Led Zeppelin - Wikipedia

,

Led Zeppelin

Background information Origin London, England Genres Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock, folk rock Years active 1968–1980 (Reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic, Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds, Page and Plant, The Honeydrippers, The Firm, Coverdale and Page, Band of Joy, Robert Plant & Alison Krauss, Them Crooked Vultures, XYZ Website ledzeppelin.com Former members Jimmy Page John Paul Jones Robert Plant John Bonham Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in 1968 by Jimmy Page (guitar). Robert Plant (vocals, harmonica), John Paul Jones (bass guitar, keyboards, mandolin) and John Bonham (drums). With their heavy, guitar-driven sound, Led Zeppelin are regarded as one of the first heavy metal bands, helping to pioneer the genre.[1][2][3][4][5] However, the band's individualistic style drew from many sources and transcends any one genre.[6] Their rock-infused interpretation of the blues and folk genres[7] also incorporated rockabilly,[8] reggae,[9] soul,[10] funk,[11] classical, Celtic, Indian, Arabic, pop, Latin and country.[12] The band did not release the popular songs from their albums as singles in the UK, as they preferred to develop the concept of "album-oriented rock".[4][13] Close to 30 years after disbanding following Bonham's death in 1980, the band continues to be held in high regard for their artistic achievements, commercial success, and broad influence. The band has sold an estimated 200 million albums worldwide,[14][15][16] including 111.5 million certified units in the United States[17] and they have had all of their original studio albums reach the top 10 of the Billboard album chart in the U.S., with six reaching the number one spot.[18] Led Zeppelin are ranked #1 on VH1's 100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock.[19] Rolling Stone magazine has described Led Zeppelin as "the heaviest band of all time", "the biggest band of the '70s" and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[5][20]Similarly, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes Led Zeppelin being "as influential in that decade (70s) as the Beatles were in the prior one". [21] On 10 December 2007 the surviving members of Led Zeppelin reunited (along with deceased drummer John Bonham's son, Jason) for the Ahmet Ertegün Tribute Concert at The O2 Arena in London. Contents 1 History 1.1 The New Yardbirds (1968) 1.2 Early days (1968–1970) 1.3 "The biggest band in the world" (1971–1977) 1.4 Bonham's death and breakup (1978–1980) 1.5 Post-Led Zeppelin (1981–2007) 1.6 2007 reunion

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1.7 Reunion tour reports (2008-2009) Songs in other media Allegations of plagiarism Discography See also References Published sources External links

History The New Yardbirds (1968) The beginning of Led Zeppelin can be traced back to the English blues-influenced rock band The Yardbirds.[4] Jimmy Page joined The Yardbirds in 1966 to play bass guitar after the original bassist, Paul Samwell-Smith, left the group. Shortly after, Page switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual-lead guitar line up with Jeff Beck. Following the departure of Beck from the group in October 1966, The Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, were beginning to wind down. Page wanted to form a supergroup with himself and Beck on guitars, and The Who's rhythm section—drummer Keith Moon and bassist John Entwistle. Vocalists Donovan, Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[22] The group never formed, although Page, Beck and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", which is featured on Beck's 1968 album, Truth. The recording session also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones, who told Page that he would be interested in collaborating with him on future projects.[23] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968. However, they were still committed to performing several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use the Yardbirds name to fulfil the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for lead singer, Terry Reid, declined the offer, but suggested Robert Plant, a West Bromwich singer.[4][24] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending a drummer, John Bonham from nearby Redditch.[4][25] When Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer (he would later take the photograph that appeared on the back of Led Zeppelin's debut album), John Paul Jones, at the suggestion of his wife, contacted Page about the vacant position.[26] Being familiar with Jones' credentials, Page agreed to bring in Jones as the final piece. The group came together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[27][28] Page suggested that they try playing "Train Kept A-Rollin'", a rockabilly song popularised by Johnny Burnette that had been given new life by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," recalled Jones, "I knew this was going to be great... We locked together as a team immediately."[29] Shortly afterwards, the group played together on the final day of sessions for the P. J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's song "Jim's Blues" was the first studio track to feature all four members of the future Led Zeppelin.[30] Proby recalled, "Come the last day we found we had some studio time, so I just asked the band to play while I just came up with the words. ... They weren't Led Zeppelin at the time, they were the New Yardbirds and they were going to be my band."[31] The band completed the Scandinavian tour as The New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen Clubs in Gladsaxe, Denmark on 7 September 1968.[32][33] However, it was clear to the band that performing under the old Yardbirds tag was akin to working under false pretences, and upon returning from Scandinavia they decided to change their name.[34] One account of the band's naming, which has become almost legendary, has it that Keith Moon and John Entwistle, drummer and bassist for The Who, respectively, suggested that a possible supergroup containing themselves, Jimmy Page, and Jeff Beck would go down like a lead zeppelin, a term Entwistle used to describe a bad gig.[35] The group deliberately dropped the 'a' in Lead at the suggestion of their manager, Peter Grant, to prevent "thick Americans"[23] from

pronouncing it "leed".[36] Grant also secured for the new band an advance deal of $200,000 from Atlantic Records in November 1968, then the biggest deal of its kind for a new band.[31] Atlantic was a label known for a catalogue of blues, soul and jazz artists, but in the late 1960s it began to take an interest in progressive British rock acts, and signed Led Zeppelin without having ever seen them, largely on the recommendation of singer Dusty Springfield.[28][37] Under the terms of the contract secured by Grant, the band alone would decide when they would release albums and tour, and had final say over the contents and design of each album. They also would decide how to promote each release and which (if any) tracks to release as singles,[29] and formed their own company, Superhype, to handle all publishing rights.[38] Early days (1968–1970) With their first album not yet released, the band made their live debut under the name "Led Zeppelin" at the University of Surrey, Guildford on 25 October 1968.[39] This was followed by a US concert debut on 26 December 1968 (when promoter Barry Fey added them to a bill in Denver, Colorado[40]) before moving on to the west coast for dates in Los Angeles, San Francisco and other cities.[41] Led Zeppelin's eponymous debut album was released on 12 January 1969, during their first US tour. The album's blend of blues, folk and eastern influences with distorted amplification made it one of the pivotal records in the creation of heavy metal music.[42] However, Plant has commented that it is unfair for people to typecast the band as heavy metal, since about a third of their music was acoustic.[43] On their first album Plant receives no credit for his contributions to the songwriting, a result of his previous association with CBS Records.[44] Live in Montreux, 1970In an interview for the Led Zeppelin Profiled radio promo CD (1990) Page said that the album took about 36 hours of studio time to create (including mixing), and stated that he knows this because of the amount charged on the studio bill.[28][45] Peter Grant claimed the album cost £1,750 to produce (including artwork).[23] By 1975, the album had grossed $7,000,000.[46] Led Zeppelin's album cover met an interesting protest when, at a 28 February 1970 gig in Copenhagen, the band were billed as "The Nobs" as the result of a threat of legal action from Countess Eva von Zeppelin (granddaughter of Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin, the creator of the Zeppelin airships), who, upon seeing the logo of the Hindenburg crashing in flames, threatened to have the show pulled off the air.[47] She is reported to have said: "They may be world famous, but a couple of shrieking monkeys are not going to use a privileged family name without permission." In their first year, Led Zeppelin managed to complete four US and four UK concert tours, and also released their second album, entitled Led Zeppelin II.[31] Recorded almost entirely on the road at various North American recording studios, the second album was an even greater success than the first and reached the number one chart position in the US and the UK.[48] Here the band further developed ideas established on their debut album, creating a work which became even more widely acclaimed and arguably more influential.[49] It has been suggested that Led Zeppelin II largely wrote the blueprint for heavy metal bands that followed it.[49][50] Following the album's release, Led Zeppelin completed several more tours of the United States. They played often, initially in clubs and ballrooms, then in larger auditoriums and eventually stadiums as their popularity grew.[4] Led Zeppelin concerts could last more than four hours, with expanded, improvised live versions of their song repertoire. Many of these shows have been preserved as Led Zeppelin bootleg recordings. It was also during this period of intensive concert touring that the band developed a reputation for off-stage excess.[12] One alleged example of such extravagance was the shark episode, or red snapper incident, which is said to have taken place at the Edgewater Inn in Seattle, Washington, on 28 July 1969.[12][23]

Led Zeppelin's popularity in the early years was dwarfed by their triumphant mid-seventies successes and it is this period that continues to define the band.[12][23] The band's image also changed as members began to wear elaborate, flamboyant clothing. Led Zeppelin began travelling in a private jet airliner (nicknamed The Starship),[12][51] rented out entire sections of hotels (most notably the Continental Hyatt House in Los Angeles, known colloquially as the "Riot House"), and became the subject of many of rock's most famous stories of debauchery. One escapade involved John Bonham riding a motorcycle through a rented floor of the Riot House,[12] while another involved the destruction of a room in the Tokyo Hilton, leading to the band being banned from that establishment for life.[28][52] However, although Led Zeppelin developed a reputation for trashing their hotel suites and throwing television sets out of the windows, some suggest that these tales have been somewhat exaggerated. Music journalist Chris Welch argues that "[Led Zeppelin's] travels spawned many stories, but it was a myth that [they] were constantly engaged in acts of wanton destruction and lewd behaviour."[28] For the composition of their third album, Led Zeppelin III, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant retired to Bron-Yr-Aur, a remote cottage in Wales, in 1970. The result was a more acoustic sound (and a song, "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp", misspelt as "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" on the album cover), which was strongly influenced by folk and Celtic music, and revealed the band's versatility.[38] The album's rich acoustic sound initially received mixed reactions, with many critics and fans surprised at the turn taken away from the primarily electric compositions of the first two albums. Over time, however, its reputation has improved and Led Zeppelin III is now generally praised.[53][54] It has a unique album cover featuring a wheel which, when rotated, displays various images through cut outs in the main jacket sleeve. The album's opening track, "Immigrant Song", was released in November 1970 by Atlantic Records as a single against the band's wishes.[55] It included their only non-album b-side, "Hey Hey What Can I Do". Even though the band saw their albums as indivisible, whole listening experiences—and their manager, Peter Grant, maintained an aggressive pro-album stance—some singles were released without their consent. The group also increasingly resisted television appearances, enforcing their preference that their fans hear and see them in live concerts.[28][56] "The biggest band in the world" (1971–1977) The four symbols on the label and inside sleeve of Led Zeppelin IV, representing (from left to right) Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham, and Robert Plant.Led Zeppelin's fourth album was released on 8 November 1971. There was no indication of a title or a band name on the original cover, as the band disdained being labelled as "hyped" and "overrated" by the music press, and in response wanted to prove that the music could sell itself by giving no indication of who they were.[24] The album remained officially untitled and is most commonly referred to as Led Zeppelin IV, though it is variously referred to by the four symbols appearing on the record label, as Four Symbols and The Fourth Album (both titles were used in the Atlantic Records catalogue), as Untitled, Zoso, Runes, or IV.[57] Led Zeppelin IV further refined the band's unique formula of combining earthy, acoustic elements with heavy metal and blues emphases. The album included examples of hard rock, such as "Black Dog" and an acoustic track, "Going to California" (a tribute to Joni Mitchell). "Rock and Roll" is a tribute to the early rock music of the 1950s. In 2007, the song was used prominently in Cadillac automobile commercials—one of the few instances of Led Zeppelin's surviving members licensing songs.[58] "Stairway to Heaven" The song became one of the most-requested recordings in rock history.

The album is one of the best-selling albums in history and its massive popularity cemented Led Zeppelin's superstardom in the 1970s. To date it has sold 23 million copies in the United States.[59] The track "Stairway to Heaven", although never released as a single, is sometimes quoted as being the most requested,[60] and most played[61] album-oriented rock FM radio song. In 2005, the magazine Guitar World held a poll of readers in which "Stairway to Heaven" was voted as having the greatest guitar solo of all time.[62] Led Zeppelin's next album, Houses of the Holy, was released in 1973. It featured further experimentation, with longer tracks and expanded use of synthesisers and mellotron orchestration. The song "Houses of the Holy" does not appear on its namesake album, even though it was recorded at the same time as other songs on the album; it eventually made its way onto the 1975 album Physical Graffiti.[23] The orange album cover of Houses of the Holy depicts images of nude children[63] climbing up the Giant's Causeway (in County Antrim, Northern Ireland). Although the children are not depicted from the front, this was controversial at the time of the album's release, and in some areas, such as the "Bible Belt" and Spain, the record was banned.[64][65] The album topped the charts, and Led Zeppelin's subsequent concert tour of the United States in 1973 broke records for attendance, as they consistently filled large auditoriums and stadiums. At Tampa Stadium, Florida, they played to 56,800 fans (breaking the record set by The Beatles at Shea Stadium in 1965), and grossed $309,000.[23] Three sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden in New York were filmed for a motion picture, but the theatrical release of this project (The Song Remains the Same) would be delayed until 1976. Before the final night's performance, $180,000 of the band's money from gate receipts was stolen from a safety deposit box at the Drake Hotel.[66] It was never recovered.[67] Led Zeppelin live at Chicago Stadium, January 1975.In 1974, Led Zeppelin took a break from touring and launched their own record label, Swan Song, named after one of only five Led Zeppelin songs which the band never released commercially (Page later re-worked the song with his band, The Firm, and it appears as "Midnight Moonlight" on their first album). The record label's logo, based on a drawing called Evening: Fall of Day (1869) by William Rimmer, features a picture of Apollo.[68] The logo can be found on much Led Zeppelin memorabilia, especially t-shirts. In addition to using Swan Song as a vehicle to promote their own albums, the band expanded the label's roster, signing artists such as Bad Company, Pretty Things, Maggie Bell, Detective, Dave Edmunds, Midnight Flyer, Sad Café and Wildlife.[4] The label was successful while Led Zeppelin existed, but folded less than three years after they disbanded.[23] 24 February 1975 saw the release of Led Zeppelin's first double album, Physical Graffiti, which was their first release on the Swan Song Records label. It consisted of fifteen songs, eight of which were recorded at Headley Grange in 1974, and the remainder being tracks previously recorded but not released on earlier albums. A review in Rolling Stone magazine referred to Physical Graffiti as Led Zeppelin's "bid for artistic respectability," adding that the only competition the band had for the title of 'World's Best Rock Band' were The Rolling Stones and The Who.[69] The album was a massive fiscal and critical success. Shortly after the release of Physical Graffiti, all previous Led Zeppelin albums simultaneously re-entered the top-200 album chart,[23] and the band embarked on another U.S. tour, again playing to record-breaking crowds. In May 1975, Led Zeppelin played five highly successful, sold-out nights at the Earls Court Arena in London, footage of which was released in 2003, on the Led Zeppelin DVD. Following these triumphant Earls Court appearances Led Zeppelin took a holiday and planned a series of outdoor summer concerts in America, scheduled to open with two dates in San Francisco.[56] These plans were thwarted in August 1975 when Robert Plant and his wife Maureen were involved in a serious car crash while on holiday in Rhodes, Greece. Robert suffered a broken ankle and Maureen was badly injured; a blood transfusion saved her life.[23] Unable to tour, Plant

headed to the channel island of Jersey to spend August and September recuperating, with Bonham and Page in tow. The band then reconvened in Malibu, California. It was during this forced hiatus that much of the material for their next album, Presence, was written. "Achilles Last Stand" Jimmy Page calls the guitar solo his favorite. By this time, Led Zeppelin were the world's number one rock attraction,[56] having outsold most bands of the time, including the Rolling Stones.[23] Presence, released in March 1976, marked a change in the Led Zeppelin sound towards more straightforward, guitar-based jams, departing from the acoustic ballads and intricate arrangements featured on their previous albums. Though it was a platinum seller, Presence received mixed responses from critics and fans and some speculated the band's legendary excesses may have caught up with them.[4][70] The recording of Presence coincided with the beginning of Page's heroin use, which may have interfered with Led Zeppelin's later live shows and studio recordings, although Page has denied this.[71] Despite the original criticisms, Jimmy Page has called Presence his favourite album, and its opening track "Achilles Last Stand" his favourite Led Zeppelin song. In an interview with a Swedish TV program, Plant stated that Presence is the album that sounds the most "Led Zeppelin" of all their LPs.[72] Plant's injuries prevented Led Zeppelin from touring in 1976. Instead, the band finally completed the concert film The Song Remains The Same, and the soundtrack album of the film. The recording had taken place during three nights of concerts at Madison Square Garden in July 1973, during the band's concert tour of the United States. The film premiered in New York on 20 October 1976, but was given a lukewarm reception by critics and fans.[4] The film was particularly unsuccessful in the UK, where, after being unwilling to tour since 1975 due to a taxation exile, Led Zeppelin were facing an uphill battle to recapture the public spotlight at home.[73] Plant (left) and Page (right) on stage during the 1977 North American tourIn 1977, Led Zeppelin embarked on another major concert tour of North America. Here the band set another attendance record, with 76,229 people attending their Pontiac Silverdome concert on 30 April.[74] It was, according to the Guinness Book of Records, the largest attendance to date for a single act show.[56] However, though the tour was financially profitable it was beset with off-stage problems. On 3 June a concert at Tampa Stadium was cut short because of a severe thunderstorm, despite tickets printed with "Rain or Shine". A riot broke out amongst the audience, resulting in several arrests and injuries.[75] After a 23 July show[76] at the "Day on the Green" festival at the Oakland Coliseum in Oakland, California, John Bonham and members of the band's support staff (including manager Peter Grant and security coordinator John Bindon) were arrested after a member of promoter Bill Graham's staff was badly beaten during the performance. A member of the staff had allegedly slapped Grant's son when he was taking down a dressing room sign. This was seen by John Bonham, who came over and kicked the man. Then, when Grant heard about this, he went into the trailer, along with Bindon and assaulted the man while tour manager Richard Cole stood outside and guarded the trailer.[23][77] The following day's second Oakland concert[78] would prove to be the band's final live appearance in the United States. Two days later, as the band checked in at a French Quarter hotel for their 30 July performance at the Louisiana Superdome, news came that Plant's five year old son, Karac, had died from a stomach virus. The rest of the tour was immediately cancelled, prompting widespread speculation about the band's future.[4][28] Bonham's death and breakup (1978–1980) November 1978 saw the group recording again, this time at Polar Studios in

Stockholm, Sweden. The resultant album was In Through the Out Door, which exhibited a degree of sonic experimentation that again drew mixed reactions from critics. Nevertheless, the band still commanded legions of loyal fans, and the album easily reached #1 in the UK and the U.S. in just its second week on the Billboard album chart. As a result of this album's release, Led Zeppelin's entire catalogue made the Billboard Top 200 between the weeks of 27 October and 3 November 1979.[56] In August 1979, after two warm-up shows in Copenhagen, Denmark, Led Zeppelin headlined two concerts at the Knebworth Music Festival, where crowds of close to 120,000 witnessed the return of the band. However, Plant was not eager to tour full-time again, and even considered leaving Led Zeppelin. He was persuaded to stay by Peter Grant. A brief, low-key European tour was undertaken in June and July 1980, featuring a stripped-down set without the usual lengthy jams and solos. At one show on 27 June, in Nuremberg, Germany, the concert came to an abrupt end in the middle of the third song when John Bonham collapsed on stage and was rushed to a hospital.[79] Press speculation arose that Bonham's problem was caused by an excess of alcohol and drugs, but the band claimed that he had simply overeaten, and they completed the European tour on 7 July, at Berlin.[23][80] On 24 September 1980, Bonham was picked up by Led Zeppelin assistant Rex King to attend rehearsals at Bray Studios for the upcoming tour of the United States, the band's first since 1977, scheduled to commence on 17 October.[28] During the journey Bonham had asked to stop for breakfast, where he downed four quadruple vodkas (450 ml), with a ham roll. After taking a bite of the ham roll he said to his assistant, "Breakfast". He continued to drink heavily when he arrived at the studio. A halt was called to the rehearsals late in the evening and the band retired to Page's house — The Old Mill House in Clewer, Windsor. After midnight, Bonham had fallen asleep and was taken to bed and placed on his side. At 1:45 pm the next day Benji LeFevre (who had replaced Richard Cole as Led Zeppelin's tour manager) and John Paul Jones found him dead.[28] Bonham was 32 years old.[81] The cause of death was asphyxiation from vomit, and a verdict of accidental death was returned at an inquest held on 27 October.[28] An autopsy found no other drugs in Bonham's body. Bonham was cremated on 10 October 1980, and his ashes buried at Rushock parish church in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England. Despite rumours that Cozy Powell, Carmine Appice, Barriemore Barlow, Simon Kirke or Bev Bevan would join the group as his replacement, the remaining members decided to disband after Bonham's death. They issued a press statement on 4 December 1980 confirming that the band would not continue without Bonham. "We wish it to be known that the loss of our dear friend, and the deep sense of undivided harmony felt by ourselves and our manager, have led us to decide that we could not continue as we were."[28] Post-Led Zeppelin (1981–2007) In 1982, the surviving members of the group released a collection of out-takes from various sessions during Led Zeppelin's career, entitled Coda. It included two tracks taken from the band's performance at the Royal Albert Hall in 1970, one each from the Led Zeppelin III and Houses of the Holy sessions, and three from the In Through the Out Door sessions. It also featured a 1976 John Bonham drum instrumental with electronic effects added by Jimmy Page, called "Bonzo's Montreux". On 13 July 1985, Page, Plant and Jones reunited for the Live Aid concert at JFK Stadium, Philadelphia, playing a short set featuring drummers Tony Thompson and Phil Collins and bassist Paul Martinez. Collins had contributed to Plant's first two solo albums while Martinez was a member of Plant's current solo band. However, the performance was marred by the lack of rehearsal with the two drummers, Page's struggles with an out-of-tune Les Paul and poorly-functioning monitors, and by Plant's hoarse voice.[82][83] Page himself has described the performance as "pretty shambolic",[84] while Plant was even less charitable, characterising it as an "atrocity".[82] When Live Aid footage was released on a four-DVD set in late 2004 to raise money for Sudan, the group unanimously agreed not to allow footage from their performance to be used, asserting that it was

not up to their standard.[85] However, to demonstrate their ongoing support for the campaign Page and Plant pledged proceeds from their forthcoming Page and Plant DVD release and John Paul Jones pledged the proceeds of his then-current US tour with Mutual Admiration Society to the project. The three members reunited again in May 1988, for the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert, with Bonham's son, Jason Bonham, on drums. However, the reunion was again compromised by a disjointed performance, particularly by Plant and Page (the two having argued immediately prior to coming on stage about whether to play "Stairway to Heaven"), and by the complete loss of Jones' keyboards on the live television feed.[83][86] Page later described the performance as "one big disappointment", and Plant said unambiguously that "the gig was foul".[86] The first Led Zeppelin box set, featuring tracks remastered under the supervision of Jimmy Page, introduced the band's music to many new fans, stimulating a renaissance for Led Zeppelin. This set included four previously unreleased tracks, including the Robert Johnson tribute "Travelling Riverside Blues". The song peaked at number seven on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks chart, with the video in heavy rotation on MTV. 1992 saw the release of the "Immigrant Song"/"Hey Hey What Can I Do" (the original b-side) as a CD single in the US. Led Zeppelin Boxed Set 2 was released in 1993; the two box sets together containing all known studio recordings, as well as some rare live tracks. In 1994, Page and Plant reunited in the form of a 90 minute "UnLedded" MTV project. They later released an album called No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded, which featured some reworked Led Zeppelin songs, and embarked on a world tour the following year. This is said to be the beginning of the inner rift between the band members, as Jones was not even told of the reunion.[26][87] When asked where Jones was, Plant had replied that he was out "parking the car".[88] On 12 January 1995, Led Zeppelin were inducted into the United States Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by Aerosmith's vocalist, Steven Tyler and guitarist Joe Perry. Jason and Zoe Bonham also attended, representing their late father. At the induction ceremony, the band's inner rift became apparent when Jones joked upon accepting his award, "Thank you, my friends, for finally remembering my phone number", causing consternation and awkward looks from Page and Plant.[89] Afterwards, they played a brief set with Tyler and Perry (featuring Jason Bonham on drums), and with Neil Young and Michael Lee replacing Bonham. On 29 August 1997, Atlantic released a single edit of "Whole Lotta Love" in the U.S. and the UK, making it the only Led Zeppelin UK CD single. Additional tracks on this CD-single are "Baby Come On Home" and "Travelling Riverside Blues". It is the only single the band ever released in the UK. It peaked at #21.[90] 11 November 1997 saw the release of Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions, the first Led Zeppelin album in fifteen years. The two-disc set included almost all of the band's recordings for the BBC. Page and Plant released another album called Walking into Clarksdale in 1998, featuring all new material. However, the album wasn't as successful as No Quarter, and the band slowly dissolved. On 29 November 1999 the RIAA announced that the band were only the third act in music history to achieve four or more Diamond albums.[91] In 2002, Robert Plant and John Paul Jones reconciled after years of strife that kept the band apart. This was followed by rumours of reunion, quickly quashed by individual members' representatives. 2003 saw the release of a triple live album, How the West Was Won, and a video collection, Led Zeppelin DVD, both featuring material from the band's heyday. By the end of the year, the DVD had sold more than 520,000 copies. Led Zeppelin were ranked #14 on Rolling Stone's 2004 list of the "100 Greatest Artists of All Time",[92] and the following year the band received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. In November 2005, it was announced that Led Zeppelin and Russian conductor Valery Gergiev were the winners of the 2006 Polar Music Prize. The King of Sweden presented the prize to Plant, Page, and Jones, along with John Bonham's daughter, in Stockholm in May 2006.[93] In November 2006, Led Zeppelin were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame. The television

broadcasting of the event consisted of an introduction to the band by various famous admirers, a presentation of an award to Jimmy Page and then a short speech by the guitarist. After this, rock group Wolfmother played a tribute to Led Zeppelin, performing the song "Communication Breakdown".[94][95] Despite having gained a reputation with the band for "raising hell" in the 1970s, Robert Plant was awarded a CBE by Prince Charles for "Services to Music" in July 2009, which followed Jimmy Page's OBE four years previously.[96] On 27 July 2007, Atlantic/Rhino, & Warner Home Video announced three new Led Zeppelin titles to be released in November, 2007. Released first was Mothership on 13 November, a 24-track best-of spanning the band's career, followed by a reissue of the soundtrack to The Song Remains the Same on 20 November which includes previously unreleased material, and a new DVD.[97] On 15 October 2007, it was reported that Led Zeppelin were expected to announce a new series of agreements that make the band's songs available as legal digital downloads, first as ringtones through Verizon Wireless then as digital downloads of the band's eight studio albums and other recordings on 13 November.[98] The offerings will be available through both Verizon Wireless and iTunes. On 3 November 2007, a UK newspaper the Daily Mirror announced that it had world exclusive rights to stream six previously unreleased tracks via its website. On 8 November 2007, XM Satellite Radio launched XM LED, the network's first artist-exclusive channel dedicated to Led Zeppelin. On 13 November 2007, Led Zeppelin's complete works were published on iTunes. 2007 reunion The surviving members of Led Zeppelin and Jason Bonham at The O2 in London in 2007Main article: Ahmet Ertegün Tribute Concert On 10 December 2007 the surviving members of Led Zeppelin reunited for a one-off benefit concert held in memory of music executive Ahmet Ertegün, with Jason Bonham taking up his late father's place on drums. It was announced on 12 September 2007 by promoter Harvey Goldsmith in a press conference. The concert was to help raise money for the Ahmet Ertegün Education Fund, which pays for university scholarships in the UK, US and Turkey. Music critics praised the band's performance. Hamish MacBain of NME proclaimed, "What they have done here tonight is proof they can still perform to the level that originally earned them their legendary reputation...We can only hope this isn't the last we see of them."[99] Page suggested the band may start work on new material,[100] and stated that a world tour may be in the works.[101] Meanwhile, Plant made his reluctance regarding a reunion tour known to The Sunday Times, stating: "having to live up to something is terribly serious." However, he also made it known that he could be in favour of more one-off shows in the near future: "It wouldn't be such a bad idea to play together from time to time."[102] Reunion tour reports (2008-2009) Following the reunion concert and the press coverage it generated, speculation on the future of the band and the possibility of a tour with Jason Bonham on drums increased to a level not seen in several years. In an interview promoting the release of the Mothership compilation in Tokyo early in 2008, Jimmy Page revealed that he was prepared to embark upon a world tour with Led Zeppelin, but due to Robert Plant's tour commitments with Alison Krauss, such plans will not be announced until at least September.[103] Showing enthusiasm for continued performing, in late spring Page and Jones joined Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl and drummer Taylor Hawkins onstage at Wembley Stadium to perform Led Zeppelin tracks "Rock and Roll" (Hawkins on vocals and Grohl on drums), followed by "Ramble On" (Grohl on vocals and Hawkins on drums).[104] Plant however continued to remain focused on his recent work and tour with Krauss. Their duet album Raising Sand became certified platinum in March,[105] and their recordings received awards including a Grammy for the song "Gone, Gone, Gone (Done Moved On)"[106] and Album of the Year from the Americana Music Association.[107] Along with concentrating on the duo's American tour, Plant remained evasive on the subject of a Led Zeppelin reunion tour, and expressed

displeasure at the process leading up to the 2007 reunion show during an interview with GQ Magazine, saying "The endless paperwork was like nothing I've experienced before. I've kept every one of the emails that were exchanged before the concert and I'm thinking of compiling them for a book, which I feel sure would be hailed as a sort of literary version of Spinal Tap."[108] After the BBC reported in late August that Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, and Jason Bonham had been recording material which could become a new Led Zeppelin project,[109] the rumours of a reunion began to accumulate through the remaining summer.[110][111][112] On 29 September Plant released a statement in which he called reports of a Led Zeppelin reunion "frustrating and ridiculous". He said he would not be recording or touring with the band, before adding, "I wish Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and Jason Bonham nothing but success with any future projects."[113][114] Following Plant's statement, authoritative but divergent views of the possibility of a Led Zeppelin reunion tour the next year were offered by John Paul Jones and promoter Harvey Goldsmith. In late October, Jones confirmed to BBC Radio Devon in Exeter that he, Page, and Bonham were seeking a replacement for Plant. The bassist remarked: "We are trying out a couple of singers. We want to do it. It's sounding great and we want to get on and get out there."[115] The next day, Goldsmith commented on the prospect of a Led Zeppelin reunion, casting doubt on the possibility or wisdom of such a venture. In an interview with BBC News, Goldsmith stated "I think that there is an opportunity for them to go out and present themselves. I don't think a long rambling tour is the answer as Led Zeppelin." The Ertegün Concert promoter felt the result of the ongoing plans of Jones, Page, and Bonham would not be "called Led Zeppelin".[116] A spokesman for guitarist Jimmy Page later confirmed this, telling RollingStone.com that a new band featuring Page, bassist John Paul Jones and drummer Jason Bonham would not go by the name Led Zeppelin due to the absence of singer Robert Plant.[117] On January 7, 2009, MusicRadar reported that Jimmy Page's manager Robert Mensch said that the band had "tried out a few singers, but no one worked out, that was it. The whole thing is completely over now. There are absolutely no plans for them to continue."[118][119] In a radio interview, Plant cited a fear of disappointment as a major factor for not continuing a reunited Zeppelin. "The disappointment that could be there once you commit to that and the comparisons to something that was basically fired by youth and a different kind of exuberance to now, it's very hard to go back and meet that head on and do it justice."[120] On 28 October 2009 it was reported by NME that Robert Plant had revealed that he is in talks with Michael Eavis to perform at the 2010 Glastonbury festival in England. Plant said he did not know who he would perform with, thus sparking rumours that Led Zeppelin may perform. Songs in other media While members of Led Zeppelin have seldom allowed their works to be licensed for films or commercials, in recent years, their position has softened. The songs of Led Zeppelin can be heard in movies such as Shrek the Third, One Day in September, School of Rock ("Immigrant Song" in all three), Dogtown and Z-Boys ("Achilles Last Stand", "Nobody's Fault but Mine", and "Hots On for Nowhere"), Almost Famous ("That's the Way", "The Rain Song", "Misty Mountain Hop", "Bron-Yr-Aur", and "Tangerine"), "Stairway to Heaven" was in a part of the movie, but later on it was taken out, due to the length. It Might Get Loud ("The Rain Song", "Ramble On", "How Many More Times", "When The Levee Breaks", "Battle of Evermore", "Over the Hills and Far Away", "Whole Lotta Love", "White Summer", "Stairway to Heaven", "In My Time of Dying", and "Ten Years Gone".) Fast Times at Ridgemont High ("Kashmir"), and Small Soldiers ("Communication Breakdown"). The television series One Tree Hill featured the song "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You". The band has denied frequent requests by developers of popular music video games to use their songs. As with other forms of media, the band seeks to protect the integrity of their work. Specifically, "the band isn't comfortable with the prospect of granting outsiders access to its master tapes, a necessary step in creating the games."[121]

Also noteworthy is Cadillac's use of "Rock and Roll" in their US TV advertising campaign. Recently, Led Zeppelin have agreed to allow Apple to sell their music in Apple's iTunes Store, with the greatest hits collection Mothership as the marquee offering.[122] In April 2007, Hard Rock Park (now Freestyle Music Park) in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, announced it had secured an agreement with the band to create "Led Zeppelin - The Ride", a roller coaster built by Bolliger & Mabillard, synchronised to the music of Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love". The coaster stands 155 feet (47 m) tall, features six inversions, and spirals over a lagoon. The ride officially opened with the park on May 9, 2008.[123] The ride is currently "Standing but not operating" (SBNO) due to Hard Rock Park filing Chapter 11 bankruptcy. In January 2009, the park filed for Chapter 7. In February 2009, the park was sold to new owners FPI MB Entertainment, who plan to reopen by Memorial Day 2009.[124] On May 4, 2009, the ride was renamed "The Time Machine," with hit songs from five decades replacing Led Zeppelin.[125] Allegations of plagiarism The credits for Led Zeppelin II were the subject of some debate after the album's release. The prelude to "Bring It On Home" was a cover of Sonny Boy Williamson's 1963 recording of "Bring It On Home", written by Willie Dixon. Similarly, "The Lemon Song" included an adaptation of Howlin' Wolf's "Killing Floor." In 1972, Arc Music, the publishing arm of Chess Records, brought a lawsuit against Led Zeppelin for copyright infringement over "Bring It On Home" and "The Lemon Song"; the case was settled out of court for an undisclosed sum. Dixon himself did not benefit from the settlement until he sued Arc Music to recover his royalties and copyrights. In addition, "Whole Lotta Love" contained lyrics that were derivative of Dixon's 1962 song "You Need Love", though the riff from the song was an original Jimmy Page composition. In 1985, Dixon filed a copyright infringement suit against Led Zeppelin over "Whole Lotta Love" and an out-of-court settlement was reached. Later pressings of Led Zeppelin II credit Dixon.[126] The band also paid a settlement to the publisher of Ritchie Valens' song "Ooh! My Head" over the song "Boogie with Stu" (from Physical Grafitti) which borrowed heavily from Valens' song.[127] Dave Headlam, in an article entitled "Does the song remain the same? Questions of authenticity and identification in the music of Led Zeppelin", suggests that "...in the course of studies on the music of Led Zeppelin, it has become apparent that many songs are compilations of pre-existent material from multiple sources, both acknowledged and unacknowledged." He contends that "...songs like 'Whole Lotta Love' and 'Dazed and Confused' are on the one hand not "authored" by Led Zeppelin, but on the other hand are virtual signatures identifying the band's musical essence." [128] However, noted blues author and producer Robert Palmer states "It is the custom, in blues music, for a singer to borrow verses from contemporary sources, both oral and recorded, add his own tune and/or arrangement, and call the song his own".[129][130] Folklorist Carl Lindahl, refers to these recycling of lyrics in songs as "floating lyrics". He defines it within the folk-music tradition as "lines that have circulated so long in folk communities that tradition-steeped singers call them instantly to mind and rearrange them constantly, and often unconsciously, to suit their personal and community aesthetics".[131] In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993, Page commented on the band's use of classic blues songs: [A]s far as my end of it goes, I always tried to bring something fresh to anything that I used. I always made sure to come up with some variation. In fact, I think in most cases, you would never know what the original source could be. Maybe not in every case -- but in most cases. So most of the comparisons rest on the lyrics. And Robert was supposed to change the lyrics, and he didn't always do that -- which is what brought on most of the grief. They couldn't get us on the guitar parts of the music, but they nailed us on the lyrics. We did, however, take some liberties, I must say [laughs]. But never mind; we did try to do the right thing.[132] In another interview, Page responded to the suggestion that Led Zeppelin used a

lot of traditional and blues lyrics and tunes and called them their own: The thing is they were traditional lyrics and they went back far before a lot of people that one related them to. The riffs we did were totally different, also, from the ones that had come before, apart from something like "You Shook Me" and "I Can't Quit You," which were attributed to Willie Dixon. The thing with "Bring It On Home," Christ, there's only a tiny bit taken from Sonny Boy Williamson's version and we threw that in as a tribute to him. People say, "Oh, 'Bring It On Home' is stolen." Well, there's only a little bit in the song that relates to anything that had gone before it, just the end.[24] Discography Main article: Led Zeppelin discography Studio albums Led Zeppelin (1969) Led Zeppelin II (1969) Led Zeppelin III (1970) Led Zeppelin IV (1971) Houses of the Holy (1973) Physical Graffiti (1975) Presence (1976) In Through the Out Door (1979) Coda[133] (1982) Filmography The Song Remains the Same (1976) Led Zeppelin (DVD) (2003) Mothership (DVD) (2007)

Jimmy Page - Wikipedia

Background information Birth name James Patrick Page Born 9 January 1944 (1944-01-09) (age 66) Heston, Middlesex, England Genres Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock, folk rock Occupations Musician, songwriter, producer Instruments Guitar, mandolin, dulcimer, theremin, bass, banjo, harmonica, sitar, synthesizer, hurdy gurdy, pedal steel guitar, keyboards, vocals Years active 1962 onward Labels Swan Song, Atlantic, Geffen. Fontana, Mercury Associated acts The Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin, The Honeydrippers, The Firm, Coverdale-Page, Page and Plant, XYZ Notable instruments Gibson Les Paul Gibson EDS-1275 Fender Telecaster Danelectro Shorthorn James Patrick Page OBE (born 9 January 1944) is an English guitarist, songwriter and record producer. He began his career as a studio session guitarist in London and was subsequently a member of The Yardbirds from 1966 to 1968, after which he founded the English rock band Led Zeppelin.

Page has been described as "unquestionably one of the all-time most influential, important, and versatile guitarists and songwriters in rock history".[1] In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine ranked Page #9 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.[2] He has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice, once as a member of The Yardbirds (1992)[3] and once as a member of Led Zeppelin (1995).[4] Contents 1 2 3 4 Early years Session musician The Yardbirds Led Zeppelin 4.1 Influence 4.2 Equipment 4.3 Music production techniques 5 Post-Led Zeppelin career 6 Legal action 7 Personal life 7.1 Drug use 7.2 Interest in the occult 8 Pre / Post Led Zeppelin discography 8.1 Single 8.2 Albums 9 Equipment details 10 References 11 Published sources 12 External links Early years Page was born to parents James and Patricia Page in the West London suburb of Heston, which today forms part of the London Borough of Hounslow. His father was an industrial personnel manager and his mother was a doctor's secretary. In 1952 they moved to Feltham, and later again to Miles Road, Epsom which is where Page came across his first guitar. "I don't know whether [the guitar] was left behind by the people [in the house] before [us], or whether it was a friend of the family's - nobody seemed to know why it was there."[5] First playing the instrument at the age of thirteen years,[1] he took a few lessons in nearby Kingston, but he was largely self-taught. Among his early influences were rockabilly guitarists Scotty Moore and James Burton, who both played on recordings made by Elvis Presley. Hearing the Elvis Presley song "Baby Let's Play House" is cited by Page as being his inspiration to take up playing the guitar.[6] His first guitar was a second hand 1959 Futurama Grazioso, which was later replaced by a Telecaster.[6][7] Page's musical tastes included skiffle (a popular English music genre of the time) and acoustic folk playing, particularly that of Bert Jansch and John Renbourn, and the blues sounds of Elmore James, B.B. King, Otis Rush, Buddy Guy, Freddie King and Hubert Sumlin.[8] "Basically, that was the start: a mixture between rock and blues."[6] At the age of 13, Page appeared on Huw Wheldon's All Your Own talent quest programme in a skiffle quartet, one performance of which aired on BBC TV in 1957. The group played "Mama Don't Want To Skiffle Anymore" and another very American-flavored song, "In Them Ol' Cottonfields Back Home". Televised Contest. When asked by Wheldon what he wanted to do after schooling, Page said, "I want to do biological research" to find a cure for "cancer, if it isn't discovered by then". In an interview with Guitar Player magazine, Page stated that "there was a lot of busking in the early days, but as they say, I had to come to grips with it, and it was a good schooling."[6] Page would take a guitar to school each day and have it confiscated and handed back to him at 4:00 P.M.[9] Although he had an interview for a job as a laboratory assistant, he ultimately chose to leave Danetree Secondary School, West Ewell, to pursue music instead.[9]

Initially, Page had difficulty finding other musicians with whom he could play on a regular basis. "It wasn't as though there was an abundance. I used to play in many groups... anyone who could get a gig together, really."[7] Following stints backing recitals by Beat poet Royston Ellis at the Mermaid Theatre between 1960-61,[10] and singer Red E. Lewis, he was asked by singer Neil Christian to join his band, The Crusaders, after Christian had seen a fifteen-year-old Page playing in a local hall.[7] Page toured with Christian for approximately two years and later played on several of his records, including the November 1962 single, "The Road to Love". During his stint with Christian, Page fell seriously ill with glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis) and couldn't continue touring.[7] While recovering, he decided to put his musical career on hold and concentrate on his other love, painting. He enrolled at Sutton Art College in Surrey.[1] As he explained in 1975: [I was] travelling around all the time in a bus. I did that for two years after I left school, to the point where I was starting to get really good bread. But I was getting ill. So I went back to art college. And that was a total change in direction. That's why I say it's possible to do. As dedicated as I was to playing the guitar, I knew doing it that way was doing me in forever. Every two months I had glandular fever. So for the next 18 months I was living on ten dollars a week and getting my strength up. But I was still playing.[11] Session musician While still a student, Page would often jam on stage at The Marquee with bands such as Cyril Davies' All Stars, Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated and with guitarists Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton. He was spotted one night by John Gibb of Brian Howard & The Silhouettes, who asked him to help record a number of singles for Columbia Graphophone Company, including "The Worrying Kind". It wasn't until an offer from Mike Leander of Decca Records that Page was to receive regular studio work. His first session for the label was the recording "Diamonds" by Jet Harris and Tony Meehan, which went to Number 1 on the singles chart in early 1963.[7] After brief stints with Carter-Lewis and the Southerners, Mike Hurst and the Method, and Mickey Finn and the Blue Men, Page committed himself to full-time session work. As a session guitarist he was known as 'Little Jim' so there was no confusion with Big Jim Sullivan. Page was mainly called in to sessions as "insurance" in instances when a replacement or second guitarist was required by the recording artist. "It was usually myself and a drummer", he explained, "though they never mention the drummer these days, just me ... Anyone needing a guitarist either went to Big Jim [Sullivan] or myself"[7] Page was the favoured session guitarist of producer Shel Talmy, and therefore he ended up doing session work on songs for The Who and The Kinks as a direct result of the Talmy connection.[12] Page's studio output in 1964 included Marianne Faithfull's "As Tears Go By", The Nashville Teens' "Tobacco Road", The Rolling Stones' "Heart of Stone" (released on Metamorphosis), Van Morrison & Them's "Baby Please Don't Go" and "Here Comes the Night", Dave Berry's "The Crying Game" and "My Baby Left Me", and Brenda Lee's "Is It True". Under the auspices of producer Talmy, Page contributed to The Kinks' 1964 debut album and he sat in on the sessions for The Who's first single "I Can't Explain" (although Pete Townshend was reluctant to allow Page's contribution on the final recording, Page did play on the B-side "Bald Headed Woman".) In 1965 Page was hired by Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham to act as house producer and A&R man for the newly-formed Immediate Records label, which also allowed him to play on and/or produce tracks by John Mayall, Nico, Chris Farlowe, Twice as Much and Eric Clapton. Page also formed a brief songwriting partnership with then romantic interest, Jackie DeShannon. He also composed and recorded songs for the John Williams (not the classical guitarist) album The Maureeny Wishful Album with Big Jim Sullivan. Page worked as session musician on the Al Stewart album Love Chronicles in 1969, and played guitar on five tracks of Joe Cocker's debut album, With a Little Help from My Friends.

When questioned about which songs he played on, especially ones where there exists some controversy as to what his exact role was, Page often points out that it is hard to remember exactly what he did given the huge number of sessions he was playing at the time.[12] Although Page recorded with many notable musicians, many of these early tracks are only available through bootlegged copies, several of which were released by the Led Zeppelin fan club in the late 1970s. One of the rarest of these is the early jam session featuring Jimmy Page playing with Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, featuring a cover of "Little Queen of Spades" by Robert Johnson. Several songs which featured Page's involvement were compiled on the twin album release: James Patrick Page: Session Man Volume One and James Patrick Page: Session Man Volume Two. Page decided to leave studio work when the increasing influence of Stax Records on popular music led to the greater incorporation of brass and orchestral arrangements into recordings at the expense of guitars.[6] However, he has stated that his time as a session player served as extremely good schooling for his development as a musician: My session work was invaluable. At one point I was playing at least three sessions a day, six days a week! And I rarely ever knew in advance what I was going to be playing. But I learned things even on my worst sessions -- and believe me, I played on some horrendous things. I finally called it quits after I started getting calls to do Muzak. I decided I couldn't live that life anymore; it was getting too silly. I guess it was destiny that a week after I quit doing sessions Paul Samwell-Smith left The Yardbirds, and I was able to take his place. But being a session musician was good fun in the beginning -the studio discipline was great. They'd just count the song off, and you couldn't make any mistakes.[8] The Yardbirds Main article: The Yardbirds The Yardbirds, 1966. Clockwise from left: Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Keith Relf, Jim McCarty, and Chris Dreja.In late 1964, Page was approached about the possibility of replacing Eric Clapton in The Yardbirds, but he declined the offer out of loyalty to his friend.[7] In February 1965 Clapton quit the Yardbirds, and Page was formally offered Clapton's spot, but because he was unwilling to give up his lucrative career as a session musician, and because he was still worried about his health under touring conditions, he suggested his friend, Jeff Beck. On 16 May 1966, drummer Keith Moon, bass player John Paul Jones, keyboardist Nicky Hopkins, Jeff Beck and Page recorded "Beck's Bolero" in London's IBC Studios. The experience gave Page an idea to form a new supergroup featuring Beck, along with The Who's John Entwistle on bass and Keith Moon on drums.[7] However, the lack of a quality vocalist and contractual problems prevented the project from getting off the ground. During this time, Moon suggested the name "Lead Zeppelin" for the first time, after Entwistle commented that the proceedings would take to the air like a lead balloon. Within weeks, Page attended a Yardbirds concert at Oxford. After the show he went backstage where Paul Samwell-Smith announced that he was leaving the group.[6] Page offered to replace Samwell-Smith and this was accepted by the group. He initially played electric bass with the Yardbirds before finally switching to twin lead guitar with Beck when Chris Dreja moved to bass. The musical potential of the line-up was scuttled, however, by interpersonal conflicts caused by constant touring and a lack of commercial success, although they released one single, "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago". (While Page and Jeff Beck played together in The Yardbirds, the trio of Page, Beck and Clapton never played in the original group at the same time. The three guitarists did appear on stage together at the ARMS charity concerts in 1983.) After Beck's departure, the Yardbirds remained a quartet. They recorded one album with Page on lead guitar, Little Games. The album received indifferent reviews and was not a commercial success, peaking at only number 80 on the

Billboard Music Charts. Though their studio sound was fairly commercial at the time, the band's live performances were just the opposite, becoming heavier and more experimental. These concerts featured musical aspects that Page would later perfect with Led Zeppelin, most notably performances of "Dazed and Confused". After the departure of Keith Relf and Jim McCarty in 1968, Page reconfigured the group with a new line-up to fulfill unfinished tour dates in Scandinavia. As he said: Once [the other Yardbirds] decided not to continue, then I was going to continue. And shift the whole thing up a notch ... The whole thing was putting a group together and actually being able to play together. There were a lot of virtuoso musicians around at the time who didn't gel as a band. That was the key: to find a band that was going to fire on all cylinders.[13] To this end, Page recruited vocalist Robert Plant and drummer John Bonham, and he was also contacted by John Paul Jones who asked to join.[14] During the Scandinavian tour the new group appeared as "The New Yardbirds", but soon recalled the old joke by Keith Moon and John Entwistle. Page stuck with that name to use for his new band. Peter Grant changed it to "Led Zeppelin", to avoid a mispronunciation of "Leed Zeppelin."[15] Led Zeppelin Main article: Led Zeppelin Page has explained that he had a very specific idea in mind as to what he wanted Led Zeppelin to be, from the very beginning: I had a lot of ideas from my days with The Yardbirds. The Yardbirds allowed me to improvise a lot in live performance and I started building a textbook of ideas that I eventually used in Zeppelin. In addition to those ideas, I wanted to add acoustic textures. Ultimately, I wanted Zeppelin to be a marriage of blues, hard rock and acoustic music topped with heavy choruses -- a combination that had never been done before. Lots of light and shade in the music.[8] Influence Led Zeppelin in 1969. From left to right: John Bonham, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones.Page's past experiences both in the studio and with the Yardbirds were very influential in contributing to the success of Led Zeppelin in the 1970s. As a producer, composer, and guitarist he helped make Led Zeppelin a prototype for countless future rock bands, and was one of the major driving forces behind the rock sound of that era, influencing a host of other guitarists.[16] Allmusic states that "just about every rock guitarist from the late '60s/early '70s to the present day has been influenced by Page's work with Led Zeppelin".[1] For example, Dictators bassist Andy Shernoff states that Page's sped up, downstroke guitar riff in "Communication Breakdown" was an inspiration for guitarist Johnny Ramone's downstroke guitar style.[17] Ramone stated in the documentary "Ramones:The True Story", he improved at his down-stroke picking style by playing the song over and over again for the bulk of his early career.[18] Tom Scholz of Boston was heavily influenced by Jimmy Page and credits the dual guitar harmonies in Led Zeppelin's "How Many More Times" as the inspiration for Boston's distinctive sound.[19] Page's guitar solo from the song "Heartbreaker" has been credited by Eddie Van Halen as being the inspiration for his two-hand tapping technique after he had seen Led Zeppelin perform in 1971.[20] Many other rock guitarists were also influenced by Jimmy Page such as Ace Frehley, [21] Joe Satriani, [22] [23] Slash, [24] King Diamond, [25] King Lizzard, [26] and Dan Hawkins. [27] Page's solo in the famous epic "Stairway to Heaven" has been voted by readers of Guitar World[28] and Total Guitar as the greatest guitar solo of all time, and he was named 'Guitarist of the Year' five times during the 1970s in Creem magazine's annual reader poll. In 2002 he was voted the second greatest guitarist of all time in a Total Guitar magazine reader poll.[29] In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine named him number nine on their list of the "100 greatest guitarists of all time". In August 2009, Time Magazine ranked him the 6th greatest electric-guitar player of all time.[30]

Jimmy Page was awarded "Living Legend Award" at Classic Rock Magazine Roll of Honour 2007.[31] In June 2008, he was also awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Surrey for his services to the music industry.[32][33] David Fricke, a senior editor at Rolling Stone magazine, described Jimmy Page in 1988 as "probably the most digitally sampled artist in pop today after James Brown."[34] Equipment Page became well-known for playing a double-necked Gibson guitarFor the recording of most of Led Zeppelin material from Led Zeppelin's second album onwards, Page used a Gibson Les Paul guitar with Marshall amplification. During the studio sessions for Led Zeppelin, and later for recording the guitar solo in "Stairway to Heaven", he used a Fender Telecaster (a gift from Jeff Beck).[35] He also used a Danelectro 3021, mainly for slide guitar parts. He usually recorded in studio with a Vox AC30, Fender, and Orange amplification. His use of the Sola Sound Tone Bender Professional MKII fuzzbox ("How Many More Times"), slide guitar ("You Shook Me", "Dancing Days", "In My Time of Dying", "What Is and What Should Never Be"), pedal steel guitar ("Your Time Is Gonna Come", "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You", "Tangerine", "That's the Way" and for effect at the very end of "Over the Hills and Far Away"), and acoustic guitar ("Gallows Pole", "Going To California", "Bron-Yr-Aur", "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp") also demonstrated his versatility and creativity as a composer. Page is famous for playing his guitar with a violin bow, as on the live versions of the songs "Dazed and Confused" and "How Many More Times". This was a technique he developed during his session days, although he was not the first guitarist to use a bow, since Eddie Phillips of The Creation had done so prior to Page.[12] On MTV's Led Zeppelin Rockumentary, Page said that he obtained the idea of playing the guitar with a bow from David McCallum, Sr. who was also a session musician. Page used his Fender Telecaster and later his Gibson Les Paul for his bow solos. On a number of Led Zeppelin songs Page experimented with feedback devices and a theremin. He used a Wah-wah pedal, both in the traditional method of rocking the pedal back and forth as done by Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, but also by simply leaving the pedal fully forward to enhance the treble. The latter technique was used on the solos for "Communication Breakdown" and "Whole Lotta Love," while the former was mostly seen in live performances. Music production techniques Page is credited for the innovations in sound recording he brought to the studio during the years he was a member of Led Zeppelin,[36][37] many of which he had initially developed as a session musician.[38] He developed a reputation for employing effects in new ways and trying out different methods of using microphones and amplification. During the late 1960s, most British music producers placed microphones directly in front of amplifiers and drums, resulting in the sometimes "tinny" sound of the recordings of the era. Page commented to Guitar World magazine that he felt the drum sounds of the day in particular "sounded like cardboard boxes."[36] Instead, Page was a fan of 1950s recording techniques, Sun Studios being a particular favourite. In the same Guitar World interview, Page remarked, "Recording used to be a science", and "[engineers] used to have a maxim: distance equals depth." Taking this maxim to heart, Page developed the idea of placing an additional microphone some distance from the amplifier (as much as twenty feet) and then recording the balance between the two. By adopting this technique, Page became one of the first British producers to record a band's "ambient sound" - the distance of a note's time-lag from one end of the room to the other.[39] For the recording of several Led Zeppelin tracks, such as "Whole Lotta Love" and "You Shook Me", Page additionally utilised "reverse echo" - a technique which he claims to have invented himself while with The Yardbirds (he had originally developed the method when recording the 1967 single "Ten Little Indians").[36]

This production technique involved hearing the echo before the main sound instead of after it, achieved by turning the tape over and employing the echo on a spare track, then turning the tape back over again to get the echo preceding the signal. Page has stated that, as producer, he deliberately changed the audio engineers on Led Zeppelin albums, from Glyn Johns for the first album, to Eddie Kramer for Led Zeppelin II, to Andy Johns for Led Zeppelin III and later albums. He explained that "I consciously kept changing engineers because I didn't want people to think that they were responsible for our sound. I wanted people to know it was me."[36] John Paul Jones has acknowledged Page's production techniques as being a key component of the success of Led Zeppelin: The backwards echo stuff [and] a lot of the microphone techniques were just inspired. Using distance-miking… and small amplifiers. Everybody thinks we go in the studio with huge walls of amplifiers, but [Page] doesn’t. He uses a really small amplifier and he just mikes it up really well, so that it fits into a sonic picture.[40] In an interview Page himself gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993, he remarked on his work as a producer: Many people think of me as just a riff guitarist, but I think of myself in broader terms... As a producer I would like to be remembered as someone who was able to sustain a band of unquestionable individual talent, and push it to the forefront during its working career. I think I really captured the best of our output, growth, change and maturity on tape -- the multifaceted gem that is Led Zeppelin.[8] Post-Led Zeppelin career Led Zeppelin broke up in 1980 following the death of drummer John Bonham at Page s home, The Old Mill House at Clewer in Berkshire. For some time Page refused to touch a guitar out of sadness for the loss of his friend Bonham,[40] but he eventually made a return to the stage at a Jeff Beck show in March 1981 at the Hammersmith Odeon.[41] Also in 1981 Page joined with Yes bassist Chris Squire and drummer Alan White to form a supergroup called XYZ (for ex-Yes-Zeppelin). They rehearsed several times, but the project was shelved. Demos of these sessions have turned up on bootleg and they reveal that some of the material emerged on later projects, notably The Firm s "Fortune Hunter" and Yes songs "Mind Drive" and "Can You Imagine?". Page would later join Yes on stage in 1984 at Westfalenhalle in Dortmund, Germany, playing "I m Down". In 1982 Page collaborated with director Michael Winner to record the Death Wish II soundtrack. This, and several subsequent Page recordings including Death Wish III soundtrack (1985), were recorded and produced at his own recording studio, The Sol in Cookham, which he had purchased from Gus Dudgeon in the early 1980s. In 1983 Page appeared with the A.R.M.S. (Action Research for Multiple Sclerosis) charity series of concerts which honoured Small Faces bass player Ronnie Lane, who suffered from the disease. For the first shows at the Royal Albert Hall in London, Page s set consisted of songs from the Death Wish II soundtrack (with Steve Winwood on vocals) and an instrumental version of "Stairway to Heaven". A four-city tour of the United States followed, with Paul Rodgers of Bad Company replacing Winwood as vocalist. During the US tour, Page and Rodgers also performed "Midnight Moonlight" which would later be recorded for The Firm s first album. All of the shows featured an on stage jam of "Layla" that reunited Page with Yardbirds guitarists Beck and Eric Clapton. According to the book Hammer of the Gods, it was reportedly around this time that Page told friends that he d just given up heroin after seven years of use. On 13 December 1983, Page joined Robert Plant onstage for one encore at the Hammersmith Odeon in London. Page next linked up with Roy Harper for the 1984 album (Whatever Happened to Jugula?) and occasional concerts, performing a predominantly acoustic set at folk festivals under various guises such as the MacGregors, and Themselves. Also in 1984 Page recorded with former Led Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant as The Honeydrippers on the albumThe Honeydrippers: Volume 1, and with John Paul Jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

on the film soundtrack Scream for Help. Page subsequently collaborated with Paul Rodgers to record two albums under the name The Firm. The first album, released in 1985, was the self-titled The Firm. Popular songs included "Radioactive" and "Satisfaction Guaranteed". The album peaked at number 17 on the Billboard pop albums chart and went gold in the US. It was followed by Mean Business in 1986. The band toured in support of both albums but soon split up. Various other projects followed, such as session work for Graham Nash, Stephen Stills and The Rolling Stones (on their 1986 single "One Hit (to the Body)"). In 1986, Page reunited temporarily with his ex-Yardbirds band members to play on several tracks of the Box of Frogs album Strange Land.[42] Page released a solo album entitled Outrider in 1988 which featured contributions from Robert Plant, with Page contributing in turn to Plant s solo album Now and Zen, which was released the same year. Page also embarked on a collaboration with David Coverdale in 1993 entitled Coverdale - Page. Throughout these years Page also reunited with the other surviving members of Led Zeppelin to perform live on a few occasions, most notably in 1985 for the Live Aid concert with both Phil Collins and Tony Thompson filling drum duties. However, the band members considered this performance here to be sub-standard, with Page having been let down by a poorly tuned Les Paul.[43] Page, Plant and Jones, as well as John Bonham s son Jason, performed at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary show on 14 May 1988, closing the 12-hour show.[43] In 1990, a Knebworth concert to aid the Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Centre and the British School for Performing Arts and Technology saw Plant unexpectedly joined by Page to perform "Misty Mountain Hop", "Wearing and Tearing" and "Rock and Roll". Page also performed with the band s surviving members at various private family functions. In 1994, Page reunited with Plant for the penultimate performance in MTV s "Unplugged" series. The 90-minute special, dubbed Unledded, premiered to the highest ratings in MTV s history. In October of the same year, the session was released as the CD No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded, and in 2004 as the DVD No Quarter Unledded. Following a highly successful mid-90s tour to support No Quarter, Page and Plant recorded 1998 s Walking into Clarksdale. Since 1990, Page has been heavily involved in remastering the entire Led Zeppelin back catalogue and is currently participating in various charity concerts and charity work, particularly the Action for Brazil s Children Trust (ABC Trust), founded by his wife Jimena Gomez-Paratcha in 1998. In the same year, Page played guitar for rap singer/producer Puff Daddy s song "Come with Me", which heavily samples Led Zeppelin s "Kashmir" and was included in the soundtrack of Godzilla. The two later performed the song on Saturday Night Live. In October 1999, Page teamed up with The Black Crowes for a two-night performance of material from the Led Zeppelin catalogue and old blues and rock standards. Due to contractual problems with their record company, The Black Crowes were unable to release any of their own songs which were played at the Greek shows. These songs, on which Jimmy Page played with the Crowes, included: "Wiser Time", "No Speak No Slave", "Remedy", "Hard to Handle", and "She Talks to Angels". The double CD[1] was released in stores by TVT Records on 4 July 2000, and featured an enhanced Quicktime video and photographs taken during the concert. The Japanese version of the album also features "Misty Mountain Hop" and "In the Light", recorded in 2000. In 2001 he made an appearance on stage with Limp Bizkit frontman Fred Durst and Wes Scantlin of Puddle of Mudd at the MTV Europe Video Music Awards in Frankfurt, where they performed a version of Led Zeppelin s "Thank You".[44] Jimmy Page performing at the Led Zeppelin reunion concert (2007)In 2005, Page was awarded the Order of the British Empire in recognition of his Brazilian charity work for Task Brazil and Action For Brazil s Children s Trust,[45] made an honorary citizen of Rio de Janeiro later that year, and was awarded a Grammy award.[46]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

In November 2006, Led Zeppelin was inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame. The television broadcasting of the event consisted of an introduction to the band by various famous admirers, a presentation of an award to Jimmy Page and then a short speech by the guitarist. After this, rock group Wolfmother played a tribute to Led Zeppelin, playing the song "Communication Breakdown".[47][48] In 2006, Page attended the induction of Led Zeppelin to the UK Music Hall of Fame. During an interview for the BBC for said event, he expressed plans to record new material in 2007, saying "It s an album that I really need to get out of my system... there s a good album in there and it s ready to come out" and "Also there will be some Zeppelin things on the horizon".[49] On 6 January 2007, Page was featured at #19 on Channel 4 s The Ultimate Hellraiser, a countdown of music s top 25 who "lived the rock n roll lifestyle". The show s reason for featuring Page was almost exclusively attributed to the groupies who toured with Led Zeppelin. In addition, many of John Bonham s shenanigans (for example driving a motorcycle down a hotel corridor) were falsely blamed on Page. On 2 December 2007, Contacmusic.com confirmed that Page was "Too traumatised for Zeppelin reunion" until now. He states in the article, "After John Bonham s death I spent 15 years not even wanting to think about Led Zeppelin. But I also have difficulty thinking it s all over. Now at least one concert is planned and I m incredibly happy about that." On 10 December 2007, the surviving members of Led Zeppelin, as well as John Bonham s son, Jason Bonham played a charity concert at the O2 Arena London. On 20 June 2008, Page was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Surrey, for his services to the music industry.[50] For the 2008 Olympics, Jimmy Page, David Beckham and Leona Lewis represented Britain during the closing ceremonies on 24 August 2008. Beckham rode a double-decker bus into the stadium, and Page and Lewis performed "Whole Lotta Love", representing the change in Olympic venue to London in 2012.[51] In 2008 Page co-produced a documentary film directed by Davis Guggenheim entitled It Might Get Loud. The film examines the history of the electric guitar, focusing on the careers and styles of Page, The Edge, and Jack White. The film premiered on 5 September 2008 at the Toronto Film Festival.[52] Page also participated in the 3 part BBC documentary London Calling: The making of the Olympic handover ceremony on 4 March 2009.[52] On 4 April 2009, Page inducted Jeff Beck into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[53] In January 2010, Jimmy Page announced he is publishing an autobiography through Genesis Publications, in a hand-crafted, limited edition of 2,500 copies.[54] Page has also been honored with the United Nations first ever Pathways To Peace Award just minutes after confirming reports that he would be among the headliners at the upcoming Show of Peace Concert in Beijing, China on April 10, 2010.[55][56] Legal action In July 2007 Page gave testimony and observed evidence on behalf of Led Zeppelin at a court case in Glasgow against an alleged bootlegger. Robert Langley was charged with, and denied, 12 counts of producing and selling products without copyright permission.[57] Page was shown hundreds of CDs and DVDs, ranging from his solo material to his time in Led Zeppelin and The Yardbirds, which Langley was allegedly selling in Scotland during 2005. Many contain footage and audio from Page s personal collection, stolen from his home in the early 1980s.[58] The goods were found on sale as far away as New York, where shop-owners thought they were official. Page later said "If you have something like this that appears legitimate then it is just not right". Page concluded his day in court by greeting waiting fans and signing autographs.[58] Personal life Page s daughter, Scarlet Page, (born in 1971) is a photographer. Her mother is Charlotte Martin, who was Page s partner from 1970 till 1982 or 1983. Page called her My Lady .[59] Page also had relationships with a number of rock groupies in the first half of 1970s, including Pamela Des Barres and Bebe Buell.[60]

