have had an impact on Canadian identity

What are its interesting characteristics? What were the lifestyle characteristics of Mayans, Ancient Egyptians, and Medieval men and women? (A2.4, A2.6, A1.2)
Expectation(s): A3.3 describe significant aspects of daily life in two or more early societies D1.3 use elements of design in art works to communicate ideas, messages, and understandings Activity: Have students create a three-dimensional structure of one of the following: castle, pyramid or temple.

Activity: Have students create a three dimensional structure of one of the following: a Native, Settler, or Metis home. Success Criteria: Design a structure using early Canadian communities building methods. Incorporate two rooms that demonstrate how people lived. Incorporate two ways they defended their structure during conflict. Assessment: Performance Task Recording Device: Rubric

Success Criteria: Design a structure using early societies' building methods. Incorporate two rooms that demonstrate how people lived. Incorporate two ways they defended their structure during conflict. Assessment: Performance Task Recording Device: Rubric

How do these characteristics change over time, place, space, etc.? How has the environment changed over time? (A2.2, A2.5, A2.6, A1.1, A1.4)
Expectation(s): A3.4 describe significant physical features and natural processes and events in two or more early societies and how they affected these societies, with a focus on the societies sustainability and food production A3.5 describe the importance of the environment for two or more early societies, including how the local environment affected the ways in which people met their physical needs A3.5 describe the importance of the environment for two or more early societies, including how the local environment affected the ways in which people met their physical needs Activity: Have students research the impact of early societies on the environment. Then have students form debate platforms arguing whether their agricultural practices had positive or negative effects on the environment. Success Criteria: Describe two of the positive and two of the negative effects for clearing land and harvesting resources. Describe two ways in which irrigation affected their life. Describe two different kinds of settlements. Describe two environmental impacts (farming of land, deforestation). Assessment: Classroom Presentation Recording Device: Rating Scale

How do these characteristics change over time, place, space, etc.? How has the environment changed over time? (A2.2, A2.5, A2.6, A1.2)
Expectation(s): A3.5 describe the impact of some different kinds of settlements on the natural environment and on any existing settlements Activity: Have students research the impact that the settlers had on the environment. Then have students form debate platforms arguing whether farming had positive or negative effects on the environment. Success Criteria: Describe two different kinds of settlements. Describe two environmental impacts (farming of land, deforestation). Describe two positive and two negative effects for clearing land and harvesting resources. Assessment: Classroom Presentation Recording Device: Rating Scale

What are these changes related to? What caused these environmental changes? (A2.1, A2.2, A2.6)
Expectations: A3.6 describe some key aspects of life in selected First Nations, Mtis, and settler communities in Canada during this period, including the roles of men, women, and children Activity: Go on a class trip to the Royal Ontario Museum. Students will have a tour of the First Peoples of Canada gallery. Have students discuss and answer questions about what they learned. Deconstruction: Describe 2 types of technology used. Describe 2 different agricultural developments and their effects on the environment. Describe 2 developments in medicine and transportation. Assessment: Question and Answer Recording Device: Checklist

What are these changes related to? What caused these environmental changes? (A2.1, A2.2, A2.6)
Expectations: A3.6 identify and describe some of the major scientific and technological developments in the ancient and medieval world Activity: Go on a class trip to the Royal Ontario Museum. Students will have a tour of the Egyptians gallery. Have students discuss and answer questions about what they learned. Deconstruction: Describe 2 types of technologies used. Describe 2 different agricultural developments and their effects on the environment. Describe 2 developments in medicine and transportation. Assessment: Question and Answer Recording Device: Checklist

What could/should/might/will happen if? What might happen if someone from early Canada was transported to our time? (A2.1, A2.4, A1.1, A1.3)
Expectation(s): A3.6 describe some key aspects of life in selected First Nations, Mtis, and settler communities in Canada during this period, including the roles of men, women, and children 1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing in a variety of ways and/or from a variety of sources 2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine if their information supports their own view Activity: Write a journal from the perspective of an early Canadian (European Settler, Aboriginal or Metis) who has been transported to our time. What would they think about our life today? Success Criteria: Describe three differences to their previous way of life (in what they would see, how people would act, etc.). Describe three similarities to their previous way of life (certain landscapes that may be the same, artifacts in museums from their time, etc.). Assessment: See Activity Below Recording Device: See Activity Below

What could/should/might/will happen if? What might happen if someone from early society was transported to our time? (A2.1, A2.4, A1.2, A1.3)
Expectation(s): A3.3 describe significant aspects of daily life in two or more early societies 1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing using a variety of strategies and oral, print, and electronic sources 2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine whether their information sufficiently supports their own view Activity: Write a journal from the perspective of a person from an early society (Ancient Egypt, Medieval Times, or Mayan Society) who has been transported to our time. What would they think about our life today? Deconstruction: Describe three differences to their previous way of life (in what they would see, how people would act, etc.). Describe three similarities to their previous way of life (certain landscapes that may be the same, artifacts in museums from their time, etc.). Assessment: See Activity Below Recording Device: See Activity Below

What could/should/might/will/was done about it? What might the early Canadian do about the changes in our society? (A2.1, A2.4, A1.1)
Expectation(s): A3.6 describe some key aspects of life in selected First Nations, Mtis, and settler communities in Canada during this period, including the roles of men, women, and children 1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing in a variety of ways and/or from a variety of sources 2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine if their information supports their own view Activity: Continue writing a journal from the perspective of an early Canadian (European Settler, Aboriginal or Metis) who has been transported to our time. Describe what the early Canadian may do about the changes that they see in our society. Deconstruction: Describe three ways they may attempt to change what they experience (e.g., Early Canadian may get into politics to attempt to change things to the way they use to be, they may avoid the lifestyle today and live out in the forest, they may embrace the new society.). Assessment: Response Journal Recording Device: Rubric

What could/should/might/will/was done about it? What might the Mayan/Egyptian/Medieval man or woman do about the changes in our society? (A2.1, A2.4, A1.2, A1.3)
Expectation(s): A3.3 describe significant aspects of daily life in two or more early societies 1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing using a variety of strategies and oral, print, and electronic sources 2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine whether their information sufficiently supports their own view Activity: Continue writing a journal from the perspective of a person from an early society (Ancient Egypt, Medieval Times, or Mayan Society) who has been transported to our time. Describe what the person from an early society may do about the changes that they see in our society. Deconstruction: Describe three ways they may attempt to change what they experience (e.g., The person from an early society may go into politics to attempt to change things to the way they use to be, they may visit the areas where they once lived and attempt to continue living there today, they may embrace the new society.). Assessment: Response Journal Recording Device: Rubric