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MIAA360: Lesson Study

Teaching Dates: May 5, 2015

Concept for this lesson: Fractions on a number line

Grade: 3

Placement of Lesson within Unit:


This lesson takes place within module 6 of Engage New York. This lesson falls after we have been exploring fractions on a number
line between zero and one, and before we explore fractions on a number line including multiple whole numbers that may be greater
than 3.
Objective:
Students will see relationships between a whole and the fraction of that whole. For example, there is a relationship between two
wholes and 6/3 because 2x3=6.
Assessment:
Formative assessment will include informal answers, class discussion, and what is written on number lines during the exploring stage
of the lesson. At the end of the period, students will complete an exit ticket which will help to inform the next days lesson.
Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Engage

Introduction of Teaching Team and the plan for the


lesson.

Time:
5-10 minutes
Materials:
Whiteboard for
teacher use.

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

21st Century Skills


used throughout:
Reason abstractly and
quantitatively

Today were going to use what we know about


fractions to plot fractions on a number line
If we want to split a whole rectangle into a
fraction, how do I do that?
Instead of the discussion I had planned, I kept
yesterdays example on the board. We had a
review conversation based on what we did
yesterday with labeling fractions on a number line
between one and zero. We did not discuss

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study


Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,
NGSS,
21st Century

You can cut it or draw lines to split it up.

Mathematical
Practices:
Model with
Mathematics

CCSS Math
Standards:

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

segmenting a rectangle or circle. We also


discussed creating a number bond based on the
model given (1/4 and 3/4 makes one whole)

3.NF.1. Understand a
fraction 1/b as the
quantity formed by 1
part when a whole is
partitioned into b equal
parts; understand a
fraction a/b as the
quantity formed by a
parts of size 1/b.

What if we want to split a whole circle into


fractions?

You can draw a line through it or cut it


through the middle.

How do we label those fractions?

We write the unit fraction in the piece.

What if we wanted to count up to show how


many of each piece we have?

We can put them in a group and say how


many we have. We can shade in a certain
number of them and write how many are
shaded and how many are unshaded.

How can I label a number line between zero


and one to show fifths?

You draw four lines to make five pieces,


and label 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, 4/5 and 1.

We extended on yesterdays number line that


showed fourths between zero and one to also show
between one and two. I then erased the part of the
number line between zero and one and we just
evaluated what was left (between one and two).

Students caught on immediately to this


example, and were able to have
productive conversation and evaluate the
number line, telling why we labeled the
fractions as we did.

What if I have a number line between 2 and 3?


How would I show fifths on that number line?

You would do the same thing as between


zero and one.
(This is where I expect them to be
incorrect and where our inquiry will
start)

Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,
NGSS,
21st Century

Explore:

Today we will be exploring fractions greater


than one on a number line.

Students will tape a length of yarn on


their desk to use as a number line. They
will label the ends with consecutive
whole numbers and label the fractions
between.

CCSS Math Standards


3.NF.2. Understand a
fraction as a number on
the number line;
represent fractions on a

Time:
15-20 minutes
Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Materials:
*Whiteboard markers
*Whiteboard erasers
*12-15 inch pieces of
yarn (One for each
student)
*Tape

Lets label the ends of this number line as zero


and one. Now lets section it into fractions.
What fractional unit should we use?
(Section and label the number line, and model
on overhead)

-Students follow along

This was part of the whole-group discussion we


did previously. While we were exploring as a
group, we then chose to explore thirds between 2
and 3 we already explored between 0 and 1 and 1
and 2.
Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Stage of Lesson

Now lets erase the fractions and whole


numbers, and make this now show (whatever
fractional unit they chose) between 1 and 2.

-Students follow along

Since we know that one whole is (fraction), now


lets see how many (fractional units) are in two
wholes.

Students label fractions adding on to


what they had labeled as one whole.

Ok, now Id like you and your partner to


explore what happens when you make the
number line between 2 and 3. When youre
done raise your hand and Ill check it.
Students explored how many thirds are between 3
and 4 wholes.
-After they get the ok, have students explore
with other fractional units between numbers
greater than one whole.
-Teacher will continue to check each completed
number line.

At this point, one student already saw


and shared the connection that there is a
multiplicative relationship between the
number of thirds and the whole. This
helped other students to quickly figure
out how many of each fractional unit
were in a given whole. One team even
wrote their number line between 1,000
and 1,001 and correctly stated that there
are 4,000 fourths in 1,000.

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study


Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

number line diagram. a.


Represent a fraction 1/b
on a number line
diagram by defining the
interval from 0 to 1 as
the whole and
partitioning it into b
equal parts. Recognize
that each part has size
1/b and that the
endpoint of the part
based at 0 locates the
number 1/b on the
number line. b.
Represent a fraction a/b
on a number line
diagram by marking off
a lengths 1/b from 0.
Recognize that the
resulting interval has
size a/b and that its
endpoint locates the
number a/b on the
number line

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,
NGSS,
3

21st Century

Explain:
Time:
10 minutes
Materials:

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Stage of Lesson

What did you notice while you were exploring


with fractions greater than one?
This part of the discussion still took place, and it
was widely restated that you can easily use
multiplication to figure out how many of a given
fractional unit are in a given whole.