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

From 1986 to 1995 Page was married to Patricia Ecker, a model and waitress. They have a son, James Patrick Page III (born April 1988). Following his 1995 divorce, Page married Jimena Gómez-Paratcha. They have three children together, Jana (born 1994) Zofia Jade (born 1997) and Ashen Josan (born 1999).[61] In 1972 Page bought, from Richard Harris, the home which William Burges designed for himself in London, The Tower House. "I had an interest going back to my teens in the pre-Raphaelite movement and the architecture of Burges", he said. "What a wonderful world to discover." The reputation of William Burges (1827-1881) rests on his extravagant designs and his contribution to the Gothic revival in architecture in the nineteenth century.[62] From 1980 to 2004 Page owned The Mill House , Mill Lane, Windsor, UK - formerly the home of actor Michael Caine. Fellow Led Zeppelin band member John Bonham died at the house in 1980. From the early 1970s to well into the 1980s, Jimmy Page owned the Boleskine House, the former residence of occultist Aleister Crowley.[63] Sections of Page s fantasy sequence in the film The Song Remains the Same were filmed at night on the mountain side directly behind Boleskine House. Page currently resides in Berkshire. Drug use Page has acknowledged heavy drug use throughout the 1970s. In an interview with Guitar World magazine in 2003, he stated: I can t speak for the [other members of the band], but for me drugs were an integral part of the whole thing, right from the beginning, right to the end.[64] After the band s 1973 concert tour of the United States, Page told Nick Kent: Oh, everyone went over the top a few times. I know I did and, to be honest with you, I don t really remember much of what happened.[65] In 1975, Page began to use heroin, a fact attributed to Richard Cole, who stated that Page (in addition to himself) was taking the drug during the recording sessions of the album Presence in that year, and that Page admitted to him shortly afterwards that he was addicted to the drug.[66] By Led Zeppelin s 1977 tour of the United States, Page s heroin addiction was beginning to hamper his guitar playing performances.[1][39][60] By this time the guitarist had lost a noticeable amount of weight. His onstage appearance was not the only obvious change: his addiction caused Page to become so inward and isolated it altered the dynamic between him and Plant considerably.[67] During the recording sessions for In Through the Out Door in 1978, Page s diminished influence on the album (relative to bassist John Paul Jones) is partly attributed to his ongoing heroin addiction, which resulted in his absence from the studio for long periods of time.[68] Page reportedly kicked his heroin habit in the early 1980s.[69] In a 1988 interview with Musician magazine, Page took offense when the interviewer noted that heroin had been associated with his name, and insisted that "I m not an addict, thank you very much." In an interview he gave to Q magazine in 2003, Page responded to a question as to whether he regrets getting so involved in heroin and cocaine: I don t regret it at all because when I needed to be really focused, I was really focused. That s it. Both Presence and In Through the Out Door were only recorded in three weeks: that s really going some. You ve got to be on top of it.[70] Interest in the occult The appearance of four symbols on the jacket of Led Zeppelin s fourth album has been linked to Page s interest in the occult.[71] The four symbols represented each member of the band. Page s own "Zoso" symbol originated in Ars Magica Arteficii (1557) by J Cardan, an old alchemical grimoire, where it has been identified as a sigil consisting of zodiac signs. The sigil is reproduced in "Dictionary of Occult, Hermetic and Alchemical Sigils" by Fred Gettings. [72] [73] During tours and performances after the release of the fourth album, Page often had the so-called "Zoso" symbol embroidered on his clothes, along with zodiac

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

symbols. These were visible most notably on his "Dragon Suit", which included the signs for Capricorn, Scorpio and Cancer which are Page s Sun, Ascendant and Moon signs, respectively. The artwork inside the album cover of Led Zeppelin IV is from a painting by William Holman Hunt, influenced by the traditional Rider/Waite Tarot card design for the card called "The Hermit".[71] Page transforms into this character during his fantasy sequence in Led Zeppelin s concert film The Song Remains the Same. In the early 1970s Page owned an occult bookshop and publishing house, "The Equinox Booksellers and Publishers" in Kensington High Street, London, eventually closing it as the increasing success of Led Zeppelin resulted in his having insufficient time to devote to it. The company published a facsimile of English occultist s Aleister Crowley s 1904 edition of The Goetia.[74] Page has maintained a strong interest in Crowley for many years. In 1978, he explained: I feel Aleister Crowley is a misunderstood genius of the 20th century. Because his whole thing was liberation of the person, of the entity, and that restrictions would foul you up, lead to frustration which leads to violence, crime, mental breakdown, depending on what sort of makeup you have underneath. The further this age we re in now gets into technology and alienation, a lot of the points he s made seem to manifest themselves all down the line.[75] Page was commissioned to write the soundtrack music for the film Lucifer Rising by another occultist and Crowley admirer, underground movie director Kenneth Anger. In the end Page produced 23 minutes of music which Anger felt were useless because the film ran for 28 minutes and Anger wanted the film to have a full soundtrack. Anger claimed Page took three years to deliver the music, and the final product was only 23 minutes of droning. On top of that, the director slammed the guitarist in the press by calling him a "dabbler" in the occult and an addict. Anger accused Page of "having an affair with the White Lady" and being too strung out on drugs to complete the project. Page countered that he had fulfilled all his obligations, even going so far as to lend Anger his own film editing equipment to help him finish the project.[76] Although Page collected works by Crowley, he has never described himself as a Thelemite nor was he ever initiated into the O.T.O.. The Equinox Bookstore and Boleskine House were both sold off during the 1980s, as Page settled into family life and participated in charity work. Pre / Post Led Zeppelin discography See also: Led Zeppelin discography Single "She Just Satisfies"/"Keep Moving" (February 1965) Albums Death Wish II Soundtrack (1982), US #50 The Honeydrippers: Volume One (1984), with Robert Plant No Introduction Necessary (1984), 1968 session recordings feat. John Paul Jones and Albert Lee Whatever Happened to Jugula? (1985), with Roy Harper Scream for Help (1985), sessions with John Paul Jones on tracks "Spaghetti Junction" and "Crackback" The Firm (1985) Mean Business (1986) Strange Land (1986), with Box of Frogs Outrider (1988), US #26 Coverdale-Page (1993) No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded (1994) Walking into Clarksdale (1998), with Robert Plant Jimmy Page and The Black Crowes - Live at the Greek (2000), US #64 Last Man Standing (2006) - Jerry Lee Lewis album featuring Jimmy Page on the first track, Rock and Roll . Pre-Led Zeppelin session recordings have been released on various labels and compilation packages, including: Guitar Boogie Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton blues album (1971) Special Early Works (1972), 1965 session recordings with Sonny Boy Williamson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smoke and Fire (1984), session recordings with Jeff Beck, Noel Redding, and Nicky Hopkins James Patrick Page: Session Man Volume One (1989) James Patrick Page: Session Man Volume Two (1990) Hip Young Guitar Slinger (2000) Equipment details Electric guitars 1959 Fender Telecaster (given to Page by Jeff Beck and repainted with a psychedelic dragon design by Page) played with the Yardbirds. Used to record the first Led Zeppelin album and used on the early tours during 1968-1969. It was later used to record the "Stairway To Heaven" solo. 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard (No. 1) (originally owned by Joe Walsh) modified with a shaved neck and the addition of a push/pull pot to put the humbuckers out of phase while the toggle is in the middle position.[77] English luthier Roger Giffin re-produced an exact replica of this guitar for Page in 1991 (nicknamed No. 3). Giffin s work was later copied for Gibson s original run of Jimmy Page Signature model Les Pauls in the mid-1990s.[78][79][80] This guitar was also used by Gibson as the model for the company s second run of Page signature models in 2004. Produced by Gibson and aged by veteran luthier Tom Murphy, this second generation of Page tribute models was limited to 25 guitars signed by Page himself; and only 150 guitars in total for the aged model issue.[80][81][81] 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard (No. 2) with a shaved down neck to match the profile on his #1; He added four push/pull pots to coil split the humbuckers as well as phase and series switches which were added under the pick guard after the breakup of Led Zeppelin. 1971 Gibson EDS-1275 (used for playing "Stairway to Heaven", "The Song Remains the Same", "The Rain Song", "Celebration Day" during live concerts and the Knebworth, "Tangerine" at the 1975 Earls Court shows, and "Sick Again" throughout the 1977 U.S. tour) 1978 Gibson Les Paul Standard 1959 Danelectro 3021 AKA 59-DC (tuned to DADGAD and used live for "White Summer", "Black Mountain Side", "Kashmir", and "Midnight Moonlight" with The Firm) Danelectro 3021 (tuned to open A and used on the Outrider tour for "In My Time Of Dying". This one has a smaller pickguard, as opposed to the large "seal" pickguard on his first Danelectro. 1967 Vox 12-String 1960 Black Gibson Les Paul Custom (with Bigsby Tremolo) - stolen in 1970. An ad was placed by Page for the recovery of this highly modified instrument but the guitar was never recovered. In 2008 the Gibson Custom Shop produced a limited run of 25 re-creations of the guitar, each with a Bigsby Tremolo and a new custom 6-way toggle switch.[82] Rickenbacker 12 String 1969 Gibson Les Paul Standard (seen in "The Song Remains The Same" during the theremin/solo section of "Whole Lotta Love" and for "Kashmir" on the O2[disambiguation needed] reunion concert. This guitar was later fitted with a Parsons-White B-string bender and used on the Outrider tour.) During Whole Lotta Love in the movie, you can see the back of the head and there is no volute (meaning it is pre-1970), and other close up pictures have revealed a pancake body (those came along in mid 1969 and went away after 1976); thus with no volute and a pancake body, it must be a mid 1969 Les Paul 1964 Lake Placid Blue Fender Stratocaster (Used during recording sessions for In Through the Out Door and in 1979 at Knebworth for In the Evening) 1966 Cream Fender Telecaster (Used on Physical Graffiti) 1960 s Botswana Brown Fender Telecaster featuring a Parsons and White B-string bender, and neck salvaged from the "Dragon Telecaster". Seen primarily during the 1980s The Firm and Outrider era. Also used at Knebworth in 1979, notably on "Ten Years Gone" and "Hot Dog". 1965 Fender Electric XII (12-String)

 

 

 

 

1977 Gibson RD Artist (used at Knebworth in 1979, on "Misty Mountain Hop") Gibson SG (seldom used on the 1980 tour) Another Gibson doubleneck guitar was given to him after he agreed to allow the company to reproduce his original EDS-1275. The guitar was picked by Page out of numerous others after he struck one chord. Page declared "This is it, this is the one!" The guitar was marked (beforehand) #1. 2007 Gibson Black Beauty custom (remake of his original stolen in 1970, has modifications concerning pickup configurations which include a 6-way pickup selector, and coil-tap on the bridge pickup) Les Paul Goldtop w/ Transperformance tuning device Used on Atlantic 40th reunion, Coverdale/Page recordings, and Page/Plant tours Mid 80s Black Kramer guitar with a trem Used for Outrider Paul Reed Smith (used on the Outrider tour, notably on "City Sirens" and "Wasting My Time") 2010 Gibson Jimmy Page "Number Two" Signature. The "Number Two" Les Paul was based on his second 1959 Les Paul purchased in 1973. The Gibson Jimmy Page "Number Two" signature guitar was released in January 2010. [83] Amplifiers Marshall SLP-1959 100-watt amp which was modded with KT-88 tubes, which boosted its output to 200 watts. Vox AC30 Hiwatt Custom 50 and Custom 100 heads Fender Dual Showman Fender Vibro-King (used on the Page/Plant "Unledded" special on MTV) Orange amps (used with the Theremin, as seen on The Song Remains The Same) Supro unidentified combos (used in the studio for Led Zeppelin I and the Stairway To Heaven guitar solo) Effects Vox wah-wah Sola Sound Tonebender fuzz Maestro Echoplex MXR Phase 90 MXR Blue Box (used for the guitar solo in "Fool In The Rain") Boss CE-2 Chorus DigiTech Whammypedal Acoustic guitars Gibson J-200 Martin D-28 Gibson Everly Brothers Giannini 12-String Harmony Sovereign Washburn 12 String Ovation 1994 Double Neck Fender 1981 F-03 Other instruments Gibson Mandolin Gibson Harp Guitar Roland GR-500 Guitar Synthesizer Roland GR-700 Guitar Synthesizer Fender 10-String 800 Pedal steel guitar Violin bow[84][85][86][87] Theremin Mellotron MKV (Prototype) Banjo Accessories Ernie Ball electric guitar strings [2] Collection Jimmy Page is reputed to own over 1,500 guitars. Page revealed this rough estimate to BBC Radio 2 presenter Stuart Maconie in June 2005. Due to the fact the guitar was too heavy, one of Jimmy Page s Les Paul Custom

 

Black Beauty guitars is now owned by Dan Hawkins of The Darkness.[88] It is not the same Black Beauty that was stolen from him in 1970. Signature models Gibson released Jimmy Page Signature Les Paul which was discontinued in 1999, then released another version in 2004, which has also been discontinued. The 2004 version included 25 guitars signed by Page, 150 aged by a former Gibson employee (an acknowledged aging master ), and 840 unlimited production guitars. The Jimmy Page Signature EDS-1275 has been produced by Gibson. Recently, Gibson reproduced Page s 1960 Les Paul Black Beauty, the one stolen from him in 1970, with modern modifications. This guitar was sold in 2008 with a run of 25, again signed by Page, plus an additional 500 unsigned guitars.

Robert Plant - Wikipedia [Help us with translations!]

Birth name Robert Anthony Plant Born 20 August 1948 (1948-08-20) (age 61) West Bromwich, England Genres Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock, folk-rock, country Occupations Singer-songwriter, musician Instruments Vocals, harmonica, percussion, guitar Years active 1966–present Labels Atlantic, Swan Song, Es Paranza, Mercury, Universal Associated acts Band of Joy, Led Zeppelin, The Honeydrippers, Page and Plant, Strange Sensation, Alison Krauss Robert Anthony Plant, CBE (born 20 August 1948), is an English rock singer and songwriter, best known as as the lead vocalist and a lyricist of the rock band Led Zeppelin. He has also had a successful solo career, releasing the 2007 album Raising Sand, produced by T-Bone Burnett with American bluegrass soprano Alison Krauss, which won the 2009 Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Contents 1 Life and career 1.1 Early career 1.2 Led Zeppelin 1.2.1 Early years 1.2.2 Lyrics 1.2.3 Stage persona 1.3 Solo career (since 1982) 1.4 With Alison Krauss (since 2007) 1.5 Led Zeppelin-related projects and reunion rumours 1.6 Personal life 2 Legacy 3 Solo discography 4 References 5 External links Life and career Early career Plant was born in West Bromwich to parents Robert C. and Annie C. (Cane) Plant,

 

 

 

   

but grew up in Halesowen, formerly in Worcestershire, now part of the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley. Plant gained an interest in singing at a young age. When I was a kid I used to hide behind the curtains at home at Christmas and I used to try and be Elvis. There was a certain ambience between the curtains and the French windows, there was a certain sound there for a ten year old. That was all the ambience I got at ten years old... I think! And I always wanted to be a certain, a bit similar to that.[1] He left King Edward s School in Stourbridge in his mid-teens and developed a strong passion for the blues, mainly through his admiration for Willie Dixon, Robert Johnson and early rendition of songs in this genre. He abandoned training as a chartered accountant after only two weeks to attend college in an effort to gain more GCE passes and to become part of the English Midlands blues scene.[2][3] "I left home at 16", he said "and I started my real education musically, moving from group to group, furthering my knowledge of the blues and of other music which had weight and was worth listening to."[4] Plant s early blues influences included artists such as Robert Johnson, Bukka White, Skip James, Jerry Miller and Sleepy John Estes. Plant did various jobs while pursuing his music career, one of which was working for the major British construction company Wimpey in Birmingham in 1967 laying tarmac on roads. He also worked at Woolworths in Halesowen town for a short period of time. He cut three obscure singles on CBS Records[5] and sang with a variety of bands, including The Crawling King Snakes, which brought him into contact with drummer John Bonham. They both went on to play in the Band of Joy, merging blues with newer psychedelic trends. Though his early career met with no commercial success, word quickly spread about the "young man with the powerful voice". Led Zeppelin Main article: Led Zeppelin Early years Led Zeppelin in 1969. From left to right: John Bonham, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones.In 1968, the guitarist Jimmy Page was in search of a lead singer for his new band and met Plant after being turned down by his first choice, Terry Reid, who referred him to a show at a teacher training college in Birmingham— where Plant was singing in a band named Hobbstweedle.[6] Page explained: When I auditioned him and heard him sing, I immediately thought there must be something wrong with him personality-wise or that he had to be impossible to work with, because I just could not understand why, after he told me he d been singing for a few years already, he hadn t become a big name yet. So I had him down to my place for a little while, just to sort of check him out, and we got along great. No problems.[7] According to Plant: I was appearing at this college when Peter and Jimmy turned up and asked me if I d like to join The Yardbirds. I knew The Yardbirds had done a lot of work in America - which to me meant audiences who would want to know what I might have to offer - so naturally I was very interested.[4] Plant with Led ZeppelinPlant and Page immediately hit it off with a shared musical passion and after Plant joined the band they began their writing collaboration with reworkings of earlier blues songs, although Plant would receive no songwriting credits on the band s first album, allegedly because he was still under contract to CBS Records at the time. Plant brought along John Bonham as drummer, and they were joined by John Paul Jones, who had previously worked with Jimmy Page as a studio musician. Jones called Page on the phone before they checked out Plant, and Page hired Jones immediately. Initially dubbed the "New Yardbirds" in 1968, the band soon came to be known as Led Zeppelin. The band s self-titled debut album hit the charts in 1969 and is

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

widely credited as a catalyst for the heavy metal genre. Plant, however, has commented that it is unfair for people to think of Zeppelin as heavy metal, as almost a third of their music was acoustic.[8] In 1975, Plant and his wife Maureen were seriously injured in a car crash in Rhodes, Greece. This significantly affected the production of Led Zeppelin s seventh album Presence for a few months while he recovered, and forced the band to cancel the remaining tour dates for the year. In July 1977 his son Karac died at the age of five of a stomach infection while Plant was engaged on Led Zeppelin s concert tour of the United States. Plant retreated to his home in the Midlands and for months afterward he questioned his future.[9] Karac s death later inspired him to write the song "All My Love" in tribute, featured on Led Zeppelin s final studio LP, 1979 s In Through the Out Door. Lyrics This section of a biographical article needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (June 2008) This section contains weasel words, vague phrasing that often accompanies biased or unverifiable information. Such statements should be clarified or removed. (March 2009) Plant did not begin writing song lyrics with Led Zeppelin until the making of Led Zeppelin II, in 1969. According to Jimmy Page: The most important thing about Led Zeppelin II is that up to that point I d contributed lyrics. Robert hadn t written before, and it took a lot of ribbing to get him into writing, which was funny. And then, on the second LP, he wrote the words of Thank You. He said, "I d like to have a crack at this and write it for my wife."[10] Plant s lyrics with Led Zeppelin were often mystical, philosophical and spiritual, alluding to events in classical and Norse mythology, such as the "Immigrant Song", which refers to Valhalla and Viking conquests. However, the song "No Quarter" is often misunderstood to refer to the god Thor; the song actually refers to Mount Thor (which is named after the god). Another example is "The Rain Song." Plant was also influenced by J. R. R. Tolkien, whose book series inspired lyrics in some early Led Zeppelin songs. Most notably the "Battle of Evermore", "Misty Mountain Hop", "No Quarter", "Ramble On" and "Over The Hills and Far Away" contain verses referencing Tolkien s The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. Conversely, Plant sometimes used more straightforward blues-based lyrics dealing primarily with sexual innuendo, as in "The Lemon Song", "Trampled Under Foot", and "Black Dog". Welsh mythology also forms a basis of Plant s interest in mystical lyrics. He grew up close to the Welsh border and would often take summer trips to Snowdonia. Plant bought a Welsh sheep farm in 1973, and began taking Welsh lessons and looking into the mythology of the land (such as Black Book of Carmarthen, Book of Taliesin, etc.) Plant s first son, Karac, was named after the Welsh warrior Caratacus. The song "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" is named after the 18th Century Welsh cottage Bron-Yr-Aur owned by a friend of his father; it later inspired the song "Bron-Yr-Aur." The songs "Misty Mountain Hop," "That s the Way," and early dabblings in what would become "Stairway to Heaven" were written in Wales and lyrically reflect Plant s mystical view of the land. Critic Steve Turner suggests that Plant s early and continued experiences in Wales served as the foundation for his broader interest in the mythologies he revisits in his lyrics (including those myth systems of Tolkien and the Norse).[11] The passion for diverse musical experiences drove Plant to explore Africa, specifically Morocco, whose musical inspiration most eventually culminated in the classic track "Kashmir" (which is not in North Africa, but rather in India). Both he and Jimmy Page revisited these influences during their reunion album No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded in 1994. In his solo career, Plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

again tapped from these influences many times, most notably in the 2002 album, Dreamland. Undoubtedly one of Plant s most significant and influential achievements with Led Zeppelin was his contribution to the track "Stairway to Heaven", an epic rock ballad featured on Led Zeppelin IV that drew influence from folk, blues, Celtic traditional music and hard rock among other genres. Most of the lyrics of the song were written spontaneously by Plant in 1970 at Headley Grange. While never released as a single, the song has topped charts as the greatest song of all time on various polls around the world. Plant is also recognised for his lyrical improvisation in Led Zeppelin s live performances, often singing verses previously unheard on studio recordings. One of the most famous Led Zeppelin musical devices involves Plant s vocal mimicking of band mate Jimmy Page s guitar effects. This can be heard in the songs "How Many More Times", "Dazed and Confused", "The Lemon Song", "You Shook Me", "Nobody s Fault but Mine" and "Sick Again". He is also known for his light-hearted, humorous, and unusual on-stage banter, often referred to as "plantations." Plant often discusses the origin and background of the songs during his shows, and sometimes provides social comment as well. He frequently talks about American blues musicians as his inspiration, mentioning artists like Robert Johnson, Howlin Wolf, Blind Willie Johnson, and Willie Dixon at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony and the 2007 Ahmet Ertegün Tribute Concert with Led Zeppelin. Stage persona Plant (left) with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page performing livePlant enjoyed great success with Led Zeppelin throughout the 1970s and developed a compelling image as the charismatic rock-and-roll front man, similar to his predecessor in The Who, singer Roger Daltrey (who adopted the look in the late 1960s), and his contemporary, Jim Morrison of The Doors who, while not displaying the same visual appearance, also exuded sexuality upon the stage.[12] With his mane of long blond hair and powerful, bare-chested appearance, Plant helped to create the "god of rock and roll" or "rock god" archetype. On stage, Plant was particularly active in live performances, often dancing, jumping, snapping his fingers, clapping, making emphatic gestures to emphasize a lyric or cymbal crash, throwing back his head, or placing his hands on his hips. As the 1960s-1970s progressed he, along with the other members of Led Zeppelin, became increasingly flamboyant onstage and wore more elaborate, colorful clothing and jewellery. According to Classic Rock magazine, "once [Plant] had a couple of US tours under his belt, Percy Plant swiftly developed a staggering degree of bravado and swagger that irrefutably enhanced Led Zeppelin s rapidly burgeoning appeal."[4] In 1994, during his "Unledded" tour with Jimmy Page, Plant himself reflected tongue-in-cheek upon his Led Zeppelin showmanship: I can t take my whole persona as a singer back then very seriously. It s not some great work of beauty and love to be a rock-and-roll singer. So I got a few moves from Elvis and one or two from Sonny Boy Williamson II and Howlin Wolf and threw them all together.[13] Solo career (since 1982) After the breakup of Led Zeppelin in 1980 (following the death of John Bonham), Plant pursued a successful solo career beginning with Pictures at Eleven in 1982, followed by 1983 s The Principle of Moments. Popular tracks from this period include "Big Log" (a Top 20 hit in 1983), "In the Mood" (1984), "Little by Little" (from 1985 s Shaken n Stirred), "Tall Cool One" (a #25 hit off 1988 s Now and Zen) and "I Believe" (from 1993 s Fate of Nations), another song written for and dedicated to his late son, Karac. In 1984, Plant formed a short-lived all-star group with Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck called The Honeydrippers, who had a #3 hit with a remake of the Phil Phillips tune, "Sea of Love" and a followup hit with a cover of Roy Brown s "Rockin at Midnight." Although Plant avoided performing Led Zeppelin songs through much of this

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

period, his tours in 1983 (with superstar drummer Phil Collins) and 1985 were very successful, often performing to sold-out arena-sized venues. Through the 1980s and 1990s, Plant co-wrote three solo albums with keyboardist/songwriter Phil Johnstone. Now and Zen, Manic Nirvana, and Fate of Nations (featuring Máire Brennan of Clannad). It was Johnstone who talked Plant into playing Led Zeppelin songs in his live shows, something Plant had resisted, not wanting to be forever known as "the former Led Zeppelin vocalist." Although Led Zeppelin split in 1980, Plant and Page occasionally collaborated on various projects, including The Honeydrippers: Volume 1 album in 1984 (there has never been a Volume 2). In the spring 2 years later Robert performed at the Birmingham Heart Beat Charity Concert 1986 which was a very special event. The pair again worked together again in the studio on the 1988 Page solo effort, Outrider, and in the same year Page contributed to Plant s album Now and Zen. Also in 1988 Plant appeared with Page as a member of Led Zeppelin (and in his own right as a solo artist) at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert. Page and Plant became a full-fledged performing act from 1994 through 1998, releasing the Unledded album in 1994 and following with an enormously successful tour in 1995. Page and Plant recorded their only post-Zeppelin album of original material on the 1998 album, Walking into Clarksdale, an effort that was surprisingly unsuccessful commercially, leading Plant to return to his solo career. Ironically, a song from this album, "Please Read the Letter," was re-recorded by Plant with Alison Krauss, winning the 2009 Grammy Award for Record of the Year. Starting at the close of 1999, Plant performed at several small venues with his folk-rock band, named Priory of Brion. In 2001, Plant appeared on Afro Celt Sound System s album "Volume 3: Further in Time." The song "Life Begin Again" features a duet with Welsh folksinger Julie Murphy, emphasizing Plant s recurring interest in Welsh culture (Murphy would also tour in support of Plant). In 2002, with his then newly-formed band Strange Sensation, Plant released a widely acclaimed collection of mostly blues and folk remakes, Dreamland. Contrasting with this lush collection of often relatively obscure remakes, the second album with Strange Sensation, Mighty ReArranger (2005), contains new, original songs. Both have received some of the most favourable reviews of Plant s solo career and four Grammy nominations, two in 2003 and two in 2006. As a former member of Led Zeppelin, along with Page and John Paul Jones, Plant received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005 and the Polar Music Prize in 2006. Plant still actively tours. His sets typically include recent, but not only, solo material and plenty of Led Zeppelin favourites, often with new and expanded arrangements. A DVD titled Soundstage: Robert Plant and the Strange Sensation, featuring his Soundstage performance (filmed at the Soundstage Studios in Chicago on 16 September 2005), was released in October 2006. On 23 June 2006, Plant was the headliner (backed by Ian Hunter s band) at the Benefit For Arthur Lee concert at New York s Beacon Theater, a show which raised money for Lee s medical expenses from his bout with leukemia. Plant and band performed thirteen songs - five by Arthur Lee & Love, five Led Zeppelin songs and three others including a duet with Ian Hunter. At the show, Plant told the audience of his great admiration for Arthur Lee dating back to the mid-Sixties. Sadly, Lee died of his illness six weeks after the concert. An expansive box set of his solo work, Nine Lives, was released in November 2006, which expanded all of his albums with various b-sides, demos, and live cuts. It was accompanied by a DVD. All his solo works were re-released with these extra tracks individually. In 2007, Plant contributed two tracks to the Fats Domino tribute album Goin Home: A Tribute To Fats Domino, "It Keeps Rainin " with the Lil Band O Gold and "Valley Of Tears" with The Soweto Gospel Choir. Robert Plant on stage with Alison Krauss at Birmingham s NIA, 5 May 2008With Alison Krauss (since 2007) Since 2007, Plant has been recording and performing with bluegrass star Alison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Krauss. A duet album, Raising Sand, was released on 23 October 2007 on Rounder Records. The album, recorded in Nashville and Los Angeles and produced by T-Bone Burnett, includes performances of lesser-known material from R&B, Blues, folk, and country songwriters including Mel Tillis, Townes Van Zandt, Gene Clark, Tom Waits, Doc Watson, Little Milton Campbell and the Everly Brothers. The song "Gone Gone Gone (Done Moved On)" from Raising Sand won a Grammy for Best Pop Collaboration With Vocals in 2008. Raising Sand also won Album of the Year at the 51st Grammy Awards.[14] The album has been successful critically and commercially, and was certified platinum on 4 March 2008. Plant and Krauss began an extended tour of the US and Europe in April 2008, playing music from Raising Sand and other American roots music as well as reworked Led Zeppelin tunes. The album was nominated for the Mercury Prize in July 2008.[15] Also in 2008, Plant performed with bluegrass musicians at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival. He appeared as a surprise guest during Fairport Convention s set at the 2008 Cropredy Festival, performing Led Zeppelin s The Battle of Evermore with Kristina Donahue as a tribute to Sandy Denny. Further reference to Fairport Convention occurs in October 2008, when it is reported that Plant has collaborated on a new album by original Fairport vocalist Judy Dyble, due for release early 2009. On February 8, 2009, Plant and Krauss won a Grammy for Album of the Year, Record of the Year, Pop Collaboration with Vocals, Country Collaboration with Vocals, and Contemporary Folk/Americana Album. Led Zeppelin-related projects and reunion rumours Plant performed with living members of Led Zeppelin both in 1985 for Live Aid (with Phil Collins and Tony Thompson on drums) and in 1988 for Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary. At the 1988 reunion, Jason Bonham, the son of Led Zeppelin s late drummer John Bonham, played drums. Both sets featured only a few songs, performed with minimal rehearsal. Plant was unhappy with both performances, saying that "it was like sleeping with your ex-wife but not making love." In 1995, Led Zeppelin was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and Plant performed at the induction show with Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Jason Bonham, Neil Young, Steven Tyler and Joe Perry, performing spirited versions of "Bring It On Home", "Honeybee", and "When the Levee Breaks." After years of reunion rumors, Led Zeppelin performed a full two-hour set on 10 December 2007 at the Ahmet Ertegün Tribute Concert, with Jason again filling in on drums. Despite enormous public demand, Plant declined a $200 million offer to tour with Led Zeppelin after the 2007 show.[16] In interviews following the 2007 show, Plant left the door open to possible future performances with Led Zeppelin, saying that he enjoyed the reunion and felt that the show was strong musically. [17] Although Page, Jones, and Bonham have expressed the strong desire to tour as Led Zeppelin[18], Plant has consistently opposed a full tour and has responded negatively to questions about another reunion. In a January, 2008 interview, he stated that he does not want to "tour like a bunch of bored old men following the Rolling Stones around." [19] In a statement on his web site in late 2008, Plant stated, "I will not be touring with Led Zeppelin or anyone else for the next two years. Anyone buying Led Zeppelin tickets will be buying bogus tickets." Personal life Plant married Maureen Wilson on 9 November, 1969. The couple had three children: daughter Carmen (married to Charlie Jones, Plant s bass player for solo tours); and sons Karac (died of a virus), and Logan. The couple divorced in August 1983. On 14 August 2009, it was announced via the Wolverhampton Wanderers text message news service that "Rock Legend and lifelong Wolves fan Robert Plant is to become the club s third Vice President." Robert officially received the honour before kick off of the club s first match of the season against West Ham.[20] Legacy Robert Plant is one of the most significant singers in rock music and has influenced the style of many of his contemporaries, including Ann Wilson,[21] Sammy Hagar,[22] Rob Halford,[23] and later rock vocalists such as Jeff Buckley

 

 

 

 

 

 

who imitated his performing style extensively. Don McLean has cited Plant as an influence as well. Freddie Mercury of Queen, Steven Tyler of Aerosmith, Paul Stanley of Kiss and Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden also were influenced by Plant. Axl Rose of Guns N Roses was kicked out of many Los Angeles bands for his vocal similarity to Plant.[24] In 2008, Rolling Stone magazine named Plant as number 15 on their list of the 100 Greatest Singers of All-Time. In 2006, metal magazine Hit Parader named Plant #1 on their list of the 100 Greatest Metal Vocalists of All-Time, a list which included Rob Halford (2), Steven Tyler (3) and Freddie Mercury (6), all of whom were influenced by Plant. That same year Blabbermouth.net named Plant the #1 vocalist on their list of the 100 Greatest Metal Vocalists of All-time.[25] He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2009 New Year Honours.[26][27] Solo discography Main article: Robert Plant discography Robert Plant has released 11 studio albums, 1 live album, 2 compilation albums and 33 singles.

John Paul Jones (musician) - Wikipedia

Birth name John Baldwin Also known as John Paul Jones Born 3 January 1946 (1946-01-03) (age 64) Sidcup, Kent, England Genres Hard rock, heavy metal, folk rock, blues-rock, instrumental rock Occupations Musician, Songwriter, Arranger Instruments Bass guitar, guitar, recorder, koto, lap steel guitar, autoharp, ukulele, clavinet, sitar, keyboards, keytar, mandolin, cello, vocals Years active 1960 — Present Labels Discipline Global Mobile, Atlantic, Swan Song Associated acts Led Zeppelin, Donovan, Foo Fighters, Butthole Surfers, Them Crooked Vultures Website www.johnpauljones.com Notable instruments Fender Jazz Bass Hammond Organ Rhodes piano John Paul Jones (born John Baldwin on 3 January 1946) is an English musician, composer, arranger, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist musician. Best known as the bassist and keyboardist for English rock band Led Zeppelin, Jones has since developed a solo career and is widely respected as both a musician and a producer. A versatile musician, Jones also plays guitar, koto, lap steel guitars, autoharp, ukulele, sitar, cello, continuum and the three over-dubbed recorder parts heard on Led Zeppelin s "Stairway to Heaven". According to Allmusic, Jones "has left his mark on rock & roll music history as an innovative musician, arranger, and director."[1] Many rock bassists have been influenced by John Paul Jones, including Geddy Lee, [2] Geezer Butler, [3][citation needed] Gene Simmons, [4] and Krist Novoselic. [5] Jones is currently part of the supergroup Them Crooked Vultures with Josh Homme (Queens of the Stone Age/Kyuss) and Dave Grohl (Nirvana/Foo Fighters). He plays the bass, piano and other instruments. This supergroup released their first single "New Fang", and released their debut, self-titled album on November 17, 2009.

 

 

Contents 1 Biography 1.1 Early years 1.2 Session work 2 Led Zeppelin 2.1 Formation 2.2 Contribution to the band 2.3 Profile 2.4 "Royal Orleans" 2.5 Other work during time with the band 3 After Led Zeppelin 3.1 2000 to the present 4 Personal life 5 Gear 6 Discography 6.1 With Led Zeppelin 6.2 Solo albums 6.3 With Them Crooked Vultures 7 Filmography 8 References 9 External links Biography Early years Jones was born in Sidcup, Kent (now part of Greater London). He started playing piano at age six, learning from his father, Joe Baldwin, a pianist and arranger for big bands in the 1940s and 1950s, notably with the Ambrose Orchestra. His mother was also in the music business which allowed the family to often perform together touring around England. His influences ranged from the blues of Big Bill Broonzy, the jazz of Charles Mingus, to the classical piano of Sergei Rachmaninoff. Because his parents often toured, Jones was sent to boarding school at a young age.[6] He was a student at Christ s College, Blackheath, London where he formally studied music. At the age of 14, Jones became choirmaster and organist at a local church and during that year, he also bought his first bass guitar, a Dallas solid body electric followed by a 1961 Fender Jazz Bass which he used until 1975. The fluid playing of Chicago musician Phil Upchurch on his You Can t Sit Down LP, which includes a memorable bass solo, is cited by Jones as being his inspiration to take up the instrument.[7] Session work Jones joined his first band, The Deltas, at 15. He then played bass for jazz-rock London group, Jett Blacks, a collective that included guitarist John McLaughlin.[8] Jones big break came in 1962 when he was hired by Jet Harris and Tony Meehan of the successful British group The Shadows for a two-year stint. Shortly before hiring Jones, Harris and Meehan had just had a Number 1 hit with "Diamonds" (a track on which Jones bandmate-to-be Jimmy Page had played.) Jones collaboration with the Shadows nearly prevented the future formation of Led Zeppelin, when the parties engaged in talks about the possibility of Jones replacing their bassist Brian Locking, who left the band in October 1963. This never eventuated as John Rostill was ultimately chosen to fill the position. In 1964, on the recommendation of Meehan, Jones began studio session work with Decca Records. From then until 1968, he played on hundreds of recording sessions.[9] He soon expanded his studio work by playing keyboards, arranging and undertaking general studio direction, resulting in his services coming under much demand. He worked with numerous artists including the Rolling Stones on Their Satanic Majesties Request (Jones string arrangement is heard on "She s A Rainbow")[10]; Herman s Hermits; Donovan (on "Sunshine Superman" and "Mellow Yellow"); Jeff Beck; Cat Stevens; Rod Stewart; Shirley Bassey; Lulu; and numerous others. As well as recording sessions with Dusty Springfield, Jones

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

also played bass for her Talk of the Town series of performances. His arranging and playing on Donovan s "Sunshine Superman" resulted in producer Mickie Most using his services as choice arranger for many of his own projects, with Tom Jones, Nico, Wayne Fontana, the Walker Brothers, and many others. Such was the extent of Jones studio work - amounting to hundreds of sessions - that he said years later that "I can’t remember three quarters of the sessions I was on."[11] It was during his time as a session player that Jones adopted the stage name John Paul Jones. This name was suggested to him by a friend, Andrew Loog Oldham, who had seen a poster for the film John Paul Jones in France.[12] Jones has stated that, as a session musician, he was completing two and three sessions a day, six and seven days a week.[13] However, by 1968 he was quickly feeling burnt out due to the heavy workload: "I was arranging 50 or 60 things a month and it was starting to kill me."[14] Led Zeppelin Main article: Led Zeppelin Formation Led Zeppelin in 1969. From left to right: John Bonham, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones.During his time as a session player, Jones often crossed paths with guitarist Jimmy Page [15], a fellow session veteran. In June 1966, Page joined The Yardbirds, and in 1967 Jones contributed to that band s Little Games album. The following winter, during the sessions for Donovan s The Hurdy Gurdy Man, Jones expressed to Page a desire to be part of any projects the guitarist might be planning.[16] Later that year, The Yardbirds disbanded, leaving Page and bassist Chris Dreja to complete some previously booked Yardbirds dates in Scandinavia. Before a new band could be assembled, Dreja left to take up photography. Jones, at the suggestion of his wife,[13] inquired to Page about the vacant position, and the guitarist eagerly invited Jones to collaborate. Page later explained: I was working at the sessions for Donovan s Hurdy Gurdy Man, and John Paul Jones was looking after the musical arrangements. During a break, he asked me if I could use a bass player in the new group I was forming. He had a proper music training, and he had quite brilliant ideas. I jumped at the chance of getting him.[17] Vocalist Robert Plant and drummer John Bonham joined the two to form a quartet. Initially dubbed the "New Yardbirds" for the Scandinavian dates, the band soon became known as Led Zeppelin. Contribution to the band Jones decision to leave session work and join a group was driven by his desire to express his artistic creativity. Despite the spotlight invariably being placed on the more flamboyant members of Led Zeppelin, many cite Jones temperament, musicianship and experience as crucial elements adding to the success of the band. He was responsible for the classic bass lines of the group, notably those in "What Is and What Should Never Be" (Led Zeppelin II), and power crunch and shifting time signatures, such as those in "Black Dog" (Led Zeppelin IV). As Led Zeppelin s rhythm section-mate with drummer John Bonham, Jones shared an appreciation for funk and soul rhythmic grooves which strengthened and enhanced their musical affinity.[18] In an interview he gave to Global Bass magazine, Jones remarked on this common musical interest: Yeah we were both huge Motown and Stax fans and general soul music fans, James Brown fan. Which is one of the reasons why I ve always said that Zeppelin was one of the few bands to "swing". We actually had a groove in those days. People used to come to our shows and dance, which was great. To see all the women dancing, it was really brilliant. You didn t necessarily see that at a Black Sabbath show or whatever: So we were different in that way. We were a groovy band. We used all our black pop music influences as a key to the rock that went over the top.[19]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jones playing bass guitar in a 1975 promotional photo After "retiring" his Fender Jazz Bass in 1975, which he had been using since his days with The Shadows in the early 1960s, Jones switched to using custom-designed Alembics (as seen here) while out on the road. However, he still preferred to use the Jazz in the studio. Jones keyboarding skills added an eclectic dimension that realised Led Zeppelin as more than just a heavy metal band. Keyboard highlights include the delicate "The Rain Song" (Houses of the Holy) played on a Mellotron; the funky, danceable "Trampled Under Foot", played on a Clavinet (Physical Graffiti); and the eastern scales of "Kashmir" (also on Physical Graffiti). In live performances, Jones keyboard showpiece was "No Quarter", often lasting for up to half-an-hour and sometimes including snatches of "Amazing Grace", Joaquín Rodrigo s "Concierto de Aranjuez", which had inspired Miles Davis Sketches of Spain, and variations of classical pieces by composers such as Rachmaninoff. Jones diverse contributions to the group extended to the use of other instruments, including an unusual triple-necked acoustic instrument consisting of a six and a twelve string guitar, and a mandolin. Jones often used bass pedals to supplement the band s sound while he was playing keyboards and mandolin. Profile While all members of Led Zeppelin had a reputation for off-stage excess (a label some have claimed was somewhat exaggerated),[20] Jones was widely seen as the most quiet and reserved member of the group.[21][22] His professionalism ensured that any excesses experienced on the road never hindered his performance. For his part, Jones has claimed that he had just as much fun on the road as his bandmates but was more discreet about it,[8] stating "I did more drugs than I care to remember. I just did it quietly."[13] Benoit Gautier, an employee of Atlantic Records in France, echoed this impression, stating that "The wisest guy in Led Zeppelin was John Paul Jones. Why? He never got caught in an embarrassing situation."[8] In an interview, Jones explained that fame with Led Zeppelin was not something that he ever became preoccupied with: Not really; I d done it all before ... I would like to think that I wasn t too stupid either. I tried to stay out of the drift of the rock star s path, mainly because I needed my sanity and freedom on the road. So generally, I used to check out of the hotel, and then get out on the street. I d go walking ... I m not as recognizable as Plant and Page. Plus, I used to change my appearance all the time just to make sure I wasn t as recognizable ... [G]enerally, I m pretty quickly into the shadows ... I once read the Beatles did a whole tour of America and never left their hotel rooms. And I thought, "I can t see the point of traveling around the world and not seeing anything."[13] However, following several exhausting tours and extended periods of time away from his family, by late 1973 Jones was beginning to show signs of disillusionment with life as a member of one of the biggest bands in the world. He considered quitting Led Zeppelin to spend more time with his family, but was talked into returning by the band s manager, Peter Grant.[23] Jones later explained his reservations: I didn t want to harm the group, but I didn t want my family to fall apart either. We toured a huge amount in those early days. We were all very tired and under pressure and it just came to a head. When I first joined the band, I didn t think it would go on for that long, two or three years perhaps, and then I d carry on with my career as a musician and doing movie music.[6] "Royal Orleans" It is rumoured that the Led Zeppelin song "Royal Orleans", from their album Presence is about an experience Jones once had on tour in the United States.[8] The song is about a person who mistakenly takes a drag queen up to his hotel room, who then falls asleep with a joint of marijuana in hand, lighting the room on fire. "Royal Orleans" was the name of a hotel where the members of Led Zeppelin would stay when they visited New Orleans, because not as many people asked for autographs there. In an interview he gave to Mojo magazine in 2007,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

Jones clarified the reliability of this rumour, stating: The transvestites were actually friends of Richard Cole s; normal friendly people and we were all at some bar. That I mistook a transvestite for a girl is rubbish; that happened in another country to somebody else... Anyway Stephanie ended up in my room and we rolled a joint or two and I fell asleep and set fire to the hotel room, as you do, ha ha, and when I woke up it was full of firemen![6] Other work during time with the band Jones involvement with Led Zeppelin did not put a halt to his session work. In 1969 he returned to the studio to play bass guitar on The Family Dogg s A Way of Life album, in 1970, keyboards for guitarist Peter Green on his solo album The End of the Game. Jones was Madeline Bell s first choice to produce and arrange her 1974 album Comin Atcha. He has also played keyboards on many Roy Harper albums, and contributed to Wings Rockestra, Back to the Egg. After Led Zeppelin Jones playing slide on his bass guitarSince Led Zeppelin dissolved in 1980 with the death of Bonham, Jones has collaborated with a number of artists, including R.E.M., Jars of Clay, Heart, Ben E. King, Peter Gabriel, Foo Fighters, Cinderella, The Mission, La Fura dels Baus, Brian Eno, the Butthole Surfers and Uncle Earl. He appeared on several sessions and videos for Paul McCartney and was involved in the soundtrack of the film Give My Regards to Broad Street. In 1985, Jones was asked by director Michael Winner to provide the soundtrack for the film, Scream for Help, with Jimmy Page appearing on two tracks. Jones provides vocals for two of the songs. He recorded and toured with singer Diamanda Galás on her 1994 album, The Sporting Life (co-credited to John Paul Jones). Jones set up his own recording studio called Sunday School, as well being involved in his daughter s (Jacinda Jones) singing career. In 1985 Jones joined the other surviving members of Led Zeppelin for the Live Aid concert with both Phil Collins and Tony Thompson filling in on drums. The surviving members again re-formed for the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert on 14 May 1988. Page, Plant and Jones, as well as John Bonham’s son Jason closed the event. The band has also played together at various private family functions. In 1995 the band Heart released a live acoustic album called The Road Home which was produced by Jones, and on which he also played several instruments. 2000 to the present Zooma, his debut solo album, was released in September 1999 on Robert Fripp s DGM label and followed up in 2001 by The Thunderthief. Both albums were accompanied by tours, in which he played with Nick Beggs (Chapman Stick) and Terl Bryant (drums). In 2004, he toured as part of the group Mutual Admiration Society, along with Glen Phillips (the front man for the band Toad the Wet Sprocket) and the members of the band Nickel Creek.[24] Jones plays on two tracks on Foo Fighters album In Your Honor. He plays mandolin on "Another Round" and piano on "Miracle", both of which are on the acoustic disc. The band s frontman Dave Grohl (a big Led Zeppelin fan) has described Jones guest appearance as the "second greatest thing to happen to me in my life". He has also branched out as a record producer, having produced such albums as The Mission s album Children, The Datsuns second album Outta Sight, Outta Mind (2004) and Uncle Earl s Waterloo, Tenneesee album of Old-time music, released in March, 2007 on Rounder Records. Recently he accompanied Robyn Hitchcock and Ruby Wright in performing the song Gigolo Aunt at a tribute for Pink Floyd founder, Syd Barrett, in London, which he did on mandolin.[25]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jones playing mandolin in 2007He played at Bonnaroo 2007 in a collaboration with Ben Harper and The Roots drummer Questlove as part of the festival s all-star Super-Jam, in the festival s annual tradition bringing together several famous, world-class musicians together to jam on stage together for a few hours. Jones appeared and played mandolin with Gillian Welch during the festival during the song "Look at Miss Ohio" and a cover of the Johnny Cash song "Jackson". He also appeared during the set of Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals where they played a cover of "Dazed and Confused". Jones then closed Gov t Mule s first set, playing part of "Moby Dick" and then "Livin Lovin Maid" on bass, then proceeded to play keyboards on the songs "Since I ve Been Loving You" and "No Quarter". Jones also performed on mandolin with the all- female bluegrass group Uncle Earl, whose album he had produced in 2007. Mandolin-slinging Jones jammed on Led Zeppelin’s "Whole Lotta Love" with Winnipeg’s energetic Duhks at April 2007’s MerleFest in North Carolina. [26] Jones played in the Led Zeppelin reunion show at London s O2 Arena on 10 December 2007 with the other remaining members of Led Zeppelin as part of a tribute to Ahmet Ertegun. In 2008, Jones produced Nickel Creek singer-fiddler Sara Watkins debut solo album.[27][28][29] As previously mentioned, Jones toured with Watkins, Glen Phillips, and the rest of Nickel Creek in late 2004 in a collaboration entitled Mutual Admiration Society. John Paul Jones playing bass in Them Crooked VulturesOn 10 February 2008, John Paul Jones appeared with the Foo Fighters on the Grammy Awards conducting the orchestral part to the song "The Pretender". On 7 June 2008, John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page appeared with the Foo Fighters to close out the band s concert at Wembley Stadium. Jones performed with Sonic Youth and Takehisa Kosugi, providing the stage music for Merce Cunningham s Nearly 90, which ran 16-19 April 2009 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.[30] Jones most recent project is a "supergroup" with Dave Grohl and Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme. The group has been announced as Them Crooked Vultures.[31] The trio played their first show together on August 9, 2009, and their first album was released on November 17, 2009. The group is tentatively planning a second album and world tour for 2010. Personal life John met his wife, Mo (Maureen) in 1965, and they have been together ever since. They have 3 daughters: Jacinda, Tamara and Kierra.[32] Gear 1961 Fender Jazz Bass (used in studio and live performances) 1951 Fender Precision Bass with the finish removed (used to play "Black Dog" live from 1971-1973) Gibson EB-1 (seen on the inner wheel of Led Zeppelin III) Fretless Fender Precision Bass Fender Bass V Ibanez RD300 Bass Gibson mandolin, used in live acoustic performances. Andy Manson custom Triple Neck Mandolin, 12 string & 6 string acoustic (used in live performances) Bruce Becvar 8 string Triple Omega Alembic Series II 4 string Custom made Pedulla Rapture Bass Acoustic Control Corporation 360 Bass Amp Hammond organs Hohner Clavinet Hohner Electra-Piano Fender Rhodes Mellotron Steinway piano Yamaha CP-80 piano

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Symbolic Sound Kyma system Korg Trinity synthesizer Yamaha GX1 synthesizer EMS VCS3 Synthesizer Moog 15 Modular Synthesizer Korg Kaossilator Discography With Led Zeppelin For a more comprehensive list, see Led Zeppelin discography Led Zeppelin (1969) Led Zeppelin II (1969) Led Zeppelin III (1970) Led Zeppelin IV (1971) Houses of the Holy (1973) Physical Graffiti (1975) The Song Remains the Same (1976) Presence (1976) In Through the Out Door (1979) Coda (1982) BBC Sessions (1997) How the West Was Won (2003) Solo albums John Paul Jones first solo recording was a single for Pye Records in April 1964 which featured "Baja". The B-side was "A Foggy Day in Vietnam". Scream for Help soundtrack (1985) The Sporting Life, with Diamanda Galás (1994) Zooma (1999) The Thunderthief (2001) With Them Crooked Vultures Them Crooked Vultures (2009) Filmography The Song Remains the Same (1976) Give My Regards to Broad Street (1984) The Secret Adventures of Tom Thumb (1993) Composer Risk (1994) Composer Led Zeppelin DVD (2003) John Bonham - Wikipedia,

Birth name John Henry Bonham Also known as Bonzo, The Beast Born 31 May 1948 (1948-05-31) Redditch, Worcestershire, England Died 25 September 1980 (aged 32) Clewer, Windsor, England Genres Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock, folk rock Occupations Musician, songwriter Instruments Drums, percussion Years active 1962–1980 Labels Atlantic, Swan Song Associated acts Led Zeppelin, Band of Joy, Paul McCartney Website www.ledzeppelin.com John Henry "Bonzo" Bonham (31 May 1948 – 25 September 1980) was an English drummer and songwriter, best known as the drummer of the band Led Zeppelin. He was renowned for his power, fast right foot, distinctive sound, and "feel"

 

for the groove. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest drummers in the history of rock music by other musicians and commentators in the industry.[1][2][3] Contents 1 Biography 1.1 Early years 1.2 Led Zeppelin 1.3 Death 1.4 Family 2 Equipment 2.1 Drums 2.2 Cymbals 2.3 Drum Heads 2.4 Bass Drum Pedal 3 Tribute Kits 4 References 5 Sources 6 External links Biography Early years Bonham was born on 31 May 1948, in Redditch, Worcestershire, England, to Joan and Jack Bonham. He first learned how to play drums at the age of five, making a drum kit out of containers and coffee tins, imitating his idols Gene Krupa and Buddy Rich. His mother gave him a snare drum at the age of ten. He received his first proper drum kit from his father at the age of fifteen, a Premier Percussion kit. Bonham never took any formal drum lessons, though as a teen he would get advice from other Redditch drummers. While still at school, Bonham would occasionally perform as a stand-in drummer for bands such as the Blue Star Trio between 1962-63,[4] and Gerry Levene & the Avengers in 1963.[5] Bonham attended Lodge Farm Secondary Modern School, where his headmaster once wrote in his school report card that "He will either end up a dustman or a millionaire".[6][7] After leaving school in 1964, he worked for his father as an apprentice carpenter[8] in between drumming for different local bands. In 1964, Bonham joined his first semi-professional band, Terry Webb and the Spiders, and met his future wife Pat Phillips around the same time. He also played in other Birmingham bands such as The Nicky James Movement, and The Senators, who released a moderately successful single "She s a Mod," in 1964. Bonham took up drumming full-time. Two years later, he joined A Way of Life, but the band soon became inactive. In desperation for a regular income, he joined a blues group called Crawling King Snakes whose lead singer was a young Robert Plant. In 1967, A Way of Life asked Bonham to return to the group, and he agreed—though throughout this period, Plant kept in constant contact with Bonham. When Plant decided to form Band of Joy, Bonham was first choice as drummer. The band recorded a number of demos but no album. In 1968 American singer Tim Rose toured Britain and invited Band of Joy to open his concerts. When Rose returned for another tour months later, Bonham was formally invited by the singer to drum for his band, which gave him a regular income. Led Zeppelin Main article: Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin in 1969. From left to right: John Bonham, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Paul JonesAfter the break-up of The Yardbirds, guitarist Jimmy Page met Robert Plant, who in turn suggested Bonham. Bonham already knew Plant, and knew Page from session work, as well as John Paul Jones. Page s choices for drummer included Procol Harum s B.J. Wilson, and session drummers Clem Cattini and Aynsley Dunbar. Ginger Baker was also rumoured to be on Page s list. However,

 

 

 

 

upon seeing Bonham drum for Tim Rose in Hampstead, north London, in July 1968, Page and manager Peter Grant were instantly convinced that he was the perfect fit for the new project. Despite an intensive campaign to snare the drummer, Bonham was initially reluctant to join the band.[9] Plant sent eight telegrams to Bonham s pub, the "Three Men in a Boat", in Walsall, which were followed by forty telegrams from Grant. However, at the same time he was also receiving lucrative offers from established artists Joe Cocker and Chris Farlowe. In the end, though, Bonham accepted Grant s offer. He later recalled, "I decided I liked their music better than Cocker s or Farlowe s."[10] During Led Zeppelin s first tour of the United States in December 1968, Bonham became friends with Vanilla Fudge s drummer Carmine Appice. Appice introduced him to Ludwig Drums, which he then used for the rest of his career. Bonham used the longest and heaviest sticks available (size 2B)(most likely the size was 5B or sometimes 5A, Made in England by Promoco), which he referred to as "trees." His hard hitting style was displayed to great effect on many Led Zeppelin songs, including "Immigrant Song" (Led Zeppelin III), "When the Levee Breaks" (Led Zeppelin IV / ), "Kashmir" (Physical Graffiti), "The Ocean" (Houses of the Holy), and "Achilles Last Stand" (Presence). The studio recording of "Misty Mountain Hop" perfectly captures his keen sense of dynamics, and this is similarly exhibited by his precise drumming on "No Quarter." On several cuts from later albums, Bonham rather adeptly handled funk and Latin-influenced drumming. Songs like "Royal Orleans" and "Fool in the Rain" are good examples, the latter displaying great skill with a New Orleans shuffle and a samba rhythm. His famous drum solo, first entitled "Pat s Delight," later renamed "Moby Dick," would often last for half an hour and regularly featured his use of bare hands to achieve different sound effects. In Led Zeppelin concert tours after 1969, Bonham would expand his basic kit to include congas, orchestral timpani, and a symphonic gong. Bonham is also credited (by the Dallas Times Herald) with the first in-concert use of electronic timpani drum synthesizers (most likely made by Syndrum) during a performance of the song "Kashmir" in Dallas, Texas in 1977. Many modern rappers would later heavily sample his drumming and incorporate it into their compositions, such as Beastie Boys, who sampled "Moby Dick," "The Ocean," and "When the Levee Breaks."[11] Performing in Madison Square Garden with Led Zeppelin in 1973In 1974, Bonham appeared in the film Son of Dracula, playing drums in Count Downe s (Harry Nilsson) backing band. This was an Apple film directed by Freddie Francis. Bonham appeared in an overcrowded drum line-up including Keith Moon and Starr on the soundtrack album. Bonham s action sequence for the film The Song Remains the Same featured him in a drag race at Santa Pod Raceway to the sound of his signature drum solo, "Moby Dick". During his time with Led Zeppelin, Bonham was also an avid collector of antique sports cars and motorcycles, which he kept on his family s farm called The Old Hyde. He even bought The Plough pub in the nearby village of Shenstone, which shows signs of conversion work to allow him to drive his bikes or cars right behind the bar. This was not, however, the pub featured in the film The Song Remains the Same. It was in fact the New Inn which is currently boarded up, the only clue to its famous past being a picture hanging close to the bar.[citation needed] As well as recording with Led Zeppelin, Bonham also found time to play on sessions for other artists. In 1969 Bonham appeared on The Family Dogg s A Way of Life, with Page and Jones. Bonham also sessioned for Screaming Lord Sutch on his album Lord Sutch and Heavy Friends in 1970. He also played drums on Lulu s 1971 song "Everybody Clap," originally written by Maurice Gibb and Billy Lawrie. Later in his career, Bonham drummed for his Birmingham friend, Roy Wood, on his 1979 album, On the Road Again, and for Wings on Paul McCartney s Back to the Egg Rockestra project. Many rock drummers were heavily influenced by John Bonham s work with Led

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zeppelin, including Neil Peart, Tony Thompson,[12] Dave Grohl, [13] Tommy Lee, [14] and Chad Smith. [15] Death On 25 September 1980, Bonham was picked up by Led Zeppelin assistant Rex King to attend rehearsals at Bray Studios for an upcoming tour of the U.S.; the band s first since 1977. During the journey Bonham had asked to stop for breakfast, where he downed four quadruple vodkas (roughly sixteen shots, amounting to about half of an imperial quart or 473 ml). He then continued to drink heavily when he arrived at the rehearsals. A halt was called to the rehearsals late in the evening and the band retired to Page s house, The Old Mill House in Clewer, Windsor. After midnight, Bonham had fallen asleep and was taken to bed and placed on his side. Benji LeFevre (who had replaced Richard Cole as Led Zeppelin s tour manager) and John Paul Jones found him dead the next afternoon.[16] Bonham was 32 years old. Weeks later at the coroner s inquest, it emerged that in the 24 hours before he died, John Bonham had consumed forty shots of vodka which resulted in pulmonary edema: waterlogging of the lungs caused by inhalation of vomit. A verdict of accidental death was returned at an inquest held on 27 October.[16] An autopsy had found no other drugs in Bonham s body.[17] John Bonham was cremated and on 12 October 1980 interred at Rushock Parish Church, Worcestershire. His headstone reads: “Cherished memories of a loving husband and father, John Henry Bonham who died Sept. 25th 1980. aged 32 years. He will always be remembered in our hearts, Goodnight my Love, God Bless.”

John Bonham s gravestoneDespite media rumors that drummers including Cozy Powell, Carmine Appice, Barriemore Barlow, Simon Kirke or Bev Bevan, among others, would join the group as his replacement, the remaining members decided to disband Led Zeppelin after Bonham s death. They issued a press statement on 4 December 1980, confirming that the band would not continue without its drummer. "We wish it to be known that the loss of our dear friend and the deep respect we have for his family, together with the sense of undivided harmony felt by ourselves and our manager, have led us to decide that we could not continue as we were." It was simply signed "Led Zeppelin".[18] Family John Bonham had two siblings; his younger brother, Mick Bonham (1951–2000), was a disc jockey, author and photographer and his younger sister, Deborah Bonham (born in 1962), who is a singer-songwriter. Bonham was married to Pat Phillips, and the couple had two children; his daughter Zoë Bonham (born 1975), who is a singer-songwriter and also appears regularly at Led Zeppelin conventions and awards and his son Jason Bonham (born 1966), a rock drummer who has gained success with various bands including Foreigner and Bonham. In December 2007, he played with Led Zeppelin on the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert, as well as their previous reunion at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary show in 1988. A 1970 film clip of a four-year-old Jason playing drums appears in the Led Zeppelin film The Song Remains the Same. Zoë and Jason appeared at the induction ceremony for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995 along with the surviving members of Led Zeppelin. John s mother, Joan Bonham, is one of the lead vocalists for the Zimmers, [19] a 40-member band set up as a result of a BBC documentary on the treatment of the elderly.[20] Bonham s cousin Billy Bonham (born 1950), also played keyboards for Terry Reid and Ace Kefford.[21] Equipment Drums Bonham initially used Premier drums, but in the late 1960s was introduced to Ludwig drums by Carmine Appice of Vanilla Fudge. Throughout the remainder of his career, Bonham was a major endorser of Ludwig Drums. In concert, he used a wide range of different drum kits, but mostly of the same sizes. From 1970 onwards,

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

he used a 14"x 26" bass drum, which was the most identifiable part of his setup. He used 16"x 16", 16"x 18" and (on certain live performances) a 20"x 18" floor toms, while occasionally changing his tom sizes, which included sizes 12"x 14", 10"x 14", and 12"x 15". Studio and Touring Kit (1969–1970) 14 x 12" Tom (mounted on snare stand, and later a Rogers mount was added) 16 x 16" Floor Tom 18 x 16" Floor Tom 26 x 14" Bass Drum ( He did have a second bass drum that can be seen in the Communication Breakdown demo however is was never used in any recordings) Also included a 20" floor tom which were rarely used due to their size) Studio and Touring Kit (1970–1973) Drums — Ludwig Green Sparkle 14 x 10" Tom (mounted on a rail consolette mount) 16 x 16" Floor Tom 18 x 16" Floor Tom 26 x 14" Bass Drum 14 x 6.5" Ludwig Chrome Supraphonic 402 Snare 29" Machine Timpani (1972+) 29" 32" Universal Timpani (1972+) Ludwig Speed King Bass pedal John was known for telling the band that the Green Sparkle kit was his favourite and best sounding kit, and it was used on all recordings from IV onwards, excluding Presence where he used the Silver Sparkle kit. "The Song Remains The Same" Kit (1973–1975) [22] Drums — Ludwig Amber Vistalite 14" x 10" Tom 16 x 16" Floor Tom 18 x 16" Floor Tom 20 x 16" Floor Tom 26 x 14" Bass Drum 14 x 6.5" Ludwig Chrome Supraphonic 402 Snare 29" Machine Timpani 29" 32" Universal Timpani Ludwig speed king bass pedal A spare bass drum was kept, as these drums were renowned for cracking Cymbals Bonham used Paiste Cymbals exclusively. His cymbal setup, included Paiste Giant Beat cymbals until 1970. The Paiste Endorsement Agreement shows he experimented with cymbals including the 602 series before changing to a complete set of what is now the 2002 series in 71, which he used for the rest of his career. His setup: 15" 2002 Sound Edge Hi-Hat 24" 2002 Ride 20" 2002 Medium Crash 18" 2002 Crash (Switched to 18" 2002 Medium Crash in 1973) 16" 2002 Medium Crash 36-38" Symphonic Gong Drum Heads Bonham played Remo drum heads throughout his career. For his wood drums, he always used Remo Coated Emperors (or Ludwig equivalent) on his batter sides, while using coated ambassadors on the resonant side of his toms, and a diplomat or clear ambassador on the resonant side of his snare drum. The bass drums front head was always a medium weight head, for instance a Remo Coated Ambassador. The batter head was always tuned medium-tight, (almost jazz-like) and the resonate head was always tuned way up, for a full, round sound. He never put anything inside his bass drum (although his band members have said that he would sometimes fill it with crumpled tin foil, so that it would project). He only used a felt strip on the batter side occasionally. The bass drum heads were also

 

tuned a lot higher than one would think. Some have claimed he used to make "Ritchie Rings" cut out of old drum heads for his front bass drum head, but this anomaly is simply the surrounding light producing a shadow from the hoop on the white drum head producing the ring effect (you can produce the same effect with a front bass drum head, as long as the head is coated).[citation needed] On the vistalites he used Remo CS black dots on the batter side of the toms and the bass drum and clear ambassadors on the resonate side. The snare always had a coated emperor on the batter side and an ambassador or a diplomat on the snare side. He sometimes used a Gretsch 42-strand snare wires to fatten the snare sound. Bass Drum Pedal Bonham used Ludwig Speed King Pedal (AKA "Squeak king") (with tight spring tension) throughout his career. His trademark bass drum "triplets," — played interchangeably with doubles and singles — which are most notable in "Good Times Bad Times", were played on a single bass pedal, and not a double bass pedal. Unlike some contemporary drummers, Bonham did not use a double-bass drum kit. He did once own one (it was featured in the demo "Communication Breakdown"), but it was removed from his kit by the rest of the band. John Bonham did play double bass drums while the band was touring with the band Vanilla Fudge {as quoted by Carmine Appice.} It is possible to hear the squeak of the pedal in several recordings, including "Since I ve Been Loving You", "The Ocean", "The Rain Song", "Houses of the Holy", "Ten Years Gone", "Bonzo s Montreux" and the live version of "I Can t Quit You Baby" on Coda and "All My Love" on In Through The Out Door. Jimmy Page later commented: The only real problem I can remember encountering was when we were putting the first boxed set together. There was an awfully squeaky bass drum pedal on "Since I ve Been Loving You". It sounds louder and louder every time I hear it! [laughs]. That was something that was obviously sadly overlooked at the time.[23] Tribute Kits In 2005, Ludwig began issuing Bonham reissue kits in green sparkle maple and amber Vistalite. Ludwig currently offers various "Zep Kits" in their Vistalite, Classic, and Accent lines, with 26" bass drums, a 13" or 14" tom mounted on a snare stand, and 16" and 18" floor toms. In 2007 they issued a limited edition stainless steel kit similar to the ones Bonham used on the last Led Zeppelin tours in the 1970s. The stainless steel shells were manufactured by Ronn Dunnett of Dunnett Classic Drums.

Led Zeppelin (album) - Wikipedia

Led Zeppelin Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded October 1968, Olympic Studios in London, England Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock Length 44:26 Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page Singles from Led Zeppelin "Good Times Bad Times/Communication Breakdown"

 

 

 

 

Released: 1969 Led Zeppelin is the debut album of English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was recorded in October 1968 at Olympic Studios in London and released on Atlantic Records on 12 January 1969. The album featured integral contributions from each of the group s four musicians and established Led Zeppelin s fusion of blues and rock. Led Zeppelin also created a large and devoted following for the band, with their unique heavy metal sound endearing them to a section of the counterculture on both sides of the Atlantic. Although the album initially received negative reviews, it was commercially very successful and has now come to be regarded in a much more positive light by critics. In 2003, the album was ranked number 29 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Contents 1 Background 2 Recording and production 2.1 Recording sessions 2.2 Production 3 Artwork 4 Composition 5 Reception 6 Legacy 6.1 Accolades 7 Track listing 8 Sales chart positions 9 Sales certifications 10 Personnel 11 References 12 External links Background In August 1968, the English rock band The Yardbirds had completely disbanded. Guitarist Jimmy Page, The Yardbirds sole remaining member, was left with rights to the group’s name and contractual obligations for a series of concerts in Scandinavia.[1] For his new band, Page recruited bassist John Paul Jones, vocalist Robert Plant and drummer John Bonham. During September 1968, the group toured Scandinavia as The New Yardbirds, performing some old Yardbirds material as well as new songs such as "Communication Breakdown", "I Can t Quit You Baby", "You Shook Me", "Babe I m Gonna Leave You" and "How Many More Times".[2] The month after they returned to England, October 1968, Page changed the band s name to Led Zeppelin, and the group entered Olympic Studios in London to record their debut album.[3] Recording and production Recording sessions In a 1990 interview, Page said that the album took only about 36 hours of studio time (over a span of a few weeks) to create (including mixing), adding that he knows this because of the amount charged on the studio bill.[4][5] One of the primary reasons for the short recording time was that the material selected for the album had been well-rehearsed and pre-arranged by the band on Led Zeppelin s tour of Scandinavia in September 1968.[6] As Page explained, "[the band] had begun developing the arrangements on the Scandinavian tour and I knew what sound I was looking for. It just came together incredibly quickly."[7] In addition, since the band had not yet signed their deal with Atlantic Records, Page and Led Zeppelin s manager Peter Grant paid for the sessions entirely themselves, meaning there was no record company money to waste on excessive studio time.[8] In another interview, Page revealed that the self-funding was to ensure artistic freedom, "I wanted artistic control in a vice grip, because I knew exactly what I wanted to do with these fellows. In fact, I financed and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

completely recorded the first album before going to Atlantic. ... It wasn t your typical story where you get an advance to make an album—we arrived at Atlantic with tapes in hand ... Atlantic s reaction was very positive—I mean they signed us, didn t they?"[9] The group recorded their songs reportedly for £1,782.[8][10] Led Zeppelin expert Dave Lewis noted that "[w]ith the possible exception of the 12 hours that the Beatles took to record their first album at Abbey Road, rarely has studio time been used so economically. Led Zeppelin s debut album went on to gross more than £3.5 million, just short of 2,000 times more than they invested!"[8] For the recordings, Page played a psychedelically painted Fender Telecaster, a gift from Jeff Beck after Page recommended his boyhood friend to the Yardbirds in 1965 as potential replacement for Eric Clapton on lead guitar.[11] This was a different guitar from those he favoured for later albums (most notably a Gibson Les Paul). Page played the Telecaster through a Supro amplifier.[11] He also used a Gibson J-200, borrowed from Big Jim Sullivan, for the album s acoustic tracks.[11] Production Led Zeppelin was produced by Jimmy Page and engineered by Glyn Johns, who had previously worked with The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Who. According to Page, "The first album is a live album, it really is, and it s done intentionally in that way. It s got overdubs on it, but the original tracks are live."[12] Page reportedly used natural room ambience to enhance the reverb and recording texture on the record, demonstrating the innovations in sound recording he had learned during his session days. Up until the late 1960s, most music producers placed microphones directly in front of the amplifiers and drums. For Led Zeppelin Page developed the idea of placing an additional microphone some distance from the amplifier (as far as twenty feet) and then recording the balance between the two. By adopting this "distance equals depth" technique, Page became one of the first producers to record a band s "ambient sound"—the distance of a note s time-lag from one end of the room to the other.[13][14] Another notable feature of the album was the "leakage" on the recordings of Robert Plant s vocals. In a 1998 Guitar World interview, Page stated that "Robert s voice was extremely powerful and, as a result, would get on some of the other tracks. But oddly, the leakage sounds intentional."[13] On the track "You Shook Me", Page used the "backward echo" technique. It involves hearing the echo before the main sound (instead of after it), and is achieved by turning the tape over and employing the echo on a spare track, then turning the tape back over again to get the echo preceding the signal.[13] The album was one of the first albums to be released in stereo-only form; at the time the practice of releasing both mono and stereo versions was the norm.[8] Artwork The Led Zeppelin album cover depicts the Hindenburg airship seconds after catching fireLed Zeppelin s front cover, which was chosen by Page, features a black-and-white image of the burning Hindenburg airship. The image refers to the origin of the band s name itself:[8] when Page, Jeff Beck and The Who s Keith Moon and John Entwistle were discussing the idea of forming a group, Moon joked, "It would probably go over like a lead balloon", and Entwistle allegedly replied, "...a Lead Zeppelin!" The album s back cover features a photograph of the band taken by former-Yardbird Chris Dreja.[8] The entire design of the album s sleeve was coordinated by George Hardie, with whom the band would continue to collaborate for future sleeves.[8] Hardie recalled that he originally offered the band a design based on an old club sign in San Francisco—a multi-sequential image of a phallic zeppelin airship up in the clouds. Page declined but it was retained as the logo for the back cover of Led Zeppelin s first two albums and a number of early press advertisements.[8] During the first few weeks of release in the UK, the sleeve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

featured the band s name and the Atlantic logo in turquoise. When this was switched to the now-common orange print later in the year, the turquoise-printed sleeve became a collector s item.[8] The album cover received widespread attention when, at a February 1970 gig in Copenhagen, the band were billed as "The Nobs" as the result of a legal threat from aristocrat Eva von Zeppelin (a relative of the creator of the Zeppelin aircraft). von Zeppelin, upon seeing the logo of the Hindenburg crashing in flames, threatened to have the show pulled off the air.[15] In 2001, Greg Kot wrote in Rolling Stone that "The cover of Led Zeppelin. . . shows the Hindenburg airship, in all its phallic glory, going down in flames. The image did a pretty good job of encapsulating the music inside: sex, catastrophe and things blowing up."[16] Composition The conceptual originality of the album was displayed on tracks such as "Good Times Bad Times" and "Communication Breakdown", which had a distinctively heavy sound to the ears of young rock fans in the late-1960s. Led Zeppelin also featured delicate steel-string acoustic guitar by Page on "Black Mountain Side", and a combination of acoustic and electric approaches on their adaptation of "Babe I m Gonna Leave You". "Dazed and Confused" is arguably the album s centerpiece: a foreboding arrangement featuring a descending bass line from Jones, heavy drumming from Bonham and some powerful guitar riffs and soloing from Page. It also showcased Page playing guitar with a violin bow (an idea suggested by David McCallum Sr., whom Page had met while doing studio session work).[17] The bowed guitar in the middle section of the song brought psychedelic rock to experimental new heights, especially in extended stage versions, building on Page s earlier renderings of the song during the latter days of The Yardbirds. "Dazed and Confused" would become Led Zeppelin s signature performance piece for years to come. The bowed guitar technique is also used on "How Many More Times", a song which features a "Bolero" riff and an improvised shift in cadence.[8] Many of Led Zeppelin s earliest songs were based on blues standards, and the album also included three songs composed by others: "You Shook Me" and "I Can t Quit You Baby", both by blues artist Willie Dixon; and "Babe I m Gonna Leave You".[8] Regarding the last of these, at the time guitarist Jimmy Page mistakenly believed he was adapting a traditional folk song he had heard on a Joan Baez record, but this was corrected on subsequent rereleases after it was revealed that the song was composed by Anne Bredon in the 1950s.[8] Dixon, on the other hand, received proper credit as the composer of his two songs on this album (although "You Shook Me" would later be additionally credited to J. B. Lenoir) but would go on to settle out of court with Led Zeppelin over partial use of other material of his on Plant s lyrics to "Whole Lotta Love". On "You Shook Me", Plant vocally mimics Page s guitar effects—a metallicised version of the "call and response" blues technique. Jeff Beck had previously recorded "You Shook Me" for his album, Truth, and accused Page of stealing his idea.[8] With John Paul Jones and drummer Keith Moon of The Who, Page had played on (and says he arranged) "Beck s Bolero", an instrumental on Truth that would be grooved into the mix of the Led Zeppelin jam "How Many More Times". These cross-pollinations led to a rift between Beck and Page, who had played in the Yardbirds together and been friends since childhood.[18] In fact, it was Page who first suggested Beck for the Yardbirds guitarist position when he was contacted by the band after Eric Clapton s departure. In an interview he gave in 1975, Page offered his own perspective on the album s music: For material, we obviously went right down to our blues roots. I still had plenty of Yardbirds riffs left over. By the time Jeff [Beck] did go, it was up to me to come up with a lot of new stuff. It was this thing where [Eric] Clapton set a heavy precedent in the Yardbirds which Beck had to follow and then it was even harder for me, in a way, because the second lead guitarist had suddenly become the first. And I was under pressure to come up with my own

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

riffs. On the first LP I was still heavily influenced by the earlier days. I think it tells a bit, too... It was obvious that somebody had to take the lead, otherwise we d have all sat around jamming for six months. But after that, on the second LP, you can really hear the group identity coming together.[19] Plant is credited on the album with "occasional bass". In an interview he gave to Rolling Stone magazine in 2005, Plant made reference to this: In truth, I was an occasional bass player. It says so on Zeppelin I, next to my name: vocals, harmonica and occasional bass. Very occasionally -- once, I think, since 1968. How in God s name that ended up on the cover is so funny. I m sure Jonesy [John Paul Jones] didn t like it [laughs]. But I suppose every time he fucked up he could say it was me.[20] Reception The album was advertised in selected music papers under the slogan "Led Zeppelin — the only way to fly".[8] It initially received poor reviews. In a stinging assessment, Rolling Stone magazine asserted that the band offered "little that its twin, the Jeff Beck Group, didn t say as well or better three months ago". It also called Plant "as foppish as Rod Stewart, but nowhere near so exciting".[29] As was noted by rock journalist Cameron Crowe years later: "It was a time of "super-groups," of furiously hyped bands who could barely cut it, and Led Zeppelin initially found themselves fighting upstream to prove their authenticity."[30] Conversely, in Britain the album received a glowing review in the Melody Maker. Chris Welch wrote, in a review titled "Jimmy Page triumphs — Led Zeppelin is a gas!": "their material does not rely on obvious blues riffs, although when they do play them, they avoid the emaciated feebleness of most so-called British blues bands".[5] The album was very commercially successful. It was initially released in America on 17 January 1969 to capitalise on the band s first U.S. concert tour. Before that, Atlantic Records had distributed a few hundred advance white label copies to key radio stations and reviewers. A positive reaction to its contents, coupled with a good reaction to the band s opening concerts, resulted in the album generating 50,000 advance orders.[8] Within two months of its release the album had reached Billboard s Top 10.[31] It stayed on the Billboard chart for 73 weeks and held a 79-week run on the British charts. By 1975 it had grossed $7,000,000.[32] Legacy The success and influence of the album is today widely acknowledged, even amongst those critics who were initially skeptical. In 2006, for example, Rolling Stone stated that [The album] was pretty much unlike anything else. The arrangements were more sculpted than those of Cream or Jimi Hendrix, and the musicianship wasn t cumbersome like Iron Butterfly s or bombastic like Vanilla Fudge s. The closest comparisons might be to MC5 or the Stooges—both from Michigan—yet neither had the polish or prowess of Led Zeppelin, nor did Led Zeppelin have the political, social or die-hard sensibility of those landmark bands. What they did have, though, was the potential for a mass audience.[14] According to Lewis: Time has done nothing to diminish the quality of one of the finest debut albums ever recorded. There s an urgency and enthusiasm about their performance that retains timeless charm. The nine cuts offer a tour de force of powerful yet often subtle dynamics ... And let s not forget the fact that with this album, Page virtually invents the guitar riff as a key songwriting component.[8] In 2003, VH1 named Led Zeppelin the 44th greatest album of all time, while Rolling Stone ranked it 29th on the magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It is widely regarded as marking a significant turning point in the evolution of hard rock and heavy metal.[33] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Times United Kingdom "The 100 Best Albums of All Time" [34] 199341 Rolling Stone United StatesThe Rolling Stone 500 Greatest Albums of All Time [35] 200329 Grammy Awards United States Grammy Hall of Fame Award [36] 2004* Q United Kingdom "The Music That Changed the World" [37] 20047 Robert Dimery United States 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die [38] 2006* Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest British Rock Album Ever" [39]200681 Uncut United Kingdom 100 Greatest Debut Albums [40] 20067 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States The Definitive 200 [41] 2007165 Q United Kingdom 21 Albums That Changed Music [42] 20076 * denotes an unordered list Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Good Times Bad Times" John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Page 2:47 2."Babe I m Gonna Leave You" Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, Anne Bredon 6:41 3."You Shook Me" Willie Dixon, J. B. Lenoir 6:30 4."Dazed and Confused" Jimmy Page 6:27 Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Your Time Is Gonna Come" John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page 4:34 2."Black Mountain Side" Jimmy Page 2:13 3."Communication Breakdown" John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page 2:30 4."I Can t Quit You Baby" Willie Dixon 4:43 5."How Many More Times" John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page 8:28 "How Many More Times" was listed as 3:30 on the record sleeve deliberately by Jimmy Page in order to trick radio stations into playing the song.[citation needed] Robert Plant participated in songwriting but wasn t given credit because of unexpired contractual obligations resulting from his association with CBS Records.[8] Some cassette versions of the album reversed the order of the sides. For these versions, side one began with "Your Time Is Gonna Come" and ended with "How Many More Times", while side two began with "Good Times, Bad Times" and ended with "Dazed and Confused". Sales chart positions Album Chart (1969) Peak Position Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [43] 11 UK Albums Chart [44] 6 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [45] 10 French Albums Chart [46] 115 Japanese Albums Chart [47] 36 Chart (1970) Peak Position Norwegian Albums Chart [48] 16 Spanish Albums Chart [49] 1 German Albums Chart [50] 32 Australian Go-Set Top 20 Albums Chart [51] 9 Singles Year Single Chart Position 1969 "Good Times Bad Times" US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart (Pop Singles) [52] 80 Sales certifications Country Sales Certification

 

 

 

Canada (CRIA)1,000,000+Diamond[53] France (SNEP)100,000+Gold[54] Switzerland (IFPI)25,000+Gold[55] Germany (IFPI)100,000+Gold[56] Argentina (CAPIF)30,000+Gold[57] Australia (ARIA)140,000+2x Platinum[58] United States (RIAA)8,000,000+8x Platinum[59] Spain (PROMUSICAE)80,000+Platinum[60] United Kingdom (BPI)600,000+2x Platinum[61]* Netherlands (NVPI)30,000+Gold[62]* Note: (*) Remastered sales only Personnel Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums, timpani, backing vocals John Paul Jones – bass guitar, organ, keyboards, backing vocals Jimmy Page – acoustic, electric, and pedal steel guitar, backing vocals, production Robert Plant – vocals, harmonica Additional personnel Barry Diament – original Compact Disc mastering Chris Dreja – back liner photo Peter Grant – executive producer George Hardie – cover design Viram Jasani – tabla on "Black Mountain Side" Glyn Johns – engineering, mixing George Marino – remastered Compact Disc

Good Times Bad Times - Wikipedia,

Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin B-side "Communication Breakdown" Released 10 March 1969 Format 7" Recorded October 1968 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal Length 2:47 Label Atlantic Writer(s) John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page Producer Jimmy Page

"Good Times Bad Times" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, featured as the opening track on their 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin. For the lead guitar solo, guitarist Jimmy Page passed his Telecaster guitar through a Leslie speaker to create a swirling effect.[1][2] This type of speaker contains a rotating paddle and was designed for Hammond organ. However, guitars

could be used with it. George Harrison and Eric Clapton also did this on the Cream song "Badge", and Harrison used this in several of The Beatles recordings.[3] In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993, Page explained that: I do remember using the board to overdrive a Leslie cabinet for the main riff in "How Many More Times". It doesn t sound like a Leslie because I wasn t employing the rotating speakers. Surprisingly, that sound has real weight. The guitar is going through the board, then through an amp which was driving the Leslie cabinet. It was a very successful experiment.[4] Page, also the band s producer, placed microphones all over the recording studio to capture a live sound when this song was recorded. This song is also notable for drummer John Bonham s repeated use of a series of two sixteenth-note triplets on a single bass drum, an effect many subsequent rock drummers have imitated, and as well as keeping the hi-hat playing quarter notes throughout almost the entire song with his left foot. Bonham had reportedly developed this technique after listening to Vanilla Fudge. He was unaware that drummer Carmine Appice was actually playing on a double bass set. As Page has stated: The most stunning thing about the track, of course, is Bonzo s amazing kick drum. It s superhuman when you realize he was not playing with double kick. That s one kick drum! That s when people started understanding what he was all about.[4] Bass player John Paul Jones has also remarked on his own contribution to the track: Usually anything [by Led Zeppelin] with lots of notes was mine and anything with chunky chords was Page s. Things like "Good Times Bad Times", those are my sort of riffs, they re quite busy .[5] Jones says that the riff he wrote for this song was the most difficult one he ever wrote.[6] "Good Times Bad Times" was rarely played live at Led Zeppelin concerts in its entirety. In a few instances in 1969 it was used as an introduction to "Communication Breakdown". It also appeared in almost complete form within the "Communication Breakdown" medley performed at the LA Forum on 4 September 1970 (as can be heard on the Led Zeppelin bootleg recording Live On Blueberry Hill), and several "Whole Lotta Love medleys in 1971. It was also the opening song for Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. TV & Radio presenter Fearne Cotton, a huge Led Zeppelin fan, has said that this is her favourite song of all time. Contents 1 Accolades 2 Formats and tracklistings 3 Chart positions 3.1 Led Zeppelin single 4 Personnel 5 Cover versions 5.1 Godsmack cover 5.2 Godsmack Single 6 Sources 7 References 8 External links Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank BlenderUnited States"The 1001 Greatest Songs to Download Right Now!" [7] 2003* Digital Dream Door United States "The 100 Greatest Rock Debut Singles" [8] 2005 73 Digital Dream Door United States" The 100 Greatest Recordings From 1969" [9] 2007 56

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(*) designates unordered lists. Formats and tracklistings 1969 7" single (UK: Atlantic 584269, US/New Zealand: Atlantic 45-2613, Australia: Atlantic AK 2914, Canada: Atlantic AT 2613X, France: Atlantic 650 153, Germany: Atlantic ATL 70369, Greece: Atlantic 255 002, Italy: Atlantic ATL NP 03117, Japan: Nihon Gramophone DT-1105, Philippines: Atlantic 45-3734, Sweden: Atlantic ATL 70.369) A. "Good Times Bad Times" (Bonham, Jones, Page) 2:47 B. "Communication Breakdown" (Page, Plant) 2:28 1969 7" single (South Africa: Atlantic ATS410) A. "Good Times Bad Times" (Bonham, Jones, Page) 2:47 B. "Black Mountain Side" (Page) 2:12 1969 7" EP (Mexico: Atlantic EPA 1577) A1. "Good Times Bad Times" (Bonham, Jones, Page) 2:47 A2. "Communication Breakdown" (Page, Plant) 2:28 B. "Dazed and Confused" (Page) 6:26 1972 7" EP (Argentina: Music Hall 186) A1. "Good Times Bad Times" (Bonham, Jones, Page) 2:47 A2. "Communication Breakdown" (Page, Plant) 2:28 B1. "Roundabout"* (Anderson, Howe) 3:27 B2. "Long Distance Runaround"* (Anderson) 3:30 Notes: (*) B-side by Yes Chart positions Led Zeppelin single Chart (1969) Peak position Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [10] 64 US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [11] 80 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [12] 66 US Record World 100 Top Pops [13] 65 Japanese Singles Chart [14] 84 Dutch Singles Chart [15] 17 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars and backing vocals. John Paul Jones - bass guitar and backing vocals. John Bonham - drums and backing vocals Cover versions 1988: Nuclear Assault (Survive) 1989: The Dalai Lamas (The Song Retains the Name) 1993: Dread Zeppelin (Hot & Spicy Beanburger) 1995: Cracker (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1998: Candlebox (Live In Boston: Mama Kins [live bootleg]) 1999: Carl Weathersby (Whole Lotta Blues: Songs of Led Zeppelin) 2000: Billy Joel (Brief live cover) 2002: Axxis (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Bug Funny Foundation (The Electronic Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2003: Phish (Live Phish Volume 20 [recorded live 29 December 1994]) 2004: Joe Lesté (Stairway to Rock: (Not Just) a Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2004: Robert Randolph and the Family Band (Bonnaroo: That Tent [live bootleg]) 2005: Tracy G (Hip Hop Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2006: Bustle In Your Hedgerow (Live at Abbey Pub, 8.6.06) 2008: Eric Bloom (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2009: The Opposables (The Hideout 5/23/09)

2009: Ben Harper and Relentless 7 (Unreleased, also played at live shows) 2009: Root Mean Square (Unreleased) Godsmack cover "Good Times, Bad Times" Single by Godsmack from the album Good Times, Bad Times... Ten Years of Godsmack Released 2007 Format CD single Recorded 2007 Genre Heavy metal Length 2:57 Label Universal/Republic Writer(s) Bonham/Jones/Page Producer Sully Erna The heavy metal band Godsmack covered the song in 2007, for their album, Good Times, Bad Times... Ten Years of Godsmack. It was the only song on the album to be newly released as a single and gained moderate radio airplay on US rock stations. A music video was also created for the Godsmack version of the song, featuring live footage. Godsmack Single Billboard (North America) Year Chart Position 2007 Mainstream Rock Tracks 8 2007 Modern Rock Tracks 28 2007 Billboard Hot 100 124

Babe I m Gonna Leave You - Wikipedia

"Babe I m Gonna Leave You" is a traditional folk song written by Anne Bredon in the late 1950s. It was recorded by Joan Baez (credited as "traditional") and released on her 1962 album Joan Baez in Concert, Part 1, and also by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, which included it on its 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin. Other interpretations of the Bredon song include versions by The Plebs (1964 Decca Records UK/MGM Records USA), The Association in 1965 (also doing a live version in 1970) and British pop singer Mark Wynter in 1965. Quicksilver Messenger Service recorded a variation on the song in 1967. Welsh band Man would later cover the QMS song on their 1976 album Maximum Darkness (recorded live at Roundhouse, Chalk Farm on 26 May 1975). Contents 1 Joan Baez version 2 Led Zeppelin version 2.1 Formats and tracklistings 2.2 Personnel 2.3 Cover versions 2.4 Samples 3 References 4 Sources 5 External links

 

 

Joan Baez version Whilst a student at UC-Berkeley in around 1960, Anne Bredon appeared on a live folk-music radio show The Midnight Special on radio station KPFA, on which she sang "Babe, I m Gonna Leave You".[1] A fellow folk singer who guested on The Midnight Special, Janet Smith, took up the song and developed it further, playing it live at hootenany folk-song events at Oberlin College, one performance of which was attended by Joan Baez.[1] Baez requested Smith to send her a recording of her songs, including "Babe, I m Gonna Leave You", which Baez subsequently began performing herself. It became the opening track on Joan Baez in Concert, Part 1.[1] Led Zeppelin version "Babe I m Gonna Leave You" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded October 1968 Genre Hard rock, folk rock Length 6:41 Label Atlantic Writer(s) Page, Plant and Bredon Producer Jimmy Page

The band was inspired to cover the song after hearing Baez s version. Both guitarist Jimmy Page and singer Robert Plant were big fans of Baez. Baez s original album had indicated that the song was a traditional number, and Led Zeppelin followed suit by crediting the song as "Trad., arr. Page". In the 1980s, Bredon was made aware of Led Zeppelin s version of the song. Since 1990 the Led Zeppelin version has been credited to Anne Bredon/Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, and Bredon received a substantial back-payment in royalties.[2] This was the number Page played to Plant at their first meeting together, which took place at Page s riverside home at Pangbourne in late July 1968.[2] It is sometimes stated that the song evolved when Plant played to Page the guitar arrangement which eventually found its way onto the album. In an interview he gave with Guitar World magazine in 1998, Page refuted this story, noting that he had worked out the arrangement long before he met Plant, told him he would like it on the album, and that Plant at that time did not even play the guitar.[3] It is rumoured that Page recorded another version of the song, with Steve Winwood, in 1968, which was never released.[4] At the 1:43 mark of Led Zeppelin s version of "Babe I m Gonna Leave You", it is possible to hear a very faint trace of Plant singing, "I can hear it calling me" just before he sings the same line in full volume. It is as if he "hears it calling him." This "ghost" is the vocal bleed from Plant s scratch vocal, and it appears on the drum tracks, which were recorded live with the full band. The band only played this song live at Led Zeppelin concerts on its 1969 concert tours, but Page and Plant brought it back for their 1998 reunion in a 9-minute version. When he played this song live, Page tended to use a fuzzbox.[citation needed] Led Zeppelin cite their best performance of the song to be at Copenhagen, Denmark, late 1968, during which Jimmy played the song with heavy fuzz.[citation needed] A live, filmed performance of "Babe I m Gonna Leave You", from Led Zeppelin s gig on Danmarks Radio at Gladsaxe, Denmark, on March 17, 1969, is featured on the Led Zeppelin DVD (2003). The song is featured on the 2006 One Tree Hill episode entitled "The Show Must Go On"[5]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

As a result of touring in the United States and watching various "Led Zeppelin" cover bands and other artists perform this song, in recent months Robert Plant has taken to performing this song again, both with his "current" band "Strange Sensations" as well as in his concert tours as a solo artist. One year after the album Led Zeppelin was released in 1969, Chicago s "25 or 6 to 4" came out as a single, and sounds similar to the progression used in the Led Zeppelin version.[6] Formats and tracklistings 1969 7" promo 45 edition (US: Atlantic EP 1019) A. "Babe I m Gonna Leave You" (Bredon, Page, Plant) 6:41 B. "Dazed and Confused" (Page) 6:26 1969 7" single edition (Greece: Atlantic 2019 003) A. "Babe I m Gonna Leave You" (Bredon, Page, Plant) 6:41 B. "How Many More Times" (Page) 8:28 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions With credits Page/Plant/Bredon 1971: Pyg (Free with PYG [recorded live 1971]) 1996: Great White (Stage) 1998: Chapter Eleven (Before the Balloon Went Up) 2000: various artists (Pickin on Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2000: Paul Oakenfold (Perfecto Presents: Another World [remixs by Quivver]) 2001: Richard DeVinck (Going to California) 2002: Cactus Jack (DisCover) 2002: Doro (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Thomas Fuchs (Nightworks) 2004: Hampton String Quartet (HSQ Rides Again) 2005: Hal Lindes (Get the Lead Out) 2006: Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! - Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2007: Carl Kennedy with Dirty South (Onelove: Your Disco Will Eat You [remix]) 2008: Tony Franklin (Rock N Pop Ballads) 2008: Joe Lynn Turner (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2009: P!nk (As part of her Funhouse Tour)

You Shook Me - Wikipedia

"You Shook Me" Single by Muddy Waters Format Single Recorded June 27, 1962 Chicago Genre Blues-rock Length 2:44 Label Chess (Cat. No. 1827) Writer(s) Willie Dixon, J. B. Lenoir Producer Willie Dixon

 

 

 

   

"You Shook Me" is a blues song written by Willie Dixon and J. B. Lenoir. Earl Hooker first recorded it as an instrumental which was then overdubbed with vocals by Muddy Waters in 1962. The single featured Muddy Waters on vocals, J.T Brown Ernest Cotton on tenor saxophone, Johnny "Big Moose" Walker on organ, Earl Hooker on guitar, Willie Dixon on bass, and Casey Jones on drums. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Led Zeppelin s version Personnel Cover versions References Sources

Led Zeppelin s version "You Shook Me" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released January 12, 1969 Genre Hard rock, blues-rock Length 6:28 Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page

The song was recorded by various rock musicians, including Jeff Beck on his album Truth (1968), and most famously by English rock band Led Zeppelin on its debut album Led Zeppelin (1969). Since the Led Zeppelin version was released in 1969, months after Beck s, he accused them of stealing his idea. This, along with the overall similarity between the sound of Led Zeppelin and that of Truth, led to a long rift between Beck and Led Zeppelin s Jimmy Page.[1] Beck and Page had been friends for years at that point, having both previously played as members of The Yardbirds[2]. Interestingly, Led Zeppelin bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones had played the organ on Beck s version of the song as part of his previous work as a session musician. In an interview he gave in 1977, Page commented: [Led Zeppelin had] done our first LP ... with “You Shook Me”, and then I heard [Beck had] done “You Shook Me” ... I was terrified because I thought they’d be the same. But I hadn’t even known he’d done it, and he hadn’t known that we had.[3] In another interview, also given by Page in 1977, he elaborated: [Beck] had the same sort of taste in music as I did. That s why you ll find on the early LPs we both did a song like "You Shook Me." It was the type of thing we d both played in bands. Someone told me he d already recorded it after we d already put it down on the first Zeppelin album. I thought, "Oh dear, it s going to be identical," but it was nothing like it, fortunately. I just had no idea he d done it. It was on Truth but I first heard it when I was in Miami after we d recorded our version. It s a classic example of coming from the same area musically, of having a similar taste.[2] For his part, Beck has said that he first heard that Page had recorded the same song was when Page himself played it to him: He said, "Listen to this. Listen to Bonzo, this guy called John Bonham that I ve got." And so I said I would, and my heart just sank when I heard "You Shook Me". I looked at him and said "Jim, what?" and the tears were coming out with anger. I thought "This is a piss-take, it s got to be." I mean, there s Truth still spinning on everybody s turntable, and this turkey s come out with

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

another version. Oh boy ... then I realised it was serious, and he did have this heavyweight drummer, and I thought "Here we go again" - pipped at the post kind of thing.[4] On the Led Zeppelin recording, Jones double tracked the organ and the electric piano. Page used his "backward echo" technique on this towards the end with Robert Plant s screaming vocals and the guitar. This production technique involved hearing the echo before the main sound instead of after it, achieved by turning the tape over and employing the echo on a spare track, then turning the tape back over again to get the echo preceding the signal. Page had originally developed the method when recording the single "Ten Little Indians" with The Yardbirds in 1967.[5] "You Shook Me" was one of the first Led Zeppelin songs to feature the call-and-response effect of blues style music, a style used frequently by the band on subsequent studio tracks and live in concert.[1] Jimmy Page uses a slide on this track and the song opens with a blues lick reminiscent to that of Elmore James. Perhaps because the song so effectively showcases the talents of all four band members, it was played frequently during early Led Zeppelin concerts. From 1973, however, the song was dropped from the band s live setlist as the group began to incorporate more material from subsequent albums into its on-stage performances. (In fact, in its entirety the song was played until October 1969, and until 1973 it was from time to time added as a part of "Whole Lotta Love"). Jimmy Page performed this song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of "You Shook Me" performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, organ, electric piano John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1968: Jeff Beck (Truth) 1970: Willie Dixon (I Am The Blues) 1993: B. B. King (Blues Summit) 1995: Mick Taylor (Live at 14 Below: Coastin Home [recorded live 1 February 1995]) 1996: The Blues Band (Homage [recorded live 1993]) 1997: Killer Whales (Shredzilla) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2002: Lisa Ferguson (Livin Lovin Played: A Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2004: George Lynch (Furious George) 2007: Hell N Diesel (Passion for Power) 2008: Artimus Pyle (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute)

Dazed and Confused (song) - Wikipedia

"Dazed and Confused" is a song by Jake Holmes and by Led Zeppelin, and also covered by The Yardbirds. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Jake Holmes The Yardbirds Led Zeppelin studio recording Led Zeppelin live performances Cultural influence

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Accolades 6 Personnel 6.1 Cover versions 6.1.1 Album versions 6.1.2 Live versions 7 References 8 Sources 9 External links Jake Holmes "Dazed and Confused" Song by Jake Holmes from the album "The Above Ground Sound" of Jake Holmes Released 1967 Genre Folk rock Length 3:50 Label Tower Writer Jake Holmes

Folk singer Jake Holmes wrote and recorded "Dazed and Confused" for his debut solo album "The Above Ground Sound" of Jake Holmes, released in June 1967. Like the other tracks on the album, the song does not include any drums. It was recorded entirely with the trio of Holmes on guitar, keyboard and vocals, Ted Irwin on guitar and Lee Underwood on bass.[1] The song has been incorrectly labelled as a tale about a bad acid trip. Holmes himself has confirmed that this is not the case. In 2001 he gave an interview to Shindig! magazine and said this about "Dazed and Confused": I never took acid. I smoked grass and tripped on it, but I never took acid. I was afraid to take it. The song s about a girl who hasn t decided whether she wants to stay with me or not. It s pretty much one of those love songs.[2] The Yardbirds During a 1967 tour of the United States by English rock group The Yardbirds, Jake Holmes performed as the opener at the Village Theater in Greenwich Village on August 25, 1967.[3] The Yardbirds were inspired by his performance and decided to work up their own arrangement for a new song. Their version featured long instrumental patches of bowed guitar courtesy of Jimmy Page, and dynamic instrumental flourishes. Page has stated that he obtained the idea of using a violin bow on his guitar from a violinist named David McCallum, Sr., during his session days before joining the Yardbirds in 1966.[4] At that time, it even had a little eastern influence, as can be heard on some French television appearances. It quickly became a staple of The Yardbirds live act during their final year of existence. It was never officially recorded by the band, although an unauthorised live version was included on the semi-legitimate Live Yardbirds: Featuring Jimmy Page album under the alternate title "I m Confused". Another live recording from French TV series "Bouton Rouge" (recorded on 9 March 1968) was released on Cumular Limit in 2000, credited as "Dazed and Confused" by Jake Holmes arr. Yardbirds[5]. Led Zeppelin studio recording "Dazed and Confused" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded October 1968 Genre Hard rock, psychedelic rock, blues-rock, heavy metal Length 6:26 Label Atlantic Writer Jimmy Page

 

 

   

 

ProducerJimmy Page

When the Yardbirds disbanded in 1968, the song "Dazed and Confused" was re-worked by Page yet again, this time while as a member of Led Zeppelin. Page took the title, came up with a new set of lyrics, and changed enough of the melody to escape a plagiarism lawsuit from Jake Holmes.[6][1][7] The Led Zeppelin version was not credited to Holmes, and they also had a different ASCAP code asigned to it.[8] While Holmes took no action at the time, he did later contact Page in regards to the matter. Page has not yet replied.[9] Led Zeppelin recorded their version in October 1968 at Olympic Studios, London, and the song was included on their 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin. It begins with a slow-tempo bluesy rhythm, propelled by John Paul Jones descending bass line. It then changes to a faster tempo during the darkest part of the song, again featuring bowed guitar by Page, followed by a furious guitar solo (similar to Page s solo from the Yardbirds "Think About It"), before finally returning to the initial rhythm. John Bonham s sporadic, explosive drumming throughout helped define the song s power and intensity. This was one of three Led Zeppelin songs on which Page used a bow on his guitar, the others being "How Many More Times" and "In The Light". The intro of the song "In the Evening" utilised the Gizmotron rubber wheel string exciter to achieve the violin-like effects. Many often mistake this for his use of the bow. Led Zeppelin live performances "Dazed and Confused" was widely popularised by, and is still heavily identified with, Led Zeppelin s version. It became the centrepiece for the group at Led Zeppelin concerts, at least through the release of "Whole Lotta Love" from their second album. When performed live, it was (except for the fast middle section) played at a slower overall tempo, and gradually extended in duration (up to 45 minutes by 1975) as a multi-section improvised jam. Although initially performed in a manner similar to the studio version, some noticeable differences were gradually developed in live performances. By June 1969, in the section where Page plays guitar with a violin bow, the rest of the band dropped out completely, allowing him to perform a lengthier free-form improvisation, though by January 1970, the main structure of the section was already formed. By 1972, another improvised section had been added between the verses and this. The fast section was extended to allow changes in dynamics and volume, as well as changing the beat, sometimes seguing in and out of another song altogether. There was a short jam at the end of the song after the final verse. Over time, the improvisational suite incorporated more and more material. In 1972, the song incorporated riffs from the Led Zeppelin songs "The Crunge", and "Walter s Walk", as can be heard on the live album How the West Was Won. By 1973, the song featured an extended transition before the violin bow solo, which incorporated a melody that would later be used in 1976 s "Achilles Last Stand". Plant sang lyrics from either Scott McKenzie s "San Francisco" or Joni Mitchell s "Woodstock" during this transition. Also during this time, the violin solo would incorporate "Mars" from Gustav Holst s suite The Planets, accompanied by Plant s vocalisations. In his 1997 publication Led Zeppelin Live: An Illustrated Exploration of Underground Tapes, Luis Rey dissects the pattern of the song (as it was in 1975) into twelve sections, in order to demonstrate its gradual state of evolution when played live: Stage 1: Bass intro and wah-wah interludes Stage 2: Main vocal theme Stage 3: Fast instrumental and oriental riffs Stage 4: "San Francisco" or "Woodstock" Stage 5: Violin bow episode including echo-slapping from the guitar; interlude with Plant s instrumental voice ; Gustav Holst s Mars, the

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bringer of War and return of the rhythm section Stage 6: Fast guitar solo and battle with Plant Stage 7: Slower tempo solo and funky moods Stage 8: Violent breaks and call and response interlude Stage 9: Faster solo in crescendos and occasional break-up tempo Stage 10: New arrangement of Mars, The Bringer Of War (slow and fast versions) and final frenzy Stage 11: Return to main theme Stage 12: Coda. Final instrumental and vocal battle inside syncopated rhythms, drum-solo and final explosion.[10] A live version of "Dazed and Confused" was featured in Led Zeppelin s 1976 concert film, The Song Remains the Same (and accompanying soundtrack), as part of Page s fantasy sequence. Other live recordings are also found on the official releases Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions (featuring two different versions), How the West Was Won, and the Led Zeppelin DVD. "Dazed and Confused" was performed on every Led Zeppelin concert tour up to and including their 1975 shows at Earls Court.[11] It was then removed from their live set, although Page continued to perform parts of the bowed guitar segment during solo spots in 1977 and 1979 (as preludes to "Achilles Last Stand" and "In the Evening", respectively). It was performed once again at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on December 10, 2007. Cultural influence The song is included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. The song was also used as the basis for the title of the 1993 film Dazed and Confused, which chronicled the lives of various American youths on their last day of high school in 1976. However, it is not found on the film s soundtrack. The film s director Richard Linklater appealed to Led Zeppelin band members to use some of their songs in the movie but, although Page agreed, Robert Plant refused.[12][13] The song is featured in the drama series Shabatot VeHagim, 2003 episode "Air Guitar"[14] In the television show The Simpsons, an episode of Itchy & Scratchy (1993 "The Front") has the title "Dazed and Contused", an obvious pun on the song. It was also used again as a pun ("abraised and contused") in the 2006 episode "Bart Has Two Mommies" where Ned Flanders addresses himself as Ned Zeppelin. Chad Smith and various others can be heard listening to it in the Red Hot Chili Peppers documentary Funky Monks. Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States "The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll" [15] 1994* Pause & Play United States "Time Capsule Inductions - Songs" [16] 1998* NME United Kingdom "117 Songs to soundtrack your summer" [17] 2003* Toby Creswell Australia "1001 Songs: the Great Songs of All Time" [18] 2005* Pitchfork Media United States "The 200 Greatest Songs of the 1960s" [19] 2006 11 Q United Kingdom "The 20 Greatest Guitar Tracks" [20] 2007 2 Q United Kingdom "21 Albums That Changed Music - Key Track" [21] 2007 6 (*) designates unordered lists. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions With credit Page Album versions 1993: John Vearity (Whole Lotta Love) 1994: Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1994: Cinnamon (Cinnamon II) 1995: Motohiko Hino (It s There) 1995: Alon Nadel & Friends (Jazzeppelin) 1996: Marxman (Time Capsule) 1999: Akira Takasaki (Super Rock Summit) 2000: Electrasy (In Here We Fall) 2001: Palladium (Sister Flute and the Sunday Best) 2001: Never Never (Never Never Tribute II) 2001: Simply Led (From the Land of the Ice and Snow) 2002: Blaze (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Kirsten Laiken (Livin, Lovin, Played: A Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2002: Galactic Achievement Society (The Electronic Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2003: Letz Zep (Live on Broadway) 2004: Jezz Woodroffe (In Through the Swing Door: Swing Cover Versions of Led Zeppelin Classics) 2004: Ray Orpeza (Stairway to Rock: (Not Just) a Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2004: Heavy Fuel (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2004: The Classic Rock String Quartet (The Led Zeppelin Chamber Suite: A Classic Rock Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Hampton String Quartet (Take No Prisoners!) 2005: Brian Tarquin (Get the Led Out! Led Zeppelin Salute) 2005: Iron Horse (Whole Lotta Bluegrass: A Bluegrass Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Dream Theater (Two Nights In North America [limited release]) 2006: The McRackins (Bat Out of Shell) 2006: Franck Tortiller & Orchestre National de Jazz (Close to Heaven: A Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2006: Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2006: Greg Reeves & Eric Stock (Dub Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Mad Zeppelin (Live im ColosSaal) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2007: Zepparella (Pleasing Pounding) 2008: Jack Russell (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) Live versions 1988-1989: Jimmy Page

Your Time Is Gonna Come - Wikipedia

"Your Time Is Gonna Come" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded October 1968 Genre Hard rock Length 4:34 Label Atlantic Writer Jones/Page Producer Jimmy Page

 

"Your Time Is Gonna Come" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released on their 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin. Guitarist Jimmy Page played an out-of-tune Fender 10-string steel guitar on this track.[1] In an interview he gave in 1977, Page stated that he only learnt how to play the steel guitar during the sessions for the first album.[2] Bassist John Paul Jones played an organ, using a pedal to create the bass. The lyrics concern an unfaithful girl who will pay the price for her deceitful ways. The lines "One of these days and it won t be long / You ll look for me but baby I ll be gone" quote the Ray Charles song "I Believe to My Soul," demonstrating Robert Plant s affinity for R&B. The only known performance of this song at Led Zeppelin concerts is a short snippet during a show at Tokyo on September 24, 1971 during the "Whole Lotta Love" medley, of which a bootleg recording exists. The name of the bootleg is Light And Shade. Jimmy Page performed "Your Time Is Gonna Come" on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of the song performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Contents 1 2 3 4 Personnel Cover versions References Sources

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - organ John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1969: Sandie Shaw (Reviewing the Situation) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2001: Wolfgang (Black Mantra) 2003: various artists (Pickin on Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2) 2005: Iron Horse (Whole Lotta Bluegrass: A Bluegrass Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Joe Parr Band (Hurts to Be Lonely) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2009: The Hold Steady (live) [1]

Black Mountain Side - Wikipedia

"Black Mountain Side" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded October 1968 Genre Folk rock Length 2:12 Label Atlantic

 

 

 

 

 

Writer Page Producer Jimmy Page "Black Mountain Side" is an instrumental by English rock band Led Zeppelin, featured on the band s 1969 début album Led Zeppelin. It was recorded at Olympic Studios, London during October 1968. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Song structure Comparisons with "Blackwaterside" Personnel Cover versions References Sources

Song structure "Black Mountain Side" was inspired by a traditional Irish folk song called "Down by Blackwaterside"[1] which also appears on Bert Jansch s 1966 album Jack Orion as "Blackwaterside".[2] Jansch had learnt it from Anne Briggs, who also recorded a version, as did The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem. The beginning of the song is arranged over the end of the previous track on Led Zeppelin, namely "Your Time Is Gonna Come". An overdubbed rapid guitar lick can be heard on the album version with the tempo then steadying to 114 beats per minute throughout the song. Page did this to simulate the sound of a sitar, for which the song s dropped-down DADGAD tuning leads into. Page played a borrowed Gibson J-200 acoustic guitar for this recording.[3] To enhance the Indian character of the song, drummer and sitarist Viram Jasani played tabla on the track.[3] The overall Eastern-flavour of the structure was to lead writer William S Burroughs into a suggestion to Jimmy Page about Led Zeppelin s music: [I] did a joint interview with William Burroughs for Crawdaddy magazine in the early Seventies, and we had a lengthy discussion on the hypnotic power of rock and how it paralleled the music of Arabic cultures. This was an observation Burroughs had after hearing "Black Mountain Side", from our first album. He then encouraged me to go to Morocco and investigate the music first hand, something Robert [Plant] and I eventually did.[4] When the song was played at Led Zeppelin concerts, it was usually featured as part of Jimmy Page s instrumental "White Summer", with the combined arrangement "White Summer-Black Mountain Side" typically running at 11 minutes. Page would sit on a stool for the duration of the two songs and usually played them on a 1959 Danelectro DC "Double Cutaway" guitar, tuned differently than his favored Gibson Les Paul. These songs were used by the band to showcase Page s skills as a guitarist, as he plays almost entirely by himself, with drummer John Bonham adding some fills later in the song. The "White Summer"/"Black Mountain Side" combination was first performed as part of their first-ever concert at the Fillmore West in San Francisco, on 10 January 1969, and the Spokane show from 30 December 1968, features the arrangement without "Black Mountain Side". This song was a component of Led Zeppelin s live set list until their fifth US Tour in 1970. Years later it was restored to their set for the 1977 US Tour, the 1979 concerts and 1980 European tour.[3] "Black Mountain Side" was also used to lead into "Kashmir" on this latter tour. A live version of this song can be seen on the Led Zeppelin DVD, during Led Zeppelin s 1970 Royal Albert Hall appearance. A similar version can be heard, most likely from the Playhouse Theatre sessions from 27 June 1969, on the expanded version of Coda, an album of outtakes released in 1982. This arrangement has the "White Summer" segment being played for around eight minutes, and "Black Mountain Side" is heard somewhere in the middle. Page later played versions of this song when he was with The Firm, the group he founded with Paul Rodgers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guitarist Steve Morse credits this song as having influenced him on the track "Led On" from the album Major Impacts.[5] Comparisons with "Blackwaterside" "Down by Blackwaterside" is a traditional song, with a well-known version being taken from a 1952 BBC Archive recording of an Irish traveller, Mary Doran.[6] This version was taught to the singer Anne Briggs by A.L. Lloyd.[7] Early in 1965, Bert Jansch and Anne Briggs were regularly performing together in folk clubs[8] and spent most of the daytime at a friend s flat, collaborating on new songs and the development of complex guitar accompaniments for traditional songs.[9] Anne Briggs has noted that "Everybody up to that point was accompanying traditional songs in a very [...] three-chord way. [...] It was why I always sang unaccompanied. [...] but seeing Bert s freedom from chords, I suddenly realised — this chord stuff, you don t need it."[10] "Blackwaterside" was one of the first songs that they worked on.[11] Briggs later recorded the song on her eponymous 1971 album (by which time she was playing a guitar accompaniment) and Jansch recorded it 5 years earlier on his 1966 Jack Orion album. It is not known when Jansch started singing the song in the folk clubs, but certainly before the recording of Jack Orion.[8] Al Stewart, who had arrived in London in early 1965, followed Jansch s gigs closely[12] and learnt what he thought was Jansch s version of "Blackwaterside". However, he mistakenly believed that Jansch was using DADGAD tuning whereas he was actually using drop D tuning. At the time, Stewart was recording his own debut record and had engaged Jimmy Page as a session musician. According to Stewart s account, it was he (Stewart) who taught Page "Blackwaterside" (the DADGAD version) during a tea-break.[13] This may even have been Page s first acquaintance with DADGAD.[13] Page went on to record "Black Mountain Side" in DADGAD tuning (which Page called the "CIA" tuning, an acronym for Celtic, Indian and Arabic),[3] Page later revisited the DADGAD tuning for the song "Kashmir", which appeared on the band s sixth album Physical Graffiti. In the actual studio recording of "Black Mountain Side", Page s guitar is tuned a half step down from DADGAD tuning, technically Db-Ab-Db-Gb-Ab-Db. Page also employs the use of a traditional Indian tabla into the recording, making the overall feel of the song as coming from the East. In spite of these differences, Jansch s record company sought legal advice in consultation with two eminent musicologists and John Mummery QC, who was one of the best-known copyright barristers in the United Kingdom, following the release of Led Zeppelin.[2] Ultimately, however, no legal action was ever taken against Led Zeppelin, because although it was likely that Page had borrowed from Jansch s piece, it could not be proved that the recording in itself constituted Jansch s own copyright, because the basic melody was traditional.[2] Personnel Jimmy Page - guitars Viram Jasani - tabla Cover versions 1987: Steve Tibbetts (Big Map Idea) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 2001: Richard DeVinck (Going to California) 2003: various artists (Pickin on Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2) 2005: David West (Long Live Bluegrass! CMH Records 30th Anniversary) 2006: Frank Tortiller (Close to Heaven: A Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2007: Boys from County Nashville (Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago and Far Away)

Communication Breakdown - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

"Communication Breakdown" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin A-side "Good Times Bad Times Released 12 January 1969 Format 7" Recorded October 1968 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal Length 2:28 Label Atlantic Writer(s) Bonham/Jones/Page Producer Jimmy Page

"Communication Breakdown" is a song by the English rock band, Led Zeppelin, from their 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin. It was one of the first songs that Jimmy Page and Robert Plant worked on together. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Structure Live history Recordings Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions 6.1 Album versions 6.2 Live versions 7 Sources 8 References 9 External links Structure The pounding guitar riff was played by Page through a small, miked Supro amplifier throughout; and ran his Fender Telecaster through a fully closed Vox wah pedal to create the "guitar in a shoebox" sound on the lead. "Communication Breakdown" is also one of the few songs that Page sang a backing vocal on. Live history The song was a popular live number at Led Zeppelin concerts, and was the only song to be played during every year that the band toured. It usually either opened shows or was played as an encore. "Communication Breakdown" was the last song performed in the year of 1975 and 1979 for the band at Earls Court on 25 May 1975 and Knebworth on 11 August 1979. Recordings In the US, the track was released as the B-side of the single "Good Times Bad Times". On the Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions, released in 1997, this song was featured three times, each with a slightly different improvisation by the musicians. Two live versions taken from performances at the TV program Tous En Scene in Paris in 1969 and at the Royal Albert Hall in 1970 can also be seen on the Led Zeppelin DVD. "Communication Breakdown" is also one of the few Zeppelin songs in which the group did a proper lip-sync video for which is also available on the Led Zeppelin DVD. The song was used on the soundtrack to the 1998 film Small Soldiers.[1] Formats and tracklistings See "Good Times Bad Times" single.

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars, backing vocals John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1980: Inner Sense (Epitaph for a Legend) 1981: D.O.A. (Hardcore 81) 1983: The Dickies (Stukas Over Disneyland) 1990: Iron Maiden (b-side to "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter") 1991: Dread Zeppelin (Rock n Roll) 1991: Dead Moon (Live Evil) 1992: Michael White & The White (White) 1993: The Hunger (Grip) 1994: Vicious Rumors (The Voice) 1995: Jeff Healey (Cover to Cover) 1996: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 2000: Glory (Positive Buoyant) 2001: Sebastian Bach (Bach 2: Basics) 2001: B-Movie Rats (I-94 Live I-94) 2001: Diamonds and Rust (Bitterskin) 2002: The Flaming Lips (Finally the Punk Rockers Are Taking Acid [recorded 1989]) 2002: Tierra Santa (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Disengage (Sucking the 70 s) 2003: The Fleshtones (Do You Swing?) 2004: Paul Gilbert with John Paul Jones (Guitar Wars) 2004: The Golden Cups (The Golden Cups Recital) 2004: 2 Many DJs (As Heard on Radio Soulwax Pt. 7 [remix]) 2005: Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Gazz (The Covers EP) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2006: The Rockies (The Music of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Zepparella (Live at 19 Broadway [recorded 28 October 2005]) 2007: The Yardbirds (Reunion Jam: Greatest Hits Live) 2008: Pavic (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millenium Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2008: The Yardbirds Experience (British Thunder) Live versions 1969: IbexI Can t Quit You Baby - Wikipedia

"I Can t Quit You Baby" Single by Otis Rush B-side "Sit Down Baby" Released 1956 Format 7" 45 rpm, 10" 78 rpm Recorded Chicago summer 1956 Genre Blues Length 2:56 Label Cobra (Cat. No. 5000) Writer(s) Willie Dixon Producer Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

"I Can t Quit You Baby" is a blues standard written by Willie Dixon and first recorded by Chicago blues artist Otis Rush, one of the leading exponents of the "West Side Sound."[1] The song, a slow 12-bar blues, was a vehicle for arranger/producer Dixon to launch Rush and Cobra Records, as it was the first single for both.[2] In this regards, it was a success, reaching #6 in the Billboard R&B chart in 1956.[3] In his autobiography, Willie Dixon explained that "I Can t Quit You Baby" was written about a relationship that Rush seemed to be preoccupied with at the time and that Dixon used that to draw out an impassioned performance by Rush.[2] Otis Rush revisited "I Can t Quit You Baby" several times over the years, most notably when he recorded the song for the 1966 blues compilation Chicago The Blues Today! Vol. 2 (Vanguard 79217). This version featured an altered arrangement with an unusual turnaround (tonic chord followed by a half-step above the tonic chord) and staccato guitar fills. This is the version on which most cover versions would be based. John Mayall s Bluesbreakers covered it on the 1967 Crusade album (Decca SKL 4890/London PS 529). In 1969, Little Milton (Checker 1212) and the song s author Willie Dixon (Columbia PC 9987) also covered it. Since then it has been recorded by many blues and other artists.[4] Otis Rush s original Cobra single "I Can t Quit You Baby" was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1994.[5] Contents 1 2 3 4 Led Zeppelin version Other versions References Sources

Led Zeppelin version "I Can t Quit You Baby" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded Olympic Studios, London October 1968 Genre Blues-rock Length 4:42 Label Atlantic Writer Willie Dixon Producer Jimmy Page

English rock band Led Zeppelin recorded "I Can t Quit You Baby" for their multi-platinum 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin.[6][7] Their rendition generally follows Otis Rush s 1966 Vanguard version, but with different instrumentation and dynamics.[8] It also incorporates a break during the guitar solo where Jimmy Page plays a four-bar unaccompanied set-up before relaunching into the solo. Although missing the turnaround coming out of the solo, "I Can t Quit You Baby" "ends up as one of the most successful pieces on the first album, with no flat spots and a perfectly symmetrical form, all within the classic blues tradition."[8] Led Zeppelin regularly performed "I Can t Quit You Baby" in concert from 1968 to early 1970.[9] Two live versions from 1969 are included on the 1997 Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions. A performance of the song on 9 January 1970 at Royal Albert Hall is included on the 2003 Led Zeppelin (DVD) (an edited version of this performance was released on the 1982 Coda album). In 1970, the song was dropped from Led Zeppelin s typical concert lineup as they incorporated material from

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Led Zeppelin III into their shows, with "I Can t Quit You Baby" essentially being replaced by "Since I ve Been Loving You." It was however revived as part of the "Whole Lotta Love" medley during some Led Zeppelin concerts in 1972 and 1973.[9] The song was rehearsed by the surviving members of Led Zeppelin for the 14 May 1988 Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary Celebration, but was not performed during the event.[9] Other versions 1989: Nine Below Zero (Live at the Venue) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1999: Todd Wolfe (Live from Manny s Car Wash) 2002: Lennon Page (L.A. Rockabilly Blues) 2004: Gary Moore (Power of the Blues) 2006: Mike Manne and Tiger Blues (Mr. Blues and I)

2006-2007: Wolfmother External links ASCAP entry "Communication Breakdown" at ledzeppelin.com

How Many More Times - Wikipedia

"How Many More Times" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded October 1968 Genre Blues rock, Hard rock, Psychedelic Rock Length 8:28 Label Atlantic Records Writer Page, Jones, Bonham Producer Jimmy Page "How Many More Times" is the ninth and final track on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin. The song is credited in the album liner to Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, and John Bonham, but is listed by ASCAP as written by all four members of the band.[1] Contents 1 2 3 4 Album version Live performances Personnel Cover versions 4.1 Album versions 4.2 Live versions 5 References 6 Sources 7 External links Album version At eight and a half minutes, "How Many More Times" is the longest song on the

 

 

 

 

album. It consists of several smaller sections held together by a bolero rhythm that pushes the piece along. At the end, the song pans between the left and right channels. Elements of this song are faintly reminiscent of previously-recorded instrumental "Beck s Bolero" by Jeff Beck, on which Jimmy Page had played guitar and John Paul Jones bass guitar. This was one of three Led Zeppelin songs on which Page used bowed guitar,[2] the others being "Dazed and Confused" and "In the Light". Led Zeppelin members Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and John Bonham were credited with writing this song. Howlin Wolf, the late Chester Burnett, had recorded a song called "How Many More Years" in 1951, and all new Led Zeppelin releases since 1993 have co-credited the song to the Burnett via arrangement with his publishing company, ARC Music. Cover versions by many artists, such as the LA Guns 1999 version on the album Shrinking Violet, however, are not credited to Burnett. As with all the other tracks on Led Zeppelin s debut album, Robert Plant didn t get a writing credit for this song due to unexpired contractual obligations, but he undoubtedly had a large influence in its construction[citation needed]. The arrangement and adaptation of old blues songs was something he had much prior experience at during his time with his former band, Hobbstweedle. The line, "I got another child on the way" refers to his unborn child, Carmen, who was born a month or two after Led Zeppelin recorded this album. Though listed at a time of 3:30 on the album sleeve, the correct length of the track is in fact 8:28. The incorrect listing was deliberate as it was intended to help promote radio play. Page knew that radio stations would never play a song over eight minutes long, so he wrote the track time as shorter on the album to trick radio stations into playing it. In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993, Page stated that the song "was made up of little pieces I developed when I was with the Yardbirds, as were other numbers such as "Dazed and Confused". It was played live in the studio with cues and nods."[3] It has also been reported that the "Rosie" and "Hunter" components of the song came spontaneously to the group on the night of the recording session.[2] The "hunter" component is reworked from "The Hunter" recorded by bluesmen Booker T & the MGs with Albert King.[4][5] Live performances On early Led Zeppelin concert tours, "How Many More Times" was often the band s closing number. Plant typically introduced the rest of the band during the opening bassline, as can be seen during the Danish TV appearance on the Led Zeppelin DVD. By late 1969, the intro of the song would be quite extended and the band would incorporate more and more material into the song as a medley. An example of such a performance is included on the same DVD, during the Royal Albert Hall concert. During the "Bolero" section, Plant quotes Neil Young s "On the Way Home". After "The Hunter," the band performs John Lee Hooker s "Boogie Chillin ," with lyrics ad-libbed from other sources, and "Travelin Little Mama." The band would then go into "Cumberland Gap" then After "The Lemon Song," the band would play "That s Alright Mama" (which is not on the Led Zeppelin DVD but bootlegs show they did play it. Then they return to "How Many More Times" at the moment where they left off, the conclusion of "The Hunter." The typical medley pattern ("Boogie Chillen" followed by improvisational set of covers and finally a slow blues and a return to the main song) would later be incorporated into "Whole Lotta Love," as demonstrated on Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions and How the West Was Won. In 1970, "How Many More Times" was dropped from Led Zeppelin s typical setlist, although they would continue to perform it on occasion until the early stages of their 1975 U.S. tour, when it was re-introduced in full as a result of Jimmy Page s injured finger, which temporarily prevented him from playing "Dazed and Confused".[2] It was also played once in 1973, on 22 January, while the band was touring the United Kingdom. The song was used on the soundtrack to the 1970 anti-Vietnam War film Homer.[6] Page and Plant would also play the song on their Walking into Clarksdale tour in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1998, releasing their Shepherd s Bush performance on a CD single. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, organ John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1987: Gary Farr (One More Chance) 1995: Dread Zeppelin (No Quarter Pounder) 1998: Page and Plant ("Shining in the Light" CD single) 1999: L.A. Guns (Shrinking Violet) 1999: Big Jim Sullivan (Ultimate Rock Guitar) 2004: Loudness (The Soldier s Just Came Back: Live Best) 2004: Flex Progression (Simply Rock Moods) 2006: Pat Travers (P.T. Power Trio 2 ) 2009: Liquid Tension Experiment (When the Keyboard Breaks: Live in Chicago [recorded live 25 June 2008]) Live versions 1988-1989: Metallica 1998: Page and Plant 2004-2007: Gomez 2007: The Avett Brothers [Live at WOW Hall, Eugene Oregon 1/23/2007]

Led Zeppelin II - Wikipedia

Led Zeppelin II Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 22 October 1969 Recorded January–August 1969 at various locations Genre Heavy metal Length 41:24 Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page Singles from Led Zeppelin II "Whole Lotta Love/Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" Released: 1969 Led Zeppelin II is the second studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released 22 October 1969 on Atlantic Records. Recording sessions for the album took place at several locations in the United Kingdom and North America from January to August 1969. Production was entirely credited to lead guitarist and songwriter Jimmy Page, while it also served as Led Zeppelin s first album to utilise the recording techniques of engineer Eddie Kramer. Led Zeppelin II furthered the lyrical themes established on their debut album, creating a work that became more widely acclaimed and influential than its predecessor. With elements of blues and folk music, it also exhibits the band s evolving musical style of blues-derived material and their guitar and riff-based sound. It was one of the band s heaviest albums.[1] Upon release, Led Zeppelin II earned a considerable amount of sales and was Led Zeppelin s first album to reach number one in the United Kingdom and United

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

States. In 1970, art director David Juniper was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Recording Package for Led Zeppelin II. On 15 November 1999, it was certified 12x platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for sales in excess of 12 million copies. Following its initial reception, it has been recognized by writers and music critics as one of the greatest and most influential rock albums recorded. Led Zeppelin II has also been cited by critics as a blueprint for heavy metal bands that followed it. In 2003, the album was ranked number 75 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Contents 1 Conception 1.1 Background 1.2 Recording 2 Composition 3 Album sleeve design 4 Release and reception 5 Influence 5.1 Accolades 6 Track listing 7 Sales chart performance 8 Sales certifications 9 Personnel 10 See also 11 Notes 12 References Conception Background Led Zeppelin II was conceived during a hectic and much-traveled period of Led Zeppelin s career from January through August 1969, when they completed four European and three American concert tours.[2] The album furthered the lyrical themes established on their debut album, Led Zeppelin (1969). This progress helped create a work that became more widely acclaimed and influential than its predecessor. With elements of blues and folk music, it also exhibits the band s evolving musical style of blues-derived material and their guitar and riff-based sound. Each song was separately recorded, mixed and produced at various studios in the United Kingdom and the United States. The album was written on tour, during periods of a couple of hours in between concerts, a studio was booked and the recording process begun, resulting in a sound with spontaneity and urgency through necessity.[2] Bassist John Paul Jones recalled that "We were touring a lot. Jimmy [Page s] riffs were coming fast and furious. A lot of them came from on-stage especially during the long improvised section of "Dazed and Confused". We d remember the good stuff and dart into a studio along the way."[3] Some of the recording studios used by the band were not the most advanced. One studio in Vancouver, credited as "a hut",[4] had an eight-track set up that did not even have proper headphone facilities.[5][6] The group s lead singer Robert Plant later discussed the writing and recording process, stating "It was crazy really. We were writing the numbers in hotel rooms and then we d do a rhythm track in London, add the vocal in New York, overdub the harmonica in Vancouver and then come back to finish mixing at New York."[7] "Thank You", "The Lemon Song" and "Moby Dick" were overdubbed during the tour, while the mixing of "Whole Lotta Love" and "Heartbreaker" was also done on tour. Page later stated "In other words, some of the material came out of rehearsing for the next tour and getting new material together."[6] Recording

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recording sessions for the album took place at Olympic and Morgan Studios in London, England, A&M, Quantum, Sunset, Mirror Sound and Mystic Studios in Los Angeles, California, Ardent Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, A&R, Juggy Sound, Groove and Mayfair Studios in New York City, and a "hut" in Vancouver, British Columbia.[4] Production was entirely credited to lead guitarist, songwriter, and producer Jimmy Page, while it also served as Led Zeppelin s first album to utilise the skills and recording techniques of engineer Eddie Kramer, whose prior work with Jimi Hendrix had impressed the band s members, especially Page. Led Zeppelin expert Dave Lewis wrote of the album s production, stating "That the album turned out to be such a triumph, in particular for a production quality that still sounds fresh today, was in no small way due to the successful alliance with Page and Kramer in the control room."[5] This partnership was particularly exhibited in the central section of the track "Whole Lotta Love". Kramer later said, "The famous Whole Lotta Love mix, where everything is going bananas, is a combination of Jimmy and myself just flying around on a small console twiddling every knob known to man."[5] In another interview, Kramer later gave great credit to Page for the sound that was achieved, despite the inconsistent conditions in which it was recorded, stating "We did that album piece-meal. We cut some of the tracks in some of the most bizarre studios you can imagine, little holes in the wall. Cheap studios. But in the end it sounded bloody marvellous. There was a unification of sound on [Led] Zeppelin II because there was one guy in charge and that was Mr. Page."[17] Page and Kramer spent two days mixing the album at A&R Studios.[17] Composition "Whole Lotta Love" The first single contains strong blues influence and sexual lyrical themes with a predominant guitar riff by Jimmy Page.