Its like multiplication.


We just keep adding on.
We can count on and then
Some students incorrectly stated that
theres an additive relationship between
the whole and the number of a fractional
unit. They added 2+4 to say that there
are 6/4 in two wholes. The class
discussed and the students were able to
see their mistake and model with tape
diagram-like rectangles.

Mathematical
Practice:

-Have students show (use camera to project) what


they created and explain how it supports their
ideas.

-Students should discuss similarities or


differences in their findings and
ideas/thoughts.

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,
NGSS,
21st Century

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,

Construct viable
arguments and
critique the reasoning
of others.

Extend:
Time:
___ minutes
Materials:
Evaluate
Consider Decisions
Point Assessments

Stage of Lesson

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study


Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Student Activities

NGSS,
21st Century

Evaluate:
Time:
5 minutes

*Give exit ticket

*Complete exit ticket


Students were able to successfully plot
fractions on a number line, however
many of them had difficulty with making
equal spacing. Using their fraction kit
strips to plan their spacing will help with
this, and I will do that in the next lesson.

Materials:
Evaluate
Consider Decisions
Point Assessments

Follow Up Lesson
Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Engage

Introduction of Teaching Team and the plan for the


lesson.

Time:
10 minutes
Materials:
*whiteboard, markers

Evaluate
Consider Decision
Points Assessments

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

21st Century
Skills used
throughout:
Reason abstractly
and quantitatively

This would begin with students comparing fractions


with the same denominator. All of the work done in
the explore section will be common denominators.
How can we use a number line to show fractions?

We split it into equal spaces.

What if I wanted to use a number line to compare


fractions? How could I do that?

You can look at where they are on the


number line.

Can someone come up and show us how to


partition this number line [between zero and one]
into fourths so we can compare and ?
--have students give input to correctness of student
work; thumbs up/thumbs down.

(Student volunteer comes up and partitions


number line)

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study


Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Standard
CCCSSM,
MPS, NGSS,
21st Century

So which fraction is less? How do you know?

Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Explore:

Have students use their fraction strips to partition their


number lines today so their spacing is equal.

Time:
20 minutes

Walk around and monitor student progress, correct as


needed.

Materials:
*Student desks
used as
whiteboards.
*Student
whiteboard
markers and
erasers.
*Student fraction
kit strips.
*Fraction
comparison
handout for
students.
*Strings for
number line

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study


Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

is less because if you jumped you


would have walked less than if you jumped
of the line.
is closer to zero, so its less.
Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities
Students will work as partners to partition
and compare fractions. They will fill in the
>, <, = sign on the handout and do all of
their work on their desks.

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,
NGSS,
21st Century
Mathematical
Practices:
Model with
Mathematics
CCCSS:
3.NF.3
d. Compare two
fractions with the
same numerator
or the same
denominator by
reasoning about
their size.
Recognize that
comparisons are
valid only when
the two fractions
refer to the same
whole. Record the
results of
comparisons with
the symbols >, =,
or <, and justify
the conclusions,
e.g., by using a
visual fraction
model.

Evaluate
Consider
Decision Points
Assessments
Stage of Lesson

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

Explain:

What did you notice about comparing those


fractions?

*The fraction with the greater numerator


will be greater.
*When the number on top is bigger you
know that one is bigger.

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses

Time:
5 minutes

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,
NGSS,
21st Century

Materials:

Evaluate
Consider
Decision Points
Assessments
Stage of Lesson

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study


Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,

Student Activities

Extend:
Time:
15 minutes
Materials:
Evaluate
Consider
Decisions Point
Assessments
Stage of Lesson

Evaluate:

What if we didnt have fractions that had the same


denominator and the size of the pieces wasnt the
same?

*The more pieces you have might not be


the greater fraction because the pieces
arent the same size.

Use your fraction strips to plot and label fourths


and thirds on the same number line.

-Students label.

Lets look at 2/4 and 2/3. Which one is greater? Did


it matter that they had the same
numerator/number of pieces?

*No because the size of the pieces are


different.

Teacher Does
Directions or Teacher Questions

Student Does
Expected Student Responses
Student Activities

*Give exit ticket

*Complete exit ticket

NGSS,
21st Century

Standard
CCCSSM, MPS,
NGSS,
21st Century

Time:
5 minutes
Materials:
-Exit ticket
Evaluate
Consider
Decisions Point
Assessments
Reflection
Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study
Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd

Collaborating with my peers during this process has been one of the most valuable experiences in this
program. In previous years it has been incredibly difficult for students to grasp the concept of greater and
equivalent fractions, and I was having a difficult time with the new curriculum and seeing how I could create a
positive flow from plotting on a number line, to using that number line to compare. My greatest fear was that
students would get too overwhelmed and make silly mistakes when moving from simple plotting, to using those
plots to compare. The reflection notes my partners gave were very valuable in my next steps. Using the fraction kit
strips to evenly space their plotted points on the number line was a great idea that ended up helping an incredible
amount in the second lesson as students plotted different units on the same number line. If the placement of their
plot points for fourths were off, it might effect their comparison with thirds, for example, and the second lesson
wouldnt have been quite as successful.

Teaching and Learning Collaborative Lesson Study


Adapted from K-12 Alliance/WestEd