The finished tracks reflect the raw, evolving sound of the band and their ability as live performers. The album has been noted for featuring a further development of the lyrical themes established by singer Robert Plant on Led Zeppelin s debut album, creating a work which would become more widely acclaimed and arguably more influential.[18][19] "Whole Lotta Love" and "The Lemon Song" both feature sexual themes, as the latter contains a metaphor, which, according to one music writer, implores "unnamed ladies to squeeze his lemon til the juice runs down my leg. "[20] As was later observed by Plant himself: Led Zep II was very virile. That was the album that was going to dictate whether or not we had the staying power and the capacity to stimulate. It was still blues-based but it was a much more carnal approach to the music and quite flamboyant. It was created on the run between hotel rooms and the GTOs, and that was quite something.[21] Led Zeppelin II also features experimentation with other musical styles and approaches, as on the alternately soft-and-loud "What Is and What Should Never Be" and "Ramble On" (which featured Page s acoustic guitar), or the pop-influenced ballad "Thank You". With its mysterious atmospherics, "Ramble On" helped develop hard rock s association with fantasy themes, which had been partly derived from the psychedelic rock genre of two to three years before, but also from Plant s personal interest in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien.[5] This musical direction would later culminate on the band s untitled fourth album (and countless subsequent groups would later carry the influence to further extremes). Conversely, the instrumental "Moby Dick" features an extended drum solo by John Bonham, which would be extended further during Led Zeppelin concert performances sometimes for as long as half an hour.[5] Jimmy Page s contribution to this album was significant, as his electric guitar solo on the song "Heartbreaker" was emulated by many younger rock guitarists,

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and exemplifies the group s intense musical attack.[5] Led Zeppelin II is the band s first album to feature Page playing a 1959 Gibson Les Paul, the electric guitar he helped make famous. Page s innovative recording and drum miking effects on tracks such as "Ramble On" and "Whole Lotta Love" also demonstrated his considerable skill, resourcefulness and originality as a producer.[22] Rolling Stone magazine later called Page s guitar riff for the latter song "one of the most exhilarating guitar riffs in rock & roll."[23] Band member and multi-instrumentalist John Paul Jones later discussed Page s contributions, stating: Jimmy started coming into his own as a producer around "Whole Lotta Love". The backwards echo stuff. A lot of the microphone techniques were just inspired. Everybody thinks he goes into the studio with huge walls of amps, but he doesn t. He uses a really small amp and he just mic s it up really well, so it fits into a sonic picture.[22] —John Paul Jones The album s material also marked a certain honing of singer Robert Plant s vocal approach,[24] and signaled his emergence as a serious songwriter.[6] Plant s name had previously been absent from the songwriting credits of the band s first album due to the previous contractual commitments that resulted from his earlier association with CBS Records as a solo artist. His influence on tracks such as "What Is and What Should Never Be" and "Ramble On" were pointers to the musical future of Led Zeppelin.[5] Plant has commented that it was only during the sessions for Led Zeppelin II that he started to feel at home as a vocalist in the studio with Led Zeppelin. In a 2008 interview for Uncut, he stated "[D]uring Led Zep I (1969) as far as I was concerned, I thought that I was going to [leave the band] anyway. I didn t feel that comfortable because there were a lot of demands on me vocally—which there were all the way though the Zeppelin thing. And I was quite nervous and didn t really get into enjoying it until II."[25] Album sleeve design The album sleeve design was from a poster by David Juniper, who was simply told by the band to come up with an idea that was "interesting". His design was based on an old photograph of the Jasta 11 Division of the German Air Force during World War I, the famed Flying Circus led by Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron.[5] The original photo can be seen here[1]. After the picture was tinted, the faces of the four members of the band were airbrushed on from a 1969 publicity photograph, as well as the faces of band manager Peter Grant and tour manager Richard Cole.[5] The woman in the picture is Glynis Johns, the mother from Mary Poppins. Her presence in the photo is an obvious play on the name of recording engineer Glyn Johns. The other face added was that of bluesman Blind Willie Johnson. The cover also pictured the outline of a Zeppelin on a brown background, which gave the album its nickname "Brown Bomber".[5] Release and reception The album was released on 22 October 1969 on Atlantic Records, with advance orders of 400,000 copies.[26] The advertising campaign was built around the slogan Led Zeppelin II Now Flying .[5] Commercially, Led Zeppelin II was the band s first album to hit #1 in the U.S., knocking The Beatles Abbey Road (1969) twice from the top spot, where it remained for seven weeks.[5] By April 1970 it had registered three million American sales, whilst in Britain it enjoyed a 138 week residence on the LP chart, climbing to the top spot in February 1970.[5] The album also yielded Led Zeppelin s biggest hit, with the track "Whole Lotta Love". This song reached #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 in January 1970, after Atlantic Records went against the group s wishes by releasing a shorter version on 45. The single s B-side, "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)", also hit the Billboard chart, peaking at #65 in April 1970. The album helped establish Led Zeppelin as an international concert attraction, as for the next year, the group continued to tour relentlessly, initially performing in clubs and ballrooms, then in larger auditoriums and eventually stadiums as their popularity grew.[27] In 1970 art director David Juniper was nominated for a Grammy Award in the

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

category of best album package for Led Zeppelin II.[5] On 10 November 1969, the album was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America and in 1990 it was certified 5x platinum reflecting sales of over five million copies. By 14 November 1999, Led Zeppelin II had sold over twelve million copies and was certified 12x platinum by the RIAA.[28] Influence Led Zeppelin II has been cited by music writers as a blueprint for heavy metal bands that followed it.[18][29] Blues-derived songs like "Whole Lotta Love", "Heartbreaker", "The Lemon Song" and "Bring It On Home" have been seen as representing standards of the genre, where the guitar-based riff (rather than vocal chorus or verses) defines the song and provides the key hook.[5] Such arrangements and emphasis were at the time atypical in popular music.[18] Page s guitar solo in "Heartbreaker" featuring rapid-fire runs of notes tapped only by the left hand, was a major inspiration to the later work of metal soloists and "shredders" such as Eddie Van Halen and Steve Vai.[30] As such, the album is generally considered to be very influential on the development of rock music, being an early forerunner of heavy metal, and inspiring a host of other rock bands including Aerosmith, Van Halen and Guns N Roses.[18][31] Since its initial critical reception, Led Zeppelin II has been acknowledged by many critics and music writers as one of the most influential albums of rock music, and has earned several accolades from music publications, frequently placed at or near the top of "best album" lists.[32] In 1989, Spin magazine ranked the album number 5 on its list of The 25 Greatest Albums of All Time.[32] In 2000, Q magazine placed Led Zeppelin II at number 37 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever.[33] In 2003, the album was ranked number 75 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.[23] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Grammy Award United States "Grammy Award for Best Recording Package" [34] 1970 Nominee Guitarist United Kingdom "Top 50 Most Influential Guitar Albums of All Time Ever" [35] 1994 3 Mojo United Kingdom "The 100 Greatest Albums Ever Made" [36] 1996 41 The Guitar United States "Album of the Millenium" [37] 1999 6 Q United Kingdom "100 Greatest Albums Ever" [38] 2003 37 Robert Dimery United States 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die [39] 2006* Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest British Rock Album Ever" [40] 2006 8 Rock and Roll Hall of FameUnited States"The Definitive 200: Top 200 Albums of All-Time" [41] 2007 47 Q United Kingdom "50 Years of Great British Music (1960s)" [42] 2008* (*) designates unordered lists. Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Whole Lotta Love" Bonham, Dixon, Jones, Page, Plant 5:34 2."What Is and What Should Never Be" Page, Plant 4:47 3."The Lemon Song" Bonham, Burnett, Jones, Page, Plant 6:20 4."Thank You" Page, Plant 4:47 Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Heartbreaker" Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant 4:15 2."Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" Page, Plant 2:40 3."Ramble On" Page, Plant 4:35 4."Moby Dick" Bonham, Jones, Page 4:25 5."Bring It On Home" Page, Plant, Dixon 4:19 Cassette tape releases of the album had "Heartbreaker" ending the first side and

 

 

 

 

"Thank You" starting the second side. Original LP pressings of the album incorrectly listed the running time of "Thank You" at 3:50, as the song s coda features a false fade at that point. Sales chart performance Album Chart (1969) Peak position Japanese Albums Chart [43] 8 US Billboard 200 [44] 1 US Billboard Soul LP s [45] 32 French Albums Chart [46] 3 Canadian RPM Top 100 Albums Chart [47] 1 UK Albums Chart [48] 1 Chart (1970) Peak position US Record World Top Pop Albums [49] 1 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums [50] 1 Norwegian Albums Chart [51] 2 Australian Kent Music Report Top 100 Albums Chart [52] 1 Spanish Albums Chart[53]1 German Albums Chart [54] 1 Singles YearSingleChartPosition 1970 "Whole Lotta Love" US Billboard Hot 100 [55] 4 1997 "Whole Lotta Love" UK Singles Chart [56] 21 1970 "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman) "US Billboard Hot 100 [57] 65 Sales certifications Country Sales Certification Austria (IFPI) 10,000+Gold [58] Argentina (CAPIF) 30,000+Gold [59] United States (RIAA) 12,000,000+12x Platinum [60] Canada (CRIA) 900,000+9x Platinum [61] France (SNEP) 200,000+2x Gold [62] Spain (PROMUSICAE) 40,000+Gold [63] Germany (IFPI) 200,000+Platinum [64] Australia (ARIA) 280,000+4x Platinum [65] United Kingdom (BPI) 1,200,000+4x Platinum [66] Personnel Led Zeppelin Robert Plant – lead vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page – electric and acoustic guitar, backing vocals John Paul Jones – bass guitar, organ, backing vocals John Bonham – drums, tympani, backing vocals Production Barry Diament – engineering (original Compact Disc) George Chkiantz – engineer on "Whole Lotta Love" and "What Is and What Should Never Be" Peter Grant – executive producer Chris Huston – engineering on "The Lemon Song" and "Moby Dick" Andy Johns – engineering on "Thank You" Eddie Kramer – engineering, mixing Bob Ludwig – mastering, engineering George Marino – engineering (remastered Compact Disc) See also List of best-selling albums in the United States

Whole Lotta Love - Wikipedia

 

 

 

"Whole Lotta Love" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II B-side "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" Released 7 November 1969 Format 7" single Recorded May 1969, Olympic Studios, London Genre Heavy metal, hard rock Length Album Version: 5:33 Single: 5:33 (1st pressings) 3:10 (2nd pressings) Label Atlantic Writer(s) Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Willie Dixon Producer Jimmy Page Certification Gold

"Whole Lotta Love" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin. It is featured as the opening track on the band s second album, Led Zeppelin II, and was released in the US and Japan as a single. The US release became their first hit single, it was certified Gold on 13 April 1970, when it sold one million copies.[1] As with other Led Zeppelin songs, no single was released in the UK, but singles were released in Germany (where it reached number one), the Netherlands (where it reached number four), Belgium and France. In 2004, the song was ranked number 75 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and in March 2005, Q magazine placed "Whole Lotta Love" at number three in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks. It was placed 11 on a similar list by Rolling Stone. In 2009 it was named the third greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1.[2] "Whole Lotta Love" was recorded at various studios in New York and Los Angeles during the band s second concert tour of the United States and assembled by Jimmy Page at Olympic Studios in London. Already part of their live repertoire, it saw its first official release on the LP Led Zeppelin II on 22 October 1969 (Atlantic LP #8236). Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Influences Song construction Release Chart success and live history Cultural influence Accolades Formats and tracklistings Chart positions 8.1 Single 8.2 Single (Digital download) 9 Sales certifications 10 Personnel 11 Cover versions 11.1 Samples 12 Sources 13 References 14 External links

 

 

 

 

 

Influences In 1962, Muddy Waters recorded "You Need Love" written for him by peer Willie Dixon. In 1966 British mod band the Small Faces recorded the song as "You Need Loving" for their début Decca LP. Some of the lyrics of Led Zeppelin s version were borrowed from the Willie Dixon song, a favorite of Plant s. Plant s phrasing is particularly similar to that of Steve Marriott s in the Small Faces version. Similarities with "You Need Love" would lead to a lawsuit against Led Zeppelin, settled out of court in favour of Dixon in 1985.[3] Strangely, the Small Faces were never sued by Dixon, even though "You Need Loving" still only credits Ronnie Lane and Steve Marriott. Robert Plant, a huge fan of blues and soul singers, regularly quoted other songs, especially live. Page s riff was Page s riff. It was there before anything else. I just thought, well, what am I going to sing? That was it, a nick. Now happily paid for. At the time, there was a lot of conversation about what to do. It was decided that it was so far away in time (it was in fact 7 years) and influence that...well, you only get caught when you re successful. That s the game.[4] - Robert Plant Song construction Page played the loose blues riff for the intro, on a Sunburst 1958 Les Paul Standard through a 100W Marshall "Plexi" head amp with distortion from the EL34 output valves, which ascends into the first chorus. Then, beginning at 1:24 (and lasting until 3:02) the song dissolves to a free jazz-like break involving a theremin solo and a drum solo and the moans of Robert Plant (sometimes called the "orgasm section"). Plant did the vocals in one take. As audio engineer Eddie Kramer has explained: "The famous Whole Lotta Love mix, where everything is going bananas, is a combination of Jimmy and myself just flying around on a small console twiddling every knob known to man." Kramer is also quoted as saying: [A]t one point there was bleed-through of a previously recorded vocal in the recording of “Whole Lotta Love.” It was the middle part where Robert [Plant] screams “Wo-man. You need it.” Since we couldn’t re-record at that point, I just threw some echo on it to see how it would sound and Jimmy [Page] said “Great! Just leave it.”[5] Led Zeppelin s bass player John Paul Jones has stated that Page s famous riff probably emerged from a stage improvisation during the band s playing of "Dazed and Confused".[6] Alternatively, Jimmy Page has vehemently denied that the song originated onstage: Interviewer: Is it true "Whole Lotta Love" was written onstage during a gig in America, when you were all jamming on a Garnett Mimms song? Page: No. No. Absolutely incorrect. No, it was put together when we were rehearsing some music for the second album. I had a riff, everyone was at my house, and we kicked it from there. Never was it written during a gig--where did you hear that? Interviewer: I read it in a book. Page (sarcastically): Oh, good. I hope it was that Rough Guide. That s the latest one, the most inaccurate. They re all inaccurate, you know.[7] In a separate interview, Page explained: I had [the riff] worked out already before entering the studio. I had rehearsed it. And then all of that other stuff, sonic wave sound and all that, I built it up in the studio, and put effects on it and things, treatments.[8] For this track, Page employed the backwards echo production technique.[3] Release Upon release of the LP, radio stations looked for a track that would fit their on-air formats from the quickly successful LP with the pulsing lead track "Whole Lotta Love" being the prime contender. However, because many radio stations saw the freeform middle section as unfit to air they simply created their own edited versions. Atlantic Records was quick to respond and in addition to the release

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

of the regular single in the US (coupled with "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" from the same LP as the B-side) released a 3:10 version of the track with the freeform section cut and an earlier fade-out on 7 November 1969. Both versions were released as Atlantic #45-2690. The edited version was intended for radio station promotional release but some copies were apparently released commercially in the US and are a collector s item for fans. The song was released as a single in the US, France, Germany (as No 1), Switzerland, The Netherlands, Belgium, Australia (where it was also issued as an EP) and Japan (countries where the band had less control). The edited version was withdrawn. In the United Kingdom, Atlantic Records had expected to issue the edited version themselves, and pressed initial copies for release on December 5, 1969. However, band manager Peter Grant was adamant that the band maintain a "no-singles" approach to marketing their recorded music in the UK, and he halted the release. An official statement from the band added that they had written a special number which they intended to be their first British single. This never materialised, and despite much record company pressure, they declined to issue official singles in the UK throughout their career.[3] Several years later, Atlantic Records reissued "Whole Lotta Love" (with its original B-side "Living Loving Maid") on its Oldies Series label (OS-13116) with a slight error. The edited 3:10 version was used for the reissue, but the labels were printed with the unedited running time of 5:33. In 1997 Atlantic Records released a CD-single edited (to 4:50 this time) from the original 1969 recording of the song. This version charted in the UK where the band had maintained control over single releases during their existence. Chart success and live history The song entered the Billboard Top 40 singles chart on 6 December 1969. It remained on the chart for 13 weeks, peaking at #4 and becoming the band s only Top 10 single in the US. Live, the song debuted 26 April 1969. It was described with details on the site [1]. When performed live, "Whole Lotta Love" also occasionally included segments of other Led Zeppelin songs such as "I Can t Quit You Baby", "You Shook Me", "How Many More Times", "Your Time Is Gonna Come", "Good Times Bad Times", "The Lemon Song", "The Crunge", "D yer Mak er", "Black Dog", "Out on the Tiles" and "Ramble On". A famous show closer at Led Zeppelin concerts, it was since mid-1970 performed as a medley of blues and R&B covers favoured by the band. Live versions of "Whole Lotta Love" were released officially on the following titles: The Song Remains the Same; 2xLP (September 28, 1976; Swan Song #SS2-201; from a 1973 concert and movie soundtrack) Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions; 2xCD (November 11, 1997; Atlantic #83061; from a 1971 concert) How the West Was Won; 3xCD (May 27, 2003; Atlantic #83587; from a 1972 concert) Led Zeppelin; DVD (2003; from a 1979 and a 1970 concert) "Whole Lotta Love" was the last song Led Zeppelin ever played live in their original lineup. It was however performed again at the band s reunions at Live Aid in 1985 and at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert in 1988, as well as at the Ahmet Ertegün Tribute Concert at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007, with Jason Bonham sitting in on drums for his late father. Cultural influence The song has been widely covered by many artists. It was famous in the United Kingdom for having been the theme music for the long-running television programme Top of the Pops during the 1970s and 1980s. It also featured in the closing ceremony of the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing on 24 August 2008, in a rewritten version with Jimmy Page on guitar and Leona Lewis providing the vocals. Both Lewis and the organizers requested that some of the lyrics be changed, notably "I m gonna give you every inch of my love". Lewis felt that the line made little sense coming from a female singer.[9] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spin United States "100 Greatest Singles of All Time" [10] 1989 39 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States "The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll" [11] 1994* Classic Rock United Kingdom "Ten of the Best Songs Ever!.. (Bubbling under)" [12] 1999 30 VH1 United States "The 100 Greatest Rock Songs of All Time" [13] 2009 3 Rolling Stone United States "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" [14] 2003 75 Q United Kingdom "100 Greatest Guitar Tracks Ever" [15] 2005 3 Toby Creswell Australia "1001 Songs: the Great Songs of All Time" [16] 2005* Grammy Awards United States "Grammy Hall of Fame Award" [17] 2007* Rolling Stone United States "100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time" [18] 2008 11 VH1 United States "VH1 Greatest Hard Rock Songs" [19] 2009 3 (*) designates unordered lists. Formats and tracklistings 1969 7" single (US: Atlantic 45-2690, Angola: Atlantic ATS 485, Australia/New Zealand: Atlantic AK 3412, Belgium: Atlantic BE 650186, Bolivia: Polydor 508007, Canada: Atlantic Oldies Series OS 13116, Chile: Atlantic 2164 002, France: Atlantic 650 186, Germany: Atlantic 70409, Greece: Atlantic 255 017, Holland: Atlantic ATL 2690, Italy: Atlantic ATL NP 03145, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-2550A, Mexico: Atlantic AT 45-52, Philippines: Atlantic ATR 0046, Sweden: Atlantic ATL 70409, Uruguay: Atlantic 2164002) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B. "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" (Page, Plant) 2:39 1969 7" radio edit (UK*/Lebanon: Atlantic 584309, Canada: Atlantic AT 2690, South Africa: Atlantic ATS 485) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 B. "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" (Page, Plant) 2:39 1969 7" radio edit (Brazil: Atlantic 205.025, Peru: Atlantic ALT 7035) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 1969 7" single (Japan: Nihon Gramophone DT-1139) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B. "Thank You" (Page, Plant) 4:49 1970 7" single (Costa Rica: Atlantic 70.020, Portugal: Atlantic ATL 10058, Spain: Atlantic H 523) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 B. "Communication Breakdown" (Page, Plant) 2:28 1970 7" single (Turkey: Atlantic 70501) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B. "Ramble On" (Page, Plant) 4:23 1970 7" EP (Bolivia: Atlantic AX 11695) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B1. "Good Times Bad Times" (Bonham, Jones, Page) 2:47 B2. "Communication Breakdown" (Page, Plant) 2:28 1970 7" EP (Holland: Atlantic ATL 2091 208) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B1. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B2. "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:16 1970 7" EP (Mexico: Atlantic Gamma GX07 762) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B1. "Communication Breakdown" (Page, Plant) 2:28 B2. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 1970 7" EP (Mexico: Atlantic 2207 002) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 B1. "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" (Page, Plant) 2:39 B2. "Heartbreaker" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:14 1970 7" EP (Australia/New Zealand: Atlantic EPA 200)

 

 

   

A1 "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 A2 "Good Times Bad Times" (Bonham, Jones, Page) 2:47 B1 "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B2 "Hey Hey What Can I Do" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:55 1970 7" EP (Australia: AX 11695 (MX 34022)) A1 "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 A2 "Black Mountain Side" (Page) 2:12 B1 "Good Times Bad Times" (Bonham, Jones, Page) 2:47 B2 "Communication Breakdown" (Page, Plant) 2:28 1970 7" single (France: Atlantic 10236, Germany: Atlantic Oldies Series ATL 10236) A. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 B. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 1997 CD single (UK: Atlantic AT 0013 CD (7567 84014 6), Australia: Atlantic 7567 84014 2, Brazil: Atlantic LZ 1997, Germany: Atlantic A 4014 CD, Japan: Atlantic AMCY 2403, Korea: Atlantic 84014 2, South Africa: Atlantic 7567 84014) 1. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 5:33 2. "Baby Come On Home" (Page, Plant, Berns) 4:29 3. "Travelling Riverside Blues" (Page, Plant, Johnson) 5:09

Chart positions Single Chart (1970) Peak position French Singles Chart [20] 13 Japanese Singles Chart [21] 50 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [22] 2 US Record World 100 Top Pop Chart [23] 4 Canadian CHUM 30 Chart [24] 2 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [25] 2 Dutch Singles Chart [26] 5 US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [27] 4 South African Top 20 Singles Chart [28] 6 German Singles Chart [29] 1 Swiss Singles Chart [30] 5 Australian Go-Set Top 40 Singles Chart [31] 1 Austrian Singles Chart [32] 3 New Zealand Top 50 Singles Chart [33] 4 Italian Singles Chart [34] 25 Spanish Singles Chart [35] 4 Chart (1997) Peak position UK Singles Chart [36] 21 Single (Digital download) Chart (2007) Peak position UK Singles Chart [37] 64 Canadian Billboard Hot Digital Singles Chart [38] 49 Note: The official UK Singles Chart incorporated legal downloads as of 17 April 2005. Sales certifications Country Sales Certification United States (RIAA) 1,000,000+Gold [39] Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars, backing vocals

John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1970: CCS (C.C.S.) 1971: King Curtis (Live at Fillmore West) 1971: The Ventures (New Testament) 1975: Tina Turner (Acid Queen) 1984: Barón Rojo (Barón al rojo vivo) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1990: The Bobs (The Bobs Sing the Songs Of...) 1991: Andy Prieboy (Montezuma Was a Man of Faith EP) 1992: Michael White & The White (The White) 1994: Robert Plant ("29 Palms" CD single) 1995: Hampton String Quartet (Sympathy for the Devil) 1996: Goldbug (Now That s What I Call Music! 33) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 1997: The Moog Cookbook (Ye Olde Space Bande) 1997: Tragic Mulatto (Let There Be Singles [recorded 1983]) 1997: London Symphony Orchestra (Symphonic Rock: The British Invasion) 1999: Coalesce (There Is Nothing New Under the Sun EP) 1999: Perry Farrell (Rev) 1999: Big Jim Sullivan (Ultimate Rock Guitar) 1999: Kevin DuBrow (The Song Remains Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: The String Quartet (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2000: Reckless Kelly (Acoustic: Live at Stubbs) 2001: Ben Harper (Live from Mars) 2002: Blue Mink (Good Morning Freedom: Anthology [recorded 1971]) 2003: Prince (Live at the Aladdin Las Vegas) 2003: Mägo de Oz (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2003: Candye Kane (Whole Lotta Love) 2005: Hayseed Dixie (A Hot Piece of Grass) 2005: Beth Hart (Live at Paradiso) 2005: Iron Horse (Whole Lotta Bluegrass: A Bluegrass Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin) 2006: Pussycat Dolls (Only sung live, part of the PCD World Tour) 2007: Lez Zeppelin (Lez Zeppelin) 2007: Electric Skychurch (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix]) 2008: Tori Amos (Live at Montreux 1991/1992 [recorded live 1992]) 2008: The Duhks (This Fall - EP) 2008: Pat Travers (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2008: Prince (Indigo Nights [recorded live 2007]) 2009: Gabriella Cilmi (live from Sound Relief, 14 March 2009) 2009: Adam Lambert, (Rock Week on American Idol) 2009: Gandhi, (live at the Antigua Aduana, 22 May 2009) Samples 1990: 1991: 1994: 1995: 1998: 2001:

Sandra ("Hiroshima" extended club mix) Son of Bazerk ("One Time for the Rebel") The Prodigy ("Rhythm Of Life") No Remorze ("Dark Malice 95") The Coup ("Busterismology") Nikka Costa ("Hope it Felt Good" Mark Ronson remix)

What Is and What Should Never Be - Wikipedia

 

 

"What Is and What Should Never Be" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II Released 22 October 1969 Recorded 1969, Olympic Studios, London Genre Hard rock Length 4:43 Label Atlantic Records Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page "What Is and What Should Never Be" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin on their 1969 album Led Zeppelin II. It was written by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant. This was one of the first songs on which Page used his soon-to-become trademark Gibson Les Paul for recording.[1] The production makes liberal use of stereo as the guitars pan back and forth between channels. The vocals were phased during Robert Plant s choruses. This was also one of the first songs recorded by the band for which Robert Plant received writing credit. According to rock journalist Stephen Davis, the author of the Led Zeppelin biography Hammer of the Gods: The Led Zeppelin Saga, the lyrics for this song reflect a romance Plant had with his wife s younger sister.[2] "What Is and What Should Never Be" was performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts between 1969 and 1972. A live version taken from a performance at the Royal Albert Hall in 1970 can be seen on the Led Zeppelin DVD. The song inspired the name of an episode of the popular Teen Drama One Tree Hill, and the name of an episode of the paranormal drama "Supernatural", as well as an episode of popular half-hour comedy That 70s Show. Billy Joel also played it as part of the intro to the "We Didn t Start the Fire" medley on the 1997 VH1 Storytellers episode on his career.[3] Contents 1 Cover versions 1.1 Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes Single 2 References 3 Sources 4 External links Cover versions 1989: Helen Keller Plaid (The Song Retains the Name) 1994: Page and Plant ("Gallows Pole" CD single) 1995: Dread Zeppelin (No Quarter Pounder) 1996: Urszula (Biala droga) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Powder (Sonic Machine) 2004: Benjamin Levine (Chamber Maid: The Baroque Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Tracy G (Hip Hop Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Franck Tortiller (Early Dawn) 2006: Zepparella (Live at 19 Broadway [recorded 28 October 2005]) 2007: Boys from County Nashville (Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago and Far Away)

 

 

 

Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes Single Chart (2000) Peak position US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart [4] 13

The Lemon Song - Wikipedia

"The Lemon Song" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II Released 22 October 1969 Recorded 1969, Mystic Studios, Hollywood Genre Blues Rock Length 6:18 Label Atlantic Writer Page, Plant, Jones, Bonham, Burnett Producer Jimmy Page "The Lemon Song" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, featured on their 1969 album Led Zeppelin II. It was recorded at Mystic Studios in Hollywood when the band was on their second concert tour of the United States. "The Lemon Song" is laced with sexual innuendo, and features some of Led Zeppelin s most blues-influenced playing. It was recorded virtually live in the studio, and no electronic devices were used to create the echo on Robert Plant s vocal. It was made solely by Plant s voice and the acoustics in Mystic Studios, which was a 16 x 16 foot room with wooden walls.[1] Another notable aspect of this song is John Paul Jones complex bass performance, which is heavily funk influenced. During interviews afterwards, he said that he had improvised during the entire song. "The Lemon Song" was performed live on Led Zeppelin s first three concert tours of the United States (on the first tour as "Killing Floor"), before being dropped from their live set in late 1969. However, the squeeze my lemon sequence continued to be inserted into the "Whole Lotta Love" medley and ad-libbed elsewhere.[1] The song borrows from Howlin Wolf s "Killing Floor", which was a song Led Zeppelin often incorporated into their live setlist during their first concert tour of the United States. For the second and third North American tours the song evolved into "The Lemon Song", with Plant often improvising lyrics onstage. Other lyrics, notably "squeeze (my lemon) til the juice runs down my leg," can be traced to Robert Johnson s "Travelling Riverside Blues". It is most likely that Johnson borrowed this himself, from a song recorded in the same year (1937) called "She Squeezed My Lemon" (by Arthur McKay).[2] The song also borrowed from Albert King s "Cross-Cut Saw".[1] In December 1972, Arc Music, owner of the publishing rights to Howlin Wolf s songs, sued Led Zeppelin for copyright infringement on "The Lemon Song."[3] The parties settled out of court. Interestingly, Wolf sued Arc Music less than two years later for failing to pass on his royalty cheque.[4] Though the amount was not disclosed, Wolf received a check for $45,123 from Arc Music immediately following the suit.[5] Jimmy Page performed this song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of "The Lemon Song" performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

1 2 3 4 5

Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1993: DMZ (Feel the Power! [recorded live 1984]) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2000: Dread Zeppelin (De-jah Voodoo) 2006: Zepparella (Girls Got Rhythm!) 2006: Bill Roberts (Raw Material) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute)

Thank You (Led Zeppelin song) - Wikipedia [Help us with translations!]

"Thank You" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II Released 22 October 1969 Recorded 1969, Morgan Studios, London Genre Rock Length 4:49 Label Atlantic Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page "Thank You" is a song written by Robert Plant and Jimmy Page that was released by English rock band Led Zeppelin on their 1969 album Led Zeppelin II. Contents 1 2 3 4 Overview Live history Personnel Cover versions 4.1 Chart positions 4.1.1 Page and Plant Single 5 Sources 6 References 7 External links Overview This song signaled a deeper involvement in songwriting by singer Robert Plant, being the first Led Zeppelin song that he wrote all the lyrics for. According to various Led Zeppelin biographies, this is also the song that made Jimmy Page realize that Plant could now handle writing the majority of the lyrics for the band s songs. The first lines of Plant s lyrics heavily resemble those in the Jimi Hendrix song "If 6 Was 9". Plant wrote the song as a tribute to his

 

 

then-wife Maureen. The song features some delicate Hammond organ playing by John Paul Jones, and ends with the organ fading into near-silence before coming back about 10 seconds later. This has created a problem for radio stations wishing to play the track, which must decide whether to accept the dead air or cut it off. Some stations typically run edited versions with the silence eliminated, while others play "Thank You" together with "Heartbreaker", because there s no pause between them on the album. For the recording of this track, Page played on a Vox 12-string guitar.[1] Live history "Thank You" was a popular song when played live at Led Zeppelin concerts, and became something of a showcase for Jones keyboard work, as he often played an extended keyboard solo (either on the Hammond organ or on some 1972-73 versions, the Mellotron) as an introduction to the song. The piece was eventually dropped from the band s standard live setlist following the 1973 tour of the United States, when it was only occasionally used as an encore, for example, at the tour s final concert in Madison Square Garden. In 1992 Plant sang part of "Thank You" before merging in to "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" by Queen at the The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert. Page and Plant revived the song in 1994 on their Unledded tour. They played a somewhat mellower arrangement for most of their shows from 1995 through 1998 as either an opening number or an encore. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, organ John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1992: Tori Amos (Crucify US EP) 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1995: Duran Duran (Encomium) 1998: The Flaming Lips (A Collection of Songs Representing an Enthusiasm for Recording...By Amateurs) 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: Coalesce (There Is Nothing New Under the Sun EP) 2000: Truffle (Out Loud) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Kimberly Bosso (Livin Lovin Played: A Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2004: Benjamin Levine (Chamber Maid: The Baroque Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2004: Classic Rock String Quartet (The Led Zeppelin Chamber Suite: A Classic Rock Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin) 2006: Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) 2007: Tesla (Real to Reel) 2007: Chris Cornell (Carry On [bonus tracks edition]) 2007: The Boys from County Nashville (Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago and Far Away) 2008: Lizz Wright (The Orchard) Chart positions Page and Plant Single Chart (1995) Peak position US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart [2] 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heartbreaker (Led Zeppelin song) - Wikipedia

"Heartbreaker" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II Released 22 October 1969 Recorded May 1969, A&R Studios, New York Genre Hard rock, blues-rock, heavy metal Length 4:14 Label Atlantic Records Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones & John Bonham Producer Jimmy Page

"Heartbreaker" is a song from English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1969 album, Led Zeppelin II. It was credited to all four members of the band, having been recorded at A&R Studios, New York, during the band s second concert tour of the United States, and was engineered by Eddie Kramer. "Heartbreaker" opens Side II of the album, and is famous for its memorable guitar riff by Jimmy Page, along with its unaccompanied solo, which he did not compose but rather improvised on the spot. It was voted as the 16th greatest guitar solo of all time by Guitar World magazine. "Heartbreaker" was ranked #320 in 2004 by Rolling Stone magazine, in their 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Contents 1 Structure 2 Live history 3 Influence 4 Formats and tracklistings 5 Chart positions 6 Personnel 7 Cover versions 8 Sources 9 References 10 External links Structure The song begins on beat 4, bending the minor 7th (G) up to the root (A), kicking off an aggressive riff constructed around the blues scale, followed by a powerful power chord assault during the verse from not only the guitar but the bass playing power chords also (through a rotating Leslie cabinet). Robert Plant sings about a woman named Annie, who is up to her old tricks again; the lyrics recalling a tale of a man painfully wizened after their encounters. Following a straight 8ths "rave up" by the band, Page s solo fires off a rapid-fire chain of sextuplet hammer-ons and pull-offs, accented by the guitarist bending the G String behind the guitar s nut. Page plays a few bluesy licks before launching into a "wall of notes" motif in A, finally bringing it to an end with a blues cliché "goodbye chord." The rest of the band joins Page for another improvisation as an interlude into the final verse. In an interview Page gave to Guitar World magazine in 1998, Page stated that: [T]he interesting thing about the [guitar] solo is that it was recorded after we had already finished "Heartbreaker" - it was an afterthought. That whole section was recorded in a different studio and it was sort of slotted in the middle. If you notice, the whole sound of the guitar is different.[1] Page also disclosed to Guitar World that this song in general, and the a cappella solo in particular, was the first recorded instance of his famous

 

 

 

 

Gibson Les Paul/Marshall Stack combination. When "Heartbreaker" is played on radio stations, it almost always segues into the next song on the album, "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)," thanks to the similarities of subjects involved between the two songs, and the fact that "Living Loving Maid" segues directly from "Heartbreaker". However, they would never be played together at concerts, purportedly because Jimmy Page was not particularly fond of the latter song.[citation needed] Live history The song was a crowd favorite at Led Zeppelin concerts, and the band opened many of their live shows in 1971 and 1972 with "Immigrant Song" followed by a segue right into "Heartbreaker". On later concert tours it was often played as an encore. "Heartbreaker", along with "Communication Breakdown", were the only songs to be played live during every year that the band toured. During live performances Page would frequently improvise the playing in his solo, and was also known to include parts of Bach s "Bourrée in E minor" from his Lute Suites (this can be heard on the live albums Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions and How the West Was Won), as well as Simon and Garfunkel s "The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin Groovy)", though on official releases this section has been cut. Sometimes the solo would also be stretched out to incorporate sections of the traditional English folk song, "Greensleeves". A live, filmed version of the song from 1973 at Madison Square Garden, New York, is included in the Led Zeppelin concert film, The Song Remains The Same, although it is only shown in parts. For many years, this recorded version was left off the film s accompanying soundtrack album, until the album was remastered and re-released in 2007, with the full performance of the song included. Led Zeppelin s last performance ever of the song was on June 29th, 1980, at Denmark. Following Bonham s death, the surviving members of Led Zeppelin performed "Heartbreaker" at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert in 1988, at Madison Square Garden in New York, with John s son Jason Bonham on drums. Jimmy Page also performed this song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of "Heartbreaker" performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Influence The solo s trickery purportedly inspired Eddie Van Halen to develop his influential tapping technique after he had seen Led Zeppelin play "Heartbreaker" live: I think I got the idea of tapping watching Jimmy Page do his "Heartbreaker" solo back in 1971. He was doing a pull-off to an open string, and I thought wait a minute, open string ... pull off. I can do that, but what if I use my finger as the nut and move it around ?" ... I just kind of took it and ran with it.[2] "Heartbreaker" is one of the songs featured in Nick Hornby s book 31 Songs. Formats and tracklistings 1969 7" single edition (Italy: Atlantic ATL NP 03162) A. "Heartbreaker" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:14 B. "Bring It On Home" (Page, Plant, Dixon) 4:21 1969 7" single edition (Philippines: Atlantic 45-3735) A. "Heartbreaker" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:14 B. "Ramble On" (Page, Plant) 4:23 1969 7" single edition (South Africa: Atlantic ATS) A. "Heartbreaker" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:14 B. "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" (Page, Plant) 2:39 Chart positions Chart (1970) Peak position Italian Singles Chart[3]39 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1995: Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin) 1998: Spike (Before the Balloon Went Up) 1999: Coalesce (There is Nothing New Under the Sun EP) 1999: Alvin Youngblood Hart (Whole Lotta Blues: Songs of Led Zeppelin) 1999: Speed Limit (Going Nowhere Fast) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2) 2004: Nirvana (With the Lights Out [recorded live 7 March 1987]) 2004: George Clinton, Killah Priest, & Bobby Reeves (Stairway to Rock: (Not Just) a Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2005: Hampton String Quartet (Take No Prisoners!) 2005: Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin) 2006: Soul Doctor (For a Fistful of Dollars [bonus tracks edition]) 2006: The Rockies (The Music of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2008: Steve Morse (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2008: Anthony Gomes (Live [recorded live 27 February 2007])

Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman) - Wikipedia

"Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II A-side "Whole Lotta Love" Released 22 October 1969 Format 7" single: US, Japan, France, The Netherlands, Belgium, CD single Recorded May 1969, Olympic Studios, London Genre Hard rock Length 2:39 Label Atlantic Writer(s) Page, Plant Producer Jimmy Page Certification Gold

"Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin from their album Led Zeppelin II, released in 1969. It was also released as the b-side of the single "Whole Lotta Love". The song is about a groupie who annoyed the band early in their career.[1] It is often noted that this is guitarist Jimmy Page s least favorite Led Zeppelin song, and was thus never performed in concert[citation needed], because Jimmy Page s then-girlfriend Charlotte Martin was offended by it and hence Page disliked playing it[citation needed]. Even though the song was never performed, there was a single show in Düsseldorf during which a short segment of the song was played right after the band s song "Heartbreaker" on March 12, 1970, as

 

 

 

 

 

 

bootlegs from that date show attest[citation needed]. It was also one of the few Led Zeppelin songs on which Page sang backing vocals. Conversely, singer Robert Plant took a liking to the song, and played it on his 1990 solo tour. For the recording of this track, Page played on a Vox 12-string guitar.[2] When heard on the radio it was typically played immediately after their song "Heartbreaker"[citation needed], as it flows seamlessly from the abrupt ending of that song on the original album. Yet the band never[citation needed] played these songs together on stage at Led Zeppelin concerts (something they consistently did, for example from late 1972 to 1975 with "The Song Remains the Same" and "The Rain Song" — the first two tracks from their 1973 album Houses of the Holy). Robert Plant brought the song into his Manic Nirvana US solo tour set in 1990. Contents 1 Formats and tracklistings 2 Chart positions 2.1 Single 3 Personnel 4 Cover versions 5 Sources 6 References 7 External links Formats and tracklistings 1969 7" single (Japan: Nihon Gramophone DT-1146, Turkey: Atlantic 70504) A. "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" (Page, Plant) 2:39 B. "Bring It On Home" (Page, Plant, Dixon) 4:21 1969 7" single (Argentina: Atlantic 2164 002) A. "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" (Page, Plant) 2:39 B. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 1969 7" single (Peru: Atlantic AT 7050) A. "Living Loving Maid (She s Just a Woman)" (Page, Plant) 2:39 B. "Ramble On" (Page, Plant) 4:23 Chart positions Single Chart (1970) Peak position Japanese Singles Chart [3] 93 US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [4] 65 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars, backing vocals John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1970: The Churchills (single, b/w Sunshine Man) 1988: Gang Green (single b/w "Born To Rock") 1989: Robert Hardesty & the Del Reys (The Song Retains the Name) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2000: Doxomedon (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2) 2006: The Rockies (The Music of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute)

Ramble On - Wikipedia

     

"Ramble On" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II Released 22 October 1969 Recorded 1969, Juggy Sound Studio, New York Genre Hard rock Length 4:23 Label Atlantic WriterPage/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Ramble On" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1969 album Led Zeppelin II. It was co-written by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, and was recorded in 1969 at Juggy Sound Studio, New York, during the band s second concert tour of the United States. The song s lyrics were heavily influenced by The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien.[1] The opening line ("Leaves are falling all around") is probably a paraphrase of the opening line of Tolkien s poem "Namárië". The poem may also be the inspiration for the entire first verse. The Tolkien references later in the song refer to the adventures of either Frodo Baggins as he travels to Mordor, or that of Aragorn as he has to choose between staying with his love Arwen (Elrond s daughter) or going to destroy the Ring in Mordor: Mine s a tale that can t be told, My freedom I hold dear; How years ago in days of old When magic filled the air, T was in the darkest depths of Mordor I met a girl so fair. But Gollum, and the evil one crept up And slipped away with her. References to the work of Tolkien also exist in other Led Zeppelin songs, such as "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp", "Misty Mountain Hop", and "The Battle of Evermore". The guitar s jangly introduction employs a classic Jimmy Page technique: using regular open chords superimposed higher on the fretboard. Often mistaken for bongos, drummer John Bonham is actually hitting a plastic rubbish bin throughout the song.[citation needed] The song also serves as an illustration of the tight interplay between bassist John Paul Jones and drummer John Bonham. Jones light, melodic bass phrases give way to an ascending motif which follows Bonham s bass drum. Until 2007 "Ramble On" was never performed live in its entirety at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] However, part of the song was performed by the band in the middle of "Babe I m Gonna Leave You" at a concert at Toronto on 2 November 1969, as can be heard on the Led Zeppelin bootleg Listen to my Bluebird. The full version of the song was played at Led Zeppelin s reunion show on 10 December 2007, at the O2 Arena in London. In 2004, the song was ranked #433 on Rolling Stone s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Contents 1 Chart positions 1.1 Single (Digital download) 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2 Samples 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Chart positions Single (Digital download) Chart (2007) Peak position Canadian Billboard Hot Digital Singles Chart [2] 66

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1992: Dread Zeppelin (It s Not Unusual) 1993: The Dusty Diamonds (The Song Retains the Same II) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: Magnificent Tracers (Stock Car Smashes) 2000: Lisa Tingle (Live at the Lucky Lounge) 2000: Kenny Blackwell (Bluegrass Then & Now: 25th Anniversary) 2000: The Exboyfriends (Harmony Sweepstakes a Capella Festival: 2000 National Fina 2000: various artists (Pickin on Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2001: Train ("Ramble On" CD single) 2001: Mad Zeppelin (The Song Remains on Stage) 2002: The String Cheese Incident (On the Road [recorded live 16 April 2002]) 2002: Patricia Maertens (Livin, Lovin, Played: A Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2003: Letz Zep (Live on Broadway) 2004: Benjamin Levine (Chamber Maid: The Baroque Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Iron Horse (Whole Lotta Bluegrass: A Bluegrass Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Bustle In Your Hedgerow (Live at The Subterranean [31 July 2005]) 2006: Kevin Martin (World s Greatest Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Paul Hultman (Paul Hultman) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2008: Foo Fighters with Jimmy Page & John Paul Jones (Foo Fighters Live at Wembley Stadium DVD) 2008: Rick Derringer (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2008: Chris Poland (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millennium Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Samples 1989: Donald D ("A Letter I ll Never Send")

Moby Dick (song) - Wikipedia

"Moby Dick" Song by Led Zeppelin Released 22 October 1969

 

 

 

 

Recorded 1969, Mirror Sound, Los Angeles Genre Hard rock Length 4:21 Label Atlantic Writer Bonham/Jones/Page Producer Jimmy Page

"Moby Dick" is an instrumental tune and drum solo by English rock band Led Zeppelin, featured on their 1969 album Led Zeppelin II. It was also known by the alternate titles "Pat s Delight" and "Over the Top" during various points of the band s career. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Overview References in popular culture Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions 5.1 Album versions 5.2 Samples 6 Sources 7 References 8 External links Overview The tune emerged after Jimmy Page would often catch John Bonham jamming in the studio, recorded parts of it, and then pieced it all together. Only Page and bassist John Paul Jones play the tune s Drop-D blues-based riff with Bonham s drums—as a power trio—at the very beginning and the very end of the tune, leaving the remainder open for Bonham alone. The structure of the main riff is that of the twelve-bar blues.[1] Singer Robert Plant did not sing at all, and in concert would simply introduce Bonham to the audience before the tune started. Studio outtakes from the Led Zeppelin II sessions reveal that the drum solo recorded was edited down from a much longer version.[2] The guitar riff can be traced back to the BBC unused session track "The Girl I Love" which was recorded in the Summer of 1969.[2] It is an almost note for note copy of a riff which appears in Bobby Parker (guitarist) s 1961 single, "Watch Your Step". Jimmy Page was a fan of Parker s, and at one point in the 1970s attempted to sign him to Led Zeppelin s Swan Song Records label. John Lennon also admitted the same Parker riff had been a big influence on The Beatles "I Feel Fine"[citation needed]. Page s riff was used as the theme to BBC2 s Disco 2 rock show.[2] Bonham s drum solo was often played at Led Zeppelin concerts from the first American tour in November 1968, being his solo performance showcase on concert tours through 1977. Over this period it went through three different name changes. During their early 1968-1969 tours it was known as "Pat s Delight" (a reference to his wife), from 1969-1975 it was "Moby Dick", and during Led Zeppelin s 1977 US Tour it was "Over the Top" as the solo began with the opening riff to "Out on the Tiles" before segueing into a lengthy drum solo (in the same time ending with a "Moby Dick" riff).[2] The last time "Moby Dick" was played by Led Zeppelin was on July 17, 1977 at the Seattle Kingdome, and can be found on various audio and video bootleg recordings. When played live, Bonham s drum solo would last as little as 6 minutes or, more frequently, as long as 30 minutes, while the rest of the band would leave the stage after having played the introduction.[2] During the performance Bonham would often set aside or throw his drumsticks into the audience, and then continue the solo with his hands (sometimes drawing blood as a result); on occasion, the reason for continuing the solo with his hands was breaking his

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sticks due to ferocious playing. Live versions of "Moby Dick" are included on the live album How the West Was Won (lasting 19:20, performed at Long Beach Arena in 1972), and on Led Zeppelin s 1976 concert film, The Song Remains the Same as part of Bonham s fantasy sequence. It was also included on the film s accompanying soundtrack. The Led Zeppelin DVD also has a 15-minute long version that was performed and recorded at the Royal Albert Hall in 1970. Jimmy Page remixed "Moby Dick" to flow seamlessly into "Bonzo s Montreux" on the Led Zeppelin Boxed Set, released in 1990. References in popular culture An anti-littering campaign in the United States used the song for its theme music in the mid 1970s. The song was referenced in the movies Dazed and Confused and Step Brothers. The song is often played by Fred Norris as an introductory music track for female guests coming onto The Howard Stern Show. Formats and tracklistings 1970 7" single edition (Italy: Atlantic ATL NP 03183, Singapore: Stereophonic 03183) A. "Moby Dick" (Page, Plant) 2:39 B. "Gallows Pole" (trad. arr. Page, Plant) 4:56 Personnel Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1989: Drum Madness (Stairway to Heaven/Highway to Hell) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1994: Nirvana (With the Lights Out [recorded live 23 January 1988]) 1995: The Cruel Sea (Just a Man) 1996: Dave O Higgins (The Secret Ingredient) 1998: Vital Information (Where We Come From) 2001: Bonerama (Live at the Old Point) 2002: Painting Over Picasso (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin) 2005: Botafogo (Don Villanova) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) Samples 1989: Beastie Boys ("What Comes Around")

Bring It On Home (Sonny Boy Williamson II song) - Wikipedia

"Bring It On Home" Song by Sonny Boy Williamson II from the album The Real Folk Blues Released 1965 Recorded 11 January 1963 Chicago Genre Blues Length 2:33 Label Chess Writer Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

Producer Marshall Chess "Bring It On Home" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin II Released 22 October 1969 Recorded 1969 Atlantic Studios, New York Genre Hard rock, blues-rock Length 4:21 Label Atlantic Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, Willie Dixon Producer Jimmy Page

"Bring It On Home" is a song written by Willie Dixon and made famous by Sonny Boy Williamson II in 1963, featuring a simple rhythm track and interplay between vocals and harmonica. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Led Zeppelin version Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Led Zeppelin version In 1969, English rock band Led Zeppelin recorded a version of the song for their album Led Zeppelin II. The intro and outro were deliberate homages to the Sonny Boy Williamson song, while the rest of the track was an original Jimmy Page/Robert Plant composition.[1] However, Dixon was not given a lyric writing credit for the track, leading to Arc Music, the publishing arm of Chess Records, bringing a lawsuit against Led Zeppelin for copyright infringement and winning an out-of-court settlement in the 1970s. Dixon himself did not benefit until he sued Arc Music to recover his royalties and a copyright credit. In an interview he gave in 1977, Page commented: The thing with "Bring It On Home," Christ, there s only a tiny bit taken from Sonny Boy Williamson s version and we threw that in as a tribute to him. People say, "Oh, Bring It On Home is stolen." Well, there s only a little bit in the song that relates to anything that had gone before it, just the end.[2] Plant s harmonica part was recorded in Vancouver. The band went on tour with the master tapes from Led Zeppelin II and now and then stopped into a studio to record parts. Led Zeppelin frequently performed this song live at Led Zeppelin concerts, first appearing as an encore on the band s 1970 UK tour. When played live, the song exhibited sharp interplay between Jimmy Page s guitar, John Bonham s drums and John Paul Jones bass. This can be seen on the Led Zeppelin DVD, which features a performance at the Royal Albert Hall in 1970. Another version dating from 1972 is included on the live release How the West Was Won which listed the song as a medley on the cover. "Bring It On Home" was credited to Dixon, while the middle section, newly named "Bring It On Back", was credited to Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant. From 1973, the song was dropped from the band s live set list. However, the middle section riff was retained and served as the introduction to "Black Dog" on the band s 1973 tour of the United States, as documented in the concert film The Song Remains the Same.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Bring It On Home" was played at the reunion of surviving Led Zeppelin members staged at Jason Bonham s wedding reception in May 1990.[1] Personnel Robert Plant - vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1970: Hawkwind (Hawkwind) 1971: Edgar Broughton Band (Edgar Broughton Band) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1995: Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin) 1995: Black on Blond (Wild Anticipation) 1999: Robert Lockwood, Jr. (Whole Lotta Blues: Songs of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Stephen Pearcy (Stripped) 2007: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute)

Led Zeppelin III - Wikipedia

Led Zeppelin III Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 5 October 1970 Recorded January–August 1970 at various locations Genre Hard rock, Heavy metal, Blues-rock, Folk rock Length 43:04 Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page

Singles from Led Zeppelin III "Immigrant Song/Hey Hey What Can I Do" Released: 5 October 1970 Led Zeppelin III is the third album by English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was recorded between January and July 1970 and was released on 5 October 1970 by Atlantic Records. Composed largely at a remote cottage in Wales known as Bron-Yr-Aur, this work represented a maturing of the band s music towards a greater emphasis on folk and acoustic sounds. This surprised many fans and critics, and upon its release the album received rather indifferent reviews. Although it is not one of the highest sellers in Led Zeppelin s catalog, Led Zeppelin III is now generally acknowledged as representing an important milestone in the band s history. Contents 1 Recording sessions 2 Composition 3 Release and critical reaction 3.1 Accolades 4 Album sleeve design 5 Track listing 6 Sales chart positions 7 Sales certifications

 

 

 

 

8 Personnel 9 External links 10 References Recording sessions Bron-Yr-Aur cottageMany of the songs featured on the album were conceived in mid-1970 at Bron-Yr-Aur, an 18th century cottage in Gwynedd, Wales, on a hilltop overlooking the Dyfi Valley, three miles north of the market town Machynlleth. There, Led Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant and guitarist Jimmy Page spent some time after a concert tour of the United States to play and compose new music. This remote setting had no running water or electric power, which encouraged a slight change of direction for the band towards an emphasis on acoustic arrangements.[6][7] As Page later explained: After the intense touring that had been taking place through the first two albums, working almost 24 hours a day, basically, we managed to stop and have a proper break, a couple of months as opposed to a couple of weeks. We decided to go off and rent a cottage to provide a contrast to motel rooms. Obviously, it had quite an effect on the material that was written ... It was the tranquility of the place that set the tone of the album. Obviously, we weren t crashing away at 100 watt Marshall stacks. Having played acoustic and being interested in classical guitar, anyway, being in a cottage without electricity, it was acoustic guitar time ... After all the heavy, intense vibe of touring which is reflected in the raw energy of the second album, it was just a totally different feeling.[8] Plant has expressed similar recollections: [Bron-Yr-Aur] was a fantastic place in the middle of nowhere with no facilities at all-and it was a fantastic test of what we could do in that environment. Because by that time we d become obsessed with change, and the great thing was that we were also able to create a pastoral side of Led Zep. Jimmy was listening to Davy Graham and Bert Jansch and was experimenting with different tunings, and I loved John Fahey. So it was a very natural place for us to go to.[9] After preparing the material that would emerge on the album, Page and Plant were joined by the other members of the band (drummer John Bonham and bass player John Paul Jones) at Headley Grange, a run-down mansion in East Hampshire, to rehearse the songs. With its relaxed atmosphere and rural surroundings, Headley Grange appealed to the band as the favoured alternative to the discipline of a conventional studio.[6] The album was then recorded in a series of sessions in May and June 1970 at both Headley Grange and at Olympic Studios, London. Some additional work was put in at Island Records new Basing Street Studios in Notting Hill, London, in July, then mixed at Ardent Studios, Memphis in August 1970 during Led Zeppelin s sixth American concert tour.[6] The album was produced by Page and engineered by Andy Johns and Terry Manning. Composition As noted above, Led Zeppelin III marked a change in focus for the band from late 1960s hard rock to a more folk rock or electric folk and acoustic inspired sound.[6] These styles had been present to a lesser degree in the band s first two releases, but here it was the main emphasis—and one that would remain prominent in the group s later albums. This development endeared the band to many progressive rock fans who would never have listened to Led Zeppelin s established blues and rock repertoire. With Led Zeppelin III the group s songwriting dynamic also changed, from Page s domination of the first two albums towards a more democratic affair in which all four group members contributed their own compositions and ideas—patterns that would continue in future sessions.[6] The album contains two songs which became key components of the band s live

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

concert performances for many years: "Immigrant Song" and "Since I ve Been Loving You". The first of these, written by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, is about the Norse invasions of England and was inspired by the band s recent live performance in Iceland. "Since I ve Been Loving You" is a classic, original blues in the key of C minor featuring heartfelt interplay by all four group members. It would become a live performance staple for the band, replacing the slow blues of "I Can t Quit You Baby" from the first album as the band s slow blues showcase. The album also featured the rock songs "Celebration Day" and "Out on the Tiles", the eastern-influenced "Friends" and the acoustic tracks "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp", "Tangerine" and "That s the Way", the last considered by Page to be a breakthrough for still-developing lyric writer Plant.[10] The song "Gallows Pole" is an updated arrangement of a traditional folk song called "The Maid Freed from the Gallows". The album concludes with "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper", a track dedicated to their influential contemporary and friend, Roy Harper, honouring Harper’s work and acknowledging the band’s roots in acoustic music. Release and critical reaction Led Zeppelin III was one of the most eagerly awaited albums of 1970, and advance orders in the United States alone were close to a million mark.[6] Its release was trailered by a full page advertisement taken out in Melody Maker magazine at the end of September, which simply said "Thank you for making us the world s number one band."[6] Although the band s expanding musical boundaries were greeted warmly by some, detractors attacked the heavier tracks as being mindless noise, while the acoustic material was criticised by others for merely imitating the music of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.[11] Page suggested that this comparison was unwarranted, stating in an interview he gave to Cameron Crowe that when the third LP came out and got its reviews, Crosby, Stills and Nash had just formed. That LP had just come out and because acoustic guitars had come to the forefront all of a sudden: LED ZEPPELIN GO ACOUSTIC! I thought, Christ, where are their heads and ears? There were three acoustic songs on the first album and two on the second.[12] Page has also said that the negative press given to the third album affected him so much that he did not give press interviews for eighteen months after its release, and was also one of the reasons why the band s subsequent untitled album contained no written information on it at all.[8] However, in more recent years, he has commented on the negative press reaction in somewhat more diplomatic terms: [W]ith hindsight, I can see how if somebody got Led Zeppelin III, which was so different from what we d done before, and they only had a short time to review it on the record player in the office, then they missed the content. They were in a rush and they were looking for the new "Whole Lotta Love" and not actually listening to what was there. It was too fresh for them and they didn t get the plot. So, in retrospect, it doesn t surprise me that the diversity and breadth of what we were doing was overlooked or under-appreciated at the time.[13] Led Zeppelin III was a trans-Atlantic #1 hit. It spent four weeks at the top of the Billboard chart, while it entered that British chart at number one and remained there for three weeks (returning to the top for a further week on December 12).[6] However, following the lukewarm, if not confused and sometimes dismissive reception from critics, sales lagged after this initial peak.[10] As Plant said: Led Zeppelin III was not one of the best sellers in the catalogue because the audience turned round and said What are we supposed to do with this? Where is our Whole Lotta Love Part 2 ? They wanted something like "Paranoid" by Black Sabbath! But we wanted to go acoustic and a piece like "Gallows Pole" still had all the power of "Whole Lotta Love" because it allowed us to be dynamic.[7] In spite of its initially indifferent reviews and lower sales than Led Zeppelin s other early albums, Led Zeppelin III s reputation has recovered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

considerably with the passage of time. The RIAA certified the album 2 x platinum in 1990, and 6 x platinum in 1999.[14] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank The Book of Rock Lists United States "The Top 40 Albums (1970)" [15] 1981 39 Mojo United Kingdom "The 100 Greatest Albums Ever Made" [16]1996 99 Colin Larkin United Kingdom "The Virgin All-Time Album Top 1000 List" [17] 1998 361 Q United Kingdom "50 Best British Albums Ever" [18] 2004 9 Robert Dimery United States 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die [19] 2005* Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest British Rock Album Ever" [20] 2006 31 Album sleeve design Led Zeppelin III s original vinyl edition was packaged in a gatefold sleeve with an innovative cover, designed by Zacron, a multi-media artist whom Jimmy Page had met in 1963 whilst Zacron was a student at Kingston College of Art.[21] Zacron had recently resigned a lectureship at Leeds Polytechnic to found Zacron Studios, and in 1970 Page contacted him and asked him to design the third album s cover. The cover and interior gatefold art consisted of a surreal collection of seemingly random images on a white background, many of them connected thematically with flight or aviation (as in "Zeppelin"). Behind the front cover was a rotatable laminated card disc, or volvelle, covered with more images, including photos of the band members, which showed through holes in the cover. Moving an image into place behind one hole would usually bring one or two others into place behind other holes. This could not be replicated on a conventional cassette or CD cover, but there have been Japanese and British CDs packaged in miniature versions of the original sleeve. In France this album was released with a different album cover, simply showing a photo of the four band members. The volvelle used on the front cover The concept of a volvelle, based on crop rotation charts, was initially Jimmy Page s idea.[6] However, the result was a meeting of minds as Zacron had been working on rotating graphics from 1965. Zacron felt that by not including text on the front of the cover, the art would endure.[22] In an article featured in the December 2007 issue of Classic Rock magazine, Zacron claimed that upon his completion of the artwork, Jimmy Page telephoned him while he was in New York to express his satisfaction with the results, saying "I think it is fantastic".[23] However, in a 1998 interview Page himself gave to Guitar World magazine, he described the results as a disappointment: I thought it looked very teeny-bopperish. But we were on top of a deadline, so of course there was no way to make any radical changes to it. There were some silly bits—little chunks of corn and nonsense like that.[24] The album cover featured on the front page of The Daily Mail s Live Magazine in December 2007, which hailed Led Zeppelin III as "The greatest rock album of all time.[22] The first pressings of the album included the phrases "Do what thou wilt" and "So mote it be", inscribed on the lacquer itself by engineer Terry Manning during the final mastering process. This phrase is from the core tenet of Aleister Crowley s philosophy of Thelema: "Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. Love is the law, love under will. There is no law beyond do what thou wilt." Page was a scholar of Crowley s work, once owning a private collection of Crowley manuscripts, artwork and other ephemera, and in the 1970s even bought one of his residences, Boleskine House on the shores of Loch Ness in Scotland. Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length

 

 

 

   

 

1."Immigrant Song" Page, Plant 2:26 2."Friends" Page, Plant 3:55 3."Celebration Day" Jones, Page, Plant 3:29 4."Since I ve Been Loving You" Jones, Page, Plant 7:25 5."Out on the Tiles" Bonham, Page, Plant 4:04 Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Gallows Pole" trad., arr. Page, Plant 4:58 2."Tangerine" Page 3:12 3."That s the Way" Page, Plant 5:38 4."Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" Jones, Page, Plant 4:20 5."Hats Off to (Roy) Harper" trad., arr. Charles Obscure 3:41 Sales chart positions Album Chart (1970) Peak Position Norwegian Albums Chart [25] 3 US Billboard 200 [26] 1 US Billboard Soul LP s [27] 30 UK Albums Chart [28] 1 Canadian RPM Top 100 Albums Chart [29] 1 Japanese Albums Chart [30] 5 US Record World Top Pop Albums [31] 1 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums [32] 1 German Albums Chart [33] 3 Spanish Albums Chart [34] 6 French Albums Chart [35] 4 Australian Go-Set Top 20 Albums Chart [36] 1 Singles Year 1970 1971 "Hey Single Chart Peak Position (release) (peak position) "Immigrant Song" / Hey What Can I Do" Billboard Hot 100 Singles 16 [37]

Sales certifications Album Country Sales Certification Switzerland (IFPI) 25,000+Gold [38] Germany (IFPI) 100,000+Gold [39]* United States (RIAA) 6,000,000 + 6 x Platinum [40] France (SNEP) 300,000 + Platinum [41] Spain (PROMUSICAE) 40,000 + Gold [42] Argentina (CAPIF) 40,000 + Platinum [43] Australia (ARIA) 210,000 + 3 x Platinum [44] Netherlands (NVPI) 30,000 + Gold [45]* Note: (*) Remastered sales only Personnel Led Zeppelin Robert Plant – vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page – acoustic, electric, and pedal steel guitar, backing vocals, banjo John Paul Jones – bass guitar, organ, synthesizer, mandolin, backing vocals John Bonham – drums, percussion, backing vocals Production Barry Diament – mastering engineering (original Compact Disc, 1986)[46] Peter Grant – executive producer Andy Johns – recording engineer, mixing engineer Eddie Kramer – mixing engineer[47]

 

 

 

Terry Manning – mixing engineer, mastering engineer[46] George Marino – mastering engineer (remastered CD, 1990) Jimmy Page – production Paul Richmond – mastering [46] External links Led Zeppelin III at MusicBrainz Interview with Jimmy Page on the making of Led Zeppelin III

Immigrant Song - Wikipedia

"Immigrant Song" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin III B-side "Hey Hey What Can I Do" Released 5 November 1970 Recorded May–August 1970 Genre Heavy metal Length 2:25 Label Atlantic Writer(s) Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Immigrant Song" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was released as a single from their third album, Led Zeppelin III, in 1970. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Overview Cultural influence Formats and tracklistings Chart positions 4.1 Single 4.2 Single (Digital download) Cover versions Sources References External links

Overview The song is famous for its distinctive, wailing cry from vocalist Robert Plant (with a melody reminiscent of "Bali Ha i") at the beginning of the song, and is built around a repeating, staccato Jimmy Page/John Paul Jones/John Bonham riff in the key of F# minor. The hiss at the beginning of the track is feedback from an echo unit.[1] "Immigrant Song" was written during Led Zeppelin s tour of Iceland, Bath and Germany in mid-1970. The opening date of this tour took place in Reykjavik, Iceland, which inspired Plant to write the song. As he explained: We weren t being pompous ... We did come from the land of the ice and snow. We were guests of the Icelandic Government on a cultural mission. We were invited to play a concert in Reykjavik and the day before we arrived all the civil servants went on strike and the gig was going to be cancelled. The university prepared a concert hall for us and it was phenomenal. The response from the

 

 

 

kids was remarkable and we had a great time. "Immigrant Song" was about that trip and it was the opening track on the album that was intended to be incredibly different.[2] Just six days after Led Zeppelin s appearance in Reykjavik, the band performed the song for the first time on stage during the Bath Festival.[3] The song is dedicated to the Icelander Leif Ericson, and is sung from the perspective of Vikings rowing west from Scandinavia in search of new lands. The lyrics make explicit reference to Viking conquests and the Old Norse religion (Fight the horde, sing and cry, Valhalla, I am coming!). In a 1970 radio interview, Plant jokingly recalled: We went to Iceland, and it made you think of Vikings and big ships... and John Bonham s stomach... and bang, there it was - Immigrant Song![1] "Immigrant Song" is one of Led Zeppelin s few single releases, having been released in November 1970 by their record label, Atlantic Records, against the band s wishes. It reached #16 on the Billboard charts.[1] Its B side, "Hey Hey What Can I Do", was otherwise unavailable before the release of the band s first boxed set in 1990. The single was also mistakenly released in Japan with "Out on the Tiles" as the B-side rather than "Hey Hey What Can I Do." That single is now a rare collectible. One of the lines from the song became part of Led Zeppelin lore. The line, "The hammer of the gods/will drive our ships to new lands" prompted some people to start referring to Led Zeppelin s sound as the "Hammer of the Gods." The phrase was used as the title of Stephen Davis famous biography of the band, Hammer of the Gods: The Led Zeppelin Saga. The lyrics also did much to inspire the classic heavy metal myth, of mighty Viking-esque figures on an adventure, themes which have been adopted in the look and music of bands from Iron Maiden to Manowar. "Immigrant Song" was used to open Led Zeppelin concerts from 1970 to 1972. On the second half of their 1972 concert tour of the United States, it was introduced by a short piece of music known as "LA Drone", designed to heighten the sense of anticipation and expectation amongst the concert audience. By 1973, "Immigrant Song" was occasionally being used as an encore, but was then removed from their live set.[1] Live versions of the song can be heard on the Led Zeppelin albums How The West Was Won (featuring a performance at Long Beach Arena in 1972) and the Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions (a version from the Paris Theatre in London in 1971). When played live, Page played a lengthy guitar solo, which was absent on the recorded Led Zeppelin III version.[1] "Immigrant Song" was played as part of the 2009 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony for Jeff Beck by both Page and Beck. Cultural influence The song is commonly played by marching bands at high school and college football games. The song is also one of the few Led Zeppelin songs to have been licensed for a film. For the 2003 film School of Rock, actor Jack Black filmed himself on stage, along with thousands of screaming fans, begging Led Zeppelin to let them use "Immigrant Song".[4] The song also appears, in a slightly changed version due to licensing reasons, in Shrek the Third, when Snow White attacks the city gates, guarded by Huorns. She cries the characteristic war cry of Robert Plant, backed by the riff, as in the beginning of the original song.[5] "Immigrant Song" also appeared in the 1999 documentary about the 1972 Munich Olympic Games massacre, One Day in September,[6] and the trailers for the BBC1 drama series Life on Mars. Starting from the 2007 season, the Minnesota Vikings play this song during their team introductions and before kickoffs. During the 2007/8 football season, Brentford FC played this song immediately before kick-off. Bruiser Brody aka Frank Goodish-professional wrestling legend entrance music was this song and the beginning of Ludwig van Beethoven s Symphony No. 5. However, in Japan, he had a cover of this song as his theme song. It was without lyrics. The Max Weinberg 7 played this song regularly during Late Night With Conan O Brien. The song was placed over an animation of kittens in Viking costumes on rathergood.com. The song by Hironobu Kageyama "GIRI GIRI --Sekai Kyokugen--"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

from the seventh Dragon Ball Z movie "Kyokugen Battle!! San Dai Super Saiyan" features similar guitar riffs and screams. Comedian Denis Leary did a comedic cover of the song during his MTV Unplugged special in 1993. Vanilla Ice used "Immigrant Song" as the basis for "Power", a rap metal song performed in concerts in 1999.[7][8] An instrumental version of the song was used in the opening credits of a 1973 martial Arts film, Young Tiger, staring Fei Meng and a young Jackie Chan. Formats and tracklistings 1970 7" single (US/Australia/New Zealand: Atlantic 45-2777, Austria/Germany: Atlantic ATL 70460, Belgium: Atlantic BE 650222, Canada: Atlantic AT 2777, France: Atlantic 650 226L, Holland: Atlantic ATL 2091043, Italy/Jamaica: Atlantic ATL 45-2777, Greece: Atlantic 2091 043, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-1007A, Portugal: Atlantic ATL N 28101, South Africa: Atlantic ATS 531, Spain: Atlantic H 671, Sweden: Atlantic ATL 70.460, Turkey: Atlantic 71505) A. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Hey Hey What Can I Do" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:55 1970 7" radio edit (US: Atlantic 45-2777 PL) A. "Immigrant Song" [stereo] (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Immigrant Song" [mono] (Page, Plant) 2:25 1970 7" single (Colombia: WEA 167/168, Costa Rica: Atlantic 70.029, Mexico: Atlantic 1701-1919, Philippines: Atlantic 45-3741) A. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Tangerine" (Page) 3:10 1970 7" single (Japan: Nihon Gramophone DT-1180) A. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Out on the Tiles" (Bonham, Page, Plant) 4:07 1970 7" single (South Africa: Atlantic ATS 528) A. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Friends" (Page, Plant) 3:54 1970 7" single (Uruguay: Atlantic 2164013) A. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Gallows Pole" (trad. arr. Page, Plant) 4:56 1970 7" single (Venezuela: Atlantic 5-018) A. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 3:12 1970 7" EP (Mexico: Atlantic 2207-014) A1. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 A2. "Tangerine" (Page) 3:10 B. "Out on the Tiles" (Bonham, Page, Plant) 4:07 1970 7" EP (Bolivia: Polydor 608030) A1. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 A2. "Celebration Day" (Jones, Page, Plant) 3:29 B. "Since I ve Been Loving You" (Jones, Page, Plant) 7:23 1971 7" single (Argentina/Chile/Peru: Atlantic 2091 149) A. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 B. "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:16 1992 CD single (US: Atlantic 2777-2) 1. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 2. "Hey Hey What Can I Do" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:55 Chart positions Single Chart (1971) Peak position Italian Singles Chart [9] 59 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [10] 8 US Record World 100 Top Pops [11] 10 Canadian CHUM Chart [12] 2 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [13] 4

 

Japanese Singles Chart [14] 13 US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [15] 16 Dutch Singles Chart [16] 9 South African Top 20 Singles Chart [17] 7 Australian Go-Set Top 60 Singles Chart [18] 16 German Singles Chart [19] 6 Swiss Singles Chart [20] 4 Austrian Singles Chart [21] 13 New Zealand Top 50 Singles Chart [22] 4 Spanish Singles Chart [23] 11 Single (Digital download) Chart (2007) Peak position UK Singles Chart [24] 109 US Billboard Hot Digital Songs Chart [25] 71 Canadian Billboard Hot Digital Singles Chart [26] 54 Note: The official UK Singles Chart incorporated legal downloads as of 17 April 2005. Cover versions 1986: Queen (Magic Tour) 1987: Minimal Compact (The Figure One Cuts) 1988: Great White (Recovery: Live!) 1988: Royal Crescent Mob (Something New, Old, and Borrowed) 1988: 7 Come 11 (Hammond Organ Trio) 1989: Dark Angel (Leave Scars) 1989: Headface (The Song Retains the Name) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1993: Infectious Grooves (Sarsippius Ark) 1994: Nirvana (With the Lights Out [recorded live 1988]) 1995: Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin) 1997: Informatik (Direct Memory Access v2.0) 1997: Blue Shift (Not the Future I Ordered) 1997: Mike Keneally (Half Alive in Hollywood) 1998: Paper Parrot (Before the Balloon Went Up) 1998: Rick Brannon (Guitar Freak) 1999: Coalesce (There Is Nothing New Under the Sun EP) 1999: Steve Whiteman (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin: The Song Remains Remixed) 2001: Sebastian Bach (Bach 2: Basics) 2001: Adagio (Sanctus Ignis) 2002: Red Flag (Fear Series box-set) 2002: Consortium Project (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: All the Queen s Men (Curvy Baby) 2002: Issa (The Electronic Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Stereofeed (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2003: Triprocket (Thrills and Chills) 2004: Tomoyasu Hotei (Electric Samurai (The Noble Savage)) 2004: Tracy G (Deviating from the List) 2005: Iron Horse (Whole Lotta Bluegrass: A Bluegrass Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Cyro Baptista (Love the Donkey) 2005: Demons & Wizards ("Touched by the Crimson King") 2005: Greg Rapaport (Led Zeppelin Salute: Get the Led Out!) 2005: Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Gotthard (Made In Switzerland) 2006: Zepparella (Live at 19 Broadway [recorded 28 October 2005]) 2006: The Rockies (The Music of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute)

 

 

2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2007: Ann Wilson (Hope & Glory) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Julian Beeston (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix]) 2007: Macdonald Duck Eclair (Our Favourite Shops: Roots of KOGA Melody) 2007: The Sword (12" Split with Witchcraft) 2008: Manny Charlton (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2008: Strikeforce (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millennium Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2008: Pendulum (BBC Radio 1 Mash Up and Live Performances) 2009: Hollywood Undead (On their CD/DVD album Desperate Measures) 2010: Bruno (On their demo album Plagiarized: EP )

Friends (Led Zeppelin song) - Wikipedia

"Friends" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin III Released 5 October 1970 Recorded May - August 1970 Genre Folk rock Length 3:54 Label Atlantic Records Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Friends" is the second track from the 1970 album Led Zeppelin III, the third studio album of English rock band Led Zeppelin. Jimmy Page and Robert Plant wrote the song in 1970 at Bron-Yr-Aur, a small cottage in Wales where they stayed after completing a gruelling concert tour of the United States.[1] The song starts out with a little noodling and studio chatter. Peter Grant s voice can be heard in the background, of the right channel, before the guitars of Jimmy Page kick in. The guitar tuning for the song is an open-C6 chord (C-A-C-G-C-E). The same tuning was used by Page on the track "Bron-Yr-Aur" (which was recorded during these same sessions), as well as the song "Poor Tom".[2] Page used an Altair Tube Limiter to enhance the acoustic quality of his Harmony guitar, a device recommended to him by an acoustic guitarist named Dick Rosemenie.[2] This same device was later used by Page on "All My Love", which was included on Led Zeppelin s In Through the Out Door album.[2] "Friends" is one of a few Led Zeppelin songs that includes strings. Bass player John Paul Jones did the string arrangement, which exhibits some distinctive Eastern influences. Some people have expressed surprise at the fact that Jones received no writing credit for this song, given that he was entirely responsible for its compelling string arrangement.[2] The outro to "Friends" includes a Moog synthesizer, which provides a link to the next track on the album, "Celebration Day". The only known live performance of the song by Led Zeppelin was on 29 September 1971 in Osaka, during the band s Japanese concert tour, as exhibited on a number of Led Zeppelin bootleg recordings of the show. If listened to closely, Page can be heard asking Plant if he wanted to perform the song when John Bonham had returned from unknown

 

 

 

activities backstage. The song was re-recorded by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant with the Bombay Symphony Orchestra in 1972, during their trip to India, along with another track, "Four Sticks" from Led Zeppelin IV.[3] This version featured tabla drums and sitars. The recordings have never been released officially and are only available on bootlegs. The project is said to have run into problems because Page complained that the orchestra didn t keep time in the Western style and some of them drank rather a lot.[4] "Friends" was also recorded by Page and Plant on their 1994 release No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded, accompanied by a Middle-Eastern orchestra. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Formats and tracklistings 1970 7" single (Poland: Prasniewska N-370) A. "Friends" (Page, Plant) 3:54 B. "Celebration Day" (Jones, Page, Plant) 3:29 1970 7" EP (Brazil: Rock Espetacular RG 03) A1. "Friends" (Page, Plant) 3:54 A2. "Celebration Day" (Jones, Page, Plant) 3:29 B. "Since I ve Been Loving You" (Jones, Page, Plant) 7:23 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1991: Stone (Colours) 1993: Men & Volts (The Song Retains the Same II) 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1997: Jaz Coleman and the London Philharmonic Orchestra (Kashmir: Symphonic Led Zeppelin) 1998: Painkiller (Before the Balloon Went Up) 1998: Morgaua Quartet (Destruction: Rock Meets Strings) 2000: Scarve (Translucence) 2000: Azigza (Azigza) 2001: Elliott Smith - Live 2005: Eric Van Aro (Friends) 2005: Steve Booke (Get the Led Out! Led Zeppelin Salute) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Led R (Led the R Out: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2008: Harry Slash & The Slashtones (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millennium Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2009: Marco Benevento (Me Not Me)

Celebration Day - Wikipedia

"Celebration Day" Song by Led Zeppelin

 

 

from the album Led Zeppelin III Released 5 October 1970 Recorded May–August 1970 Genre Hard rock Length 3:29 Label Atlantic Records Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones Producer Jimmy Page "Celebration Day" is the third track from English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1970 album Led Zeppelin III. The track was almost left off the album, due to a studio oversight in which an engineer accidentally erased the first few bars of John Bonham s drum track. To disguise it, the Moog synthesizer from the end of the previous song on the album, "Friends", was used to composite over the edit. This enabled the track to be salvaged and included on the album.[1] "Celebration Day" is made up of jangling Jimmy Page guitar riffs and a hypnotic, trance-like mood. In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993, Page discussed the construction of the song: There s about three or four riffs going down on that one, isn t there? Half was done with a guitar in standard tuning and the other half was done on slide guitar tuned to an open A, I think. We put that together at Headley Grange. Because we rented the Rolling Stones mobile recording studio, we could relax and take our time and develop the songs in rehearsals. I do not remember too much about that song other than that and what I told you earlier about the opening being erased. I used to play the whole thing live on my electric 12-string.[1] The lyrics of Robert Plant refer to his impressions of the city of New York. On Led Zeppelin s 1971 concert tour of the United States, Robert Plant would sometimes introduce it as "The New York Song". "Celebration Day" was often played live in Led Zeppelin concerts from 1971 through 1973, and was returned to the band s set list at Knebworth in 1979 (where Page unusually performed the song using his Gibson EDS-1275 double-necked guitar).[2] A live version from the band s 1973 U.S. tour was recorded and included on their concert soundtrack The Song Remains the Same. When released in 1976, the album s accompanying film did not include this live cut of "Celebration Day," but when the DVD of the film was reissued in 2007, footage of the song was added to the second extras disc, and included on the reissue of the album. This reissued version is slightly different from the one that was originally included on the 1976 album, in particular featuring a different guitar solo. Jimmy Page performed "Celebration Day" on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999, and another version performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Formats and tracklistings 1970 7" single (Poland: Daszkowska N 037) A. "Celebration Day" (Jones, Page, Plant) 3:29 B. "Paranoid"* (Butler, Iommi, Osbourne, Ward) 2:52 1970 7" single (South Africa: Atlantic Teal MR 10) A. "Celebration Day" (Jones, Page, Plant) 3:29 B. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes: (*) B-side by Black Sabbath Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2001: TKO (In Your Face [bonus tracks edition]) 2007: Dread Zeppelin (Bar Coda) 2007: Spearfish (Back for the Future)

Since I ve Been Loving You - Wikipedia

"Since I ve Been Loving You" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin III Released 5 October 1970 Recorded May - August 1970 Genre Blues-rock Length 7:23 Label Atlantic Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones Producer Jimmy Page

"Since I ve Been Loving You" is a blues-rock song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released on the 1970 album Led Zeppelin III. Contents 1 Overview 1.1 Accolades 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Live versions 3.3 Samples 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Overview This was one of the first songs prepared for the Led Zeppelin III album.[1] The song was recorded live in the studio with very little overdubbing. John Paul Jones played Hammond Organ on the song, using the bass pedals for the bassline.[2] It was the only track from the third album that the band had played live prior to the recording sessions, but was reportedly the hardest to record.[3] One story mentions Jimmy Page taking a break following a series of failed attempts to track the solo. Seemingly unable to get the tone he was craving, he set about a walk around the studio to clear his mind. Sitting outside of the recording area was an unplugged amplifier, which he utilised, and

 

 

 

recorded the solo we hear today on the next take.[citation needed] Audio engineer Terry Manning called it "The best rock guitar solo of all time."[citation needed] Because of the live recording, this is one of a few songs in which one can hear the squeak of John Bonham s bass drum pedal in the studio, the others being "The Ocean", "The Rain Song" and Dancing Days from 1973 s Houses of the Holy, "Ten Years Gone" from 1975 s Physical Graffiti, and "Bonzo s Montreux" from 1982 s Coda and "I Can t Quit You Baby" from the same album. In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993, Page made comment of this whilst discussing the remastering of Led Zeppelin tracks: The only real problem I can remember encountering was when we were putting the first boxed set together. There was an awfully squeaky bass drum pedal on "Since I ve Been Loving You". It sounds louder and louder every time I hear it! [laughs]. That was something that was obviously sadly overlooked at the time.[4] As an improvisational showcase for all four group members, and especially for Jimmy Page s electric blues guitar solos, "Since I ve Been Loving You" became a staple and fan favorite of Led Zeppelin s live concert performances from 1970 until the end of their ninth American tour in summer 1973. It was played on the 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1979 and 1980 tours, as well as a few times on the 1975 North American tour. Just before this 1975 tour, Page broke the tip of his left ring finger in a door-slamming incident. They went on with the tour but they had to drop this song and "Dazed and Confused" from the set lists as he couldn t play them properly until his finger healed. In live performances of the song from 1977 onwards, Page would sometimes incorporate some of the solo of "Tea for One", a track from the band s 1976 album Presence that is similar in style to this song. Page s guitar prowess is well demonstrated in different performances of the song from Madison Square Garden in July 1973, as seen in the group s concert films The Song Remains the Same (and accompanying soundtrack) and Led Zeppelin DVD. There is also a June 1972 live recording of "Since I ve Been Loving You" which can be heard on the album How the West Was Won, and another live version on Disc 2 of Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions. Page and Plant recorded a version of the song in 1994, released on their album No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded. Plant also used a sample from this on his solo track "White, Clean, and Neat". "Since I ve Been Loving You" was performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on December 10, 2007. Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Zounds Germany "The Top 30 Songs of All Time" [5] 1992 16 Mojo United Kingdom "100 Great Voices" [6] 1994* Guitarist United Kingdom "Top 100 Guitar Solos of All-time" [7] 1998 8 Guitar World United States "100 Greatest Solos of All-time" [8] 1998 53 Q United Kingdom "1010 Songs You Must Own!" [9] 2004* (*) designates unordered lists. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars, lyrics John Paul Jones - bass pedals, Hammond organ John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1994: Cinnamon (Cinnamon II) 1996: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: Otis Clay (Whole Lotta Blues: Songs of Led Zeppelin) 1999: Naoto Shibata (Stand Proud! II)

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

2000: Tequila & the Actual Matrix (Radio Therapy) 2001: Simply Led (From the Land of the Ice and Snow) 2002: Voodoo Highway (Love s Addiction) 2003: Letz Zep (Live on Broadway) 2003: Mad Zeppelin (Live) 2003: Whole Lotta Led (The Bring It On Home Tour) 2004: Jizzy Pearl (Just a Boy) 2004: Dokaka (Tributes) 2004: Jezz Woodroffe (In Through the Swing Door: Swing Cover Versions of Led Zeppelin Classics) 2006: Corinne Bailey Rae (Corinne Bailey Rae [bonus tracks edition]) 2006: Gentlemen s Blues Club (Shotgun Wedding) 2006: Danny Masters Band (99.5 The Mountain Homegrown Vol. 5) 2006: Zepparella (Live at 19 Broadway [recorded 28 October 2005]) 2007: Lez Zeppelin (Lez Zeppelin) 2008: Europe (Almost Unplugged) Live versions 2007: John Paul Jones with Gov t Mule Samples 1988: Robert Plant ("White, Clean and Neat") 2000: Sebutones ("Nibiru")

Out on the Tiles - Wikipedia

"Out on the Tiles" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin III Released 5 October 1970 Recorded May - August 1970 Genre Hard rock, Funk rock Length 4:07 Label Atlantic Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Bonham Producer Jimmy Page

"Out on the Tiles" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, from the 1970 album Led Zeppelin III. The title of the song is derived from the British phrase for going out for a night on the town. Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham would talk about going "out on the tiles," meaning to go to bars, and often sang a ditty based around the phrase. It goes "I ve had a pint of bitter and now I m feeling better and I m out on the tiles. We re going down the rubbers and we re going to pull some scrubbers because we re out on the tiles." Guitarist Jimmy Page turned the tune into a riff and Bonham s lyrics were replaced with something a little more tame for general audiences. Bonham and Page are credited with writing the song, along with vocalist Robert Plant. The song is one of the most aggressive recordings in the band s catalog and closes the "hard" first side of Led Zeppelin III, which is noted for its stylistic departure from the band s first two releases, featuring several acoustic arrangements that dominate the second half of the album. The spacey sound mix achieved on the recording of this song was a product of

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

distance miking in the studio by Page.[1][2] Just after the 1:23 mark in the track, someone in the recording studio is heard saying "stop". It is widely believed that it was Page who said it, although this has never been confirmed. As the song has unique rhythm and syncopation, it is assumed that whoever yelled "stop" was trying to act as a verbal conductor. Before that, at about 0:11 in the song, someone (again possibly Page) says "All right". In Japan "Out on the Tiles" was mistakenly placed on the B-side of the "Immigrant Song" single, rather than "Hey Hey What Can I Do". Those copies are now rare collector s items. "Out on the Tiles" was played live in its entirety just a few times at Led Zeppelin concerts, most notably on September 4, 1970 in Los Angeles, as is preserved on the famous bootleg recording Live On Blueberry Hill. However, the beginning of the song was much more often used as an introduction to live performances of "Black Dog", as heard on the official live release How the West Was Won. It was also used as an introduction to John Bonham s drum solo "Over the Top" on the band s 1977 North American concert tour.[1] Jimmy Page performed "Out on the Tiles" on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of this song performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. The song was also featured on the VH1 series SuperGroup, in which it was performed as part of the group s set at the concert in series finale, and Jason Bonham dedicated it to his late father John. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1989: Toxik (Think This) 1993: Helen Keller Plaid (The Song Retains the Same II) 1995: Blind Melon (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: Coalesce (There Is Nothing New Under the Sun EP) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2000: Malamor (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2004: Vick LeCar (Bad Influence) 2005: Julz A (Squeeze Rock) 2006: Greg Reeves & Erica Stock (Dub Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Megadeth (United Abominations [Japanese bonus disc edition]) 2007: Dread Zeppelin (Bar Coda) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

The Maid Freed from the Gallows - Wikipedia

Jump to: navigation, search "The Maid Freed from the Gallows" is one of many titles of a centuries-old folk song about a condemned maiden pleading for someone to buy her freedom from the executioner. In the collection of ballads compiled by Francis James Child, it is

 

 

 

 

indexed as Child Ballad number 95; eleven variants, some fragmentary, are indexed as 95A to 95K.[1] The ballad existed in a number of folkloric variants from many different countries, and has been remade in a variety of formats. It was recorded in 1939 as "The Gallis Pole" by folk singer Huddie "Leadbelly" Ledbetter, but the most famous version was the 1970 cover of the Fred Gerlach version by English rock band Led Zeppelin, which was entitled "Gallows Pole" on the album Led Zeppelin III. Contents 1 2 3 4 Synopsis Variants Origin "Gallows Pole" and the era of recorded music 4.1 Leadbelly version 4.2 Bob Dylan version 4.3 Led Zeppelin version 4.4 Other versions Names See also References Further reading External links

5 6 7 8 9

Synopsis Although it exists in many forms, all versions recount a similar story. A maid about to be hanged (for unknown reasons) pleads with the hangman, or judge, to wait for the arrival of someone who may bribe him. The first person (or people) to arrive, who may include the father, mother, brother, and sister, have brought nothing and often have come to see her hanged. The last person to arrive, often her true love, has brought the gold to save her. She may curse all those who failed her. The typical refrain would be: "Hangman, hangman, hangman / slack your rope awhile. I think I see my father / ridin’ many a mile. Father, did you bring any silver? / father, did you bring any gold, Or did you come to see me / hangin from the gallows pole?" "No, I didn’t bring any silver, / no I didn’t bring any gold. I just come to see you / hangin’ from the gallows pole." The song is also known as "The Prickly Bush", a title derived from the oft-used refrain lamenting the maid s situation by likening it to being caught in briery bush, wherein the brier prickles her heart. In versions carrying this theme, the typical refrain may add: O the prickly bush, the prickly bush, It pricked my heart full sore; If ever I get out of the prickly bush, I ll never get in any more. In "The Maid Freed from the Gallows", the first person (usually her father, mother or brother) has come not to free the condemned, but to see her hanged, but the last person (usually her lover) has brought the bribe with which to free her.[1] Although the traditional versions do not resolve the fate of the condemned one way or the other, it may be presumed that the bribe would succeed.[2] It has been suggested that the reference to "gold" may not mean actual gold for a bribe, but may instead stand for the symbolic restoration of the maid s honor, perhaps by proof of her innocence or fidelity.[3][4] Such an interpretation would explain why a number of variations of the song have the maid (or a male condemned) asking whether their visitors had brought them gold or paid their fee. In at least one version, the reply comes that "I haven t brought you gold/ But I have paid your fee."[5] Variants

 

 

 

 

 

In some versions, the protagonist is male. This appears to be more prevalent in the United States, where hanging of women was uncommon.[4] The crime for which the protagonist faces hanging is occasionally mentioned. The woman may be being held for ransom by pirates; or, she has stolen something from her employer. Other instances tell of her having lost a treasured golden ball,[6][7] or indicate that she is being hanged for fornication. The most extensive version is not a song at all, but a fairy story titled "The Golden Ball", collected by Joseph Jacobs in More English Fairy Tales. It encompasses the theme of the song. The story focuses more on the exploits of the fiance who must recover a golden ball in order to save his love from the noose; the incident resembles The Story of the Youth Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was.[8] Other fairy tales in the English language, telling the story more fully, always retell some variant on the heroine being hanged for losing an object of gold.[9] Origin The song likely originated in a language other than English. Some fifty versions have been reported in Finland,[10] where it is well known as Lunastettava neito. It is titled Den Bortsålda in Sweden, and Die Losgekaufte in German. A Lithuanian version has the maid asking relatives to ransom her with their best animals or belongings (sword, house, crown, ring etc.). The maiden curses her relatives who refuse to give up their property, and blesses her fiancé, who does ransom her.[11] Francis James Child found the English version "defective and distorted", in that, in most cases, the narrative rationale had been lost and only the ransoming sequence remained. Numerous European variants explain the reason for the ransom: the heroine has been captured by pirates.[12] Of the texts he prints, one (95F) had "degenerated" into a children s game, while others had survived as part of a Northern English cante-fable, The Golden Ball (or Key).[12] Child describes additional examples from Färöe, Iceland, Russia, and Slovenia. Several of these feature a man being ransomed by a woman.[12] The theme of delaying one s execution while awaiting rescue by relatives appears with a similar structure in the classic fairy tale "Bluebeard" by Charles Perrault in 1697[13] (translated into English in 1729). "Gallows Pole" and the era of recorded music Leadbelly version "In the Shadow of the Gallows Pole", a Lead Belly album featuring the song as "The Gallis Pole".Legendary folksinger Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter, who also popularized such songs as "Cotton Fields" and "Midnight Special" first recorded "The Gallis Pole" in the 1930s, and set the stage for the song s popularity today.[citation needed] Lead Belly s rendition, available through Folkways music and recently re-released by the Library of Congress, differs from more familiar recordings in several notable ways. The Lead Belly version is performed on acoustic twelve string guitar, and following an introductory phrase reminiscent of the vocal melody, Lead Belly launches into a furious fingerpicking pattern.[citation needed] His haunting, shrill tenor delivers the lyrical counterpoint, and his story is punctuated with spoken-word, as he "interrupts his song to discourse on its theme".[14] Bob Dylan version Bob Dylan recorded a thematically similar "Seven Curses" in 1963 during the sessions for his Freewheelin album. The song tells a similar story, but from the point of view of the condemned s daughter. Dylan s song has been recorded by many artists, and Judy Collins song "Anathea" is based on Dylan s song. The definitive folk version of the song is probably that by Nic Jones recorded as Prickly Bush which he performed live and is featured on the Unearthed album. The song has also been played by Spiers & Boden. Led Zeppelin version "Gallows Pole" Song by Led Zeppelin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

from the album Led Zeppelin III Released October 5, 1970 Recorded May - August 1970 Genre Folk rock Length 4:56 Label Atlantic Records Writer trad. arr. Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

This plotline is followed in perhaps the most familiar version today. English band Led Zeppelin recorded the song for their album Led Zeppelin III in 1970. The album is a shift in style for the band towards acoustic material, influenced by a vacation Jimmy Page and Robert Plant took to the Bron-Yr-Aur cottage in the Welsh countryside.[15] Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page adapted the song from a version by Fred Gerlach.[15] On the album the track was credited "Traditional: Arranged by Page and Plant". "Gallows Pole" begins as a simple acoustic guitar rhythm; mandolin is added in, then electric bass guitar shortly afterwards, and then banjo and drums simultaneously join in. The instrumentation builds up to a crescendo, increasing in tempo as the song progresses. The acoustic guitar chord progression (in standard tuning) is simple with a riff based on variations of the open A chord and the chords D and G occurring in the verse. Page played banjo, six and 12 string acoustic guitar and electric guitar (a Gibson Les Paul), while John Paul Jones played mandolin and bass.[15] Page has stated that, similar to the song "Battle of Evermore" which was included on their fourth album, the song emerged spontaneously when he started experimenting with Jones banjo, an instrument he had never before played. "I just picked it up and started moving my fingers around until the chords sounded right, which is the same way I work on compositions when the guitar s in different tunings."[16] Led Zeppelin would perform the song a few times live during Led Zeppelin concerts in 1971.[15] Singer Plant would sometimes also include lyrics in live performances of the Led Zeppelin song "Trampled Under Foot" in 1975. The Led Zeppelin version of the song is unique in that, despite the bribes, which the hangman accepts, he still carries out the execution: Oh yes, you got a fine sister, she warmed my blood from cold, She brought my blood to boiling hot to keep you from the Gallows Pole, Your brother brought me silver, and your sister warmed my soul, But now I laugh and pull so hard to see you swinging on the Gallows Pole The Led Zeppelin version is also unique in that the convict is male. This is evident when the convict s brother addresses the convict as "brother" rather than "sister" in the line, "Brother, I brought you some silver, yeah." "Gallows Pole" single released by Led Zeppelin members Jimmy Page and Robert Plant.Other versions Led Zeppelin members Page and Plant later recorded a version of this song for their 1994 release No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded. They also released this track as a single. The song was performed regularly on the subsequent tour and featured a hurdy gurdy. The song has also been recorded by numerous other artists, including Odetta, Great Big Sea, The Kingston Trio, Peter, Paul and Mary, Nic Jones, Almeda Riddle, Uriah Heep, the Pine Valley Cosmonauts, and Alvin Youngblood Hart. German folk metal band In Extremo has version of this song called "Der Galgen". Spiers and Boden recorded two variations: Derry Gaol and Prickle Eye Bush, the latter was also recorded with Bellowhead. Jasper Carrott performed a comedy version in which the narrator is hanged before he can finish the first verse. American folk singer John Jacob Niles also recorded a version under the title

 

   

The Hangman , the song was featured in the Harmony Korine film Mister Lonely. A few lines of the song are sung by a woman strumming a guitar in a 1949 John Wayne movie, "The Fighting Kentuckian". The song is chronologically appropriate to the film, which is set in 1818. Names In addition to "The Maid Freed from the Gallows", "The Prickly Bush" and the more recent "Gallows Pole", variations of the song have been recorded or reported under more than a dozen names.[17] These include: "The Gallis Pole" "The Gallows Tree" (Bert Jansch) "The Prickilie Bush" "Hangman" "Hangman, Slacken"[5] "Gallows" "Freed from the Gallows" "Maid Saved" "By a Lover Saved" "Down by the Green Willow Tree" "Girl to be Hanged for Stealing a Comb" "Ropeman" "Ropeman s Ballad" "Prickle Holly Bush" "Derry Gaol" "Hold Your Hands, Old Man"[5] "Old Rabbit, the Voodoo" "The Briery Bush"[18] "The Golden Ball" "Mama, Did You Bring Any Silver?" "Prickle-Eye Bush (Bellowhead and Spiers and Boden)

See also The Child ballad "Geordie" also features a rescue from the gallows by a payment.

Tangerine (Led Zeppelin song) - Wikipedia

"Tangerine" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin III Released 5 October 1970 Recorded May - August 1970 Genre Folk rock Length 3:10 Label Atlantic Writer Jimmy Page Producer Jimmy Page

"Tangerine" is a song composed by Jimmy Page and performed by English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was released on their 1970 album Led Zeppelin III. Like several Led Zeppelin tunes written by Page, it has its origins in an old

 

 

 

Yardbirds song, in this instance a composition entitled "Knowing That I m Losing You".[1] The Yardbirds version features different lyrics, with the exception of the verse that begins with "Measuring a summer s day." The track has an acoustic country flavor courtesy of the pedal-steel guitar playing of Page.[1][2] The song begins with a false start, after which Page pauses to set the right tempo. Throughout its duration, the song continually changes tempo a few bars at a time whilst the lyrics fondly recall love and contentedness. This was the second-to-last Led Zeppelin song Page wrote without any input from Robert Plant. (Bron-Yr-Aur from Physical Graffiti was the last.) The song uses a simple double track vocal pattern to create a recognisable lilting feel. The song uses a standard Am G D C progression for the verses before moving on to G C D progression for the chorus. "Tangerine" was often played live at Led Zeppelin concerts as part of the band s acoustic set from 1971 through 1972, and was revived for the Earls Court shows of 1975.[1] At these latter performances, Page played the song on his Gibson EDS-1275 double-neck guitar. During the 1975 concert at the Earls Court, Plant said that "Tangerine" is "a song of love in its most...innocent stages".[3] This was the second Led Zeppelin song to be named after a fruit, the first being "The Lemon Song". Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Personnel Legacy Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitar John Paul Jones - bass guitar, mandolin John Bonham - drums Legacy "Tangerine" appears in the movie Almost Famous, and can be heard during the final scene of the movie. Tangerine was performed by Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds numerous times throughout the 1990s. Cover versions 1993: When Skip Jack Tripped (The Song Retains the Same II) 1995: Big Head Todd and the Monsters (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1997: Life of Agony (Soul Searching Sun) 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2) 2004: Benjamin Levine (Chamber Maid: The Baroque Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2004: Classic Rock String Quartet (The Led Zeppelin Chamber Suite: A Classic Rock Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Marek Stycos (Godbody VI: the Dogleg) 2007: The Thermals (Bridging the Distance: a Portland, OR covers compilation)

That s the Way (Led Zeppelin song) - Wikipedia

"That s the Way" Song by Led Zeppelin

 

 

 

 

 

from the album Led Zeppelin III Released 5 October 1970 Recorded May - August 1970 Genre Folk rock Length 5:37 Label Atlantic Writer Page, Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"That s the Way" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their third album, Led Zeppelin III, released in 1970. Like several of the tracks on the album, it is an acoustic song and is particularly noted as being one of the most gentle and mellow compositions in the Led Zeppelin catalogue. The studio version features Jimmy Page playing acoustic guitar in open G tuning, and pedal steel, while John Paul Jones plays mandolin. There is no presence of John Bonham s drums on the track, and light tambourine and bass guitar is added towards the end of the song. Jimmy Page and Robert Plant wrote this piece in 1970 whilst on a retreat at Bron-Yr-Aur cottage, Wales.[1][2] Page explained: "That s the Way" was written in Wales. It was one of those days after a long walk and we were setting back to the cottage. We had a guitar with us. It was a tiring walk coming down a ravine and we stopped and sat down. I played the tune and Robert sang the first verse straight off. We had a tape recorder with us and we got the tune down".[3] When onstage for Page and Plant s Unledded reunion in 1994, Plant announced to the audience that Page s daughter, Scarlet Page, was conceived "about half an hour" after "That s the Way" was written.[4] Page s partner, Charlotte Martin, was staying at Bron-Yr-Aur at the time with Page, along with Plant s wife Maureen and their own child Carmen. The original working title of the song was "The Boy Next Door".[2] According to Stephen Davis s biography of Led Zeppelin, Hammer of the Gods, the song s lyrics reflected Plant s views on the ecology and environment. There are also several lines in the song which reflected on the way Led Zeppelin was sometimes treated in America during their early concert tours, when they were sometimes spat on, had guns drawn on them and were heckled at airports and on planes.[2] They were also troubled about the violence that they had seen policemen visit upon youth who protested the war in Vietnam, as well as upon the fans at their shows, particularly during their Spring 1970 Tour of the United States:[5] I can t believe what people saying, you re gonna let your hair hang down, I m satisfied to sit here working all day long, you re in the darker side of town. "That s the Way" was played live at Led Zeppelin concerts from 1970 through 1972, and was recalled for their series of concerts at Earls Court in 1975. Live versions of the song can also be found on How the West Was Won, the Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions and the Led Zeppelin DVD. The song was always performed half a step higher than the studio version, and the bass part at the end was always played by John Paul Jones on bass pedals. In 1994 Page and Plant also released a version on the No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded CD and DVD. This was one of the few songs in their catalogue that Led Zeppelin authorized for use on a film soundtrack. After seeing a rough cut of Cameron Crowe s Almost Famous in 2000, Page and Plant agreed to let him use some Led Zeppelin songs on it, but this is the only one which made it onto soundtrack. Other Led Zeppelin songs which can be heard in the movie are "Tangerine" "The Rain Song" "Bron-Yr-Aur" "The Immigrant Song" and "Misty Mountain Hop" Contents 1 Formats and tracklistings 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Formats and tracklistings 1971 7" EP (Australia: Atlantic EPA 228) A1. "That s the Way" (Page, Plant) 5:37 A2. "Going to California" (Page, Plant) 3:31 B. "Stairway to Heaven" (Page, Plant) 8:02 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - mandolin, bass guitar John Bonham - tambourine Cover versions 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1995: Thunderhead (The Ballads 88- 95) 1997: The Blenders (Now and Then) 1999: Coalesce (There Is Nothing New Under the Sun EP) 2001: Richard DeVinck (Going to California) 2004: Classic Rock String Quartet (The Led Zeppelin Chamber Suite: A Classic Rock Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Letz Zep (Letz Zep II: Live in London) 2007: The Boys from County Nashville (The Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago and Far Away)

Bron-Y-Aur Stomp - Wikipedia

"Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin III B-side "Out on the Tiles" Released 5 October 1970 Format 7" Recorded May–August 1970 Genre Folk rock, Country-rock Length 4:16 Label Atlantic Writer(s) Page, Plant, Jones Producer Jimmy Page

"Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" is a song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s third album, Led Zeppelin III, released in 1970. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Song history Origin of the name Lyrics Live performances Cultural influence Formats and tracklistings

 

 

 

 

7 Personnel 8 Cover versions 9 Sources 10 References 11 External links Song history Jimmy Page and Robert Plant constructed the song in 1970 at Bron-Yr-Aur, a small cottage in Wales where they stayed after completing a gruelling concert tour of the United States.[1][2] John Paul Jones also received a writing credit for the song. It was later recorded at Headley Grange in 1970, using a mobile studio belonging to the Rolling Stones. It was finished off at Island, London and Ardent Studios, Memphis, Tennessee. Drummer John Bonham played spoons and castanets on the recording.[2] Bassist John Paul Jones played an acoustic five-string fretless bass. Jimmy Page s guitar in this song is tuned to open D and has a capo on the third fret. Led Zeppelin also recorded the song as an electric instrumental, "Jennings Farm Blues", which later surfaced as a studio out-take on a number of Led Zeppelin bootleg recordings.[2] Jennings Farm is the name of the property in which the Plant family stayed in the early 1970s. Origin of the name The song is named after Bron-Yr-Aur, a house in Gwynedd, Wales, where the members of Led Zeppelin retreated in 1970 to write much of Led Zeppelin III after having completed a grueling concert tour of the United States. Bron-Yr-Aur means "golden breast" or "breast of gold" in Welsh, as in a hillside of gold. Its pronunciation is [ br?n ?r a?r]. The cottage had no electricity or running water, but the change of scenery provided inspiration for many of the songs on the album, including "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp". The song s title was misspelled on the album cover during initial printing; it should read "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp". This error can be contrasted to another Led Zeppelin track, "Bron-Yr-Aur," a two-minute instrumental featured on their later album Physical Graffiti, which was spelled correctly. When the song appeared on the 2003 DVD, it was spelled correctly both on the back cover of the set and the DVD s menu, although without the hyphens ("Bron Yr Aur Stomp"), and on the live album How the West Was Won it was spelled "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp". Lyrics In "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp", a country music-inflected hoedown, singer Robert Plant waxes lyrically about walking in the woods with his blue-eyed Merle dog named Strider.[2] Plant reportedly named his dog after Aragorn (often called Strider) from J. R. R. Tolkien s The Lord of the Rings. References to the work of Tolkien exist in some other Led Zeppelin songs, such as "Ramble On", "The Battle of Evermore", and "Misty Mountain Hop". However, there are no explicit references to Tolkien works in "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp". The lyrics also make reference to the song "Old Shep": When you re old and your eyes are dim / There ain t no "Old Shep" gonna happen again. Live performances This song regularly appeared in Led Zeppelin s acoustic set from the second UK tour in 1971 to the 1972 North American Tour. When the band performed the song live at Led Zeppelin concerts, John Paul Jones played an upright bass and Bonham sang harmony vocals with Plant (always stopping in the middle of the third verse). This can be seen in the footage from the Earls Court concerts in May 1975, featured on the Led Zeppelin DVD. On the band s 1977 North American tour, the song "Black Country Woman" was merged into a medley with "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp". At one Californian show, "Dancing Days" also featured in the acoustic medley. In some shows, Page sings harmony vocals with Plant instead of Bonham (Seattle in 1977, for example). It is also notable that the song was always performed live a whole step higher than the album version. Cultural influence The band Blue Merle took their name from lyrics in the song: "There ain t no

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

companion like a blue-eyed Merle". Formats and tracklistings 1970 7" single (Italy: Atlantic ATL NP 03174) A. "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:16 B. "Immigrant Song" (Page, Plant) 2:25 1970 7" single (Holland: Atlantic ATL 2019030) A. "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:16 B. "Out on the Tiles" (Bonham, Page, Plant) 4:07 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1999: Interior Rides (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2003: various artists (A Bluegrass Tribute: Pickin on Led Zeppelin, Volume II) 2005: Coheed and Cambria (Good Apollo, I m Burning Star IV, Volume One: From Fear Through the Eyes of Madness [bonus track]) 2005: Hampton String Quartet (Take No Prisoners!) 2005: Iron Horse (Whole Lotta Bluegrass: A Bluegrass Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: The Boys from County Nashville (The Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago and Far Away) 2007: Carbon Leaf (iCovers 1.4 EP) 2008: Roland Chadwick (Freedom Dreamer)

Hats Off to (Roy) Harper - Wikipedia

"Hats Off to (Roy) Harper" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin III Released 5 October 1970 Recorded May - August 1970 Genre Blues Length 3:42 Label Atlantic Records Writer (trad.) Producer Jimmy Page

"Hats Off to (Roy) Harper" is a song played by English rock band Led Zeppelin. It is the last track on the album Led Zeppelin III, released in 1970. The track features Jimmy Page playing slide guitar, and Robert Plant s vocals, processed through a tremolo. The song was listed on the album as "Arranged by Charles Obscure," which was a humorous pseudonym for Page. The song is a medley of fragments of blues songs and lyrics, including "Shake Em on Down" by Bukka White[1] Therefore, the song is both a tribute to contemporary folk singer Roy Harper and the influential American blues singer who recorded in the 1960s. Roy Harper is a folk singer from England whom Jimmy Page met at the Bath Festival in 1970. He became close friends with members of the band, who invited him to perform as the opening act on some later Led Zeppelin concert tours. In 1971, Page played on Harper s album Stormcock, appearing in the credits under the pseudonym "S. Flavius Mercurius." Harper would go on to perform the lead vocals on Pink Floyd s "Have a Cigar", from 1975 s Wish You Were Here. In 1985,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page recorded an album with Harper called Whatever Happened to Jugula?. Harper explained: I used to go up to [Led Zeppelin s] office in Oxford Street, where Peter Grant and Mickie Most would be. And one day Jimmy was up there and gave me the new record. I just said thanks and put it under my arm. Jimmy said "Look at it". So I twirled the little wheel around and put it back under my arm. Very nice and all that. So he went "Look at it!" Then I discovered Hats Off To (Roy) Harper. I was very touched.[2] According to Page, during recording sessions for Led Zeppelin III, the band "did a whole set of country blues and traditional blues numbers that Robert [Plant] suggested. But ["Hats Off to (Roy) Harper"] was the only one we put on the record."[3] "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper" begins with a strange audio snippet from the sessions which is quickly introduced and then faded out again, featuring Plant s voice and Page s slide guitar in tandem. An alternate studio outtake of the track in the same style and similar instrumentation is available on some Led Zeppelin bootleg recordings. Likely from the same recording session as the official release, it features lyrics from the songs "Feel So Bad," (recorded by Otis Rush and Elvis Presley), Robert Johnson s "Traveling Riverside Blues" & "32-20 Blues", Sleepy John Estes "Diving Duck Blues", Bukka White s "Fixin To Die", and Elvis "That Alright Mama."[1] These songs were frequently performed in medley by the band at Led Zeppelin concerts during "How Many More Times" and, later, "Whole Lotta Love." Thus, this outtake perhaps gives insight into the inspiration for the track, a desire to lay down an acoustic, studio take of a staple of their live performances. However, Led Zeppelin never performed "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper" live in concert.[1] Contents 1 2 3 4 Formats and tracklistings Personnel Sources References

Formats and tracklistings 1970 7" single (Poland: Prasniewski 03) A. "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper" (trad.) 3:42 B. "Out on the Tiles" (Bonham, Page, Plant) 4:07 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitar

Led Zeppelin IV - Wikipedia

Led Zeppelin IV Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 8 November 1971 Recorded December 1970 – March 1971 at various locations Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, folk rock Length 42:33 Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page Singles from Led Zeppelin IV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Black Dog/Misty Mountain Hop" Released: 2 December 1971 "Rock and Roll/Four Sticks" Released: 21 February 1972 The untitled fourth album by English rock band Led Zeppelin was released on 8 November 1971. No official title is printed on the album, but it is generally referred to as Led Zeppelin IV, following the naming standard used by the band s first three studio albums. The album has alternatively been referred to as Four Symbols, , The Fourth Album, Sticks, ZoSo, Untitled, The Hermit, Runes, or simply, IV. Zoso is also the monicker for the band s guitarist Jimmy Page. Upon its release, Led Zeppelin IV was a huge commercial and critical success. The album is one of the best-selling albums in history at 37 million units.[1] It has shipped over 23 million units in the United States alone, putting it third on the all-time list.[2] In 2003, the album was ranked 66th on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Contents 1 2 3 4 Recording sessions Album title Album cover and inside sleeve Release and critical reaction 4.1 Accolades 5 Track listing 6 Sales chart performance 7 Sales certifications 8 Personnel 9 See also 10 References 11 External links Recording sessions The album was initially recorded at Island Records s newly opened Basing Street Studios, London, at the same time as Jethro Tull s Aqualung in December 1970.[3] Upon the suggestion of Fleetwood Mac,[4], the band then moved to Headley Grange, a remote Victorian house in East Hampshire, England, to conduct additional recordings. Here they used the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Guitarist James Patrick Page later recalled, "We needed the sort of facilities where we could have a cup of tea and wander around the garden and go in and do what we had to do."[5] This relaxed, atmospheric environment at Headley Grange also provided other advantages for the band. As is explained by Dave Lewis, "By moving into Headley Grange for the whole period of recording, many of the tracks [on the album] were made up on the spot and committed to tape almost there and then."[5] Once the basic tracks had been recorded, the band later added overdubs at Island Studios, and then took the completed master tapes to Sunset Sound in Los Angeles, CA for mixing. However, the mix ultimately proved to be less than satisfactory, creating an unwanted delay in the album s release. Further mixing had to be undertaken in London, pushing the final release date back by some months.[5] Album title Led Zeppelin IV inner sleeve. From the 2003 CD release After the lukewarm, if not confused and sometimes dismissive, critical reaction Led Zeppelin III had received in late 1970, Page decided that the next Led Zeppelin album would not have a title, but would instead feature four hand-drawn symbols on the inner sleeve and record label, each one chosen by the band member it represents.[4] "We decided that on the fourth album, we would deliberately play down the group name, and there wouldn t be any information whatsoever on the outer jacket",

 

 

   

 

 

 

Page explained. "Names, titles and things like that do not mean a thing."[6] Page has also stated that the decision to release the album without any written information on the album sleeve was contrary to strong advice given to him by a press agent, who said that after a year s absence from both records and touring, the move would be akin to "professional suicide".[7] In the words of the guitarist: "We just happened to have a lot of faith in what we were doing."[7] Owing to the lack of an official title, Atlantic Records initially distributed graphics of the symbols in many sizes to the press for inclusion in charts and articles. The album was one of the first to be produced without conventional identification, and this communicated an anti-commercial stance that was controversial at the time (especially among certain executives at Atlantic Records). The idea for each member of the band to choose a personal emblem for the cover was Page s.[7] In an interview he gave in 1977, he recalled: After all this crap that we d had with the critics, I put it to everybody else that it d be a good idea to put out something totally anonymous. At first I wanted just one symbol on it, but then it was decided that since it was our fourth album and there were four of us, we could each choose our own symbol. I designed mine and everyone else had their own reasons for using the symbols that they used.[7] Page stated that he designed his own symbol himself[5][4] and has never publicly disclosed any reasoning behind it. However, it has been argued that his symbol appeared as early as 1557 to represent Saturn.[8] [9] The symbol is sometimes referred to as "ZoSo", though Page has explained that it was not in fact intended to be a word at all.[4] The four symbols on the label and inside sleeve of Led Zeppelin IV, representing (from left to right) Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham, and Robert Plant.Bassist John Paul Jones symbol, which he chose from Rudolf Koch s Book of Signs[4], is a single circle intersecting 3 vesica pisces (a triquetra). It is intended to symbolise a person who possesses both confidence and competence.[5] Drummer John Bonham s symbol, the three interlocking rings, was picked by the drummer from the same book.[4] It represents the threesome of mother, father and child[5][10], but also happens to be the logo for Ballantine beer.[5] Singer Robert Plant s symbol was his own design, being based on the sign of the supposed Mu civilization.[4][5] There is also a fifth, smaller symbol chosen by guest vocalist Sandy Denny representing her contribution to the track "The Battle of Evermore"; it appears in the credits list on the inner sleeve of the LP, serving as an asterisk and is shaped like three triangles touching at their points. During Led Zeppelin s tour of the United Kingdom in Winter 1971, which took place shortly following the release of the album, the band visually projected the four symbols on their stage equipment. Jimmy Page s "ZoSo" symbol was put onto one of his Marshall amplifiers, John Bonham s three interlinked circles adorned the outer face of his bass drum, John Paul Jones had his symbol stenciled onto material which was draped across his Fender Rhodes keyboard and Robert Plant s feather symbol was painted onto a side speaker PA cabinet. Only Page s and Bonham s symbols were retained for subsequent Led Zeppelin concert tours.[11] Releasing the album without an official title has made it difficult to consistently identify. While most commonly called Led Zeppelin IV, Atlantic Records catalogs have used the names Four Symbols and The Fourth Album. It has also been referred to as ZoSo (which Page s symbol appears to spell), Untitled and Runes.[5] Page frequently refers to the album in interviews as "the fourth album" and Led Zeppelin IV,[7][12][13] and Plant thinks of it as "the fourth album, that s it".[14] Album cover and inside sleeve

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Led Zeppelin IV outer gatefold album coverThe 19th century rustic oil painting on the front of the album was purchased from an antique shop in Reading, Berkshire by Robert Plant.[15][5][4] The painting was then juxtaposed and affixed to the internal, papered wall of the partly demolished suburban house for the photograph to be taken. The 20th century urban tower block on the back of the full gatefold album cover is Butterfield Court in Dudley, England. Page has explained that the cover of the fourth album was intended to bring out a city/country dichotomy that had initially surfaced on Led Zeppelin III: It represented the change in the balance which was going on. There was the old countryman and the blocks of flats being knocked down. It was just a way of saying that we should look after the earth, not rape and pillage it.[7] The album cover for IV was among the ten chosen by the Royal Mail for a set of "Classic Album Cover" postage stamps issued in January 2010.[16] "The Hermit" Back sleeve of the 2003 CD with the lyrics of "Stairway To Heaven"The inside illustration, entitled "The Hermit" and credited to Barrington Colby MOM, was influenced by the design of the card of the same name in the Rider-Waite tarot deck.[5] This character was later portrayed by Page himself in Led Zeppelin s concert film, The Song Remains the Same (1976). The inner painting is also referred to as View in Half or Varying Light and was sold at auction under that name in 1981.[17] Varied versions of the artwork within the album exist. Some versions depict a longhaired and bearded supplicant climbing at the base of the mountain, while some others do not show the six pointed star within the hermit s lantern. If the inside cover of the album is held vertically against a mirror, a man s face can be seen hidden in the rocks below the hermit. Speculation exists that the face is actually that of a black dog.[17] The typeface for the lyrics to "Stairway to Heaven", printed on the inside sleeve of the album, was Page s contribution. He found it in an old arts and crafts magazine called Studio Magazine which dated from the late 1800s. He thought the lettering was interesting and arranged for someone to work up a whole alphabet.[15]

The album was released on 8 November 1971. In the lead-up to its release, a series of teaser advertisements depicting each symbol was placed in the music press.[5] The album was a massive instant seller. It entered the UK chart at number one and stayed on the chart for 62 weeks.[5] In the United States it stayed on the charts longer than any other Led Zeppelin album and became the biggest selling album in the US not to top the charts (peaking at #2).[5] "Ultimately," writes Lewis, "the fourth Zeppelin album would be the most durable seller in their catalogue and the most impressive critical and commercial success of their career".[5] Accolades In 1998, Q magazine readers voted Led Zeppelin IV the 26th greatest album of all time; in 2000 Q placed it at #26 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. In 2003, the album was ranked number 66 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It is ranked at #7 on Pitchfork Media s Top 100 Albums of the 1970s. In 2006, the album was rated #1 on Classic Rock magazine s 100 Greatest British Albums poll; that same year it was voted #1 in Guitar World 100 Greatest Albums readers poll and was ranked #7 in ABC media s top ten albums. Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Mojo United Kingdom "The 100 Greatest Albums Ever Made" [26] 1996 24 Grammy Awards United States Grammy Hall of Fame Award [27] 1999*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guitar United States "Album of the Millenium" [28] 1999 2 Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest Rock Albums Ever" [29] 2001 1 Q United Kingdom "The Greatest Classic Rock Albums Ever" [30] 2004* Robert Dimery United States 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die [31] 2005* Q United Kingdom "100 Best Albums Ever" [32] 2006 21 Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest British Rock Album Ever" [33] 2006 1 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States "The Definitive 200: Top 200 Albums of All-Time" [34] 2007 4 (*) designates unordered lists. Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Black Dog" Page, Plant, Jones 4:57 2."Rock and Roll" Page, Plant, Jones, Bonham 3:40 3."The Battle of Evermore" Page, Plant 5:52 4."Stairway to Heaven" Page, Plant 8:02 Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Misty Mountain Hop" Page, Plant, Jones 4:38 2."Four Sticks" Page, Plant 4:46 3."Going to California" Page, Plant 3:31 4."When the Levee Breaks" Page, Plant, Jones, Bonham, Douglas 7:07 Sales chart performance Album Chart (1971–1972) Peak Position Japanese Albums Chart [35] 2 Norwegian Albums Chart [36] 3 UK Albums Chart [37] 1 US Billboard 200 [38] 2 German Albums Chart [39] 9 French Albums Chart [40] 2 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums Chart [41] 1 US Record World Top Pop Albums Chart [42] 1 Canadian RPM 100 Albums [43] 1 Spanish Albums Chart [44] 8 Australian Go-Set Top 20 Albums Chart [45] 2 Singles Year Single Chart Position 1971 "Black Dog" US Billboard Hot 100 [46] 15 1972 "Rock and Roll "US Billboard Hot 100 [47] 47 Sales certifications Album Country Sales Certification Argentina (CAPIF) 60,000 + Platinum [48] Brazil (ABDP) 50,000 + Gold [49] Canada (CRIA) 2,000,000 + 2 × Diamond [50] Switzerland (IFPI) 50,000 + Platinum [51] France (SNEP) 600,000 + 2 × Platinum [52] Spain (PROMUSICAE) 80,000 + Platinum [53] Germany (IFPI)300,000 + 3 x Gold [54] Australia (ARIA) 560,000 + 8 × Platinum [55] United States (RIAA) 23,000,000 + Diamond [56] Netherlands (NVPI) 60,000 + Platinum [57]* United Kingdom (BPI) 1,800,000 + 6 × Platinum [58]

Note: (*) Remastered sales only Personnel Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums John Paul Jones – synthesizer, bass guitar, keyboards, mandolin, recorders Jimmy Page – acoustic and electric guitar, mandolin, production, remastering, digital remastering Robert Plant – vocals, harmonica Additional musicians Sandy Denny – vocals on "The Battle of Evermore" Ian Stewart – piano on "Rock and Roll" (uncredited) Production Barrington Colby MOM – The Hermit illustration George Chkiantz – mixing Peter Grant – executive producer Graphreaks – design coordinator Andy Johns – engineering, mixing George Marino – remastered (1990 Compact Disc re-release) Joe Sidore – mastering (original Compact Disc release) See also List of best-selling albums worldwide List of best-selling albums in the United States

Black Dog (song) - Wikipedia

"Black Dog" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin IV B-side"Misty Mountain Hop" Released 8 November 1971 2 December 1971 (7 inch single release date) Format 7 inch 45 RPM Recorded December 1970–March 1971 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock Length 4:56 Label Atlantic Records Writer(s) Page/Plant/Jones Producer Jimmy Page

"Black Dog" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, which is featured as the lead-off track of their fourth album, released in 1971. It was also released as a single in the US and Australia with "Misty Mountain Hop" on the B-side, and reached #15 on Billboard and #11 in Australia. In 2004 the song was ranked #294 on Rolling Stone s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Music sociologist Deena Weinstein argues, "Black Dog" is "one of the most instantly recognisable [Led] Zeppelin tracks".[1] Contents

 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Inspiration and recording Live performances Accolades Formats and tracklistings Chart positions 5.1 Single (Digital download) Personnel Cover versions 7.1 Album versions 7.2 Samples Sources References

Inspiration and recording Led Zeppelin bass player John Paul Jones, who is credited with writing the main riff,[2][3] wanted to write a song that people could not "groove" or dance to with its winding riff and complex time signature changes. In an interview, Jones explained the difficulties experienced by the band in writing the song: I wanted to try an electric blues with a rolling bass part. But it couldn t be too simple. I wanted it to turn back on itself. I showed it to the guys, and we fell into it. We struggled with the turn-around, until [John] Bonham figured out that you just four-time as if there s no turn-around. That was the secret.[4] The song s title is a reference to a nameless black Labrador retriever that wandered around the Headley Grange studios during recording.[4][5] The dog has nothing to do with the song lyrics, which are about desperate desire for a woman s love and the happiness resulting thereby. Regarding the lyrics to the song, Plant later said, "Not all my stuff is meant to be scrutinized. Things like Black Dog are blatant, let s-do-it-in-the-bath type things, but they make their point just the same."[6] Plant s vocals were recorded in two takes.[7] Built around a call-and-response dynamic between vocalist and the band, the start and stop a cappella verses were inspired by Fleetwood Mac s 1969 song "Oh Well."[2] (Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and The Black Crowes would later perform "Oh Well" on their 1999 tour and included it on the album Live at the Greek.)[8] Despite the seeming simplicity of the drum pattern, the song features a complex, shifting time signature that the band has sometimes claimed was intended to thwart cover bands from playing the song.[citation needed] Jones originally wanted the song recorded in 3/16 time but realised it was too complex to reproduce live.[9] In live performances, Bonham eliminated the 5/4 variation so that Plant could perform his a cappella vocal interludes and then have the instruments return to together synchronised.[10] If the volume is turned up loud enough, Bonham can be heard tapping his sticks together before each riff. Page made reference to this in an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993: He did that to keep time and to signal the band. We tried to eliminate most of them, but muting was much more difficult in those days than it is now.[11] Page also discussed how he achieved his guitar sound on the track: We put my Les Paul through a direct box, and from there into a mic channel. We used the mic amp of the mixing board to get distortion. Then we ran it through two Urei 1176 Universal compressors in series. Then each line was triple-tracked. Curiously, I was listening to that track when we were reviewing the tapes and the guitars almost sound like an analog synthesizer.[11] Page s solo was constructed out of four overdubbed Gibson Les Paul fills.[2] The sounds at the beginning of the song are those of Page warming up his electric guitar. He called it "waking up the army of guitars" — which are multitrack recorded in unison with electric bass guitar to provide the song s signature. During the outro-solo Robert Plant can be heard moaning and wailing in the

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

background. [1] Around the 4-minute mark, he says, "Push me babe, push me babe." It was also during this part of the song that Robert Plant hits his highest note on any Led Zeppelin studio recording. He reaches it between the second and third repitition of the fade-out riff during the guitar solo (at the 3:49 mark in the song). Often known for hitting the high G during the band s early years, Plant seems to reach A5 here.[original research?] Live performances "Black Dog" became a staple and fan favourite of Led Zeppelin s live concert performances. It was first played live at Belfast s Ulster Hall on 5 March 1971, a concert which also featured the first ever live performance of "Stairway to Heaven".[2] It was retained for each subsequent concert tour until 1973. In 1975 it was used as an encore medley with "Whole Lotta Love", but was hardly used on the band s 1977 concert tour of the United States. It was recalled to the set for the Knebworth Festival 1979 and the 1980 Tour of Europe. For these final 1980 performances, Page introduced the song from stage.[2] When played live, Led Zeppelin often played the first few bars of "Out on the Tiles" as the introduction for "Black Dog", except for the 1973 tour where the riff from "Bring It On Home" introduced the song. Also, the "ah-ah" refrains were sung in call-and-response between Robert Plant and the audience. Page s guitar playing prowess is well demonstrated in different recorded performances of the song from Madison Square Garden in July 1973, as seen in the group s concert films The Song Remains the Same and Led Zeppelin DVD. There is also a June 1972 live recording of "Black Dog" which can be heard on the album How the West Was Won, and another live version on Disc 2 of Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions. "Black Dog" was performed at the Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. Plant sampled the song on his solo tracks "Tall Cool One" and "Your Ma Said She Cried In Her Sleep Last Night". Page and Plant performed an updated version of this song on their 1995 tour. "Black Dog" was the first song performed by Page and Plant at the American Music Awards, which kicked off their first tour together in almost 15 years. Robert Plant also played a version of the song during his solo tour in 2005, as is included on the DVD release Soundstage: Robert Plant and the Strange Sensation. Whitesnake overtly based "Still of the Night" on this song; later, when David Coverdale toured with Page in 1993, they played both songs together. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss regularly covered "Black Dog" during their tour of USA and Europe in April and May 2008.[12] It also features on their appearance on the Country Music Television show CMT Crossroads, recorded in October 2007. CMT Episode Guide Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Classic RockUnited States"The Top Fifty Classic Rock Songs of All Time" [13] 1995 18 The Guitar United States "Riff of the Millenium" [14]1999 7 Rolling Stone United States "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" [15] 2003 294 Q United Kingdom "1010 Songs You Must Own!" [16] 2004* Blender United States "The Greatest Songs Ever!" [17] 2005* Bruce Pollock United States "The 7,500 Most Important Songs of 1944-2000 "[18] 2005* Q United Kingdom "The 20 Greatest Guitar Tracks" [19] 2007 1 Digital Dream Door United States "The 100 Greatest Recordings From 1971" [20] 2007 20 Digital Dream Door United States "The 100 Greatest Rock Guitar Riffs" [21] 2007 32 (*) designates unordered lists. Formats and tracklistings 1971 7" single (US/Australia: Atlantic 45-2849, Angola/South Africa: Atlantic ATS 568, Argentina: Atlantic 2091175, Austria/Germany: Atlantic ATL 10103,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brazil: Atco 2091175, Canada: Atlantic AT 2849, Cape Verde: Atlantic ATL N 28-118, Ecuador: Atlantic 45-73502, France: Atlantic 10 103, Greece: Atlantic 2091 175, Holland: Atlantic ATL 2091 175, Italy: Atlantic K 10103, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-1101A, Mexico: Atlantic 2207-024, New Zealand: Atlantic ATL 88, Philippines: Atlantic ATR 0033, Portugal: Atlantic N 28118, Singapore: Stereophonic 10103, Spain: Atlantic HS 775, Sweden: Atlantic ATL 10.103, Turkey: Atlantic 72 500) A. "Black Dog" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 B. "Misty Mountain Hop" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:38 1971 7" radio edit (Japan: Warner Pioneer P-1001A) A. "Black Dog" [stereo] (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 B. "Black Dog" [mono] (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 1971 7" single (Poland: Atlantic X 87) A. "Black Dog" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 B. "When the Levee Breaks" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Minnie) 7:08 1971 7" single (Poland: Prasniewski N 677) A. "Black Dog" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 B. "Four Sticks" (Page, Plant) 4:44 1973 7" single (Venezuela: Atlantic 5-011) A. "Black Dog" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 B. "Rock and Roll" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:40 Chart positions Chart (1972) Peak position Japanese Singles Chart [22] 24 Dutch Singles Chart [23] 20 US Billboard Hot 100 Chart [24] 15 Canadian CHUM 30 Chart [25] 14 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [26] 9 US Record World 100 Top Pops [27] 10 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [28] 11 German Singles Chart [29] 22 Australian Go-Set Top 40 Singles Chart [30] 9 New Zealand Top 50 Singles Chart [31] 10 French Singles Chart [32] 23 Chart (1973)Peak position Swiss Singles Chart[33]6 Single (Digital download) Chart (2007) Peak position UK Singles Chart [34] 119 US Billboard Hot Digital Songs Chart [35] 66 Canadian Billboard Hot Digital Singles Chart [36] 59 Note: The official UK Singles Chart incorporated legal downloads as of 17 April 2005. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions Ronnie James Dio covered the song with his band Elf in early 70s. 1972: CCS (C.C.S. 2) 1975: Eumir Deodato (First Cuckoo) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1992: Foley (7 Years Ago... Directions in Smart-Alec Music) 1993: Paul Shaffer (The World s Most Dangerous Party) 1995: Hampton String Quartet (Sympathy for the Devil) 1997: John Farnham (Anthology 3: Rarities [recorded live 1996])

 

Samples 1988: Robert Plant ("Tall Cool One") 1990: Daddy Freddy ("Daddy Freddy s In Town") 2009: T.I. ("Make You Sweat") Tori Amos has performed part of this song live at several of her shows.

Rock and Roll (Led Zeppelin song) - Wikipedia

"Rock and Roll" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin IV B-side "Four Sticks" Released 8 November 1971 21 February 1972 (7" single release date) Format 7" 45 RPM Recorded December 1970–March 1971 Genre Hard rock, rock n roll, heavy metal Length 3:40 Label Atlantic Writer(s) Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham Producer Jimmy Page

 

1997: 1999: 1999: 1999: 2001: 2002: 2002: 2002: 2003: 2003: 2004: 2004: 2004: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2008: 2008: 2008: 2008: 2009:

John Lee Sanders (World Blue) Coalesce (There Is Nothing New Under the Sun EP) Jizzy Pearl (The Song Remains Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Johnny Favourite (Holiday Romance: Swing Collection) Out of Phase (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin IV) Tony Levin (Double Espresso) Masterplan (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Issa (The Electronic Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Heart (Alive in Seattle [recorded live 2002]) Tracy Bonham (Bee EP) Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded DVD) Tracy G (Deviating from the List) Tuba Guitarra & Bateria (TubaGuitarra&Bateria) Hayseed Dixie (A Hot Piece of Grass) Larry Coryell, Victor Bailey, & Lenny White (Electric) James Ryan (Led Zeppelin Salute: Get the Led Out!) Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Robert Plant & The Strange Sensation (Robert Plant & The Strange Sensation) Zepparella (Live at 19 Broadway [recorded 28 October 2005]) Franck Tortiller & Orchestre National de Jazz (Close to Heaven: A Led Zeppeli Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute) Spahn Ranch (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix]) Finn and the Sharks (Breakfast Special) The Boys from County Nashville (Long Ago and Far Away: The Celtic Tribute to Ted Kooshian (Ted Kooshian s Standard Orbit Quartet) Keith Emerson (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) Mads Tolling Trio (Speed of Light) Debbie Landry (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millennium Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Momentary Prophets (Quickening)

 

 

"Rock and Roll" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, which was first released as the second track from the band s fourth album in 1971. Contents 1 Overview 2 Live performances 3 Cultural influence 3.1 Accolades 4 Formats and tracklistings 5 Chart positions 6 Personnel 7 Cover versions 8 Live covers 9 Sources 10 References 11 External links Overview Befitting its title, the song is based on one of the most popular structures in rock and roll, the 12 bar blues progression (in A). "Rock and Roll" stands as one of the best-known songs in the band s catalogue. Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page has said that this song came to be written as a spontaneous jam session, whilst the band were trying (and failing) to finish the track "Four Sticks".[1] Drummer John Bonham played the introduction to "Good Golly Miss Molly"/"Keep a Knockin " and Page added a guitar riff.[2] The tapes were rolling and fifteen minutes later the basis of the song was down.[3] The song also included Ian Stewart on piano.[2] Said Page: It actually ground to a halt after about 12 bars, but it was enough to know that there was enough of a number there to keep working on it. Robert [Plant] even came in singing on it straight away.[4] "Rock and Roll" is one of the few Led Zeppelin songs where all four members share the composer credit. The lyrics by singer Robert Plant reference a number of 1950s and 1960s early rock hits, including "The Stroll," "The Book of Love," and "Walking In the Moonlight." Live performances "Rock and Roll" was a key component of the band s setlist at Led Zeppelin concerts from 1971 on. Initially, Plant referred it on stage as "It s Been A Long Time", which is the first line of the song.[2] In 1972 it was elevated to the opening number of all concert performances and it retained this status until 1975. For the band s 1977 concert tour of the United States, it became part of a medley encore with "Whole Lotta Love", and during 1979 and 1980 it became an encore in its own right.[2] When performing the song live, singer Robert Plant usually switched the second verse with the third. A live performance of the song from Madison Square Garden in July 1973 was recorded for the band s concert film The Song Remains the Same and accompanying soundtrack album. There is also a June 1972 live recording of "Rock and Roll" which has been captured on the album How the West Was Won. In 1985 Page, Plant and Jones reunited and performed the song at the Live Aid concert at JFK Stadium, Philadelphia, as part of the Led Zeppelin set featuring drummers Tony Thompson and Phil Collins. "Rock and Roll" was also performed as the final encore at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. On June 7, 2008, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones joined Foo Fighters front man Dave Grohl and drummer Taylor Hawkins on stage at Wembley stadium to perform "Rock and Roll," along with "Ramble On". Cultural influence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2002, General Motors used "Rock and Roll" in a series of television commercials for their Cadillac line of automobiles and ended the song and slogan "Break Through" in late 2006. In 2006, Bowl Games of America used "Rock and Roll" as the finale for the Gator Bowl halftime show. (The song was performed by 28 high school marching bands, with over 2,500 players.) Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Dave Marsh United States "The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made" [5] 1989 424 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States "The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll" [6] 1994* Radio Caroline United Kingdom "Top 500 Tracks" [7] 1999 21 VH1 United States "The 100 Greatest Rock Songs of All Time" [8] 2000 66 Q United Kingdom "The 50 Most Exciting Tunes Ever.." [9] 2002 17 Q United Kingdom "The 1001 Best Songs Ever" [10] 2003 201 Digital Dream Door United States "The 100 Greatest Recordings From 1971" [11] 2007 17 (*) designates unordered lists. Formats and tracklistings 1972 7" single (US/Australia/New Zealand: Atlantic 45-2865, Austria/Germany: Atlantic ATL 10156, Brazil: Atco ATCS 10.005, Canada: Atlantic AT 2865, France: Atlantic 10156, Holland: Atlantic ATL 2091190, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-1123A, Lebanon: Atlantic AT 16005, Mexico: Atlantic G-1136, Poland: Atlantic XN 82, Portugal: Atlantic ATL N 28128, Spain: Atlantic HS 823) A. "Rock and Roll" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:40 B. "Four Sticks" (Page, Plant) 4:44 1972 7" single (South Africa: Atlantic ATL 590) A. "Rock and Roll" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:40 B. "Going to California" (Page, Plant) 3:31 1972 7" EP (US: Atlantic LLP 171 SD 7-7208) A1. "Rock and Roll" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:40 A2. "Black Dog" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 B. "Stairway to Heaven" (Page, Plant) 8:02 Chart positions Chart (1972) Peak position US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [12] 47 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [13] 42 US Record World 100 Top Pops [14] 38 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [15] 38 Japanese Singles Chart [16] 34 German Singles Chart [17] 13 Spanish Singles Chart [18] 14 Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart 51 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Ian Stewart - piano Cover versions 1980: Heart (Greatest Hits Live) 1986: The Glitter Band (Live at the Marquee) 1988: Great White (Recovery: Live!) 1989: various artists (Stairway to Heaven/Highway to Hell) 1989: Tent Poles (The Song Retains the Name) 1994: Gotthard (Dial Hard) 1999: Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown (Whole Lotta Blues: Songs of Led Zeppelin) 1999: Mark Slaughter (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin: The Song Remains Remixed)

 

Live covers Axl Rose and Tracii Guns once performed the song live with Shark Island at Gazzari s nightclub.[19]

The Battle of Evermore - Wikipedia

"The Battle of Evermore" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin IV Released 8 November 1971 Recorded December 1970 – March 1971 Genre Folk rock, Celtic rock Length 5:52 Label Atlantic Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"The Battle of Evermore" is a folk rock song by the English rock band Led

 

2000: 2000: 2001: 2001: 2001: 2002: 2002: 2002: 2002: 2003: 2004: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2008: 2008: 2008: 2008: 2008:

Dread Zeppelin (De-jah Voodoo) Solus (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Rasputina (The Lost & Found) Double Trouble with Susan Tedeschi and Kenny Wayne Shepherd (Been a Long Time Out of Phase (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin IV) Elegy (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Peter Pan Speedrock (Speedrock Chartbusters Vol.1) Cactus Jack (DisCover) Galactic Achievement Society (The Electronic Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Sheryl Crow (C mon America 2003 DVD) Van Halen (Live Without a Net [recorded live 27 August 1986]) Roger Daltrey (Moonlighting) Chris Norman (One Acoustic Evening) Susan Tedeschi (The Best of Susan Tedeschi: Episode One) Iron Horse (Whole Lotta Bluegrass: A Bluegrass Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Vanessa Boyd (Unkept Woman) Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Jerry Lee Lewis with Jimmy Page (Last Man Standing) Soul Doctor (For a Fistful of Dollars [bonus tracks edition]) Zepparella (Live at 19 Broadway [recorded 28 October 2005]) Studio 99 (A Led Zeppelin Tribute) The Rockies (The Music of Led Zeppelin) Stevie Nicks (Crystal Visions - The Very Best of Stevie Nicks [recorded live Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) KMFDM (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix]) Lez Zeppelin (Lez Zeppelin) The Boys from County Nashville (The Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago Molly Shea (Voodoo Woman) Foo Fighters with Jimmy Page & John Paul Jones (Foo Fighters Live at Wembley Alvin and the Chipmunks (Undeniable) Steve Lukather (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) Albert Cummings (Feel So Good) Edinho Santa Cruz (Na Estrada do Rock: In Concert)

 

Zeppelin, featured on their untitled fourth album (a.k.a. "Led Zeppelin IV"), released in 1971. The song is well-known for its acoustic guitar and mandolin playing. Contents 1 Overview 1.1 Accolades 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Live versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Overview The tune for this was written by guitarist Jimmy Page at Headley Grange while he was experimenting on the mandolin owned by bassist John Paul Jones.[1][2] As Page explained in 1977: "Battle of Evermore" was made up on the spot by Robert [Plant] and myself. I just picked up John Paul Jones s mandolin, never having played a mandolin before, and just wrote up the chords and the whole thing in one sitting.[3] Vocalist Robert Plant had recently been reading about Scottish folklore and this inspired him to compose the lyrics to this song.[1] The song, as many others by the group, makes references to The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. Plant felt he needed another voice to tell the story and for the recording of this song folk singer Sandy Denny was invited to duet with Plant. Denny was a former member of British folk group Fairport Convention, with whom Led Zeppelin had shared a bill in 1970 at the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music. Plant played the role of the narrator and Denny represented the town crier. Page elaborated: [The song] sounded like an old English instrumental first off. Then it became a vocal and Robert did his bit. Finally we figured we d bring Sandy by and do a question-and-answer-type thing.[3] To thank her for her involvement, Denny was given the symbol on the album sleeve of three pyramids (the four members of Led Zeppelin each designed their own symbols for the album). This is the only song Led Zeppelin ever recorded with a guest vocalist. In an interview he gave in 1995 to Uncut magazine, Plant stated: [F]or me to sing with Sandy Denny was great. We were always good friends with that period of Fairport Convention. Richard Thompson is a superlative guitarist. Sandy and I were friends and it was the most obvious thing to ask her to sing on "The Battle of Evermore". If it suffered from naivete and tweeness - I was only 23 - it makes up for it in the cohesion of the voices and the playing.[4] "The Battle of Evermore" was played live at Led Zeppelin concerts during the band s 1977 concert tour of the United States. For these live performances, Jones sang Denny s vocals with Plant and played acoustic guitar whilst Page played mandolin. Sometimes drummer John Bonham sang Denny s vocals instead of Jones. Page and Plant also recorded a version of the song in 1994, released on their album No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded. Singer Najma Akhtar sang Sandy Denny s vocal part. Fairport Convention performed "The Battle of Evermore" with guest vocalists Robert Plant and Kristina Donahue at Fairport s Cropredy Convention on 9 August 2008. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss regularly covered "The Battle Of Evermore" on their tour of USA and Europe in Spring and Summer 2008. Alison Krauss and Robert Plant perform "The Battle of Evermore" at Denver s Red Rocks, 21 June 2008.[5] Accolades

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Blender United States "The 1001 Greatest Songs to Download Right Now!" [6] 2003* QUnited Kingdom "150 Greatest Rock Lists Ever" [7] 2004 4 (10) Q United Kingdom "1010 Songs You Must Own!" [8] 2004*

(*) designates unordered lists. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - mandolin John Paul Jones - acoustic guitar John Bonham - tambourine Sandy Denny - vocals Cover versions Album versions 1992: The Lovemongers (Battle of Evermore EP) 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1995: Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin) 1996: Ann Wilson & Nancy Wilson (Women: Live from Mountain Stage) 1997: Jaz Coleman and the London Philharmonic Orchestra (Kashmir: Symphonic Led Zep 1998: Kyle and Vee (Before the Balloon Went Up) 2000: Kenny Blackwell (Pickin on Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2001: Out of Phase (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin IV) 2002: Terra Gold & Leslie King (Livin, Lovin, Played: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2003: Heart (Alive in Seattle) 2003: Stonecircle (In Concert) 2004: Hampton String Quartet (HSQ Rides Again) 2004: Benjamin Levine (Chamber Maid: The Baroque Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: The Fellowship (In Elven Lands) [NOT Jon Anderson!] 2005: The Barbary Coast Guitar Duo (Suites for 2 Guitars) 2005: Steve Bingham (Get the Led Out! Led Zeppelin Salute) 2005: Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Dawn Humphrey (Enjoy the Dance) 2006: Kiva (Out of the Corner of the Eye) 2007: Smooth Citizen (Shadows of the Fading Light) 2007: The Boys from County Nashville (Long Ago and Far Away: The Celtic Tribute to 2008: Jay and Abby Michaels (For a Moment: The Harper and the Minstrel) 2008: Tom Kofler & Darryl St John (Visiting Zeppelin) Live versions 2007-2008: Deborah Bonham 2008: Robert Plant & Alison Krauss

Stairway to Heaven - Wikipedia

"Stairway to Heaven" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin IV Released 8 November 1971 Recorded December 1970 – March 1971

 

Genre Rock, Folk rock, Hard rock Length 8:02 Label Atlantic Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Stairway to Heaven" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was composed by guitarist Jimmy Page and vocalist Robert Plant for the band s fourth unnamed studio album, (see Led Zeppelin IV (1971)). The song was voted #3 in 2000 by VH1 on their list of the 100 Greatest Rock Songs.[1] It was the most requested song on FM radio stations in the United States in the 1970s, despite never having been released as a single there.[2] In November 2007, through download sales promoting Led Zeppelin s Mothership release, "Stairway to Heaven" hit #37 on the UK Singles Chart.[3] Contents 1 Song construction and release 2 Music 3 Live performances 4 Success and influence 5 Other versions 6 Taurus 7 Allegation of backward masking 8 Accolades 9 Formats and tracklistings 10 Chart positions 10.1 Single (Digital download) 11 References 12 Sources 13 External links Song construction and release The recording of "Stairway to Heaven" started in December 1970 at Island Records new Basing Street Studios in London.[4] The song was completed by the addition of lyrics by Plant during the sessions for Led Zeppelin IV at Headley Grange, Hampshire, in 1971.[5] Page then returned to Island Studios to record his guitar solo.[2] The song originated in 1970 when Jimmy Page and Robert Plant were spending time at Bron-Yr-Aur, a remote cottage in Wales, following Led Zeppelin s fifth American concert tour. According to Page, the instrumentals were written by him "over a long period, the first part coming at Bron-Yr-Aur one night".[6] Page always kept a cassette recorder around, and the idea for "Stairway" came together from bits of taped music.[7] Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones explained that, following the song s genesis at Bron-Yr-Aur, it was presented to him: [Page and Plant would] come back from the Welsh mountains with the guitar intro and verse. I literally heard it in front of a roaring fire in a country manor house! I picked up a bass recorder and played a run-down riff which gave us an intro, then I moved into a piano for the next section, dubbing on the guitars.[8] In an interview he gave in 1977, Page elaborated: I do have the original tape that was running at the time we ran down "Stairway To Heaven" completely with the band. I d worked it all out already the night before with John Paul Jones, written down the changes and things. All this time we were all living in a house and keeping pretty regular hours together, so the next day we started running it down. There was only one place where

   

 

 

 

 

there was a slight rerun. For some unknown reason Bonzo couldn t get the timing right on the twelve-string part before the solo. Other than that it flowed very quickly.[4] The song s opening guitar arpeggios are strikingly similar to the guitar line from the instrumental track "Taurus" by the American band Spirit, for whom Led Zeppelin toured as support act in 1968.[6][9] The first attempts at lyrics, written by Led Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant next to an evening log fire at Headley Grange, were partly spontaneously improvised and Page claimed, "a huge percentage of the lyrics were written there and then".[7] Jimmy Page was strumming the chords and Robert Plant had a pencil and paper. Plant later said that suddenly, "My hand was writing out the words, There s a lady is sure [sic], all that glitters is gold, and she s buying a stairway to heaven . I just sat there and looked at them and almost leapt out of my seat." Plant s own explanation of the lyrics was that it "was some cynical aside about a woman getting everything she wanted all the time without giving back any thought or consideration. The first line begins with that cynical sweep of the hand ... and it softened up after that."[10] The lyrics of the song reflected Plant s current reading. The singer had been poring through the works of the British antiquarian Lewis Spence, and later cited Spence s Magic Arts in Celtic Britain as one of the sources for the lyrics to the song.[5] In November 1970, Page dropped a hint of the new song s existence to a music journalist in London: It s an idea for a really long track.... You know how "Dazed and Confused" and songs like that were broken into sections? Well, we want to try something new with the organ and acoustic guitar building up and building up, and then the electric part starts.... It might be a fifteen-minute track.[5] The complete studio recording was released on Led Zeppelin IV in November 1971. The band s record label, Atlantic Records was keen to issue this track as a single, but the band s manager Peter Grant refused requests to do so in both 1972 and 1973. The upshot of that decision was that record buyers began to invest in the fourth album as if it were a single.[2] In the US, Atlantic issued "Stairway to Heaven" as a 7" promotional single in 1972. Music The song consists of several distinct sections, beginning with a quiet introduction on a finger picked 6 string guitar and three recorders[11] (ending at 2:15) and gradually moving into a slow electric middle section (2:16-5:33), before the faster hard rock final section (5:34 to the end). Page stated that the song "speeds up like an adrenaline flow".[12] Written in the key of A minor, the song opens with an arpeggiated, finger-picked guitar chord progression with a chromatic descending bassline A-G#-G-F#-F. John Paul Jones contributed overdubbed wooden bass recorders in the opening section (he used a Mellotron and, later, a Yamaha CP70B Grand Piano and Yamaha GX1 to synthesize this arrangement in live performances)[10] and a Hohner Electra-Piano electric piano in the middle section. The sections build with more guitar layers, each complementary to the intro, with the drums and bass entering at 4:18. During the interlude before the start of the guitar solo, the time signature switches between common time and several other time signatures: 3/4, 5/4 and finally 7/8. The extended Jimmy Page guitar solo in the song s final section was played for the recording on a 1958 Fender Telecaster (an instrument he used extensively with the Yardbirds)[10] plugged into a Supro amplifier,[13] although in an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine, Page also claimed, "It could have been a Marshall, but I can t remember".[7] Three different improvised solos were recorded, with Page agonizing about deciding which to keep. Page later revealed, "I did have the first phrase worked out, and then there was the link phrase. I did check them out before hand before the tape ran." The other guitar parts were played using a Harmony Sovereign H1260 acoustic guitar and Fender Electric XII (12-string); these can be heard on the left and right recording channels respectively. For

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

live versions, Page switched to a Heritage Cherry Gibson EDS-1275 6/12 Doubleneck guitar. The final progression is a i-VII-VI (natural minor) progression (Am-G-F), a mainstay of rock music. Sound engineer Andy Johns recalls the circumstances surrounding the recording of Page s famous solo: I remember Jimmy had a little bit of trouble with the solo on "Stairway to Heaven"... [H]e hadn t completely figured it out. Nowadays you sometimes spend a whole day doing one thing. Back then, we never did that. We never spent a very long time recording anything. I remember sitting in the control room with Jimmy, he s standing there next to me and he d done quite a few passes and it wasn t going anywhere. I could see he was getting a bit paranoid and so I was getting paranoid. I turned around and said "You re making me paranoid!" And he said, "No, you re making me paranoid!" It was a silly circle of paranoia. Then bang! On the next take or two he ripped it out.[14] According to Page, "Stairway to Heaven" ...crystallized the essence of the band. It had everything there and showed the band at its best... as a band, as a unit. Not talking about solos or anything, it had everything there. We were careful never to release it as a single. It was a milestone for us. Every musician wants to do something of lasting quality, something which will hold up for a long time and I guess we did it with "Stairway".[15] [Pete] Townshend probably thought that he got it with Tommy. I don t know whether I have the ability to come up with more. I have to do a lot of hard work before I can get anywhere near those stages of consistent, total brilliance.[16] Live performances The inaugural public performance of the song took place at Belfast s Ulster Hall on 5 March 1971.[10] Bassist John Paul Jones recalls that the crowd was unimpressed: "They were all bored to tears waiting to hear something they knew".[12] However, Page stated about an early performance at the LA Forum, before the record had even come out,[17] that: I m not saying the whole audience gave us a standing ovation - but there was this sizable standing ovation there. And I thought, This is incredible because no one s heard this number yet. This is the first time hearing it! It obviously touched them, so I knew there was something with that one.[18] The world radio premiere of "Stairway to Heaven" was recorded at the Paris Cinema on 1 April, 1971, in front of a live studio audience, and broadcast three days later on the BBC. [17] "Stairway to Heaven" was performed at almost every subsequent Led Zeppelin concert, only being omitted on rare occasions when shows were cut short for curfews or technical issues. The band s final performance of the song was in Berlin on 7 July 1980, which was also their last concert for 27 years; the version was also one of the longest, lasting almost fifteen minutes. When playing the song live, the band would often extend it to over ten minutes in length, with Page playing an extended guitar solo and Plant adding a number of lyrical ad-libs, such as "Does anybody remember laughter?", "wait a minute!" and "I hope so". For performing this song live, Page used a Gibson EDS-1275 double neck guitar so he would not have to pause when switching from a six to a twelve string guitar. By 1975, the song had a regular place as the finale of every Led Zeppelin concert. However, after their concert tour of the United States in 1977, Plant began to tire of "Stairway to Heaven": "There s only so many times you can sing it and mean it ... It just became sanctimonious."[19] The song was played again by the surviving members of Led Zeppelin at the Live Aid concert in 1985;[10] at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert in 1988, with Jason Bonham on drums;[20] and by Jimmy Page as an instrumental version on his solo tours. By the late 1980s, Plant made his negative impression of the song clear in interviews. In 1988, he stated: I d break out in hives if I had to sing ("Stairway to Heaven") in every show. I wrote those lyrics and found that song to be of some importance and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

consequence in 1971, but 17 years later, I don t know. It s just not for me. I sang it at the Atlantic Records show because I m an old softie and it was my way of saying thank you to Atlantic because I ve been with them for 20 years. But no more of "Stairway to Heaven" for me.[21] However, by the mid-1990s Plant s views had apparently softened. The first few bars were played alone during Page and Plant tours in lieu of the final notes of "Babe I m Gonna Leave You", and in November 1994 Page and Plant performed an acoustic version of the song at a Tokyo news station for Japanese television. "Stairway to Heaven" was also performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. Plant cites the most unusual performance of the song ever as being that performed at Live Aid: "...with two drummers while Duran Duran cried at the side of the stage - there was something quite surreal about that."[10] Footage of the song being played live is preserved on the band s concert film The Song Remains the Same, featuring a performance from Madison Square Garden in 1973, and on the Led Zeppelin DVD, featuring a performance from Earls Court Arena in 1975. Official audio versions are also available on The Song Remains the Same s accompanying soundtrack, on Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions (a performance from London s Paris Theatre in 1971) and on How the West Was Won (a performance from the Long Beach Arena in 1972). There are also hundreds of audio versions which can be found on unofficial Led Zeppelin bootleg recordings. Success and influence According to music journalist Stephen Davis, although the song was released in 1971, it took until 1973 before the song s popularity ascended to truly "anthemic" status.[22] "Stairway to Heaven" continues to top radio lists of the greatest rock songs, as well as topping a recent Guitar World poll.[23] On the 20th anniversary of the original release of the song, it was announced via U.S. radio sources that the song had logged up an estimated 2,874,000 radio plays - back to back, that would run for 44 years solid.[2] As of 2000, the song had been broadcast on radio over three million times.[24] In 1990 a St Petersburg, Florida station kicked off its all-Led Zeppelin format by playing "Stairway to Heaven" for 24 hours straight.[25] It is also the biggest-selling single piece of sheet music clocking up an average of 15,000 copies yearly.[10] In total, over one million copies have been sold.[24] The song s length precluded its release in full form as a single. Despite pressure from Atlantic Records the band would not authorize the editing of the song for single release, making "Stairway to Heaven" one of the most well-known and popular rock songs never to have been released as a single. It did, however, appear as a promotional disc in the United States, pressed as a 7:55 track on each side; on an Australian acoustic EP, and in the 1990s as a 20th anniversary promo book. The group s recording of this song also appeared as the sole Led Zeppelin track in the 1977 Atlantic Records 2-LP promotional sampler album, We ve Got Your Music, marking the very first time that Led Zeppelin s "Stairway To Heaven" made its official debut appearance in an American-released various artists compilation collection. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine put it at number 31 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. An article from the 29 January 2009 Guitar World magazine rated Jimmy Page s guitar solo at number one in the publication s 100 Greatest Guitar Solos in Rock and Roll History.[26] Other versions The song has been covered a number of times. Rolf Harris s didgeridoo-and-wobble board interpretation reached number seven in the UK charts in 1993.[27] Rolf Harris s version was one of 25 different versions of the song that were performed live by guest stars on the early 1990s Australian chat show The Money or the Gun - each being a unique version of the song in the usually idiosyncratic style of performance of each guest star. Dolly Parton released a stripped down acoustic cover of the song in 2002; Plant spoke highly of Parton s version, noting that he was pleasantly surprised with how her version turned

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

out. [28] In 1977, Little Roger and the Goosebumps recorded a parody of the song in which the words to the theme song of the television show Gilligan s Island were sung in place of the original lyrics. Within five weeks, Led Zeppelin s lawyers threatened to sue them and demanded that any remaining copies of the recording be destroyed. However, during a 2005 interview on National Public Radio, Plant referred to the tune as his favorite cover of "Stairway to Heaven."[29] The sketch comedy series SCTV had an elaborate spoof of the song with its spoof album Stairways to Heaven. In the mock album, advertised in the style of K-tel, various snippets of cover versions are featured, supposedly from artists ranging from Slim Whitman to the faux-50s group "The Five Neat Guys," as well as the original version (albeit advertised to be a sound-alike). This sketch, due to rights issues, was not released on the DVDs for the show. The London Symphony Orchestra recorded a verison Stairway to Heaven as part of their Classic Rock series in 1980, the venue being EMI Studio One, Abbey Road, London. It has also been arranged and recorded by the Hampton String Quartet on their early album, "What if Mozart Wrote Born to be Wild ." A version by Far Corporation was released in 1985 and reached number 8 in the UK singles chart.[30] Australian physicist and composer Joe Wolfe composed a set of variations on "Stairway to Heaven." This work, The Stairway Suite, is composed for orchestra, big band, chorus, and SATB. Each variation is in the style of a famous composer: Franz Schubert, Gustav Holst, Glenn Miller, Gustav Mahler, Georges Bizet, and Ludwig van Beethoven. For example, the Schubert inspired variation is based on the Unfinished Symphony, and the Beethoven inspired variation includes vocal soloists and chorus and resembles Beethoven s Ninth Symphony.[31] Wolfe posted the full score of this piece on the Internet..[32] The blog for radio station WFMU contains a page with links to over 100 cover versions of "Stairway to Heaven." The page contains mp3 files for each version.[33] In 2007, Rodrigo y Gabriela covered this song in the album Rhythms del Mundo Classics by the Buena Vista Social Club. Taurus Spirit - "Taurus"

It has been suggested that the song s introduction bears a close resemblance to the 1968 instrumental "Taurus" by the group Spirit.[6][34] In the liner notes to the 1996 reissue of Spirit s debut album, songwriter Randy California writes: People always ask me why "Stairway to Heaven" sounds exactly like "Taurus", which was released two years earlier. I know Led Zeppelin also played "Fresh Garbage" in their live set. They opened up for us on their first American tour.[35][36][37]

backward masking In the early 1980s, some Christian evangelists in the US alleged that hidden messages were contained in many popular rock songs through a technique called backward masking. One example of such hidden messages that was often prominently cited was in "Stairway to Heaven." The alleged message, which occurs during the middle section of the song ("If there s a bustle in your hedgerow, don t be alarmed now...") when played backwards, was purported to contain the Satanic references "Here s to my sweet Satan" and "I sing because I live with Satan".[38] In 1982, the Consumer Protection and Toxic Materials Committee of the California State Assembly held a hearing on backward masking in popular music, during which "Stairway to Heaven" was played backwards. During the hearing, William Yarroll,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a self-described "neuroscientific researcher", claimed that backward messages could be deciphered by the human brain.[39] Various versions of the alleged message exist.[40] One such interpretation reads: Oh here s to my sweet Satan. The one whose little path would make me sad, whose power is Satan. He will give those with him 666. There was a little tool shed where he made us suffer, sad Satan.[41] The band itself has for the most part ignored such claims; in response to the allegations, Swan Song Records issued the statement: "Our turntables only play in one direction—forwards". Led Zeppelin audio engineer Eddie Kramer called the allegations "totally and utterly ridiculous. Why would they want to spend so much studio time doing something so dumb?"[42] Robert Plant expressed frustration with the accusations in a 1983 interview in Musician magazine: "To me it s very sad, because Stairway to Heaven was written with every best intention, and as far as reversing tapes and putting messages on the end, that s not my idea of making music."[43] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States "The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll " [44] 1994* Classic Rock United Kingdom "Ten of the Best Songs Ever!" [45] 1999 1 VH1 United States "The 100 Greatest Rock Songs of All Time" [46] 2000 3 RIAA United States "Songs of the Century" [47] 2001 53 Grammy Awards United States "Grammy Hall of Fame Award" [48] 2003* Rolling Stone United States "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" [49] 2003 31 Q United Kingdom "100 Songs That Changed the World" [50] 2003 47 Toby Creswell Australia "1001 Songs: the Great Songs of All Time" [51] 2005* Q United Kingdom "100 Greatest Songs of All Time" [52] 2006 8 Rolling Stone United States "100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time" [53] 2008 8 Triple J Australia "Hottest 100 of All Time" 2009 10 Guitar World United States "100 Greatest Guitar Solos" [54] 2006 1 (*) designates unordered lists. Formats and tracklistings 1972 7" single (Philippines: Atlantic 45-3747) A. "Stairway to Heaven" [part 1] (Page, Plant) 4:01 B. "Stairway to Heaven" [part 2] (Page, Plant) 4:01 1972 7" promo (US: Atlantic PR 175 [picture sleeve]) A. "Stairway to Heaven" [stereo] (Page, Plant) 8:02 B. "Stairway to Heaven" [mono] (Page, Plant) 8:02 1972 7" promo (US: Atlantic PR-269) A. "Stairway to Heaven" [stereo] (Page, Plant) 7:55 B. "Stairway to Heaven" [mono] (Page, Plant) 7:55 1972 7" promo (South Africa: Atlantic Teal) A. "Stairway to Heaven" (Page, Plant) 8:02 B. "Going to California" (Page, Plant) 3:31 1978 12" single (Brazil: WEA 6WP.2003) A. "Stairway to Heaven" [stereo] (Page, Plant) 8:02 B. "Stairway to Heaven" [mono] (Page, Plant) 8:02 1990 7" promo (UK: Atlantic LZ3) A. "Stairway to Heaven" (Page, Plant) 8:02 B. "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Dixon) 1991 20th Anniversary promo (US: Atlantic PRCD 4424-2, Japan: Warner Pioneer PRCD 4424-2) CD single, 7" single Chart positions Single (Digital download) Chart (2007) Peak position New Zealand RIANZ Singles Chart [55] 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norwegian Singles Chart [56] 5 Irish Singles Chart [57] 24 UK Singles Chart [58] 37 US Billboard Hot Digital Songs Chart [59] 30 US Billboard Hot Singles Recurrents Chart [60] 16 Canadian Billboard Hot Digital Singles Chart [61] 17 EU Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [62] 79 Swiss Singles Chart [63] 17 Portuguese Singles Chart [64] 8 Italian Singles Chart [65] 60 Chart (2008) Peak position Swedish Singles Chart [66] 57 German Singles Chart [67] 71 Note: The official UK Singles Chart incorporated legal downloads as of 17 April 2005.

Misty Mountain Hop - Wikipedia

"Misty Mountain Hop" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin IV A-side "Black Dog" Released 8 November 1971 2 December 1971 (7" single release date) Format 7" 45 RPM Recorded December 1970–March 1971 Genre Hard rock, blues-rock Length 4:38 Label Atlantic Writer(s) Page/Plant/Jones Producer Jimmy Page

"Misty Mountain Hop" is a song from English rock band Led Zeppelin s untitled fourth album, released in 1971. In the United States and Australia it was the B-side of the "Black Dog" single, but still received considerable FM radio airplay. It was recorded at Headley Grange, a mansion with a recording studio in Hampshire, England, where the band sometimes lived.[1] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Overview Overview Live performances Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

 

Musically the song is a medium tempo rocker which begins with bassist John Paul Jones playing the electric piano. It is notable for the presence of layered guitar and keyboard parts, making it solidly melodic, and is driven by one of drummer John Bonham s most powerful recorded performances in the studio. The song features a memorable riff, on which Page and Jones harmonize using keyboard and guitar. This repeating riff, heard on the bass guitar, is based on the notes A G E and sounds like a funk rock bassline. At 2:11, in the second half of the second verse, the band erroneously falls out of sync with one another. However, the musicians felt that the rest of the take was too good to discard it. The most common interpretation of the song s lyrics is that they point to an encounter with the police after smoking marijuana in the park, and leaving to go to the Misty Mountains ("where the spirits fly")[citation needed], which seems to be a reference to J. R. R. Tolkien s The Hobbit. References to the work of Tolkien also exist in other Led Zeppelin songs, such as "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp," "The Battle of Evermore," and "Ramble On". The group s recording of this song also appeared as the sole Led Zeppelin track in the 1997 Time-Life 6-CD boxed set, Gold And Platinum: The Ultimate Rock Collection, marking one of the rare times that a Led Zeppelin recording has been released in a commercially-issued various artists compilation. Live performances "Misty Mountain Hop" was regularly played live at Led Zeppelin concerts from late 1972 through 1973, often linking directly into "Since I ve Been Loving You" (as can be seen on the Led Zeppelin DVD). It was also played at the band s two performances at Knebworth in 1979. For the second of the two performances, Jimmy used a 1977 Gibson RD Artist, due to a broken string on his main Les Paul. The surviving members of the band additionally performed the song at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert in 1988 with Jason Bonham filling in on drums for his late father, and again with Jason at Robert Plant s daughter s 21st birthday party the following year. "Misty Mountain Hop" was also performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. Robert Plant performed a version of the song on his solo tours. Jimmy Page performed the song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. Although not included on their original album Live at the Greek, a version of "Misty Mountain Hop" can be found as a bonus track on the Japanese version of the album released in 2000. Formats and tracklistings See "Black Dog" single. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, electric piano John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1991: Dread Zeppelin (5,000,000) 1993: 7 Seconds (The Song Retains the Name II) 1994: Cinnamon (Cinnamon II) 1995: 4 Non Blondes (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1995: Alon Nadel & Friends (Jazzeppelin) 1998: Sansi Janiba s Infectious Groove (A Tribute to John Bonham) 1999: Taime Downe (The Song Remains Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Sigue Sigue 1999: Makoto Ihara (Super Rock Summit) 1999: Pondlife ("Misty Mountain Hop" CD single) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek [bonus tracks edition]) 2000: Kokoo (Super-Nova) 2001: Out of Phase (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin IV) 2001: Never Never (Never Never Tribute II) 2003: various artists (Pickin on Led Zeppelin, Volume II: A Bluegrass Tribute) 2004: Bruce Lash (Prozak for Lovers II) 2004: 2 Many DJs (As Heard on Radio Soulwax Pt. 8 [remix]) 2005: The Rockies (The Hits Re-loaded: The Music of Led Zeppelin)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2005: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2008:

Cee (Hip-Hop tribute to Led Zeppelin) Glenn Hughes (Music for the Divine [bonus tracks edition]) Dream Theater (Two Nights In North America [limited release]) Greg Reeves & Eric Stock (Dub Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Heart (Dreamboat Annie Live) Zepparella (A Pleasing Pounding) Letz Zep (Letz Zep II: Live in London) Harry Slash & The Slashtones (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millennium Tribute to Led

Four Sticks - Wikipedia,

"Four Sticks" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin IV A-side "Rock and Roll" Released 8 November 1971 21 February 1972 (7" single release date) Format 7" 45 RPM Recorded December 1970 – March 1971 Genre Hard rock Length 4:44 Label Atlantic Records Writer(s) Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Four Sticks" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin from their fourth album, released in 1971. The title came from the fact that drummer John Bonham played with two sets of two drumsticks, totalling four.[1] His decision to play the song with four sticks was a result of him being very frustrated with not being able to get the track down right during recording sessions at Island Studios. After he grabbed the second pair of sticks and beat the drums as hard as he could, he recorded the perfect take and that was the one they kept. This song was particularly difficult to record, and required more takes than usual.[1] John Paul Jones played a VCS3 synthesizer on the track.[1] Guitarist Jimmy Page once said of the song: "It was supposed to be abstract." The abstract effect is further achieved by the unusual time signature of the song, featuring riffs in a mixture of 5/8 and 6/8 time signatures. After another failed take during the recording, Jimmy began to play an improvised guitar riff out of frustration. That riff was later on developed into the second track of the album, "Rock and Roll". The song was re-recorded by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant with the Bombay Symphony Orchestra in 1972, during their trip to India, along with another track, "Friends" from Led Zeppelin III.[2] This version featured tabla drums and sitars. The recordings have never been released officially and are only available on Led Zeppelin bootleg recordings. The project is said to have run into problems because the orchestra didn t keep time in the Western style and some of them drank rather a lot.[3] The band is only known to have played this song live once, at Copenhagen on

 

their 1971 European tour, as has been preserved on some bootleg recordings.[1] Also in 1994, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page had rejoined in musical collaboration as Page and Plant. On 25 August and 26, live performances were taped in London, Wales, and Morocco with Egyptian and Moroccan orchestration of several Led Zeppelin tunes - "Four Sticks" was one of them, and the arrangement features drummer Michael Lee playing with four sticks as well as multiple percussionists such as Hossam Ramzy. This new version of "Four Sticks" was also included on the album No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded, and live performances were so successful commercially and artistically that the ensemble coordinated a 1995/1996 world tour. Robert Plant played a version of the song during his solo tour in 2005, as is included on the DVD release Soundstage: Robert Plant and the Strange Sensation, although drummer Clive Deamer only plays with two sticks. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Formats and tracklistings See "Rock and Roll" single. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, VCS3 synthesizer John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1987: Bongwater (Breaking No New Ground! EP) 1989: The Earwigs (The Song Retains the Name) 1992: Unsane (Singles 89-92) 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1995: Rollins Band (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2001: Out of Phase (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin IV) 2002: Reptile Palace Orchestra (Official Bootleg 2002) 2004: Jezz Woodroffe (In Through the Swing Door: Swing Cover Versions of Led Zeppel 2005: Howard Hart (Get the Led Out! Led Zeppelin Salute) 2006: Robert Plant & The Strange Sensation (Soundstage: Robert Plant and the Strang 2006: Franck Tortiller & Orchestre National de Jazz (Close to Heaven: A Led Zeppeli 2007: Sones de México Ensemble Chicago (Esta tierra es tuya (This Land Is Your Land 2007: MIDIval Punditz (Backspin: A Six Degrees 10 Year Anniversary Project) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: The Nowtet (The Nowtet Plays Zep!) 2007: Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Led R (Led the R Out: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2008: Alec Haavik Friction Five (Ye Shanghai!) 2009: Hampton String Quartet (The Hampton Rock String Quartet: All Zeppelin)

Going to California - Wikipedia

"Going to California" Song by Led Zeppelin

from the album Led Zeppelin IV Released 8 November 1971 Recorded December 1970 – March 1971 Genre Folk rock Length 3:31 Label Atlantic Records Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page "Going to California" is the penultimate song performed by the English rock band Led Zeppelin on their fourth album, released in 1971. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Overview Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Overview The song s wistful folk-style sound, with Robert Plant on lead vocals, acoustic guitar by Jimmy Page and mandolin by John Paul Jones, contrasts with the heavy electric-amplified rock on four of the album s other tracks. The song is reportedly about Canadian singer/songwriter Joni Mitchell, with whom Plant and Page were both infatuated. In live performances of the song, Plant would often say the name "Joni" after this stanza (which is thought to have referenced Mitchell s 1967 composition "I Had a King"): To find a Queen without a King, They say she plays guitar and cries, and sings In an interview he gave to Spin magazine in 2002, Plant stated that the song "might be a bit embarrassing at times lyrically, but it did sum up a period of my life when I was 22."[1] In a 2007 interview with the same magazine, Plant stated that the song was about "Me reflecting on the first years of the group, when I was only about... 20, and was struggling to find myself in the midst of all the craziness of California and the band and the groupies..."[citation needed] This song started out as a song about Californian earthquakes and when Jimmy Page, audio engineer Andy Johns and band manager Peter Grant travelled to Los Angeles to mix the album, they coincidentally experienced a minor earthquake.[2] At this point it was known as "Guide to California".[2] At Led Zeppelin concerts the band performed this song during their acoustic sets, first playing it on their Spring 1971 tour of the United Kingdom.[2] One live version, from Led Zeppelin s performance at Earls Court in 1975, is featured on disc 2 of the Led Zeppelin DVD. It was performed on Plant s solo tours during 1988/1989 and at the Knebworth Silver Clef show in 1990. He played it again on his Mighty ReArranger tour, with additions of a double bass and a synthesizer. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - mandolin John Bonham - tambourine Cover versions 1993: Dread Zeppelin (Hot & Spicy Beanburger) 1994: Marc Jöcis (State of the Heart) 1995: Never the Bride (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1995: Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin) 1996: Edgar Cruz (The A.R.T. of Edgar Cruz)

 

 

 

 

 

When the Levee Breaks - Wikipedia

This article is about the Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie song. For the "When the Levee Breaks" Song by Kansas Joe McCoy, Memphis Minnie

 

 

1997: 1997: 1998: 1998: 1998: 1999: 1999: 1999: 2000: 2000: 2000: 2000: 2001: 2001: 2001: 2001: 2002: 2003: 2004: 2004: 2004: 2004: 2004: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2005: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2006: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2007: 2008: 2008: 2008: 2009: 2009:

Jaz Coleman and the London Philharmonic Orchestra (Kashmir: Symphonic Led Zep Zakk Wylde (Stairway to Heaven) Morgaua Quartet (Destruction: Rock Meets Strings) Cinnamon (The Song Replays the Same II) Pearl Jam ("Given to Fly", instrumental cover) Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) The String Quartet (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Jay Aston (The Song Remains Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Rosetta Stone Joseph Patrick Moore (Soul Cloud) Clove (Go) Mario da Silva (Meet Mario) Dennis Caplinger (Pickin on Zeppelin: A Tribute) Richard DeVinck (Going to California: A Classical Guitarist s Tribute to Led Out of Phase (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin IV) Never Never (Never Never Tribute II) Simply Led (From the Land of the Ice and Snow) Katherine Ramirez (Livin, Lovin, Played: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Fuel (Something Like Human [bonus tracks edition]) Paul Gilbert with John Paul Jones (Guitar Wars) Hampton String Quartet (HSQ Rides Again) Jamie Reno with Randi Driscoll (All American Music) Benjamin Levine (Chamber Maid: The Baroque Tribute to Led Zeppelin) The Classic Rock String Quartet (The Led Zeppelin Chamber Suite: A Classic Ro Liz Larin (Wake Up, Start Dreaming) Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin Sun Palace (Give Me a Perfect World) The Young Unknowns (The East Village Sessions: Volume 1) Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) The Analogues (The Analogues) Julian Coryell (Undercovers) Bar 12 (Start the Machine) The Rockies (The Hits Re-Loaded: The Music of Led Zeppelin) Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) Jake Shimabukuro (My Life) Kenny James (Give Me Peace) Anastasia Gilliam (Slip Beneath the Covers) Dawn Tyler Watson & Paul Deslauriers (En Duo) Pascal Mono (La Rascasse: Monte Carlo, Volume I) The Boys from County Nashville (Long Ago and Far Away: The Celtic Tribute to The Nowtet (The Nowtet Plays Zep!) Davey T Hamilton (Classics) Lore Constantine (Piano Expressions) Letz Zep (In Concert) Ben Lapps (The New Color) Hall Pass (Hard Rock Covers)

from the album Blues Classics by Memphis Minnie Released 1965 Recorded June 18, 1929 Genre Delta blues Length 3:12 Label Columbia Records Writer Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie

"When the Levee Breaks" is a blues song written and first recorded by husband and wife Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie in 1929. The song is in reaction to the upheaval caused by the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. It was famously re-worked by English rock group Led Zeppelin as the last song on their fourth album, released in 1971. The lyrics in Led Zeppelin s version were partially based on the original recording. Many other artists have also recorded versions of the song or played it live. While the Led Zeppelin version is still under copyright by the band, the original song by Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie is currently in the public domain.[1][2][3][4][5] Contents

Origin The original "When the Levee Breaks" was produced by the blues musical duo Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie. The lines at the end of the song, "Going to Chicago; sorry but I can t take you", are quoted in "Going to Chicago Blues" by Jimmy Rushing and the Count Basie Orchestra. In the first half of 1927, the Great Mississippi Flood ravaged the state of Mississippi and surrounding areas. It destroyed many homes and ravaged the agricultural economy of the Mississippi Basin. Many people were forced to flee to the cities of the Midwest in search of work, contributing to the "Great Migration" of African Americans in the first half of the 20th century. During the flood and the years after it subsided, it became the subject of numerous Delta blues songs, including "When the Levee Breaks", hence the lyrics, "I works on the levee, mama both night and day, I works so hard, to keep the water away" and "I s a mean old levee, cause me to weep and moan, gonna leave my baby, and my happy home". The song focused mainly on when more than 13,000 residents in and near Greenville, Mississippi evacuated to a nearby, unaffected levee for its shelter at high ground. The tumult that would have been caused if this and other levees had broken was the song s underlying theme.[6][7] Led Zeppelin s version "When the Levee Breaks" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin IV Released November 8, 1971 Recorded December 1970 – March 1971 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock Length 7:08 Label Atlantic Writer Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Memphis Minnie Producer Jimmy Page

 

 

 

 

1 2 3 4 5 6

Origin Led Zeppelin s version Other versions Sources References External links

 

 

Led Zeppelin recorded its version of the song in December 1970 at Headley Grange, where the band used the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. The song had earlier been tried unsuccessfully by the band at Island Studios at the beginning of the recording sessions for their fourth album.[8] The Led Zeppelin version features a distinctive pounding drum beat by John Bonham, driving guitars and a wailing harmonica, all presumably meant to symbolize the relentless storm that threatens to break the levee, backing a powerful vocal performance by vocalist Robert Plant. The vocals were processed differently on each verse, sometimes with phasing added. Plant had the original McCoy and Minnie recording in his personal collection. He removed and rearranged lines and line parts from the original song and added new lyrical parts (again, the lyrics focused on the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927), and combined it with a revamped melody. According to Led Zeppelin guitarist and producer Jimmy Page, the song s structure "was a riff that I d been working on, but Bonzo s drum sound really makes a difference on that point."[9] The famous drum performance was recorded by engineer Andy Johns by placing Bonham and a new drumkit at the bottom of a stairwell at Headley Grange, and recording it using two Beyerdynamic M160 microphones at the top, giving the distinctive resonant but slightly muffled sound.[10][11] Back in the Rolling Stones mobile studio, Johns compressed the drum sound through two channels and added echo through guitarist Jimmy Page s Binson echo unit.[8] The performance was made on a brand new drum kit that had only just been delivered from the factory.[8] The drum beat has long been popular in hip hop and dance music circles for its "heavy" sound, and has been sampled for many tracks.[12] At one time the remaining band members took legal action against Beastie Boys for their use of this drum sample on "Rhymin & Stealin" from Licensed to Ill.[13] Page recorded Plant s harmonica part using the backward echo technique, putting the echo ahead of the sound when mixing, creating a distinct effect.[8] "When the Levee Breaks" was recorded at a different tempo, then slowed down, explaining the "sludgy" sound, particularly on the harmonica and guitar solos. Because this song was heavily produced in the studio, it was difficult to recreate live. The band only played it a few times in the early stages of their 1975 U.S. Tour.[8] "When the Levee Breaks" was the only song on the album that was not re-mixed after a supposedly disastrous mixing job in the U.S. (the rest of the tracks were mixed again in England). The original mixing done on this song was kept in its original form. In the May 2008 issue of Uncut Magazine, Page elaborated upon the effects at the end of the song: Interviewer: How was the swirly effect at the end of "When the Levee Breaks" achieved? I always imagine you sitting there with a joystick... Page: It s sort of like that, isn t it? It s interesting, on "Levee Breaks" you ve got backwards harmonica, backwards echo, phasing, and there s also flanging, and at the end you get this super-dense sound, in layers, that s all built around the drum track. And you ve got Robert, constant in the middle, and everything starts to spiral around him. It s all done with panning.[14] In another interview, Page commented: "When The Levee Breaks" is probably the most subtle thing on [the album] as far as production goes because each 12 bars has something new about it, though at first it might not be apparent. There s a lot of different effects on there that at the time had never been used before. Phased vocals, a backwards echoed harmonica solo.[9] Other versions Several other artists have covered the song or played it live: Page and Plant had performed it on their MTV Unplugged appearance and their 1995-96 world tour, swapping it with "Nobody s Fault but Mine" at times.[10][11] John Paul Jones worked the song into the tour for his two solo albums.[11]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With Plant playing guitar along with T-Bone Burnett s band, Alison Krauss sang it for the CMT Crossroads TV special starring Plant and Krauss, to promote their album Raising Sand. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss regularly covered the song during their tour of USA and Europe in April and May 2008.[15] Led Zeppelin parody cover band Dread Zeppelin covered it on 5,000,000. The London Philharmonic Orchestra performed a version of the Led Zeppelin cover on the CD Kashmir: Symphonic Led Zeppelin in 1997. W.A.S.P. released a version on the bonus disk of The Crimson Idol in 1991. John Campbell covered it on his Howlin Mercy album in 1993. Jeff Buckley covered it on the so-called Rarities from NYC (that contains some songs recorded on tape and never released) in 1996. Rosetta Stone covered it on the album An Eye For The Main Chance in 1991. Tori Amos played it on her 2005 world tour, at a concert in Austin, TX just days after the hurricane on September 2, 2005. Gov t Mule has been playing it in concert since 2005. A Perfect Circle included a version on their cover album eMOTIVe in 2004. There were few changes in lyrics but the melody was very different from Led Zeppelin s version. The drum part was the inspiration for megaphone s song "Stain" from their 2005 album "For Cryin Out Loud." The band also performs part of the song live at the end of "Stain." Film score composer John Powell on the soundtrack to the 2006 film Ice Age: The Meltdown. Kristin Hersh covered it on her 1994 EP "Strings". Stream of Passion performed it in 2006 and recorded that on the second disc of their Live in the Real World album. Buckwheat Zydeco recorded this song on their May 5, 2009 release Lay Your Burden Down. This version features blues slide guitarist Sonny Landreth.

Houses of the Holy - Wikipedia

Houses of the Holy Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 28 March 1973 Recorded January–August 1972, Stargroves and Headley Grange with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio, and Island Studios, London. Mixed at Olympic Studios, London and Electric Lady Studios, New York City Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock Length 40:58 Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page

Houses of the Holy is the fifth album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released by Atlantic Records on 28 March 1973. The album title is a dedication by the band to their fans who appeared at venues they dubbed "Houses of the Holy." It was the first Led Zeppelin album to not be, at least unofficially, titled after the band, and was also the first of the band s albums to be

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

composed of completely original material. It represents a musical turning point for Led Zeppelin, as they began to use more layering and production techniques in recording their songs. Although Houses of the Holy initially received mixed reviews, it has since become regarded by critics as one of Led Zeppelin s finest albums. The album provided notable additions to the band s catalogue, including "Over the Hills and Far Away", "Dancing Days", "The Song Remains the Same", "D yer Mak er", "No Quarter" and "The Ocean", and it has sold over 11 million copies in the United States. In 2003, the album was ranked number 149 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Contents 1 2 3 4 Recording sessions Composition Album sleeve design Release and critical reaction 4.1 Accolades 5 Track listing 6 Sales chart performance 7 Sales certifications 8 Personnel 9 See also 10 References 11 External links Recording sessions Much of this album was recorded in Spring 1972 at Stargroves, the country estate in Berkshire which was owned by Mick Jagger, through the use of the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. Some songs from the album had initially been tried out earlier than this, such as "No Quarter", which was first attempted during a session at Headley Grange.[1] Several of the songs were also demoed at the personal studios of guitarist Jimmy Page and bass player/keyboardist John Paul Jones. These two musicians had recently installed the studios in their respective homes, which enabled them to complete the arrangements which had been laid down earlier.[1] In particular, Page was able to present complete arrangements of "The Rain Song" and "Over the Hills and Far Away", while Jones had developed "No Quarter".[1] Another bout of recording took place at Olympic Studios in May 1972, and during the band s 1972 North American tour additional recording sessions were conducted at Electric Lady Studios in New York.[1] Some songs which were recorded from these various sessions did not eventually make it onto Houses of the Holy, namely "Black Country Woman", "Walter s Walk", "The Rover" and also the title-track, "Houses of the Holy". All of these songs were retained and later released on subsequent Led Zeppelin albums. Composition This album was a stylistic turning point in the lifespan of Led Zeppelin. Guitar riffs became more layered within Jimmy Page s production techniques and departed from the blues influences of earlier records. In the album s opening opus, "The Song Remains the Same", and its intricate companion suite, "The Rain Song", Robert Plant s lyrics matured toward a less overt form of the mysticism and fantasy of previous efforts. Houses of the Holy also featured styles not heard on the first four Led Zeppelin albums. For example, "D yer Mak er" is a reggae-based tune (the name of the song being derived from the phonetic spelling of the British pronunciation of "Jamaica"); "No Quarter" features atmospheric keyboard sounds and an acoustic piano solo from John Paul Jones; "The Crunge" is a funk tribute to James Brown; and "The Rain Song" is embellished by Jones on his newly-acquired mellotron. The album s closing song "The Ocean", which featues an a cappella section and a doo-wop influenced coda, is dedicated to "the ocean" of fans who were massing to Led Zeppelin concerts at this point of the band s career.

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

According to Led Zeppelin expert Dave Lewis: In retrospect, Houses of the Holy holds its ground with the middle period releases quite admirably. The barnstorming effect of the early era was now levelling off and though devoid of the electricity of Led Zeppelin I and II , or the sheer diversity of the third album, and lacking the classic status of the fourth, Houses took stock of their situation. In doing so, it laid several foundations on which they would expand their future collective musical aspirations.[1] Album sleeve design Houses of the Holy album cover, outer gatefoldThe cover art for Houses of the Holy was inspired by the ending of Arthur C. Clarke s novel Childhood s End.[1] (The ending involves several hundred million naked children, only slightly and physically resembling the human race in basic forms.) It is a collage of several photographs which were taken at the Giant s Causeway, Northern Ireland, by Aubrey Powell of Hipgnosis. This location was chosen ahead of an alternative one in Peru which was being considered.[1] The two children who modelled for the cover were siblings Stefan and Samanatha Gates.[2] The photoshoot was a frustrating affair over the course of ten days. Shooting was done first thing in the morning and at sunset in order to capture the light at dawn and dusk, but the desired effect was never achieved due to constant rain and clouds. The photos of the two children were taken in black and white and were multi-printed to create the effect of 11 individuals that can be seen on the album cover. The results of the shoot were less than satisfactory, but some accidental tinting effects in post-production created an unexpectedly striking album cover.[1] The inner sleeve photograph was taken at Dunluce Castle near to the Causeway. Like Led Zeppelin s fourth album, neither the band s name nor the album title was printed on the sleeve. However, manager Peter Grant did allow Atlantic Records to add a wrap-around paper title band to US and UK copies of the sleeve that had to be broken or slid off to access the record.[1] This hid the children s buttocks from general display, but still the album was either banned or unavailable in some parts of the Southern United States for several years.[3][4] Houses of the Holy inner gatefoldThe first CD release of the album in the 1980s did have the title logos printed on the cover itself.[1] In 1974, the album was nominated for a Grammy Award in the category of best album package. The cover was rated #6 on VH1 s 50 Greatest Album Covers in 2003. Jimmy Page has stated that the album cover was actually the second version submitted by Hipgnosis. The first, by artist Storm Thorgerson, featured an electric green tennis court with a tennis racquet on it. Furious that Thorgerson was implying their music sounded like a "racket", the band fired him and hired Powell in his place.[5] Thorgerson did, however, go on to produce the album artwork for Led Zeppelin s subsequent albums Presence and In Through the Out Door. This was Led Zeppelin s final studio release on Atlantic Records before forming their own label, Swan Song Records, in 1974. It was also the only Led Zeppelin album that contained complete printed lyrics to each song. "The epic scale suited Zeppelin: They had the largest crowds, the loudest rock songs, the most groupies, the fullest manes of hair. Eventually excess would turn into bombast, but on Houses, it still provided inspiration." —Gavin Edwards, Rolling Stone.[14] Although intended for release in January 1973, delays in producing the album

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

cover meant that it was not released until March, when the band was on its 1973 European tour. The album was promoted heavily before the commencement of Led Zeppelin s subsequent North American Tour, ensuring that it had ascended the top of the American chart by the beginning of the tour.[1] Because much of the album had been recorded almost a year previously, many of the songs which are featured on the album had already been played live by Led Zeppelin on their concert tours of North America, Japan, Europe and the United Kingdom in 1972-1973.[1] Upon its release, the album received some mixed reviews, with much criticism from the music press being directed at the off-beat nature of tracks such as "The Crunge" and "D yer Mak er".[1] However, the album was very commercially successful, entering the UK chart at number one, while in America its 39-week run on the Billboard Top 40 was their longest since their third album.[1] In 2003, the album was ranked number 149 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank The Book of Rock Lists United States "The Top 40 Albums (1973)" [15] 1981 13 Grammy Award United States "Grammy Award for Best Recording Package" [16] 1974 Nominee Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest British Rock Album Ever" [17] 2006 90 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States "The Definitive 200: Top 200 Albums of All-Time" [18] 2007 51 (*) designates unordered lists. Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length 1."The Song Remains the Same" Page, Plant 5:32 2."The Rain Song" Page, Plant 7:39 3."Over the Hills and Far Away" Page, Plant 4:50 4."The Crunge" Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant 3:17 Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Dancing Days" Page, Plant 3:43 2."D yer Mak er" Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant 4:23 3."No Quarter" Jones, Page, Plant 7:00 4."The Ocean" Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant 4:31 Sales chart performance Album Chart (1973) Peak Position Japanese Albums Chart [19] 3 UK Albums Chart [20] 1 Norwegian Albums Chart [21] 4 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [22] 1 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums Chart [23] 1 US Record World Top Pop Albums Chart [24] 1 Austrian Albums Chart [25] 3 Canadian RPM Top 100 Albums Chart [26] 1 Spanish Albums Chart [27] 9 Australian Go-Set Top 20 Albums Chart [28] 1 Australian Kent Music Report Albums Chart 1 German Albums Chart [29] 8 French Albums Chart [30] 3 Singles Year Single Chart Position 1973 "D yer Mak er" Billboard Pop Singles (Billboard Hot 100) 20 1973 "Over The Hills And Far Away" Billboard Pop Singles (Billboard Hot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100) 51 Sales certifications Country Sales Certification United Kingdom (BPI) 300,000+Platinum [31] Germany (IFPI) 100,000+Gold [32] Argentina (CAPIF) 30,000+Gold [33] United States (RIAA) 11,000,000+Diamond [34] France (SNEP) 150,000+2× Gold [35] Spain (PROMUSICAE) 40,000+Gold [36] Personnel Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums, backing vocals John Paul Jones – organ, Mellotron, bass guitar, backing vocals, piano, synthesizers, harpsichord Jimmy Page – acoustic, electric, and pedal steel guitar, production Robert Plant –Lead vocals and backing vocals. Production Barry Diament – mastering (original Compact Disc release) Keith Harwood – mixing Hipgnosis – sleeve art direction Andy Johns – engineering, mixing (on "No Quarter") Eddie Kramer – engineering, mixing Bob Ludwig – mastering engineering Aubrey Powell – cover photography George Marino – mastering (remastered Compact Disc) See also List of best-selling albums in the United States

The Song Remains the Same (song) - Wikipedia

"The Song Remains the Same" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy Released 28 March 1973 Recorded 1972 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal Length 5:30 Label Atlantic Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"The Song Remains the Same" is a song by the English rock group Led Zeppelin. It is the opening track from their 1973 album, Houses of the Holy. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Overview Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References

7 External links Overview The song features furious multi-tracked guitar from Jimmy Page, played on a Gibson EDS-1275 double neck 12-string during live shows,[1] and vocals from lead singer Robert Plant. This was Plant s tribute to world music, reflecting his belief that music is universal. The song was originally an instrumental which was given the working title "The Overture",[2] before Plant added lyrics to it, after which it temporarily came to be known as "The Campaign" before the band settled on the title "The Song Remains the Same".[3] In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1993, Page discussed the song s construction: It was originally going to be an instrumental -- an overture that led into "The Rain Song". But I guess Robert had different ideas. You know, "This is pretty good, Better get some lyrics--quick!" [laughs]... I had all the beginning material together, and Robert suggested that we break down into half-time in the middle. After we figured out that we were going to break it down, the song came together in a day... I always had a cassette recorder around. That s how both "The Song Remains The Same" and "Stairway" came together -- from bits of taped ideas.[1] Plant s vocal track was slightly sped up for the album release.[3] Page played overdubs with a Telecaster on this recording, and also a Rickenbacker 12-string guitar.[3] The band first performed this song live on their 1972 Japanese Tour.[3] Bootlegs from this tour reveal that the song was still without a settled title, with Plant introducing it as "Zep" from the stage at Tokyo. At Led Zeppelin concerts from late 1972 through 1975, "The Song Remains the Same" was followed (just as on the original album) by direct segue into "The Rain Song". For this live arrangement, Page employed his trademark Gibson EDS-1275 double-necked guitar. "The Song Remains the Same" would be the opening song for the 1977 US tour and 1979 concerts, before being dropped from the set list for the 1980 European tour.[3] The song was also performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. "The Song Remains the Same" was featured on Led Zeppelin s 1976 concert film (and accompanying soundtrack), as part of lead singer Robert Plant s fantasy sequence. The title of the song was used as the title of both the film and the album. Formats and tracklistings 1973 7" single (Thailand: Atlantic TK769 ST-H) A. "The Song Remains the Same" (Page, Plant) 5:30 B1. "The Ocean" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:31 B2. "Dancing Days" (Page, Plant) 3:43 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1991: Dread Zeppelin (5,000,000) 1995: Dream Theater (A Change of Seasons EP, medley) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 2000: Dennis Caplinger (Bluegrass Forever) 2000: various artists (Pickin on Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2007: Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Letz Zep (Letz Zep II: Live in London) 2008: Gov t Mule (Holy Haunted House [recorded live 2007])

The Rain Song - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"The Rain Song" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy Released 28 March 1973 Recorded 1972 Genre Ballad Length 7:39 Label Atlantic Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"The Rain Song" is a song from English rock band Led Zeppelin s fifth album Houses of the Holy, released in 1973. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Recording Live history References in other media Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Recording "The Rain Song" is a love ballad of over 7 minutes in length. Guitarist Jimmy Page originally constructed the melody of this song at his home in Plumpton, England, where he had recently installed a studio console. A new Vista model, it was partly made up from the Pye Mobile Studio which had been used to record the group s 1970 Royal Albert Hall performance and The Who s Live at Leeds album.[1] Page was able to bring in a completed arrangement of the melody, for which singer Robert Plant composed some lyrics. These lyrics are considered by Plant himself to be his best overall vocal performance.[2] The song also features a mellotron played by John Paul Jones to add to the orchestral effect, while Page plays a Danelectro guitar.[1] George Harrison was reportedly the inspiration for "The Rain Song" when he made a comment to Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham, about the fact that the group never wrote any ballads.[3][4] In tribute to Harrison, the opening two chords are recognisably borrowed from the melody of the first line of his ballad "Something" with The Beatles.[3] The working title for this track was "Slush," a reference to its easy listening mock orchestral arrangement.[1] Live history During Led Zeppelin concerts from late 1972 until 1975, the band played this song immediately following "The Song Remains the Same", presenting the songs in the same order as they appeared on the album. They organized their setlist in this manner because Page used a Gibson EDS-1275 double-necked guitar for both songs: the top, 12-string neck for "The Song Remains the Same" and then switching to the bottom, 6-string neck for "The Rain Song". The song was dropped from the 1977 U.S. tour, but returned for Led Zeppelin s 1979 concerts in Copenhagen, Denmark and at the Knebworth Music Festival, as well as their European tour in 1980.[1] "The Rain Song" was the only song from Houses of the Holy performed on the 1980 European tour. In this incarnation, Page again utilized the double-neck, the only known time he used that guitar solely for the

 

   

 

6-string portion without using the 12-string portion on a preceding song. For all live versions of the song, the orchestral string sounds were played by Jones on either the mellotron (1972–1975) or a Yamaha synthesizer (1979–1980), as Led Zeppelin never utilised a string section on-stage. When played live, Page used the 6-string neck of the EDS-1275 for "The Rain Song" in order to have two different tunings on the same guitar. The 12-string neck was tuned to Standard tuning (E-A-D-G-B-E) for his use on "The Song Remains the Same". The alternate tuning used for "The Rain Song" on the 6-string neck was Asus4 (E-A-D-A-D-E) - a step higher than the album cut, which is D-G-C-G-C-D. This is quite an uncommon modal tuning and makes for a very rich sounding accompaniment, led by John Paul Jones. The likely reason the alternate tuning was used in live performances is that while it required Plant to sing in a higher key, it necessitated a tuning change of only two strings (the B and G) on the EDS-1275, whereas the song s original key would have required the tuning of five of the six strings to be changed. As this same guitar would later be used in the show for "Stairway to Heaven", the six-string neck would then need to be returned to standard tuning—the alternate "Rain Song" tuning allowed this to be achieved with relative ease. Page and Plant recorded a version of the song in 1994 but it was not originally released on their album No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded. It was, however, released on the special tenth anniversary reissue of that album in 2004. References in other media "The Rain Song" has appeared in three films: Almost Famous, directed by Cameron Crowe (who, as a teen reporter for Rolling Stone magazine, covered Led Zeppelin), "It Might Get Loud", a documentary by filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, and Led Zeppelin s own 1976 concert film, The Song Remains the Same (and accompanying soundtrack), as part of lead singer Robert Plant s fantasy sequence. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, mellotron John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1990: The Shakers (Songs from Beneath the Lake) 1993: Motohiko Hino (It s There) 1994: Page and Plant (Gallows Pole EP) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 2001: Randy Jackson (95 WIIL Rock: 95 Live CD) 2001: Richard DeVinck (Going to California) 2002: Aya Peard (Livin Lovin Played: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2004: Lumpy (Tarantula: Naked Acoustic Guitar) 2005: Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin) 2006: Franck Tortiller & Orchestre National de Jazz (Close to Heaven: A Led Zeppelin Trib 2006: Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) 2007: Fred Benedetti (Dream Voyage) 2007: The Boys from County Nashville (The Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago and Fa 2007: Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2008: Gov t Mule (Holy Haunted House [recorded live 2007]) 2008: Wave Mechanics Union (Second Season: Progressive & Classic Rock as Jazz)

Over the Hills and Far Away (song) - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Over the Hills and Far Away" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy B-side "Dancing Days" Released 28 March 1973 24 May 1973 (7" single release date) Forma 7" 45 RPM Recorded 1972 Genre Hard rock Folk rock Length 4:50 Label Atlantic Records Writer(s) Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Over the Hills and Far Away" is the third track from English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1973 album Houses of the Holy. Contents 1 Overview 2 Formats and tracklistings 3 Chart positions 3.1 Single 3.2 Single (Digital download) 4 Personnel 5 Cover versions 6 Sources 7 References 8 External links Overview Jimmy Page and Robert Plant originally constructed the song in 1970 at Bron-Yr-Aur, a small cottage in Wales where they stayed after completing a gruelling concert tour of the United States.[1] Page plays a six-string acoustic guitar introduction with a melody reminiscent of "White Summer". Page repeats the theme with 12-string acoustic guitar in unison. In an interview published in Guitar World magazine s November 1993 issue, Page commented on the construction of the song: GW: There’s an acoustic guitar running throughout the song. Did you play a main acoustic and then overdub an electric? Page: No, we played it through entirely as you know it, but I was playing electric. GW: So you simply edited out of the beginning? Page: Yeah, that’s right. “Presumably”. It sounds that way. It sounds like the acoustic is going straight through. Plant s vocals enter on the next repetition. He tenderly offers himself to the "lady" who s "got the love [he] need[s]." The acoustic guitars build in a crescendo toward the abrupt infusion of Page s electric guitars along with drummer John Bonham s and bass guitarist John Paul Jones rhythm accompaniment. Through the pre-verse interludes and instrumental bridge, "Over the Hills and Far Away" stands out as an example of Jones and Bonham s tight interplay. Following the final verse, the rhythm section fades out, gradually replaced by the echo returns from Page s electric guitar and a few chords played by Jones on harpsichord.[2] In the final 8 bars, Page executes a linearly descending/ascending sequence and then concludes with the idiomatic V-I tag[clarification needed] on pedal steel guitar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The song was released as Houses of the Holy s first U.S. single, reaching #51 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, later becoming a staple of the Classic rock radio format. Set lists from Led Zeppelin concerts frequently contained "Over the Hills and Far Away", the song being one that the band introduced on stage well ahead of its studio release.[3] The group first played it during their 1972 concert tour of the United States and retained it consistently through 1979, before omitting it from their final tour of Europe in 1980. In singing the song live, Plant commonly followed the words "pocket-full of gold" with "Acapulco Gold" (a type of marijuana), as can be heard on the live album How the West Was Won. Also, at concerts guitarist Jimmy Page performed an extended guitar solo, which essentially consisted of the rhythm and lead guitar parts of the album version split into two separate pieces. This extended solo made the live renditions last almost or more than seven minutes. Archive footage of this track being performed live at Seattle in 1977 and at Knebworth in 1979 was used for an officially distributed video of the song, used to promote the 1990 Led Zeppelin Remasters release.[3]. The video accompanied a CD single which was released following the successful "Travelling Riverside Blues" release.[4] The song was first called "Many, Many Times", as shown on a picture of the original master on the Led Zeppelin website. Among blogging and forum-attending Led Zeppelin fans, the song has gained the abbreviation OTHAFA. The title of this song (as well as many others by Led Zeppelin and other artists) was the name of an episode of That 70s Show. It was also the name of an episode of One Tree Hill. Formats and tracklistings 1973 7" single (US/Australia/Finland/New Zealand/Philippines/Sweden: Atlantic 45-2970, Angola: Atlantic ATS 610, Brazil: Atco ATCS 10.062, Canada: Atlantic AT 2970, Greece: Atlantic 2091228, Holland: Atlantic ATL 10328, Italy: Atlantic K 10328, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-1237A, Mexico: Atlantic G-1210, Portugal: Atlantic ATL NS 28138, South Africa: Atlantic ATL 610, Spain: Atlantic HS 957, Yugoslavia: Atlantic ATL 26076) A. "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page, Plant) 4:47 B. "Dancing Days" (Page, Plant) 3:43 1973 7" radio edit (US: Atlantic 45-2970) A. "Over the Hills and Far Away" [mono] (Page, Plant) 4:47 B. "Over the Hills and Far Away" [stereo] (Page, Plant) 4:47 1990 CD single (US: Atlantic PRCD 3717) 1. "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page, Plant) 4:47 Chart positions Single Chart (1973) Peak position US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [5] 51 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [6] 28 US Record World 100 Top Pop Chart [7] 31 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [8] 63 Single (Digital download) Chart (2007) Peak position US Billboard Hot Digital Songs Chart [9] 63 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, mellotron John Bonham - drums Cover versions 2000: Kokoo (Super-Nova) 2002: Purdymouth W.V. (Just Don t Kiss Her) 2002: Nikki Boyer (Livin , Lovin , Played: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

 

 

 

 

 

The Crunge - Wikipedia

"The Crunge" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy A-side "D yer Mak er" Released 28 March 1973 Recorded 1972 Genre Funk rock Length 3:17 Label Atlantic Records Writer(s) Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"The Crunge" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1973 album Houses of the Holy. It was also released as the B-side of "D yer Mak er". Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Overview Time signatures References in other media Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions 6.1 Album versions 6.2 Samples 7 Sources 8 References 9 External links Overview The song evolved out of a jam session in the studio. John Bonham started the beat, John Paul Jones came in on bass, Jimmy Page played a funk guitar riff (and a chord sequence that he d been experimenting with since 1970), and Robert Plant started singing.[1][2] For the recording of this track, Page played on a Stratocaster guitar and it is possible to hear him depressing a whammy bar at the end of each phrase.[1] This song is a play on James Brown s style of funk in the same way that "D yer Mak er" (which it backed on a single release) experiments with reggae.[2] Since most of James Brown s earlier studio recordings were done live with almost no rehearsal time, he often gave directions to the band in-song e.g. "take it to the bridge" - the bridge of the song. Plant pays tribute to this at the end by asking "Where s that confounded bridge?" (spoken, just as the song finishes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2003: 2004: 2005: 2006: 2006: 2007: 2008: 2008:

various artists (A Bluegrass Tribute: Pickin on Led Zeppelin, Volume II) Hampton String Quartet (HSQ Rides Again) Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) Bustle In Your Hedgerow (Live at Abbey Pub, 8.6.06) The Boys from County Nashville (The Celtic Tribute to Led Zeppelin: Long Ago and Fa Gov t Mule (Holy Haunted House [recorded live 2007]) Snowblynd (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millenium Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

 

 

abruptly). The song also contains references to songs written by Otis Redding, specifically "Respect" (later popularized by Aretha Franklin) and "Mr. Pitiful." A voice is audible at the beginning asking Bonham if he s "ready to go." The voices that can be heard talking on the recording just as Bonham s drums begin on the intro are those of Jimmy Page and audio engineer George Chkianz.[2] Prior to 1975, "The Crunge" was only heard live at Led Zeppelin concerts during the band s "Whole Lotta Love" medley and their 1972 tour version of "Dazed and Confused". One example of this arrangement is presented on the live album How the West Was Won, where it also appears with "Walter s Walk" on a 25 minute medley. However, on the 1975 tour of the United States the song was performed almost entirely several times, in the funk jam that would link "Whole Lotta Love" and "Black Dog" at the end of the concert. The band s bass player John Paul Jones considers this to be one of his favourite Led Zeppelin songs.[3] Time signatures Some of the humor of the song derives from the juxtaposition of James Brown funk against shifting time signatures. One way to count out the song is as follows: Intro measure: 1 x 9/8 Part 1: 7 x 9/8 (or 4/8 + 5/8) 1 x 8/8 (or 4/8 + 4/8) Part 2: 3 x 4/4 1 x 5/8 1 x 2/4 3 x 4/4 1 x 5/8 1 x 2/4 3 x 4/4 1 x 2/4 1 x 2/8 then return to "Part 1", play through pattern two more times, end with roughly 23 x 9/8 (last one ends in the middle of the measure, with drums ending on the 5th beat and the synth continuing for a beat or two). References in other media A reference to "The Crunge" is made in the film Almost Famous. On the shirt of the Led Zeppelin fanatic, Vic, is written the four "runes" from Led Zeppelin IV and "Have You Seen The Bridge?". This song was the title of a season 5 episode of That 70s Show. All season 5 episodes were named after Led Zeppelin tunes. Formats and tracklistings 1973 7" single (Uruguay: Atlantic 74007) A. "The Crunge" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:17 B. "D yer Mak er" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:23 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, synthesizer John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 2004: The Bacchus Brothers (Funky! Alien! Booty!) 2005: Joshua Redman (Momentum) 2008: Gov t Mule (Holy Haunted House [recorded live 2007]) Samples 1985: Double Dee and Steinski ("Lesson 3: The History of Hip-Hop Mix") 1989: De La Soul ("The Magic Number") 1997: Fatboy Slim ("Going out of My Head") 1998: Jurassic 5 ("Lesson 6: The Lecture")

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

2005: Devil May Cry 3: Dante s Awakening

Dancing Days - Wikipedia

"Dancing Days" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy A-side "Over the Hills and Far Away" Released 28 March 1973 Format 7" 45 RPM Recorded 1972 Genre Hard rock, blues-rock Length 3:43 Label Atlantic Records Writer(s) Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Dancing Days" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin. It appears on their 1973 album, Houses of the Holy, having been recorded at Stargroves in 1972. It was inspired by an Indian tune that Jimmy Page and Robert Plant heard while traveling in Bombay. [1] Recording engineer Eddie Kramer reportedly said that the band members danced in joy on the lawn at Stargroves during playback of this track, such was their satisfaction with the song.[2] This was the first track from the album to be offered for radio play by Atlantic Records. It was premiered on 24 March 1973 on the BBC Radio One Rosko lunch time show.[2] Like another track on the album, "Over the Hills and Far Away" (which it backed on a single), "Dancing Days" was introduced by the band in concert well ahead of its commercial release. Although a bootleg tape purports to prove it was first played at the Wembley Empire Pool in November 1971, evidence suggests its inclusion on this tape was a hoax. The earliest live documented reference is in Seattle on 19 June 1972 where the song was performed twice: once during the main set and again as an encore;[2] it was then performed frequently during the rest of this tour, with a version appearing on the live album, How the West Was Won. With the release of Houses of the Holy, however, "Dancing Days" was largely dropped from concerts, although an abridged, acoustic version was occasionally performed during the 1977 U.S. tour.[2] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Formats and tracklistings 1973 7" single (France: Atlantic 10328) A. "Dancing Days" (Page, Plant) 3:43 B. "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page, Plant) 4:47

 

1973 7" radio edit (South Africa: Atlantic Teal LM) A. "Dancing Days" [stereo] (Page, Plant) 3:43 B. "Dancing Days" [mono] (Page, Plant) 3:43 1973 7" EP (US: Atlantic LLP 213 SD 7-7255) A1. "Dancing Days" (Page, Plant) 3:43 A2. "D yer Mak er" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:23 B1. "The Song Remains the Same" (Page, Plant) 5:30 B2. "The Crunge" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:17 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, Organ John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1989: H.P. Zinker (...And There Was Light EP) 1993: Bad Livers (The Song Retains the Name II) 1995: Stone Temple Pilots (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1998: Morgaua Quartet (Destruction: Rock Meets Strings) 1999: Kelly Hansen (The Song Remains Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Stereofeed (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Hampton String Quartet (Take No Prisoners!) 2006: The Rockies (The Music of Led Zeppelin) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2007: Blackjack (Live [recorded 2006]) 2007: Razed in Black (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix]) 2008: Gov t Mule (Holy Haunted House [recorded live 2007]) 2008: John Wetton & Geoff Downes (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2008: David Wayne (Songs of Yesterday)

D yer Mak er - Wikipedia

"D yer Mak er" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy B-side "The Crunge" Released September 17, 1973 Recorded 1972 Genre Reggae rock Length 4:23 Label Atlantic Records Writer(s) John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"D yer Mak er" (intended to be pronounced in a British non-rhotic accent as "Jamaica", /dʒəˈmeɪkə/) is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, from their 1973 album Houses of the Holy. Contents 1 Overview 2 Song title pronunciation

   

 

 

 

   

 

 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Accolades Formats and tracklistings Chart positions Personnel Sources References External links

Overview This song was meant to imitate reggae and its "dub" derivative emerging from Jamaica in the early 1970s. Its genesis is traced to Led Zeppelin s rehearsals at Stargroves in 1972, when drummer John Bonham started with a beat similar to 1950s doo-wop, and then twisted it into a slight off beat tempo, upon which a reggae influence emerged.[1] The distinctive drum sound was created by placing three microphones a good distance away from Bonham s drums. "D yer Mak er" is one of the few Led Zeppelin songs where all four members share the composer credit. The sleeve on the album also gives tribute to "Rosie and the Originals",[1] a reference to the doo-wop influence which was evident in the song s style. This track, as well as another song entitled "The Crunge", was initially not taken seriously by many listeners, and some critics reserved their harshest criticism for these two arrangements.[1] In an interview he gave in 1977, Page referred to this negative response: I didn t expect people not to get it. I thought it was pretty obvious. The song itself was a cross between reggae and a 50s number, "Poor Little Fool," Ben E. King s things, stuff like that.[2] Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones has expressed his distaste for the song, suggesting that it started off as a joke and wasn t thought through carefully enough.[1] However, "D yer Mak er" has gathered critical respect in the years since, and has grown into something of a Led Zeppelin classic. Upon the album s release, Robert Plant was keen to issue the track as a single in the United Kingdom. Atlantic Records went so far as to distribute advance promotional copies to DJs (now valuable collectors items). While it was released in the US, and the single peaked at #20 in December of 1973, it was ultimately never released in the UK.[1] This song was never performed live in its entirety at Led Zeppelin concerts, although snatches of it were played during "Whole Lotta Love" during the 1975 concert tour of the United States and "Communication Breakdown" at the Earls Court shows in the same year. A well known cover of the song was played by 311, who included the track in their 3-11 Day DVD. The single "Me Love" from the eponymous debut album of Sean Kingston samples "D yer Mak er". [1] American pop star Lady GaGa used to cover this song when she played small venues in New York City before she got famous. The Jamaican artist Eek-a-Mouse did a cover of the song [3] Song title pronunciation The name of the song is derived from a play on the words "Jamaica" and "Did you make her", based on an old joke ("My wife s gone to the West Indies." "Jamaica?" "No, she went of her own accord.") On 21 July 2005, Led Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant discussed the song during an interview with Mike Halloran, a DJ on radio station FM94.9 in San Diego. During the interview, he talked about the different interpretations and pronunciations of the name of the song [4]. The title, which appears nowhere in the lyrics, was chosen because it reflects the reggae flavour of the song. Plant has said that he finds it amusing when fans completely ignore the apostrophes and pronounce it as "Dire Maker". The common mispronunciation is alluded to in the song "Joke About Jamaica" by The Hold Steady in the lines: "They used to think it was so cute when she said Dire Maker /All the boys knew it was a joke about Jamaica". Accolades

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Radio Caroline United Kingdom "Top 500 Tracks" [5] 1999 453 Digital Dream Door United States "The 100 Greatest Recordings From 1973" [6] 2007 79 Formats and tracklistings 1973 7" single (US/Australia/New Zealand: Atlantic 45-2986, Austria/Germany: Atlantic ATL 10377, Canada: Atlantic AT 2986, France: Atlantic 10377, Greece: Atlantic 2091236, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-1265A, Mexico: Atlantic G-1275, Peru: Atlantic ALT 2986, Spain: Atlantic HS 987, Venezuela: Atlantic 5-001, Yugoslavia: Atlantic 26077) A. "D yer Mak er" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:23 B. "The Crunge" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:17 1973 7" single (Holland: Atlantic ATL 10374) A. "D yer Mak er" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:23 B. "Gallows Pole" (trad. arr. Page, Plant) 4:56 1973 7" promo (UK: Atlantic K 10296, South Africa: Trutone 45) A. "D yer Mak er" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:23 B. "The Crunge" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:17 1973 7" EP (Mexico: Atlantic GX 07-818) A1. "D Yer Mak er" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:23 A2. "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page, Plant) 4:47 B1. "Black Dog" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:56 B2. "Misty Mountain Hop" (Jones, Page, Plant) 4:38 1973 7" EP (Argentina: Music Hall 40.019) A1. "D Yer Mak er" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:23 A2. "The Crunge" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:17 B1. "The Ocean" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:31 B2. "No Quarter" (Jones, Page, Plant) 7:00 Chart positions Chart (1973) Peak position US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [7] 20 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [8] 16 US Record World 100 Top Pops [9] 15 Chart (1974) Peak position Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [10] 24 Canadian CHUM Chart [11] 7 New Zealand Top 50 Singles Chart [12] 20 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, piano John Bonham - drums

No Quarter (song) - Wikipedia

"No Quarter" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy Released 28 March 1973 Recorded 1972 Genre Progressive rock Length 7:00 Label Atlantic

 

 

     

 

 

     

Writer Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"No Quarter" is the seventh song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s fifth album Houses of the Holy, released in 1973. It was written by bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones, guitarist Jimmy Page and singer Robert Plant. Contents 1 Overview 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Samples 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Overview "No Quarter" was recorded in 1972 at Island Studios, London. It was engineered by Andy Johns and also mixed by Johns at Olympic Studios, London. The version that made it onto the album evolved out of a faster version Led Zeppelin had recorded earlier at Headley Grange, an old mansion in East Hampshire, England.[1] Jimmy Page applied vari-speed to drop the whole song a semi-tone, in order to give it a thicker and more intense mood.[2] The guitar solo effect was achieved by direct injection and compression.[1] The song features a brief Shepard scale at the close of the solo section at around the 4:45 mark. The title is derived from the military practice of showing no mercy to a vanquished opponent. This military theme is captured in several of the song s lyrics. From 1973 "No Quarter" became a centrepiece at Led Zeppelin concerts, being played at virtually every show the band performed until 1980 (it was eventually discarded on their final tour "Over Europe" in that year).[1] The song took on a very mysterious texture on stage as many lights and simulated fog were used. During live performances Jones would showcase his skills as a pianist, frequently improvising on keyboards and playing parts of classical music. On the band s ninth North American tour in 1973, performances of the song lasted twice the length of the studio version. On Led Zeppelin s concert tours from 1975 onwards, Jones would also play a short piano concerto (on a grand piano) frequently turning the seven-minute song into a performance exceeding twenty minutes, with Page and Bonham always joining him later in the song. He was particularly fond of playing Rachmaninoff pieces, but sometimes included Joaquín Rodrigo s Concierto de Aranjuez which had inspired Miles Davis Sketches of Spain. One version of the song, recorded at the Kingdome in Seattle in 1977, lasted thirty-six minutes, where, after the piano solo, Jones led the group into an R&B based jam, as a prelude to the guitar solo proper (similar versions can also be heard on the Destroyer bootleg CD, or bootleg DVDs of the concerts at Knebworth in 1979.) In Led Zeppelin s concert film The Song Remains the Same, "No Quarter" was the thematic music behind Jones personal fantasy sequence, in which he played a haunting masked horseman roaming the graveyards. Jimmy Page also used a short segment of theremin as an added sound effect while playing the song live, as can additionally be seen in the movie. Page and Plant recorded a version of the song in 1994, ironically without Jones, released on their album No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded. Robert Plant played a radically different version of the song as the opening number on his solo tour in 2005, as is included on the DVD release Soundstage: Robert Plant and the Strange Sensation. "No Quarter" was also a central part of Jones own solo concerts between 1999 and 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"No Quarter" was performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass pedals, acoustic and electric piano John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1989: I Love Ethyl (The Song Retains the Name) 1993: Crowbar (Crowbar) 1993: Moving Targets (Last of the Angels) 1994: Kasia Kowalska (Gemini) 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1995: Dread Zeppelin (No Quarter Pounder) 1996: Killdozer & Ritual Device ("When the Levee Breaks" CD single) 1998: Morgaua Quartet (Destruction: Rock Meets Strings) 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2000: Tool (Salival) 2000: Violeta De Outono (The Early Years [bonus tracks edition]) 2000: various artists (Pickin on Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2001: Matt Jorgensen & 451 (The Road Begins Here) 2001: Richard DeVinck (Going to California: A Classical Guitarist s Tribute to Led 2001: Mad Zeppelin (The Song Remains on Stage) 2002: Grave Digger (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Star One (Space Metal [Japanese bonus tracks edition]) 2002: Maktub (Khronos) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Quidam (The Time Beneath the Sky) 2002: Motor Industries (The Electronic Tribute To Led Zeppelin) 2003: Lana Lane & Erik Norlander (European Tour 2003) 2003: Tyrrell & Supercreep ("Dope Quarter" single) 2004: Ayreon ("Day Eleven: Love" CD single) 2004: Chris Gavin & Ice-T (Stairway to Rock: (Not Just) a Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2004: Jezz Woodroffe (In Through the Swing Door: Swing Cover Versions of Led Zeppel 2004: Chemystry Set (Live at the Sweatlodge) 2004: Classic Rock String Quartet (The Led Zeppelin Chamber Suite: A Classic Rock T 2005: Exhumed (Garbage Daze Re-Regurgitated) 2005: Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin 2006: The Flaming Lips (At War with the Mystics 5.1) 2006: Hookslide (Bump It Up) 2006: Nuspirit Helsinki (Rewind! 5) 2006: Franck Tortiller & Orchestre National de Jazz (Close to Heaven: A Led Zeppeli 2006: Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) 2007: Invisigoth (Alcoholocaust) 2007: Letz Zep (Letz Zep II: Live in London) 2008: Gov t Mule (Holy Haunted House [recorded live 2007]) 2008: Flametal (Master of the Aire [Japanese bonus tracks edition]) Samples 1997: Apollo 440 ("Electro Glide in Blue") 2002: Kallabris ("Kalkwater")

The Ocean (Led Zeppelin song) - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

"The Ocean" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Houses of the Holy Released 28 March 1973 Recorded 1972 Genre Hard rock Length 4:31 Label Atlantic Writer Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

For other uses, see Ocean (disambiguation). "The Ocean" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, from their 1973 album Houses of the Holy. "The Ocean" refers to the sea of fans seen from the stage at Led Zeppelin concerts, to whom this song was dedicated.[1] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Overview Formats and tracklistings Chart positions Personnel Cover versions 5.1 Album versions 5.2 Samples 6 Sources 7 References 8 External links Overview The intro and chorus (the main riff) of this song are done in an alternating 4/4 and 7/8 beat, and the song is in a 4/4 beat in the verses and the latter part of the song. The voice on the intro is drummer John Bonham. When he says, "We ve done four already but now we re steady, and then they went 1, 2, 3, 4!" he is referring to the takes. They had tried to record it four times prior but couldn t get it right, so as a pep talk he said this famous line. At approximately 1:37-1:38 into the song and again at around 1:41, a telephone can be faintly heard ringing in the background. Some speculate that this was intentional - the sheet music (printed after the fact) that accompanies the CD box set has the word "ring" printed twice above the percussion tab of this song. Others are of the opinion that while Led Zeppelin recorded the song a ringing phone was accidentally captured in the mix. There is also a noise heard about 1:59 which sounds like someone pronouncing "c" as in "cat". This occurs again at about 2:12. At 4:11, Jimmy Page distinctly hits a G string by mistake. In the last line, the "Girl who won my heart" is a reference to Robert Plant s daughter Carmen, (born 21 November 1968), who was three years old at the time of recording. In concert, Plant always updated the lyric to reflect her current age, as captured on the Led Zeppelin DVD which features the band s performance of the song at Madison Square Garden in 1973. The band first played this song live on their 1972 U.S. concert tour and it remained as part of their live performances until their 1973 U.S. tour. It was deleted from their set list thereafter.[1] This is one of the few Led Zeppelin songs in which it is possible to hear the squeak of John Bonham s bass drum pedal in the studio, the others being "Since I ve Been Loving You" from 1970 s Led Zeppelin III, "Ten Years Gone" and "Houses of the Holy" from 1975 s Physical Graffiti, and "Bonzo s Montreux" from 1982 s Coda. The hard rock song unwinds to a coda consisting of a guitar solo and a doo-wop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

homage. During the last minute or so of the song, Plant can softly be heard singing something along the lines of "I m sorry, I m sorry, I m sorry, yeah!" (Or "I m so, I m so, I m so glad!") Formats and tracklistings 1973 7" single (Austria/Germany: Atlantic ATL 10316) A. "The Ocean" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:31 B. "Dancing Days" (Page, Plant) 3:43 1973 7" single (Germany: Atlantic ATL 10316) A. "The Ocean" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:31 B. "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page, Plant) 4:47 1973 7" EP (Thailand: Atlantic FT 911) A1. "The Ocean" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:31 A2. "Dancing Days" (Page, Plant) 3:43 B1. "The Song Remains the Same" (Page, Plant) 5:30 B2. "The Crunge" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:17 1975 7" EP (Thailand: Atlantic KS 185) A1. "The Ocean" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 4:31 A2. "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page, Plant) 4:47 B1. "The Song Remains the Same" (Page, Plant) 5:30 B2. "Dancing Days" (Page, Plant) 3:43 Chart positions Chart (1973) Peak position German Singles Chart [2] 8

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1990: Zebra (Live [recorded live November 1989]) 1991: Living Colour (Biscuits [Japanese bonus tracks edition]) 1993: Motohiko Hino (It s There) 1993: John Vearity (Whole Lotta Love) 1994: Tesla (Bust a Nut [Japanese bonus tracks edition]) 1994: Cinnamon (Cinnamon II) 1994: They Play Led Zeppelin (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 1997: King Size (Romeo & Julie) 1998: Illuminati (Music of the Grateful Dead and Beyond) 1999: Jani Lane (The Song Remains Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Astralasia re 1999: Stereofeed (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: Makoto Ihara (Super Rock Summit) 2000: Postmortem (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Melissa Quade (Livin, Lovin, Played: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2003: Jon Hamar (Basso Profundo: Solos and More) 2003: Shaker (Shaker) 2004: David White Trio (Words and Music) 2004: Brass Monkey Brass Band (The Highest Good) 2004: Heavy Fuel (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute Performed by Heavy Fuel) 2005: Susaye Greene (Brave New Shoes) 2005: GVL (Hip Hop Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: The Rockies (The Hits Re-loaded: The Music of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Dream Theater (Two Nights In North America [limited release]) 2006: GogoLab (99.5 The Mountain Homegrown Vol. 5) 2006: Studio 99 (Led Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2007: Bonerama (Bringing It Home) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Michael LaMacchia (Organic Jive Collective: Live at the Sweetwater)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beastie Boys ("She s Crafty") Steady B ("What s My Name") Robert Plant ("Tall Cool One") The Real Roxanne ("Early Early (La La)") DJ Mavrikk ("99 Problems") Fort Minor ("Dolla")

Physical Graffiti - Wikipedia

Physical Graffiti Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 24 February 1975 Recorded July and December 1970 – March 1971, May 1972, January–February 1974 [1] Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock Length 82:15 Label Swan Song Producer Jimmy Page

Physical Graffiti is the sixth album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. It is a double album which was released on 24 February 1975. Recording sessions for the album were initially disrupted when John Paul Jones considered leaving the band. After reuniting at Headley Grange, the band wrote and recorded eight songs, the combined length of which stretched the album beyond the typical length of an LP. This prompted the band to make Physical Graffiti a double album by including previously unreleased tracks from earlier recording sessions. Physical Graffiti was commercially and critically successful; the album is 16 times platinum (though this only signifies sales of 8 million copies, as it is a double album) in the United States alone, and has come to be regarded as one of Led Zeppelin s defining works. In 2003, the album was ranked number 70 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Recording history Music Album sleeve design Release and critical reception 4.1 Accolades Track listing Sales chart performance Sales certifications Personnel

 

 

Samples 1986: 1987: 1988: 1988: 2005: 2006:

 

 

2007: 2007: 2007: 2008: 2008:

Zepparella (A Pleasing Pounding) Lez Zeppelin (Lez Zeppelin) Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Gov t Mule (Holy Haunted House [recorded live 2007]) Letz Zep (In Concert)

 

9 See also 10 References Recording history The recording sessions for Physica` Graffiti ini ially took placa in November 1973 at Headley Grange in East Hampshire, England. For these recordings, the band utilised Ronnie Lane s Mobile Studio. However, these sessions came to a halt quickly and the studio time was turned over to the band Bad Company, who used it to record songs for their debut album, Bad Company.[2] In an interview he gave in 1975, guitarist and album producer Jimmy Page explained the reason for this abrupt cessation of recording: It took a long time for this album mainly because when we originally went in to record it, John Paul Jones wasn t well and we had to cancel the time . . . everything got messed up. It took three months to sort the situation out.[3] However, according to Led Zeppelin archivist Dave Lewis, it later emerged that Jones had wanted to quit the band and take up a position as choirmaster at Winchester Cathedral. [Manager] Peter Grant urged caution, suggesting that Jones was overwrought from the incessant touring and should take a rest from Zeppelin for a few weeks. Jones changed his mind and sessions resumed at Headley Grange after the Christmas holidays.[2] Once they had reconvened, the band recorded eight tracks at Headley Grange in January and February 1974, which were engineered by Ron Nevison. Vocalist Robert Plant later referred to these eight tracks as "the belters": We got eight tracks off ... and a lot of them were really raunchy. We did some real belters with live vocals, off-the-wall stuff that turned out really nice.[2] Similar to the sessions for the previous two albums, the decision to record at the informal surroundings of Headley Grange provided a welcome opportunity for the band to improvise and develop material along the way.[2] As Plant commented: Some of the tracks we assembled in our own fashioned way of running through a track and realising before we knew it that we had stumbled on something completely different.[2] Bron-Yr-Aur cottageBecause the eight tracks extended beyond the length of a conventional album, it was decided at some point to include several unreleased songs which had been recorded during the sessions for previous Led Zeppelin albums. The instrumental "Bron-Yr-Aur" was recorded in July 1970 at Island Studios, London, for Led Zeppelin III. It was named after Bron-Yr-Aur, a cottage in Gwynedd, Wales where the members of Led Zeppelin spent time during the recording of Led Zeppelin III. "Night Flight" and "Boogie with Stu" were recorded at Headley Grange and "Down by the Seaside" at Island Studios, all for Led Zeppelin IV. "The Rover" and "Black Country Woman" were recorded at the same sessions as "D yer Mak er" at Stargroves using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio in May 1972. "Houses of the Holy" was also recorded in May 1972, but at Olympic Studios. The group s fifth album, Houses of the Holy, took its title from this song despite the decision not to include the song on that album. Page explained: We had more material than the required 40-odd minutes for one album. We had enough material for one and a half LPs, so we figured let s put out a double and use some of the material we had done previously but never released. It seemed like a good time to do that sort of thing, release tracks like "Boogie With Stu" which we normally wouldn t be able to do ... [T]his time we figured it was better to stretch out than to leave off.[4] According to engineer Nevison, the decision to expand the album to include songs from previous sessions was not part of the original planning: I never knew that Physical Graffiti was going to be a double album. When we started out we were just cutting tracks for a new record. I left the project before they started pulling in songs from Houses of the Holy and getting them up to scratch. So I didn t know it was a double [album] until it came out.[5] Additional overdubs were added and the final mixing of the album was performed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in October 1974 by Keith Harwood at Olympic Studios, London. The title "Physical Graffiti" was coined by Page to illustrate the whole physical and written energy that had gone into producing the set.[2] Music In the opinion of Lewis, Physical Graffiti was a massive outpouring of [Led] Zeppelin music that proved to be the definitive summary of their studio work ... Given the luxury of a double format, Physical Graffiti mirrors every facet of the Zeppelin repertoire. The end result is a finely balanced embarrassment of riches.[2] Spanning several years of recording, the album featured forays into a range of musical styles, including hard rock ("The Rover", "The Wanton Song", "Sick Again". "Houses of the Holy"), eastern-influenced orchestral rock ("Kashmir"), driving funk ("Trampled Under Foot"), acoustic rock and roll ("Boogie With Stu", "Black Country Woman"), love ballad ("Ten Years Gone"), blues rock ("In My Time of Dying") and acoustic guitar instrumental ("Bron-Yr-Aur").[2][6][7] The wide range of Physical Graffiti is also underlined by the fact that it contains both the longest and shortest studio recordings by Led Zeppelin. "In My Time of Dying" clocks in at 11 minutes 5 seconds and "Bron-Yr-Aur" is 2 minutes 6 seconds. It is also the only Led Zeppelin album to feature bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones playing additional guitar on some tracks. Several tracks off the album became live staples at Led Zeppelin concerts. In particular, the songs "In My Time of Dying", "Trampled Under Foot", "Kashmir", "Ten Years Gone" and "Sick Again" became regular components of the band s live concert set lists following the release of the album.[2] According to vocalist Robert Plant, of all the albums Led Zeppelin released, Physical Graffiti represented the band at its most creative and most expressive.[8] He has commented that it is his favourite Led Zeppelin album. Similarly, guitarist Jimmy Page considers this album to be a "high watermark" for Led Zeppelin.[9] Album sleeve design

The album s sleeve design features a photograph of a New York City tenement block, with interchanging window illustrations. The album designer, Peter Corriston, was looking for a building that was symmetrical with interesting details, that was not obstructed by other objects and would fit the square album cover. He said: 96 and 98 St. Mark s Place Physical Graffiti, the used clothing store in the basement of 96 St. Mark s PlaceWe walked around the city for a few weeks looking for the right building. I had come up a concept for the band based on the tenement, people living there and moving in and out. The original album featured the building with the windows cut out on the cover and various sleeves that could be placed under the cover, filling the windows with the album title, track information or liner notes.[10] The two five-story buildings photographed for the album cover are located at 96 and 98 St. Mark s Place in New York City.[11][12] To enable the image to fit properly with the square format of the album cover, the fourth floor (of five) had to be cropped out, making them appear as four-story buildings in the image.[10] The front cover is a daytime image, while the back cover is the same image but at nighttime. Mike Doud is listed as the Cover Artist on the inner sleeve, and either the concept or design or both were his. He passed away in the early 1990s, and this album design was one of his crowning achievements in a lifetime of design–he was later to win a Grammy for best album cover of the year 1978. The buildings on the album cover were the same Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were filmed in front of in the Rolling Stones music video "Waiting on a Friend".[13] There is currently a used clothing store in the basement of 96 St.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark s Place called Physical Graffiti. The building has been profiled on the television show, Rock Junket.[14] The original album jacket for the LP album included four covers made up of two inners (for each disc), a middle insert cover and an outer cover. The inner covers depict various objects and people (including photos of Robert Plant and Richard Cole in drag)[2] on each window. The middle insert cover is white and details all the album track listings and recording information. The outer cover has die-cut windows on the building, so when the middle cover is wrapped around the inner covers and slid into the outer cover, the title of the album is shown on the front cover, spelling out the name "Physical Graffiti". In 1976 the album was nominated for a Grammy Award in the category of best album package. Philadelphia comedy-punk band the Dead Milkmen spoofed the album cover and title on their 1990 album Metaphysical Graffiti

The album was released on 24 February 1975, at a time when Led Zeppelin was undertaking its tenth concert tour of North America. Delays in the production of the album s sleeve design prevented its release prior to the commencement of the tour.[21] Physical Graffiti was the band s first release on their own Swan Song Records label, which had been launched in May 1974. Until this point, all of Led Zeppelin s albums had been released on Atlantic Records. The album was a commercial and critical success, having built up a huge advance order, and when eventually released it reached #1 on Billboard s Pop Albums chart. It has since proven to be one of the most popular releases by the group, selling 8 million copies in the United States alone (which has made it 16 times platinum as it is a double album). Physical Graffiti was the first album to go platinum on advance orders alone.[22] Shortly after its release, all previous Led Zeppelin albums simultaneously re-entered the top-200 album chart.[23] Billboard magazine s 5 star review of the album stated: "[Physical Graffiti] is a tour de force through a number of musical styles, from straight rock to blues to folky acoustic to orchestral sounds."[24] In 1998 Q magazine readers voted Physical Graffiti the 28th greatest album of all time; in 2000 Q placed it at number 32 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever; and in 2001 the same magazine named it as one of the 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time. In 2003 the TV network VH1 named it the 71st greatest album ever. In 2003, the album was ranked number 70 on Rolling Stone magazine s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The album is also listed in Robert Dimery and Stevie Chick s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die (2005). Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Grammy Award United States "Grammy Award for Best Recording Package" [25] 1976 Nominee Mojo United Kingdom "The 100 Greatest Albums Ever Made" [26] 1996 47 Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest Rock Album Ever" [27] 2001 5 Q United Kingdom "100 Greatest Albums Ever" [28] 2003 41 Record Collector United Kingdom "Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century" Robert Dimery United States 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die [30] 2005* Q United Kingdom "100 Best Albums Ever" [31] 2006 57 Classic Rock United Kingdom "100 Greatest British Rock Album Ever" [32] 2006 7 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame United States "The Definitive 200: Top 200 Albums of All-T (*) designates unordered lists. Track listing All songs written and composed by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, except where noted. Side one #Title Date recorded Length

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1."Custard Pie" January–February 1974 4:13 2."The Rover" May 1972 5:37 3."In My Time of Dying" (Traditional; arr./adap. Page, Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham) January–February 1974 11:05 Side two #Title Date recorded Length 1."Houses of the Holy" May 1972 4:02 2."Trampled Under Foot" (Page, Plant, Jones) January–February 1974 5:37 3."Kashmir" (Page, Plant, Bonham) January–February 1974 8:32 Side three #Title Date recorded Length 1."In the Light" (Page, Plant, Jones) January–February 1974 8:46 2."Bron-Yr-Aur" (Page) July 1970 2:06 3."Down by the Seaside" February 1971 5:13 4."Ten Years Gone" January–February 1974 6:32 Side four #Title Date recorded Length 1."Night Flight" (Jones, Page, Plant) December 1970–January 1971 3:36 2."The Wanton Song" January–February 1974 4:07 3."Boogie with Stu" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Ian Stewart, Mrs. Valens) December 1970–January 1971 3:53 4."Black Country Woman" May 1972 4:24 5."Sick Again" January–February 1974 4:42 Some cassette versions of the album place "Bron-Yr-Aur" immediately after "Kashmir", presumably to make each side of the cassette last approximately the same amount of time. The running times listed for "Kashmir" and "Ten Years Gone" on original LP pressings of the album were significantly in error; "Kashmir" was listed at 9:41, "Ten Years Gone" at 6:55. "Boogie with Stu" is credited to "Mrs. Valens, mother of Ritchie Valens". The credit came about after the band had heard Valens mother never received any royalties from any of her son s hits.[34] Sales chart performance Album Chart (1975) Peak Position Japanese Albums Chart [35] 13 UK Albums Chart [36] 1 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [37] 1 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums Chart [38] 1 US Record World Top Pop Albums Chart [39] 1 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [40] 1 Norwegian Albums Chart [41] 4 Austrian Albums Chart [42] 2 Australian Kent Music Report Albums Chart2 New Zealand Top 50 Albums Chart [43] 3 German Albums Chart [44] 17 Spanish Albums Chart [45] 2 French Albums Chart [46] 2 Singles Year Single Chart Position 1975 "Trampled Under Foot" Billboard Pop Singles (Billboard Hot 100) 38 Sales certifications Country Sales Certification France (SNEP) 75,000+Gold [47]

 

 

Germany (IFPI) 100,000+Gold [48] Argentina (CAPIF) 30,000+Gold [49] United Kingdom (BPI) 1,200,000+4x Platinum [50] United States (RIAA) 8,000,000+16x Platinum [51] Personnel Led Zeppelin Jimmy Page – lead guitar, mandolin, production Robert Plant – lead vocals, harmonica, acoustic guitar on "Boogie with Stu" John Paul Jones – bass guitar, organ, piano, electric piano, Mellotron, guitar, mandolin, VCS3 synthesizer John Bonham – drums, percussion Additional personnel Ian Stewart – piano on "Boogie with Stu" George Chkiantz – engineering Peter Corriston – artwork, design, cover design Barry Diament – mastering (original Compact Disc release) Mike Doud – artwork, design, cover design Elliot Erwitt – photography B. P. Fallon – photography Peter Grant – producer, executive producer Roy Harper – photography Keith Harwood – engineering, mixing Dave Heffernan – illustrations Andy Johns – engineering Eddie Kramer – engineering, mixing George Marino – remastered Compact Disc release Ron Nevison – engineering See also List of best-selling albums in the United States

Custard Pie - Wikipedia

"Custard Pie" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock Length 4:13 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Custard Pie" is the first track on English rock band Led Zeppelin s sixth album, Physical Graffiti, released in 1975. The lyrics to the riff-heavy song pay homage to the blues songs of the Robert Johnson era; specifically "Drop Down Mama" by Sleepy John Estes, "Shake Em On Down" by Bukka White, and "I Want Some Of Your Pie" by Blind Boy Fuller.[1] The song contains somewhat difficult-to-comprehend lyrics, but, like several

 

 

other songs on the album, they are full of sexual innuendo. In this case, "Custard Pie" refers to a woman s sexual organs and the song is rife with references to oral sex: "Your custard pie, yeah, sweet and nice / When you cut it mama, save me a slice", as well as "chewin a piece of your custard pie". "Custard Pie" contains a wah-wah solo by guitarist Jimmy Page, which was played through an ARP synthesizer.[1] It also features an electric clavinet played by John Paul Jones and a mouth harp solo by vocalist Robert Plant.[1] Despite being rehearsed for Led Zeppelin s 1975 US Tour, this track was never completely played live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] On Led Zeppelin s 1977 US Tour the band briefly performed a portion of the song as part of their acoustic set during a concert in Houston, Texas on 21 May 1977. In later years, Robert Plant incorporated a chorus of the song on the end of the live version of his solo song, "Tall Cool One". Page also produced his own live version on his Outrider tour. Page and Plant finally performed the complete song together on occasion in 1996 while touring behind their No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded album. In 1999, Page again performed the song, this time whilst on his tour with The Black Crowes. A version of "Custard Pie" performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. This song is also the basis of Dread Zeppelin s "Viva Las Vegas". Contents 1 Formats and tracklistings 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Samples 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Formats and tracklistings 1975 7" single (Thailand: Atlantic TKR 278) A1. "Custard Pie" (Page, Plant) 4:13 A2. "Boogie with Stu" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Stewart, Mrs. Valens) 3:51 B. "Trampled Under Foot" (Jones, Page, Plant) 5:35 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, Clavinet John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1995: Helmet with David Yow (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1998: L.A. Guns (Hollywood Rehearsal) 1999: Eric Gales (Whole Lotta Blues: Songs of Led Zeppelin) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2002: Derek Trucks, Eric Gales, & Matt Tutor (All Blues d Up: This Ain t No Tribute to Rock & Roll s Finest) 2005: Hampton String Quartet (Take No Prisoners!) 2006: Greg Reeves & Erica Stock (Dub Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Zepparella (Pleasing Pounding) Samples 1986: Beastie Boys ("Time to Get Ill") 1988: Robert Plant ("Tall Cool One")

The Rover (song) - Wikipedia

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

"The Rover" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1972 Genre Heavy metal Length 5:37 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"The Rover" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, being the second track on their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. The song was originally meant to be an acoustic piece, being written at Bron-Yr-Aur in 1970 and then recorded at Stargroves during the Houses of the Holy sessions in 1972.[1][2] However, the band decided to hold the track off the Houses of the Holy album, and the song eventually saw its way onto Led Zeppelin s next studio album Physical Graffiti. By this time it had obtained a distinctly heavier feel, with several studio overdubs having been laid down by Jimmy Page in 1974.[2] "The Rover" opens with a heavy drum beat from John Bonham, and throughout the song, Page plays a distinctive riff using a Phase Shifter effect. The riff is in the key of E major, and the solo uses a F# minor scale. "Rover" is old British slang term for a wanderer, and the lyrics are fitting to this definition: I ve been to London, seen seven wonders. I know to trip is just to fall . . . In fields of plenty, when heaven sent me. I saw the kings who rule them all. The sleeve credit for this track includes the line "Guitar lost courtesy Nevison...Salvaged by the grace of Harwood", which would seem to be a reference to difficulties encountered during the mixing of the track, "Harwood" being Keith Harwood and "Nevison" referring to Ron Nevison, both audio engineers on Physical Graffiti .[2] "The Rover" was never played live in its entirety at Led Zeppelin concerts, although the band played the opening bars as an introduction to "Sick Again" throughout their 1977 concert tour of the United States.[2] However, the song was rehearsed in full, as can be heard on bootleg recordings of the band s soundcheck rehearsal at the Chicago Stadium on July 6, 1973. This rehearsal took place before the opening date of the second leg of the band s 1973 US Tour.[2] Also in 1972, instrumental themes from the song were played in a "Whole Lotta Love" medley during a concert in Sydney. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Formats and tracklistings 1975 7" single (Thailand: Atlantic FT 206) A. "The Rover" (Page, Plant) 5:44 B. "Trampled Under Foot" (Jones, Page, Plant) 5:35

 

 

 

 

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1995: Dream Theater (A Change of Seasons EP, medley) 1996: Marq Torien (The Songs Remain Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 1999: Van Halen (Golden West Ballroom: Live 1976 [recorded live 1976]) 2002: Primal Fear (The Music Remains the Same: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Zepparella (Live at 19 Broadway) 2007: Ex Voto (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix]) 2007: various artists (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin: The Essential Collection)

In My Time of Dying - Wikipedia

"In My Time of Dying" is a traditional gospel music song that has been covered by many rock musicians since the early 1960s. The first known recording of this song was under the title "Jesus Make Up My Dying Bed" recorded by blues-gospel guitarist Blind Willie Johnson; the sides were recorded over the period 1927-1930. "Jesus Goin A-Make Up My Dyin Bed" is mentioned in historian Robert Emmet Kennedy s Black Cameos published in 1924, on Louisiana street performers, and also listed in the Cleveland Library s Index to Negro Spirituals.[1][2] Currently Johnson s version is not registered with any copyright association and resides in public domain.[3] Charlie Patton’s variant was titled "Jesus is a Dying-Bed-Maker"[4] "In My Time of Dying" has also been covered by numerous artists including Shocking Blue, John Sebastian, Martin L. Gore, John Cougar Mellencamp, The Be Good Tanyas, Jeff Lang, Bob Dylan and, most famously, Led Zeppelin. Contents 1 Bob Dylan version 2 John Sebastian version 3 Led Zeppelin version 3.1 Formats and tracklistings 3.2 Personnel 3.3 Cover versions 3.3.1 Album versions 3.3.2 Live versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Bob Dylan version The song gained greater prominence in popular music when Bob Dylan included a version (along with several others dealing with the subject of death) on his 1962 eponymous debut album. The song had a slightly different name on the Dylan album, "In My Time of Dyin " (as did the later Shocking Blue cover). On the liner notes to the album: "Dylan had never sung In My Time of Dyin prior to this recording session. He does not recall where he first heard it. The guitar is fretted (i.e., he plays slide guitar) with the lipstick holder he borrowed from his girl, Suze Rotolo, who sat devotedly and wide-eyed through the recording session."

 

   

 

 

 

 

Dylan s version is likely based on Joshua White s 1933 recording and arrangement.[5] The song s running time is 2:40. John Sebastian version John Sebastian s version of the song, under the title "Well, Well, Well," is the opening selection on his 1971 album The Four of Us. Sebastian s arrangement, credited to Joshua White, is lyrically similar to Dylan s, but features an up-tempo blues-rock approach with no slide guitar. The musicians on this version, which was produced by Paul A. Rothchild, include Sebastian (guitar and vocal), Paul Harris (keyboards), Greg Reeves (bass), and Dallas Taylor (percussion). With a running time of 2:20, "Well, Well, Well" is one-fifth as long as the rendition of the song Led Zeppelin would record three years later. Led Zeppelin version "In My Time of Dying" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released February 24, 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock, blues-rock, blues Length 11:06 Label Swan Song Records Writer Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham ProducerJimmy Page

Led Zeppelin s "In My Time of Dying" was released on their sixth album Physical Graffiti; it is the third song on the album, and closes Side 1 of the album s original double-LP configuration. At 11:05, it is the longest studio track on any Led Zeppelin studio album, but contains no long instrumental passages despite its extended timing. As Physical Graffiti was exceptionally successful commercially, achieving RIAA 16x Platinum status, Led Zeppelin s rendition of the song is probably the most widely known one. Led Zeppelin had previously included a photograph of Blind Willie Johnson on the cover of their earlier album, Led Zeppelin II, and lyrical inspiration for their version appears to come from Johnson s recording. Despite this, however, Led Zeppelin s version of the song is credited to the group s musicians Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham, and is registered with the copyright association ASCAP with the unique title code 390282185.[6] Jimmy Page s guitar tuning for this song is an open A chord (E / A / E / A / C# / E from bottom to top), and (with "What Is and What Should Never Be") is one of the few instances where Page played slide guitar on a Led Zeppelin recording. John Paul Jones played a fretless bass. Meanwhile, the distinctive, powerful drumming sounds of John Bonham were recorded in the same way as those on the track "When the Levee Breaks" from Led Zeppelin s fourth album.[7] Because of its improvisational nature the band never had a rehearsed ending for the song. The studio version ends with: "I m going to make it my dyin , dyin , dyin ..." After a few seconds of silence followed by a dramatically-feigned coughing fit (likely by John Bonham) is heard. Playing along, Plant quips "cough" as an apt final word for the song. Bonham can then be heard exclaiming, "That s gonna be the one, isn t it?", referring to that particular take. This is followed by a different voice (likely that of recording engineer Andy Johns) saying through the talk-back microphone "Come have a listen, then." Bonham then releases the clutch of his hi-hat and says (rather sheepishly) "Oh, yes. Thank you." In the May 2008 issue of Uncut Magazine, Page elaborated on the humorous reaction in the studio which can be heard at the end of the song: We were just having such a wonderful time. Look, we had a framework for "In My Time Of Dying", Ok, but then it just takes off and we re just doing what Led Zeppelin do. We re jamming. We re having a ball. We. Are. Playing.[8]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

"In My Time of Dying" was played during Led Zeppelin s 1975 and 1977 concert tours, where Robert Plant dedicated the song to the British Labour Party s Chancellor of the Exchequer, Denis Healey. When played live, the band tuned the song down one step. Although performed in 1977, Plant initially was not keen on singing the song after suffering a near-fatal car crash in 1975, due to its fatalistic lyrical theme.[7] This was one of the few live songs where Page switched to his black and white Danelectro guitar, which he also used for "White Summer" and "Kashmir". One live version of "In My Time of Dying", from Led Zeppelin s performance at Earls Court on May 24, 1975, is featured on disc 2 of the Led Zeppelin DVD, and its promotional sampler. Page performed this song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of "In My Time of Dying" performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Page also included the song as part of his solo Outrider tour. "In My Time of Dying" was performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on December 10, 2007. The 2006 Season 2 opener for the CW Television Network show Supernatural was titled "In My Time of Dying", as classic rock is the only music featured on the show. The song "Come Down Easy" by British shoegaze group Spacemen 3 also bears a distinct resemblance. Formats and tracklistings 1975 7" single edition (Thailand: Atlantic Ft 205) A. "In My Time of Dying" [Part 1] (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 8:03 B1. "In My Time of Dying" [Part 2] (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 3:02 B2. "Houses of the Holy" (Page, Plant) 4:01 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions With credits Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham Album versions 1991: Lydia Lunch (Shotgun Wedding) 1994: Pride and Glory (Pride and Glory) 1968: Fear Itself featuring Ellen MacIlwaine 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2003: Big Sugar (Hit & Run) 2003: Martin L. Gore (Counterfeit²) (Mute STUMM 214, 2003) 2007: Zepparella (Pleasing Pounding) Live versions 1988-1989: Jimmy Page 1993:Coverdale/Page

Houses of the Holy (song) - Wikipedia

"Houses of the Holy" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded May 1972 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal Length 4:02 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant

 

 

 

 

Producer Jimmy Page

"Houses of the Holy" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. The track is a mid-tempo rock song, heavy on bass and featuring a distinctive Jimmy Page guitar riff. In order to create the layered guitar introduction and fade-out, Page used a Delta T digital delay unit.[1] The squeak of John Bonham s drum pedal can be heard throughout the song. Lyrically, the song is an ode to Led Zeppelin concerts, with the "Houses of the Holy" referring to the arenas and auditoriums in which the band performed. Despite this, the song was never played live by Led Zeppelin.[1] Although the name of the song is "Houses of the Holy," the track does not appear on the earlier-released album Houses of the Holy. It was originally set to be the title track of that album but was removed when the band decided it did not fit. The song did not require any further re-mixing for its inclusion on Physical Graffiti, having already been fully mixed by audio engineer Eddie Kramer at the Electric Lady sessions in June 1972.[1] Contents 1 Chart positions 1.1 Single 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Chart positions Single Chart (1975) Peak position Italian Singles Chart [2] 27 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1989: Fool Killers (The Song Retains the Name) 1993: Folkadelic (The Song Retains the Same II) 2006: Joe Lesté (World s Greatest Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Jean Synodinos (Breathe) 2006: The Rockies (The Music of Led Zeppelin) 2006: Greg Reeves & Erica Stock (Dub Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Interface (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix]) 2007: various artists (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin: The Essential Collection) 2008: Pat Travers (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute)

Trampled Under Foot - Wikipedia

"Trampled Under Foot" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti

 

 

B-side "Black Country Woman" Released April 2, 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock, funk rock, funk metal[1] Length 5:37 Label Swan Song Writer(s) Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones ProducerJimmy Page

"Trampled Under Foot" (also sometimes seen as "Trampled Underfoot") is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin, featured on their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Overview Accolades Formats and tracklistings Chart positions Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Overview The song was written by Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, and evolved out of a jam session in 1972.[2] The lyrics were inspired by blues musician Robert Johnson s 1936 "Terraplane Blues."[3] A Terraplane is a classic car, and the song uses car parts as metaphors for sex—"pump your gas," "rev all night," etc.[4] The themes of these songs however differ; "Terraplane Blues" is about infidelity, while "Trampled Under Foot" is about giving in to sexual temptation.[5] Much rehearsal went into perfecting the relentless semi-funk riff that dominates this song.[3] John Paul Jones has credited Stevie Wonder with the inspiration for the beat, which he played on a clavinet.[3][6] While both riffs are funky with a vaguely similar pattern, they are readily distinguishable. The guitar lick after the verse is also reminiscent of the slide riff in the Sam & Dave song "Soul Man." [7] Backed with a solid backbeat from Bonham, the song would later be sampled in dance remixes and the BBC television programme the Old Grey Whistle Test, synchronised the song with a black and white filmclip featuring dance hall girls. Guitarist Jimmy Page played wah-wah and, as producer, employed backwards echo on the recording.[3][8] "Trampled Under Foot" became a standard part of Led Zeppelin concerts from 1975 onwards, being played on every tour until 1980.[3] It was also performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on 10 December 2007. When the song was played live, the band would often extend it with lengthy guitar and keyboard solos, and sometimes Plant would add lyrics from the song "Gallows Pole." Along with "No Quarter," "Trampled Under Foot" showcased Jones skills as a keyboard player when performed on stage. A notable example is the version played at the Earls Court Arena in 1975, as featured on the Led Zeppelin DVD, which includes an extended solo by Jones on a Hohner Clavinet D6. It is also notable that Plant rarely sang all the different verses of the song live, and sang a verse (with small alterations sometimes) twice or even three times. "Trampled Under Foot" was frequently played on the radio when it was first released, charting at #38 on Billboard s Hot 100 chart. One of Plant s favorite Led Zeppelin songs, he sang it on his 1988 Now and Zen tour, and also at his daughter Carmen s 21st birthday party in November 1989, with Jason Bonham on

 

 

 

 

 

 

drums. Led Zeppelin did not release any singles in the United Kingdom until 1997, when "Whole Lotta Love" was released 28 years after it was written. There were several pressings made of "Trampled Under Foot" as a single in 1975 in time for the band s Earl s Court concerts, but they were all shelved before being released, and are today highly sought-after collectors items.[3][4] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Melody Maker United Kingdom "Best Song of the Year" 1975 2 Radio Caroline United Kingdom "Top 500 Tracks" [9] 1999 398 Digital Dream Door United States "The 100 Greatest Recordings From 1975" [10] 2007 115 Formats and tracklistings 1975 7" single (US/Australia/El Salvador/New Zealand: Swan Song SS 70102, Austria/Germany: Swan Song SS K 19402, Brazil: Atlantic ATL 1-15-101-012, Canada: Swan Song SWS 70102, Chile: Atlantic 70102, France/Holland: Swan Song SS 19402, Italy: Swan Song K 19402, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-1361A, Mexico: Swan Song G-1514, Portugal: Atlantic ATL NS 28162, South Africa: Swan Song SNS 100, Spain: Swan Song SS 45-1205) A. "Trampled Under Foot" (Jones, Page, Plant) 5:35 B. "Black Country Woman" (Page, Plant) 4:24 1975 7" promo (UK: Swan Song SSK 19403) A. "Trampled Under Foot" (Jones, Page, Plant) 5:35 B. "Black Country Woman" (Page, Plant) 4:24 Chart positions Chart (1975) Peak position US Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart [11] 38 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles Chart [12] 28 US Record World 100 Top Pop Chart [13] 39 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [14] 41 Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart 80 Personnel Robert Plant – vocals Jimmy Page – guitars John Paul Jones – bass guitar, clavinet John Bonham – drums Cover versions 1992: Michael Hall (Love Is Murder) 1997: The Honeymoon Killers (Sing Sing (1984–1994) [recorded 1984]) 1999: Eric Gales (Whole Lotta Blues: Songs of Led Zeppelin) 2003: various artists (A Bluegrass Tribute: Pickin on Led Zeppelin, Volume II) 2005: Hampton String Quartet (Take No Prisoners!) 2005: Tracy G (Hip Hop Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Greg Reeves & Eric Stock (Dub Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2007: Zepparella (A Pleasing Pounding) 2008: Chuck Bonnett (Misty Mountain Hop: A Millennium Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

Kashmir (song) - Wikipedia

"Kashmir" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti

 

 

 

Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock Length 8:29 Label Swan Song Writer Page, Plant, Bonham Producer Jimmy Page

"Kashmir" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin from their sixth album Physical Graffiti, released in 1975. It was written by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant (with contributions from John Bonham) over a period of three years, with the lyrics dating back to 1973. Contents 1 Overview 2 Influence 2.1 Accolades 3 Formats and tracklistings 4 Chart positions 4.1 Single (Digital download) 5 Sources 6 References 7 External links Overview All four members of Led Zeppelin have agreed that it is one of their best musical achievements.[1] John Paul Jones suggested that it showcases all of the elements that made up the Led Zeppelin sound.[2] Plant has stated that "Kashmir" is the "definitive Led Zeppelin song",[3] and that it "was one of my favourite [Led] Zeppelin tracks because it possessed all the latent energy and power that wasn t heavy metal. It was something else. It was the pride of Led Zeppelin."[4] During a television interview in January 2008, he also named "Kashmir" as his first choice of all Led Zeppelin songs that he would perform, commenting "I m most proud of that one".[5] Page has indicated he thinks that the song is one of the band s best compositions.[6] The song centres around a signature chord progression guitar riff, which first appeared on Page s home-studio work tapes.[2] It was initially a tuning, an extension of a guitar-cycle that Page had been working on for years. This was the same cycle that produced "Black Mountain Side," "White Summer" and the unreleased track, "Swan-song."[2] As bass player and keyboardist John Paul Jones had been late for the recording sessions, Page used the time to work on the riff with drummer John Bonham. The two demoed it late in 1973.[7] Plant later added the middle section and in early 1974 Jones added all the string parts.[2][7] The guitar was played in an alternative guitar tuning: the strings are tuned to Open Dsus4 or DADGAD. Bonham s drums feature a phasing effect courtesy of an early Eventide phaser supplied by engineer Ron Nevison.[8] Plant has stated that Bonham s drumming is the key to the song: "It was what he didn t do that made it work".[2] The song also includes many distinctive musical patterns of classical Moroccan, Indian and Middle Eastern music. Page explained that "I had a sitar for some time and I was interested in modal tunings and Arabic stuff. It started off with a riff and then employed Eastern lines underneath."[4] Orchestral brass and strings with electric guitar and mellotron strings are also used in the song. This is one of the few Led Zeppelin songs to use outside musicians. Session players were brought in for the string and horn sections.[7] According to Jones, "the secret of successful keyboard string parts is to play only the parts that a real string section would play. That is, one line for the First Violins, one line for Second Violins, one for Violas, one for Cellos, one

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

for Basses. Some divided parts [two or more notes to a line] are allowed, but keep them to a minimum. Think melodically".[9] The lyrics to the song - originally called "Driving to Kashmir" - were written by Plant in 1973 immediately after Led Zeppelin s 1973 US Tour, in an area he called "the waste lands"[4] of Southern Morocco, while driving from Goulimine to Tantan in the Sahara Desert.[2][7] This was despite the fact that the song is named for Kashmir, a region in the northernmost part of the Indian subcontinent.[10] As Plant explained to rock journalist Cameron Crowe: The whole inspiration came from the fact that the road went on and on and on. It was a single-track road which neatly cut through the desert. Two miles to the East and West were ridges of sandrock. It basically looked like you were driving down a channel, this dilapidated road, and there was seemingly no end to it. Oh, let the sun beat down upon my face, stars to fill my dreams... It s one of my favourites...that, All My Love and In the Light and two or three others really were the finest moments. But Kashmir in particular. It was so positive, lyrically.[2] In an interview he gave to William S. Burroughs in 1975, Page mentioned that at the time the song was composed, none of the band members had even been to Kashmir.[11] The song runs for 8:28, a length that radio stations usually consider too long to play. However, upon its release radio stations had no problem playing "Kashmir," especially after seeing "Stairway to Heaven", which was almost as long, do so well. (Original LP releases of Physical Graffiti incorrectly list the song s length as 9:41.) "Kashmir" was played live at almost every Led Zeppelin concert from its debut in 1975. One live version, from Led Zeppelin s performance at Knebworth in 1979, is featured on disc 2 of the Led Zeppelin DVD. This performance came from the band s first show at the venue, on 4 August. The surviving members of Led Zeppelin also performed "Kashmir" at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert in 1988. It was again performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the The O2, London on 10 December 2007. When the band performed the song live, Robert Plant would switch the last verse with the second verse after singing the first verse normally. The third verse would also be sung normally in its original spot. When Led Zeppelin came together for Atlantic records 40th Anniversary in 1988, Robert accidentally sang the second verse twice. He admitted to doing this by singing "Oh father of the four winds fill my sails (again) across the sea of years" during the fourth verse. He never ended up singing the third verse ("Oh pilot of the storm...") before the mistake. However, he did sing "With talk and song from tongues..." during the third verse while trying to correct it by singing "I will return again..." halfway through. Also Plant, known for his improvision while performing, would ad lib a lot during "Kashmir". He would add in "sweet mama", "slowly dyin ", "now just a minute", "sweet darlin ", and he would stutter the words "baby" and "mama". He would also end that section with "there s no denyin what ma gunna do yeah." Page and Plant recorded another version in 1994, released on their album No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded. For this arrangement, they added an orchestra and Egyptian musicians. Led Zeppelin expert Dave Lewis describes "Kashmir" as: Unquestionably the most startling and impressive track on Physical Graffiti, and arguably the most progressive and original track that Led Zeppelin ever recorded. Kashmir went a long way towards establishing their credibility with otherwise sceptical rock critics. Many would regard this track as the finest example of the sheer majesty of Zeppelin s special chemistry.[7] Influence Lists of miscellaneous information should be avoided. Please relocate any relevant information into appropriate sections or articles. (December 2009) The song was used in the James Bond film Goldeneye. Playing at the beginning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

credits, only a small section was used. The tune was sampled by Sean "Puffy" Combs (now known as Diddy) in his song "Come With Me" from the soundtrack to the movie Godzilla (1998), which featured Jimmy Page, who endorsed Combs adaptation, appears in the video and also played it with him on Saturday Night Live. The opening riff of the song "Wake Up" by rap metal band Rage Against the Machine is adapted from the opening chords of Kashmir. Snippets of the song were used in the X Factor series 3 and in the German TV show TV Total. Since mid-2006, the wrestling company Total Nonstop Action Wrestling has used an instrumental remix of "Kashmir" for one of the top superstars of that company, Kevin Nash. The song was employed on the soundtrack to the French 1977 action-adventure film Le Crabe-Tambour (The Drummer Crab).[12] The song is sampled in the D12 song "Fight music" In the movie Ocean s 12, Linus (Matt Damon) requests to play a more central role in the heist and convinces Danny (George Clooney) and Rusty (Brad Pitt) to let him join them in the meeting with a contact named Matsui. In the meeting, Matsui, Danny and Rusty speak in a strange, metaphorical code-language. When it comes to Linus s turn to say something, who is already baffled as he cannot understand what the other are saying, he can t think of anything so he recites the first two lines of the song. However, Matsui takes this as an insult and Linus is forced to wait outside for the remainder of the interview. When Danny and Rusty come outside afterwards, Rusty asks him "Kashmir?" In the movie Fast Times at Ridgemont High, when Mike Damone tells Mark Ratner "When it comes down to making out, whenever possible, put on side one of Led Zeppelin IV", "Kashmir" can be heard playing in Mark s (Brian Backer) car while he is on a date. (obvious mistake from the writers.) In an episode of The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson, Craig Ferguson brought out a monkey puppet named Cronus that said that he was going to perform Kashmir that evening, but he forgot the words due to taking too many drugs in the 1970s.[13] The song was ranked 140th in Rolling Stone s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time in 2004.[14] In 2009 it was named the 21st greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1.[15] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Classic Rock United States "The Top Fifty Classic Rock Songs of All Time" [16] 1995 20 Classic Rock United Kingdom" Ten of the Best Songs Ever!.. (Bubbling under)" [17] 1999 23 VH1 United States "The 100 Greatest Rock Songs of All Time" [18] 2000 62 Rolling Stone United States "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" [19] 2003 140 Blender United States "Standout Tracks from the 500 CDs You Must Own" [20] 2003* Q United Kingdom "1010 Songs You Must Own!" [21] 2004* Q United Kingdom "Ultimate Music Collection - Rock" [22] 2005* Q United Kingdom "100 Greatest Songs of All Time" [23] 2006 74 VH1 United States "VH1 Greatest Hard Rock Songs" [24] 2009 21 JJJ Australia "Hottest 100 of All Time" [25] 2009 98 (*) designates unordered lists. Formats and tracklistings 1975 7" single (Thailand: Atlantic T 026) A. "Kashmir" (Bonham, Page, Plant) 8:28 B1. "Boogie with Stu" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Stewart, Mrs. Valens) 3:51 B2. "Black Country Woman" (Page, Plant) 4:24 Chart positions Single (Digital download)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chart (2007) Peak position UK Singles Chart [26] 80 Swiss Singles Chart [27] 64 US Billboard Hot Digital Songs Chart [28] 42 US Billboard Hot Digital Tracks Chart [29] 49 Canadian Billboard Hot Digital Singles Chart [30] 33 Note: The official UK Singles Chart incorporated legal downloads as of 17 April 2005.

In the Light - Wikipedia

"In the Light" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock Length 8:47 Label Swan Song Records Writer Page/Plant/Jones Producer Jimmy Page

"In the Light" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. Most of it was composed by bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones on his synthesizer. It was based on an earlier song the band had written called "In The Morning" (aka "Take Me Home").[1] The unique sound of the intro to the song was created by Jimmy Page using a violin bow on an acoustic guitar. This was one of three Led Zeppelin songs on which Page used bowed guitar, the others being "Dazed and Confused" and "How Many More Times" (although for both of these he used a bow to play an electric guitar). The song "In the Evening" utilized several tremolo bar drops to mimic the bow sound. "In the Light" was never played live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] According to Jones, Robert Plant was emphatic about wanting to play the song onstage, but because Jones could not reproduce the synthesizer sound properly outside of the studio, he vetoed the idea.[citation needed] In an interview he gave to rock journalist Cameron Crowe, Plant stated that this song was one of Led Zeppelin s "finest moments".[2] Similarly, Page has stated that this is his personal favourite track on Physical Graffiti.[1] He performed this song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. Although not included on their original album Live at the Greek, a version of "In the Light" can be found as a bonus track on the Japanese version of this album, released in 2000. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

 

Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, Clavinet, synthesizer John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek [bonus tracks edition]) 2000: Vladimirs (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2004: Benjamin Levine (Chamber Maid: The Baroque Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

Bron-Yr-Aur (song) - Wikipedia

"Bron-Yr-Aur" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1970 Genre Folk rock Length 2:07 Label Swan Song Records Writer Page

"Bron-Yr-Aur" (Welsh pronunciation: [brɔn.ər.aɪr]) is an acoustic guitar instrumental tune by English rock band Led Zeppelin, and, at two minutes and six seconds in duration, is the shortest studio recording under the band s name. The song was initially written and recorded in 1970 by Jimmy Page during the sessions for the album, Led Zeppelin III, but was eventually released in 1975 on Physical Graffiti. It was named after Bron-Yr-Aur, a cottage in Gwynedd, Wales where the members of Led Zeppelin spent time during the recording of Led Zeppelin III.[1] ("Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" is a different song from Led Zeppelin III.) "Bron-Yr-Aur" is a reflective and relaxed piece, and one of the last acoustic tunes released under the band s name. It features a characteristic open-C6 tuning (C-A-C-G-C-E) and is played on a 1971 [[Martin D-28][1]].[2] This same tuning was also used by Page on the tracks "Poor Tom" and "Friends".[3] Some minor string squeaks and small mistakes were left in by Page to keep the live feel. The song also uses a Chorus pedal on the acoustic guitar, to create a floating sound. The tune was rarely performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts, but can be heard on some bootleg recordings from their sixth American concert tour in August-September 1970, when it was sometimes played as part of their acoustic set.[3] It can be heard on the famous bootleg album Live On Blueberry Hill, on which Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant explains the origins of "Bron-Yr-Aur": This is a thing called Bron-Yr-Aur . This is a name of the little cottage in the mountains of Snowdonia in Wales, and Bron-Yr-Aur is the Welsh equivalent of the phrase Golden Breast . This is so because of its position every morning as the sun rises and it s a really remarkable place. And so after staying there for a while and deciding it was time to leave for various reasons, we couldn t really just leave it and forget about it. You ve probably all been to a place like that, only we can tell you about it and you can t tell us. The studio version of "Bron-Yr-Aur" is played in the concert film The Song

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remains the Same, at the point when the band members are shown driving through New York City in a limousine (although it is not featured on the accompanying soundtrack album). A snippet of the tune can also be heard in the film Almost Famous, one of the rare instances when the band allowed part of their catalogue to be used for a motion picture. Contents 1 2 3 4 Personnel Cover versions Sources References

Personnel Jimmy Page - guitar Cover versions 1994: Richard Gilewitz (Voluntary Solitary) 1995: Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin) 1998: Top Banana (Before the Balloon Went Up) 2001: Robert John Ward, Jr. (Both Sides of the Story) 2001: Richard DeVinck (Going to California) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2) 2004: Jeff Lawrence (Heart of the Son) 2005: Coheed and Cambria (Hidden track on Good Apollo I m Burning Star IV Vol. 1: From Fear Through the Eyes of Madness) Down by the Seaside - Wikipedia

"Down by the Seaside" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1971 Genre Hard rock Length 5:16 Label Swan Song Records Writer Page/Plant

"Down by the Seaside" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. Contents 1 2 3 4 Overview Neil Young influence Personnel Cover versions 4.1 Album versions 4.2 Live versions 5 Sources 6 References 7 External links Overview The song was originally written as an acoustic piece by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant at Bron-Yr-Aur, the cottage in Wales where they went after their 1970

 

concert tour of the United States.[1][2] It was then recorded in 1971 as an electric arrangement and was intended for release on Led Zeppelin IV but was held over and eventually placed on Physical Graffiti to fill up the double album. The song alternates between soft and hard-rocking sections, with the lighter sections employing a tremolo effect on the guitar, or possibly by running it through a Leslie speaker, to give an underwater talking feel. John Paul Jones plays a Hohner "Electra-Piano" electric piano on the track. "Down by the Seaside" was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[2] Plant would later record "Down by the Seaside" as a duet with Tori Amos for the 1995 Led Zeppelin tribute album Encomium. Neil Young influence The song was influenced by Neil Young.[2] The title may be a reference to the song "Down by the River" and the somewhat nasal infection in Plant s vocals may be an homage to Young s distinctive voice. Plant had long admired the work of Young and Stephen Stills. While in the Band of Joy, he covered Buffalo Springfield s "For What It s Worth", now available on Plant s compilation album Sixty Six to Timbuktu. Also, Plant sang lyrics from "On the Way Home," another Buffalo Springfield song, during "How Many More Times" at the Royal Albert Hall performance found on the Led Zeppelin DVD release. Additionally, during performances of "Dazed and Confused" in 1975, Plant often employed lyrics from "Woodstock," a Joni Mitchell song most familiar in its Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young incarnation. Plant also occasionally included "Cinnamon Girl" and "For What It s Worth" in the "Whole Lotta Love" Medley. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, electric piano John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1989: Robert Kuhlmann & Flying Boats (The Song Retains the Name) 1995: Tori Amos with Robert Plant (Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Live versions 1994: The Trash Can Sinatras

Ten Years Gone - Wikipedia

"Ten Years Gone" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock Length 6:33 Label Swan Song Records Writer Page/Plant

"Ten Years Gone" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. Originally intended to be an instrumental piece, Jimmy Page used some 14 guitar tracks to overdub the harmony section.[1] Robert Plant later added lyrics, which are dedicated to an old girlfriend who, ten years

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

earlier, had made him choose either her or his music. Plant explained in an interview in 1975: Let me tell you a little story behind the song "Ten Years Gone" on our new album. I was working my ass off before joining Zeppelin. A lady I really dearly loved said, "Right. It s me or your fans." Not that I had fans, but I said, "I can t stop, I ve got to keep going." She s quite content these days, I imagine. She s got a washing machine that works by itself and a little sports- car. We wouldn t have anything to say anymore. I could probably relate to her, but she couldn t relate to me. I d be smiling too much. Ten years gone, I m afraid. Anyway, there s a gamble for you.[2] In another interview, Plant credited Page with the song s intricate construction: Jimmy is the man who is the music. He goes away to his house and works on it a lot and then brings it to the band in its skeletal state. Slowly everybody brings their personality into it. This new flower sort of grows out of it. "Ten Years Gone" was pain-stakingly pieced together from sections he d written.[3] Some have speculated that this song was a variation of the never-released Led Zeppelin track "Swan Song", the name they chose for their own record label.[1] This is one of the few Led Zeppelin songs in which it is possible to hear the squeak of John Bonham s bass drum pedal in the recording studio, the others being "Since I ve Been Loving You" from 1970 s Led Zeppelin III, "The Ocean" from 1973 s Houses of the Holy, "Houses of the Holy" from 1975 s Physical Graffiti, and "Bonzo s Montreux" from 1982 s Coda. Live versions of this song were performed on Led Zeppelin s 1977 concert tour of the United States. John Paul Jones originally played the melody on an acoustic guitar but then introduced an unusual triple-necked guitar that included a six-string, twelve string, a mandolin and bass pedals.[1] Jimmy Page used his 1960 s Botswanna Brown Fender Telecaster featuring a Parsons and White B-string bender. The band again played the song on the first date of the concerts at Knebworth on August 4, 1979 which was also their last time playing it in concert. They cut it from their set on their second and final Knebworth appearance on August 11, due to problems with the sound system. Page and Plant performed this song once on their Japanese tour at Osaka on February 15, 1996. Jimmy Page also performed this song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of "Ten Years Gone" performed by Page and The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Contents 1 Personnel 2 Cover versions 3 Chart positions 3.1 Jimmy Page and The Black Crowes Single 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2000: Dread Zeppelin (De-jah Voodoo) 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2) 2002: Michael Bluestein (Wild World) 2004: Kevin Russell (My Generation)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

   

   

 

2005: Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Michael Armstrong (Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of Led Zeppelin) Chart positions Jimmy Page and The Black Crowes Single Chart (2000) Peak position US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart [4] 33

Night Flight (song) - Wikipedia

"Night Flight" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1971 Genre Hard rock Length 3:37 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant/Jones

"Night Flight" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. Originally recorded at Headley Grange in 1971, it was intended for Led Zeppelin IV but was held over and placed on Physical Graffiti to fill up the double album.[1] It was written largely by bassist John Paul Jones, who is listed first on the writing credits. Guitarist Jimmy Page played his guitar through a Leslie speaker for this track.[1] A somewhat lyrically ambiguous song, singer Robert Plant recounts the tale of a young man attempting to evade the military draft. A different version was also recorded which included extra backing vocals.[1] The song was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts. However, bootleg recordings exist of the band performing the song during a soundcheck at the Chicago Stadium on 6 July 1973, which took place during Led Zeppelin s 1973 North American tour.[1] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, hammond organ John Bonham - drums Cover versions 2003: Jeff Buckley (Live at Sin-é [bonus tracks edition]) 2007: Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

 

The Wanton Song - Wikipedia

"The Wanton Song" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal Length 4:06 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant

"The Wanton Song" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. The song came about as the result of a jam session at rehearsals and features a sharp, aggressive riff from guitarist Jimmy Page, which like "Immigrant Song" found Page switching back and forth between two notes one octave apart. Lyrically it is mainly about sex, specifically sex with a "wanton woman". For his solo, Page employed a backwards echo (where the echo is heard before the note), and also put his guitar through a Leslie speaker cabinet, as Jimi Hendrix had done on "Little Wing" and "Angel", to create a doppler effect with a Hammond Organ.[1] This was a technique Page had himself used as far back as his work with The Yardbirds, and faced serious opposition from audio engineers when he tried it on the earliest Led Zeppelin recordings. "The Wanton Song" was played live during some of the Led Zeppelin s European and American concerts in 1975, but was then dropped.[1] "The Wanton Song" was played extensively as an opening number during Page and Plant s tours in 1995 and 1998. The song was played live a few times when Jimmy Page teamed up with The Black Crowes in 1999. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1993: Whyos (The Song Retains the Same II) 1999: Sen Dog (The Song Remains Remixed: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2001: Earth Crisis (Last of the Sane) 2006: Hammer of the Gods (Two Nights in North America DVD) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2007: Reconstruction (The Many Faces of Led Zeppelin [remix])

Boogie with Stu - Wikipedia

 

 

"Boogie with Stu" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1971 Genre Blues-rock Length 3:51 Label Swan Song Records Writer Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/ Ian Stewart/Mrs. Valens

"Boogie with Stu" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their 1975 album Physical Graffiti. It was a jam recorded in 1971 at Headley Grange, where the band had done most of the recording for their fourth album. They were using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio and were accompanied by Rolling Stones road manager and piano player, Ian Stewart, who ended up jamming with the band on piano.[1] The working title for this song was "Sloppy Drunk", a title that vocalist Robert Plant came up with.[1] It has been reported that Plant played guitar on the track (with Jimmy Page playing mandolin)[2]. The slapping guitar came from an overdub session with an ARP guitar synth.[1] The final product was a song which was a tribute to Ritchie Valens "Ooh, My Head."[1] Instead of crediting Valens as writer or co-writer, the song was credited to "Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Mrs. Valens/Ian Stewart". Explained Jimmy Page: What we tried to do was give Ritchie s mother credit, because we heard she never received any royalties from any of her son s hits, and Robert did lean on that lyric a bit. So what happens? They tried to sue us for all of the song![3] Led Zeppelin eventually came to a settlement agreement with Valens publishers, although it is not publicly known if his mother received any of that money. Most people would agree however, after listening to both songs, that Boogie with Stu is directly based on the Ritchie Valens song. This song was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] Contents 1 Formats and tracklistings 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Live versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Formats and tracklistings 1975 7" EP (Thailand: Atlantic FT 204) A1. "Boogie with Stu" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Stewart, Mrs. Valens) 3:51 A2. "Custard Pie" (Page, Plant) 4:13 B1. "Night Flight" (Jones, Page, Plant) 3:37 B2. "Down by the Seaside" (Page, Plant) 5:13 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals, acoustic guitar Jimmy Page - mandolin John Paul Jones - bass guitar

 

   

 

 

John Bonham Ian Stewart Cover versions Album versions 1992: Michael Live versions 2007: Rebekah

drums piano White & The White (The White) Pulley & the Reluctant Prophets

Black Country Woman - Wikipedia

"Black Country Woman" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti A-side "Trampled Under Foot" Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1972 Genre Rock Length 4:24 Label Swan Song Writer(s) Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Black Country Woman" is the fourteenth song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1975 album Physical Graffiti. It was originally intended to be part of the Houses of the Holy album, which had been released two years earlier. "Black Country Woman" was an acoustic song recorded in the back garden of Mick Jagger s home, Stargroves, in 1972 (around the same time as "D yer Mak er").[1] At the beginning of the track, recording engineer Eddie Kramer can be heard saying, "Shall we roll it Jimmy?" followed by "Don t want to get this airplane on" about an aeroplane which is heard flying overhead, to which Robert Plant replies "Nah, leave it, yeah." Recording outdoors proved to be difficult. On one occasion at Headley Grange when Plant tried to go outside to sing the song, he was attacked by a flock of angry geese.[1] Originally the song was subtitled "Never Ending Doubting Woman Blues." This was a reference to a final spoken tag left off the finished version which had Plant proclaiming "What s the matter with you mama, never-ending, nagging, doubting woman blues.[1] Black Country refers to the area near to Birmingham in which Robert Plant was brought up. "Black Country Woman" was rarely played live at Led Zeppelin concerts, but was merged into a medley with "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp" on the band s concert tour of the United States in 1977. For this arrangement, John Paul Jones played an upright bass. This song was performed by Robert Plant and Alison Krauss live during their tour supporting the duo s album Raising Sand.[2] Contents 1 Formats and tracklistings 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Live versions 4 Sources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

5 References 6 External links Formats and tracklistings See "Trampled Under Foot" single. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, mandolin John Bonham - drums Ian Stewart - piano Cover versions Album versions 2006: Christie Winn and the Lowdowns (Further Away from Here) 2007: Letz Zep (Letz Zep II: Live in London) Live versions 2008: Robert Plant and Alison Krauss

Sick Again - Wikipedia

"Sick Again" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Physical Graffiti Released 24 February 1975 Recorded 1974 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal Length 4:43 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant

"Sick Again" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin, from the band s 1975 album Physical Graffiti. This song was written by Robert Plant about teenage groupies, or as he called them, the "L.A. Queens", with whom the band were acquainted on their 1973 US Tour.[1] He took pity upon these girls who would flock to the hotel rooms of the band to offer them favors. In an interview he gave in 1975, he provided an explanation of the lyrics: If you listen to "Sick Again," a track from Physical Graffiti, the words show I feel a bit sorry for [the girls]. "Clutchin pages from your teenage dream in the lobby of the Hotel Paradise/Through the circus of the L.A. Queen how fast you learn the downhill slide." One minute she s 12 and the next minute she s 13 and over the top. Such a shame. They haven t got the style that they had in the old days... way back in 68.[2] Plant s vocals are however somewhat hard to hear because they are not prominent in the mix. The song s musical structure alternates between a bluesy E minor motif in the verse section as the vocals are called, followed by a thunderous E minor pentatonic chord sequence in response. A riff in A major is introduced in the chorus, resolved by a bluesy B7 "goodbye chord" arpeggio as an interlude to the verse and bridge. Of particular note is the relentless pounding of drummer John Bonham s bass drum and triplet fills during the open chords of the song s interludes, almost as if to punctuate that this is the heavy section. The very last sound of the very last song on Physical Graffiti is that of Jimmy

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Page s backward echo-processed slide guitar, followed by a pick scrape to close out the song, although shortly afterwards a cough from drummer John Bonham can be heard very faintly.[1] "Sick Again" was frequently performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts, being the second number performed on all the 1975 and 1977 tour dates.[1] When Led Zeppelin performed this live on their 1977 U.S. tour, they started it with the first verse instrumental of "The Rover", and Page here used his Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck Guitar as the song was played directly after "The Song Remains the Same". It was also played in 1979 (a filmed version from Knebworth is featured on the Led Zeppelin DVD), but was dropped for the band s final tour "Over Europe" in 1980.[1] Jimmy Page performed this song on his tour with The Black Crowes in 1999. A version of "Sick Again" performed by Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes can be found on the album Live at the Greek. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) 2007: Zepparella (Pleasing Pounding)

Presence (album) - Wikipedia

Presence Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 31 March 1976 Recorded November 1975, Musicland Studios, Munich, Germany Genre Hard rock, Heavy metal, Blues-rock Length 44:25 Label Swan Song Producer Jimmy Page Singles from Presence "Candy Store Rock/Royal Orleans" Released: 18 June 1976 Presence is the seventh studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released by Swan Song Records on 31 March 1976. The album was written and recorded during a tumultuous time in the band s history, as Robert Plant was recuperating from serious injuries he had sustained in a recent car accident. The album received mixed reviews from critics, and is one of the lowest sellers in the band s catalogue. It was Led Zeppelin s second album to be composed of completely

 

 

 

 

 

original material, after Houses of the Holy. Contents 1 Background 2 Composition 3 Album sleeve design 4 Release and critical reception 5 Track listing 6 Sales chart performance 7 Sales certifications 8 Personnel 9 References 10 External links Background This album was conceived after singer Robert Plant sustained serious injuries from a car accident on the Greek island of Rhodes on 5 August 1975, which forced the band to cancel a proposed world tour which was due to commence on 23 August 1975.[1] At this point, Led Zeppelin were arguably at the height of their popularity. Plant recalled: I was lying there in some pain trying to get cockroaches off the bed and the guy next to me, this drunken soldier, started singing "The Ocean" from Houses of the Holy.[2] During a convalescent period on the Channel Island of Jersey and in Malibu, California, Plant wrote some lyrics, and when guitarist Jimmy Page joined him at Malibu, these compositions were fleshed out. The two prepared enough material for rehearsals to begin at Hollywood s SIR Studio, where drummer John Bonham and bass player John Paul Jones joined them. After a month of rehearsals, the album was recorded in just eighteen days[3] at Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany, with Plant in a wheelchair. This was the fastest recording turnaround time achieved by the band since their début album.[1] The rushed recording sessions were in part a result of Led Zeppelin having booked the studio immediately prior to The Rolling Stones, who were shortly to record songs for their album Black and Blue. Upon their arrival, the Rolling Stones were amazed that Led Zeppelin s album had indeed been completed (both recorded and mixed) in a mere eighteen days. Jimmy Page had simply stayed awake for two days straight to perform all of the guitar overdubs. In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1998, Page stated that he worked an average of 18 to 20 hours a day during the mixing period at Musicland Studios: [A]fter the band finished recording all its parts, me and the engineer, Keith Harwood, just started mixing until we would fall asleep. Then whoever would wake up first would call the other and we d go back in and continue to work until we passed out again.[4] The recording sessions for Presence were also particularly challenging for Plant. The studio was in a basement of an old hotel, and the singer felt claustrophobic.[5] He also experienced physical difficulties as a result of his car accident, and missed his family. He later explained: I spent the whole process in a wheelchair, so physically I was really frustrated. I think my vocal performance on it is pretty poor. It sounds tired and strained. The saving grace of the album was "Candy Store Rock" and "Achilles Last Stand". The rhythm section on that it was so inspired ... I was furious with Page and [band manager] Peter Grant. I was just furious that I couldn t get back to the woman and the children that I loved. And I was thinking, is all this rock n roll worth anything at all?[5] The album was completed on 26 November 1975. This was the day before Thanksgiving, and in a telephone call to Swan Song Records, Page suggested the album be named Thanksgiving.[1] This idea was quickly dropped, in favour of a title which it was thought would represent the powerful force and presence that the band members felt surrounded the group.[1]

 

 

 

   

 

Composition Six of the seven songs on the album are Page and Plant compositions; the remaining song being credited to all four band members. This can be explained by the fact that the majority of the songs were formulated at Malibu, where Page (but not Bonham and Jones) had initially joined a recuperating Plant.[1] With Plant at less than full fitness, Page took responsibility for the album s completion, and his playing and production dominate the album s tracks.[1] Both Page and Plant had planned this album s recording session as a return to hard rock, much like their debut album, except at a new level of complexity. It marked a change in the Led Zeppelin sound towards more straightforward, guitar-based jams. Whereas their previous albums contain electric hard rock anthems balanced with acoustic ballads and intricate arrangements, Presence was seen to include more simplified riffs, and is Led Zeppelin s only studio album that features neither acoustic tracks nor keyboards (almost buried in the mix, a lone acoustic guitar can be heard on "Candy Store Rock"). The changed stylistic emphasis on this album was a direct result of the troubled circumstances experienced by the band around the time of its recording. As Page said at the time: I think it was just a reflection of the total anxiety and emotion of that period. There s a hell of a lot of spontaneity about that album. We went in with virtually nothing and everything just came pouring out.[1] Plant expressed similar views, stating: It was really like a cry of survival. There won t be another album like it, put it like that. It was a cry from the depths, the only thing that we could do.[6] In contrast to earlier albums which contained several tracks that the band chose to play live at Led Zeppelin concerts, only two tracks from Presence were played in full on stage while the band was active. "Achilles Last Stand" and "Nobody s Fault but Mine" were added to the setlist for the 1977 tour of the United States and stayed through the band s final concerts in 1980. Some of the guitar solo from "Tea for One" was also incorporated into "Since I ve Been Loving You" in these shows, but the actual song was never performed live until the Page and Plant tour of Japan in 1996, where it received three airings backed by an orchestra. "For Your Life" was played in full by Led Zeppelin for the first time at the Ahmet Ertegün Tribute Concert on 10 December 2007. The lack of live interpretations of the Presence material is perhaps understandable given that it would be a full year before they would return to the road.[1] Album sleeve design The cover and inside sleeve of this album, created by Hipgnosis, features various images of people interacting with a black obelisk-shaped object. Inside the album sleeve, the item is referred to simply as "The Object". It was intended to represent the "force and presence" of Led Zeppelin.[1] In the liner notes of the first Led Zeppelin boxed set, Jimmy Page explained: There was no working title for the album. The record-jacket designer said `When I think of the group, I always think of power and force. There s a definite presence there. That was it. He wanted to call it `Obelisk . To me, it was more important what was behind the obelisk. The cover is very tongue-in-cheek, to be quite honest. Sort of a joke on [the film] 2001. I think it s quite amusing. The background used in the cover photograph is of an artificial marina that was installed inside London s Earl s Court Arena for the annual Earl s Court Boat Show that was held in the winter of 1974–1975. This was the same venue where the band played a series of concerts a few months after the boat show, in May 1975. In 1977 Hipgnosis and George Hardie were nominated for a Grammy Award in the category of best album package. The album was released on 31 March 1976, having been delayed by the completion of the album sleeve.[1] In Britain it attained one of the highest ever advance

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

orders, shipping gold on the day of release. In America it peaked at #1 on Billboard s Pop Albums chart, leaping from #24 inside two weeks.[1] The album s catalogue numbers were Swan Song SS 8416 in the U.S. and Swan Song SSK59402 in the UK, before being changed to 92439-2 for when the remastered version was released. However, this album has not been one of the band s biggest sellers, and it received somewhat lukewarm reviews upon its release.[11] In late 1976 the album was also somewhat overshadowed by the release of the band s movie and soundtrack The Song Remains the Same.[1] According to Dave Lewis, "the direct-hard hitting nature of the seven recordings failed to connect with a fan base more accustomed to the diversity and experimental edge of their previous work.[12] Indeed, Page later himself acknowledged that, because the album conveys a sense of urgency resulting from the troubled circumstances in which it was recorded, "it s not an easy album for a lot of people to access ... [I]t s not an easy album for a lot of people to listen to."[13] However, despite its initially subdued reception, Lewis considers that Presence has become a much underrated element of their catalogue. The basic drums-bass-guitars formula may lack the diversity of previous Zeppelin sets, but in terms of sheer energy, Presence packs a considerable punch, and has emerged as one of their most potent performances ... This album is also a triumph for Jimmy Page. His production and dominant guitar style has an urgency and passion that reflects the troubled period that the group were going through at the time. Presence is Led Zeppelin with their backs against the wall.[1] Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Achilles Last Stand" Page, Plant 10:25 2."For Your Life" Page, Plant 6:24 3."Royal Orleans" Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant 2:58 Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Nobody s Fault but Mine" Page, Plant 6:27 2."Candy Store Rock" Page, Plant 4:11 3."Hots On for Nowhere" Page, Plant 4:43 4."Tea for One" Page, Plant 9:27 Sales chart performance Chart (1976) Peak Position Japanese Albums Chart [14] 2 Norwegian Albums Chart [15] 4 UK Albums Chart [16] 1 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums Chart [17] 1 US Record World Top Pop Albums Chart [18] 1 Swedish Albums Chart [19] 8 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [20] 1 Canadian RPM Top 100 Albums Chart [21] 16 New Zealand Top 50 Albums Chart [22] 8 German Albums Chart [23] 27 Spanish Albums Chart [24] 7 French Albums Chart [25] 5 Australian Kent Music Report Albums Chart 4 Sales certifications Country Sales Certification United Kingdom (BPI) 300,000+Platinum [26] United States (RIAA) 3,000,000+3× Platinum [27] Personnel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums, percussion John Paul Jones – 4- and 8-string bass guitars Jimmy Page – electric guitars, production Robert Plant – vocals, harmonica Additional personnel Barry Diament – mastering (original Compact Disc release) Peter Grant – executive producer Jeremy Gee – tape engineering George Hardie – sleeve design Keith Harwood – engineering, mixing Hipgnosis – sleeve design George Marino – remastered Compact Disc release

Achilles Last Stand - Wikipedia

"Achilles Last Stand" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Presence Released 31 March 1976 Recorded November–December 1975 Genre Heavy metal Length 10:25 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Achilles Last Stand"[1] is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin, featured as the opening track on their 1976 album Presence. It was written by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant at Page s house in Malibu, California where they stayed for a month while Plant recovered from a serious car accident he had sustained in Greece in 1975. The song was then recorded at Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany. Contents 1 Overview 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Live versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Overview "Achilles Last Stand", at 10 minutes and 25 seconds, is the third longest studio recording released by Led Zeppelin (after "In My Time of Dying" at 11:06 and "Carouselambra" at 10:34). It is famous for John Bonham s powerful drumming, John Paul Jones s galloping bass line (played on a custom-built Alembic eight string bass) and Jimmy Page s overdubbed orchestral guitar arrangement (the dozen or so guitar tracks having been recorded in Munich in a single session). Page applied vari-speed during production of this song to speed it up, one of the few times he employed that device in the studio for Led Zeppelin songs.[2]

 

 

 

 

In 1977, he explained: I ll tell you about doing all the guitar overdubs to "Achilles Last Stand." There were basically two sections to the song when we rehearsed it. I know John Paul Jones didn t think I could succeed in what I was attempting to do. He said I couldn t do a scale over a certain section, that it just wouldn t work. But it did. What I planned to try and get that epic quality into it so it wouldn t just sound like two sections repeated, was to give the piece a totally new identity by orchestrating the guitars, which is something I ve been into for quite some time. I knew it had to be jolly good, because the number was so long it just couldn t afford to be half-baked. It was all down to me how to do this. I had a lot of it mapped out in my mind, anyway, but to make a long story short, I did all the overdubs in one night ... I thought as far as I can value tying up that kind of emotion as a package and trying to convey it through two speakers, it was fairly successful.[3] It has been suggested that the title of the song was originally supposed to be known as "Wheelchair Song" as an acknowledgment of Plant s broken ankle where he believed he would never walk again, which was a result of a car accident. Lyrically, the song was inspired by Plant s experiences in Morocco, where he and Page travelled following Led Zeppelin s 1975 Earl s Court concerts.[4] Plant specifically refers to Morocco s Atlas Mountains in the line: "The mighty arms of Atlas hold the heavens from the Earth". This is a double-meaning to imply the Atlas mountains in a physical sense seeming to hold up the sky, as well as the reference to the Titan Atlas and his task to hold up the sky on his shoulders and thus separate it from the Earth. Plant s lyrics were also inspired by some of the poetry he was reading at the time, which includes William Blake. "Albion remains/sleeping now to rise again" is a reference to Blake s engraving The Dance Of Albion. The following is an excerpt from the poem that goes with the song: Albion rose from where he labour d at the Mill with Slaves. Giving himself for the Nations he danc d the dance of Eternal Death. Albion is the most ancient name of Great Britain. Jimmy Page during the 1977 US tour with his Gibson EDS-1275.Jimmy Page has been quoted as saying that "Achilles Last Stand" is his favorite Led Zeppelin song; it became an integral component of almost every Led Zeppelin concert from their 1977 tour of the United States onwards. Though Page initially expected that he would need to use his Gibson EDS-1275 double-necked guitar to play the song live, he realised that it was possible to use the Gibson Les Paul (or occasionally a red Telecaster).[4] One live version, from Led Zeppelin s performance at Knebworth in 1979, is featured on disc two of the Led Zeppelin DVD. Page has mentioned that this song, like several others the band recorded which involved guitar overdubs, was quite challenging to adapt for live performances on stage: "Achilles" is the classic one. When Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards came to hear us play, Keith said, "You ought to get another guitarist; you re rapidly becoming known as the most overworked guitarist in the business." Quite amusing. There are times when I d just love to get another guitarist on, but it just wouldn t look right to the audience.[3] "Achilles Last Stand" was used in the film Dogtown and Z-Boys (2001), one of the few times the band allowed a number from its catalogue to be used in a motion picture. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1994: Cinnamon (Cinnamon II) 1995: Dream Theater (A Change of Seasons EP, medley) 1996: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset, medley) 2000: Assisting Sorrow (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2004: The Classic Rock String Quartet (The Led Zeppelin Chamber Suite: A Classic Rock Tr 2005: The Barbary Coast Guitar Duo (Suites for 2 Guitars) 2006: The String Quartet (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin [bonus DVD edition]) 2007: Letz Zep (Letz Zep II: Live in London) Live versions 1991: The Electric Fence 1995: Andy Scarth

For Your Life - Wikipedia

"For Your Life" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Presence Released 31 March 1976 Recorded November-December, 1975 Genre Hard rock Length 6:20 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"For Your Life" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin, from their 1976 album Presence. During the recording of "For Your Life" at Musicland Studios, Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant was convalescing from a car accident which he had sustained in Greece the previous year, and he delivered his vocal performance from a wheelchair. The song s vocals are notable in part because of the snorting sound heard around 5:30, with the lyrics: "With the fine lines of the crystal payin through your nose". Plant later explained the song s venom was due in part to his observations of the excessive amount of cocaine which had now pervaded and ruined the music scene in Los Angeles, during his stay on the West Coast prior to recording.[1] The lyrics, written by Plant, indicated that one part of the song also had to do with an unnamed female acquaintance of his who got drawn into the Los Angeles drug scene, to whom he wags a finger and says "watch it." Jimmy Page used his 1962 Lake Placid blue Fender Stratocaster for the first time on this track, which was supplied to him by Gene Parsons.[2] Evidence of its usage is clearly present as Page executes numerous "dive bombs" on the instrument s tremolo arm.[3] He would later use it with his band The Firm. In an interview he gave to rock journalist Cameron Crowe, Page commented on the spontaneous nature of the song s construction, saying that it "was made up in the studio, right on the spot".[4][5] This song was never performed live by the band at Led Zeppelin concerts[6] until their reunion show on 10 December 2007 at The O2 in London [[1]]. An arrangement was also worked out for the Coverdale & Page tour of Japan in 1993, but never executed live.[7] Contents 1 Personnel 2 Cover versions

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Live versions 3 Sources 4 References 5 External links Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Live versions 2007: Bustle In Your Hedgerow

Royal Orleans - Wikipedia

"Royal Orleans" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Presence A-side "Candy Store Rock" Released 31 March 1976 Recorded November-December, 1975 Genre Hard rock Length 2:59 Label Swan Song Writer(s) Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Royal Orleans" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin, from their 1976 album Presence. When in New Orleans on concert tours, members of the group would stay at the Royal Orleans Hotel, and the song is reportedly based on an incident that occurred there.[1] The story goes that, once when staying at the hotel in the early 1970s, John Paul Jones accidentally brought a transvestite up to his room, thinking he was a woman. Both smoked marijuana and fell asleep, the transvestite with a lit joint in his/her hand, which caught fire and burned the room down (though everyone escaped). The lyrics include lines such as "Be careful how you choose it" and "Poor whiskers set the room alight" to reference the event. The song alludes to the fact that it was John Paul Jones from the line: And when the sun peeked through John Cameron with Suzanna, He kissed the whiskers, left & right John Cameron was a studio rival of John Paul Jones. The song also alludes to Barry White.[1] In an interview he gave to Mojo magazine in 2007, Jones clarified the reliability of this rumour, stating that: The transvestites were actually friends of Richard [Cole s]; normal friendly people and we were all at some bar. That I mistook a transvestite for a girl is rubbish; that happened in another country to somebody else... Anyway Stephanie ended up in my room and we rolled a joint or two and I fell asleep and set fire to the hotel room, as you do, ha ha, and when I woke up it was

 

 

 

full of firemen![2] "Royal Orleans" is the only song on the album credited to all four members (or any members besides Robert Plant and Jimmy Page). Vocalist Robert Plant wrote most of the lyrics, using the song as a way to poke fun at Jones, allegedly because of a comment Jones once made that vocals were the least important part of the band. The song was the B-side of "Candy Store Rock". Drummer John Bonham played bongo drums on this track.[1] "Royal Orleans" was never performed live by the band at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] Contents 1 Formats and tracklistings 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Live versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Formats and tracklistings 1976 7" single (France: Swan Song SS 19407, New Zealand: Swan Song SS 70110) A. "Royal Orleans" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 2:58 B. "Candy Store Rock" (Page, Plant) 4:07 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1998: Sansi Janiba s Infectious Groove (A Tribute to John Bonham) 2005: Steven Davenport (Green Magic) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Live versions 2007: FMBJ

Nobody s Fault but Mine - Wikipedia

"Nobody s Fault but Mine" is a traditional blues song that has been covered by many musicians since the late 1960s. A gospel under the title "It s Nobody s Fault but Mine" is listed in the 1924 Cleveland Library s Index to Negro Spirituals.[1][2] The first known recording of this song, under the title "It s Nobody s Fault but Mine", was made by blues-gospel guitarist Blind Willie Johnson; the sides were recorded over the period 1927-1930.[3] It is unknown if he was the writer of the track, or simply covering a traditional song. Currently Johnson s version is not registered with any copyright association and resides in public domain.[4] A cover of this song was played intermittently by Jerry Garcia with the Grateful Dead throughout their career, sometimes with lyrics, sometimes without. Earlier versions crediting "traditional, arranged Grateful Dead", while later versions crediting Blind Willie Johnson.[5] Contents 1 Led Zeppelin s version

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

2 3 4 5

1.1 Overview 1.2 Live history 1.3 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Led Zeppelin s version "Nobody s Fault But Mine" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Presence Released 31 March 1976 Recorded November-December, 1975 Genre Blues-Rock, Hard Rock Length 6:27 Label Swan Song Writer Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Nobody s Fault but Mine" was recorded by English rock band Led Zeppelin, and released in 1976 on their album Presence. The Led Zeppelin song is registered with copyright association ASCAP, with the unique title code 440088148.[6] Led Zeppelin had previously included a photograph of Blind Willie Johnson on the cover of their earlier album, Led Zeppelin II, who served as an inspiration for this title. Overview The Led Zeppelin version contains different lyrics in the song such as "brother he showed me the gong", "I got a monkey on my back" and "Devil he told me to roll",[7] which do not appear in the Johnson version. The Led Zeppelin song structure also includes differences in the arrangements within the verse-chorus.[8] Musically there are changes to the tempo, and the track features a phase-treated, delta blues-based riff in E minor (and later E major) from Jimmy Page which is doubled by vocalist Robert Plant. The solo in E Minor Pentatonic, switches to E Major Pentatonic, back to E Minor Pentatonic, and concludes in E Major Pentatonic. Page triple-tracked his guitar intro; playing one guitar an octave higher than the others. Drummer John Bonham and bassist John Paul Jones maintain the rhythm of the song, adding some syncopated accents during repetitions of the introductory phrase. The first half of the song also features a harmonica accompaniment by Plant.[9] Live history From 1977 onwards, "Nobody s Fault but Mine" became a vital component of Led Zeppelin concerts, and was played at virtually every show until the group s final tour of Europe in 1980.[9] One live version, from Led Zeppelin s performance at Knebworth in 1979, is featured on disc 2 of the Led Zeppelin DVD. During live performances, Plant often exclaimed, "Oh Jimmy!" right before Page went into his guitar solo. "Nobody s Fault but Mine" was performed at Led Zeppelin s reunion show at the O2 Arena, London on December 10, 2007. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions With credits Page/Plant 1991: Dread Zeppelin (5,000,000) 1994: Page and Plant (No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded)

 

 

 

 

   

   

Candy Store Rock - Wikipedia

"Candy Store Rock" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album Presence B-side "Royal Orleans" Released June 18, 1976 Recorded November-December, 1975 Genre Hard rock Length 4:07 Label Swan Song Writer(s) Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Candy Store Rock" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released in 1976 on their album Presence. It was also released as a single in the United States, but it did not chart.[1] The track is done in the style of a 1950s rock n roll number, giving it a rather low-key but cheerful flavor. Some of lead singer Robert Plant s lyrics were inspired by parts of various Elvis Presley songs. John Bonham s drumming is controlled rather than bombastic, making heavy use of the timpani. Meanwhile Jimmy Page s guitar solo is short and measured, coming in half way through the song. The band recorded the song at Musicland Studios in Germany, and it only took them about an hour to write it. Plant sang from a wheelchair because he was recovering at the time from a car accident he had sustained in Greece. "Candy Store Rock" was never performed live by the band at Led Zeppelin concerts[2], except for a brief riff by Page at Riverfront Coliseum in Cincinnati, Ohio, on April 20, 1977. However, a one-minute improvisation was played live in concert by Page & Plant as a "Black Dog" introduction on July 26, 1995 at Wembley Arena, London, UK. Robert Plant considers "Candy Store Rock" to be one of his favourite songs from Presence.[2] Contents 1 Formats and tracklistings 2 Personnel 3 Sources

 

 

   

 

1994: 1994: 1995: 1995: 1999: 2000: 2000: 2000: 2003: 2004: 2007: 2007:

The 77s (Drowning with Land in Sight) Cinnamon (Cinnamon III) Page and Plant (Untitled single) Michael White & The White (Plays the Music of Led Zeppelin) John Corabi (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin: The Song Remains Remixed) Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes (Live at the Greek) Orange Moon (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Never Never (Never Never Tribute) various artists (Pickin on Led Zeppelin, Vol. 1-2)[citation needed] Paul Gilbert with John Paul Jones (Guitar Wars) various artists (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin: The Essential Collection)[citation nee Led Zepagain (Led Zepagain II: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

 

4 References 5 External links Formats and tracklistings 1976 7" single edition (US & Australia: Swan Song SS 70110, Canada: Swan Song SWS 70110, Germany: Swan Song SS K 19407, Japan: Warner-Pioneer P-35N, Portugal: Atlantic ATL NS 28176, Spain: Swan Song SS 45-1381) A. "Candy Store Rock" (Page, Plant) 4:07 B. "Royal Orleans"* (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) 2:58 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums

Hots On for Nowhere - Wikipedia

"Hots On for Nowhere" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Presence Released 31 March 1976 Recorded November-December, 1975 Genre Hard rock Length 4:43 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Hots On for Nowhere" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin released in 1976 on their album Presence. The basic structure of this song can be traced to rehearsal sessions for Led Zeppelin s sixth album, Physical Graffiti, as well as the 1975-era live versions of the song "Dazed and Confused".[1] One of the interludes (first heard at around 0:38) can also be heard in Walter s Walk, as well as the snippets of the song included in certain extended live versions of Dazed and Confused. The lyrics were written by Robert Plant about his frustrations with Jimmy Page and Peter Grant.[1] Page used a lake placid blue 1960 Fender Stratocaster for the recording of this song, as can be heard from his use of this guitar s tremolo arm.[1] This is the only Led Zeppelin song in which the word "fuck" is ALMOST used in the lyrics. Plant says "fluck" at the end of the song s first verse ("...time and his bride growing older, I got friends who will give me fluck all..."). Whether the addition of the L is deliberate, it is obvious that the correct word should be pronounced without the L. It is the second time the word shows up in one of the band s songs, as Jimmy Page can be heard muttering it during studio chatter before the start of the song "Friends" on Led Zeppelin III. This song was never performed live by the group at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] However, Jimmy Page later performed it with The Black Crowes on their US tour in 2000. "Hots On for Nowhere" was used in the film Dogtown and Z-Boys (2001), one of the few times the band allowed a number from its catalogue to be used in a motion picture. Contents

 

 

 

 

 

1 Personnel 2 Cover versions 2.1 Album versions 2.2 Live versions 3 Sources 4 References 5 External links Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1996: Nicklebag (12 Hits and a Bump) 1999: Van Halen (Club Days [recorded live 1976]) 2007: Stevie Salas (Sun and the Earth) Live versions 1999-2000: Jimmy Page & The Black Crowes

Tea for One - Wikipedia

"Tea for One" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Presence Released 31 March 1976 Recorded November-December, 1975 Genre Blues-rock Length 9:27 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Tea for One" is the last track on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1976 album Presence. It begins with mid-tempo interplay between guitarist Jimmy Page and drummer John Bonham before settling into a sotto voce groove. The song evolves into a slow blues epic, featuring lyrics which deal with homesickness and loneliness. Much of this was felt by Robert Plant, who recalls sitting alone in a New York hotel during a U.S. concert tour drinking "tea for one". Other members of the band, notably John Bonham, were also widely reported to suffer from homesickness during Led Zeppelin s concert tours. The song recalls an earlier Led Zeppelin song in sound and style, "Since I ve Been Loving You".[1] "Tea for One" came from the desire of the band to return to their roots in order to see what had changed since they were younger. In an interview given in 1977, Page said that the song was the only time I think we ve ever gotten close to repeating the mood of another of our numbers, "Since I ve Been Loving You". The chordal structure is similar, a minor blues. We just wanted to get a really laid-back blues feeling without blowing out on it at all. We did two takes in the end, one with a guitar solo and one without. I ended up sitting there thinking, "I ve got this

 

 

 

 

 

 

guitar solo to do," because there have been blues guitar solos since Eric (Clapton) on Five Live Yardbirds and everyone s done a good one. I was really a bit frightened of it. I thought, "What s to be done?" I didn t want to blast out the solo like a locomotive or something, because it wasn t conductive to the vibe of the rest of the track. I was extremely aware that you had to do something different than just some B.B. King licks.[2] He also said "Tea For One is exceptional. It was to the point, recorded in a couple of takes. Robert s vocals are tremendous. He was doing that while his leg was in a cast."[3] "Tea for One" was never played live in its entirety at Led Zeppelin concerts,[1] but from 1977 some of the guitar solo was incorporated into "Since I ve Been Loving You" at various shows. It was played in full by Page and Plant during their tour of Japan in 1996, where it received three airings backed by an orchestra. Contents 1 Personnel 2 Cover versions 2.1 Album versions 2.2 Live versions 3 Sources 4 References 5 External links Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 2003: Whole Lotta Led (The Bring It On Home Tour) 2006: Joe Bonamassa (You and Me) 2007: Frankie Banali & Friends (24/7/365: The Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Live versions 1996: Page and Plant

In Through the Out Door - Wikipedia

In Through the Out Door Studio album by Led Zeppelin Released 15 August 1979 Recorded November–December 1978, Polar Studios, Stockholm, Stockholm County, Sweden Genre Hard rock, Heavy metal, Blues-rock Length 42:25 Label Swan Song Producer Jimmy Page Singles from In Through the Out Door "Fool in the Rain/Hot Dog" Released: 7 December 1979

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Through the Out Door is the eighth studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was recorded over a three week period in November and December 1978 at ABBA s Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden, and released by Swan Song Records on 15 August 1979. In Through the Out Door was the band s sixth and final release to reach the top of the charts in America, and was the last recorded by the band before the death of drummer John Bonham in 1980. Contents 1 Background 2 Album sleeve design 3 Release 3.1 Accolades 4 Track listing 5 Sales chart performance 6 Sales certifications 7 Personnel 8 References 9 External links Background The album was named by the group to describe its recent struggles amidst the death of Robert Plant s son Karac in 1977, and the taxation exile the band took from the UK as a result of the Harold Wilson and James Callaghan administrations, which also adversely affected other major British bands of the time, such as The Rolling Stones. The exile resulted in the band being unable to tour on British soil for over two years, and trying to get back into the public mind was therefore like "trying to get in through the out door."[1] In contrast to previous Led Zeppelin albums, In Through the Out Door features much greater influence on the part of bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones and vocalist Robert Plant, and relatively less from drummer John Bonham and guitarist Jimmy Page. Two songs from the album—"South Bound Saurez" and "All My Love"—were the only two original Led Zeppelin songs which Jimmy Page had no part in writing. With the exception of "Darlene," a Boogie-Woogie based song credited to all band members (which was eventually released on the 1982 album, Coda), Bonham did not receive writing credits for any of the songs recorded at Polar Studios. This diminished input by Page and Bonham is attributed to the two band members often not showing up on time at the recording studio, with Bonham struggling with alcoholism and Page battling heroin addiction.[2] As Jones said: There were two distinct camps by then, and we [myself and Plant] were in the relatively clean one.[3] Many of the songs were consequently put together by Plant and Jones during the day, with Page and Bonham adding their parts late at night.[4] According to Jones, this was mainly because I had a new toy. I had this big new keyboard. And Robert and I just got to rehearsals early, basically... So Robert and I, by the time everybody turned up for rehearsals, we’d written three or four songs. So we started rehearsing those immediately, because they were something to be getting on with.[5] Both Page and Bonham later expressed reservations about the album. In an interview he gave to Guitar World magazine in 1998, Page stated that he and Bonham: ... both felt that In Through the Out Door was a little soft. I wasn t really keen on "All My Love". I was a little worried about the chorus. I could just imagine people doing the wave and all of that. And I thought, that s not us. That s not us. In its place it was fine, but I wouldn t have wanted to pursue that direction in the future.[6] Years later, Page elaborated that "we wanted, after In Through the Out Door, to make something hard-hitting and riff-based again. Of course, we never got to make that album."[7] He is also quoted as saying "It wasn t the most comfortable

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

album. I think it was very transitional... a springboard for what could have been.[8] Following the recording sessions at Polar Studios, the album was mixed at Page s personal studio at his home in Plumpton.[1] "Wearing and Tearing", "Ozone Baby" and "Darlene" were recorded during sessions for this album, but were dropped due to space constraints. All later appeared on Coda. Album sleeve design The original album featured an unusual gimmick: the album had an outer sleeve which was made to look like a plain brown paper bag, and the inner sleeve featured black and white line artwork which, if washed with water, would become permanently fully colored. There were also six different sleeves featuring a different pair of photos (one on each side; see images at right), and the external brown paper sleeve meant that it was impossible for record buyers to tell which sleeve they were getting. (There is actually a code on the spine of the album jacket, which indicated which sleeve it was—this could sometimes be seen while the record was still sealed.) The pictures all depicted the same scene in a bar (in which a man burns a Dear John letter), and each photo was taken from the separate point of view of someone who appeared in the other photos. The album artwork was designed by Hipgnosis. Storm Thorgerson recalls the design in his book Eye of the Storm: The sepia quality was meant to evoke a non-specific past and to allow the brushstroke across the middle to be better rendered in colour and so make a contrast. This self same brushstroke was like the swish of a wiper across a wet windscreen, like a lick of fresh paint across a faded surface, a new look to an old scene, which was what Led Zeppelin told us about their album. A lick of fresh paint, as per Led Zeppelin, and the music on this album... It somehow grew in proportion and became six viewpoints of the same man in the bar, seen by the six other characters. Six different versions of the same image and six different covers.[9] Did you ever noticed you could affect the dust jacket by putting water on it? If you applied spittle to it or a bit of water, it would change color, like a children s coloring book we based it on. But we didn t tell anyboddy. I don t think Zeppelin told anybody, either.[10] In 1980, Hipgnosis was nominated for a Grammy Award in the category of best album package for In Through the Out Door.[11] Release The album was intended to be released prior to the band s twin concerts at Knebworth in 1979, but production delays meant that it was released shortly after their performances at this event. Plant jokingly referred to the delays at times during the performance on August 4. Despite receiving poor reviews,[1][12] the album went to #1 on Billboard s chart in its second week on the chart. On this album s release, Led Zeppelin s entire catalogue made the Billboard 200 between the weeks of 23 October and 3 November 1979, an unprecedented feat.[1] The album remained on the US top spot for seven weeks and sold three million copies by the end of September 1979.[12] To date, the album has sold six million copies in the US. In Through the Out Door was Led Zeppelin s final album to be released while the band was together. Drummer John Bonham died the next year on 25 September 1980. Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank American Music Award United States Favorite Pop/Rock Album [13] 1980 Nominee Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length 1."In the Evening" Jones, Page, Plan t6:49 2."South Bound Saurez" Jones, Plant 4:12 3."Fool in the Rain" Jones, Page, Plant 6:12 4."Hot Dog" Page, Plant 3:17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Carouselambra" Jones, Page, Plant 10:32 2."All My Love" Jones, Plant 5:51 3."I m Gonna Crawl" Jones, Page, Plant 5:30 Sales chart performance Album Chart (1979) Peak Position Japanese Albums Chart [14] 2 Swedish Albums Chart [15] 17 UK Albums Chart [16] 1 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums [17] 1 US Record World Album Chart [18] 1 US Billboard 200 [19] 1 Norwegian Albums Chart [20] 14 Austrian Album Charts [21] 20 Canadian RPM Top 100 Albums Chart [22] 1 New Zealand Top 50 Albums Chart [23] 1 Australian Kent Music Report Albums Chart 3 German Albums Chart [24] 28 Spanish Albums Chart [25] 5 French Albums Chart [26] 7 Singles Year Single Chart Position 1980 "Fool in the Rain"Billboard Hot 100 21 [27] Sales certifications Album Country Sales Certification Argentina (CAPIF) 30,000+Gold [28] United States (RIAA) 6,000,000 +6× Platinum [29] United Kingdom (BPI) 300,000+Platinum [30] Australia (ARIA) 140,000+2× Platinum [31] Personnel Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums John Paul Jones – bass guitar, keyboards Jimmy Page – acoustic and electric guitar, production Robert Plant – vocals Additional personnel Barry Diament – mastering (original Compact Disc release) Peter Grant – executive producer Hipgnosis – record sleeve Leif Mases – engineering George Marino – remastered Compact Disc release Lennart Östlund – assistant engineering

In the Evening - Wikipedia

"In the Evening" Song by Led Zeppelin

 

from the album In Through the Out Door Released 15 August 1979 Recorded November-December, 1978 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, Progressive Rock Length 6:49 Label Swan Song Writer Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page "In the Evening" is the first song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s eighth studio album, In Through the Out Door, released in 1979. The track has a synthesizer-driven sound backed by a gargantuan guitar repetition. Contents 1 Overview 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Album versions 3.2 Live versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Overview The track features an extended distorted introductory section led by Jimmy Page on guitar. Page may have used a violin bow to create the droning effect at the beginning of the song,[1] as well as a Gizmotron to increase distortion and create the slamming door effect heard at the onset of the guitar solo.[2] (Page would play a very similar section to the intro of "In the Evening" during "Dazed and Confused" using a violin bow, as can be heard on bootleg recordings of Led Zeppelin s concert at Tampa Stadium in 1973). During live performances 1979-1980, Page s violin bow incorporated a laser strobe, which added to the visual effects. "In the Evening" was also one of the few songs that he performed on his 1964 Fender Stratocaster. The Stratocaster s whammy bar was used giving that riff a distinctive diving sound during the solo. The creation of this song can be traced largely to Led Zeppelin bassist and keyboardist, John Paul Jones. When the band was recording this album, Page and drummer John Bonham would usually show up at the studio very late and work through the night. In their absence, "In the Evening" started out with just drums and keyboards created by Jones, who had a new drum machine to work with. The song was performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts during 1979 and 1980. During the 1979 performances, this song would be played directly after Page s guitar distortion solo.[2]One such live version, from Led Zeppelin s performance at Knebworth in 1979, can be seen on the Led Zeppelin DVD. Performances on the 1980 tour could last more than eight minutes. Plant revived the song on his Now and Zen solo tour in 1988. Also, in 1996, this song was played on some concerts of Page & Plant s tour. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, keyboards John Bonham - drums Cover versions Album versions 1989: Twice Shy (The Song Retains the Name) 1997: Jason Bonham Band (In the Name of My Father - The Zepset) 2005: Sly and Robbie (The Rhythm Remains the Same: Sly & Robbie Greets Led Zeppelin) 2005: Tracy G (Hip Hop Tribute to Led Zeppelin)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Live versions 1988: Robert Plant South Bound Saurez - Wikipedia

"South Bound Saurez" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album In Through the Out Door Released 15 August 1979 Recorded November-December, 1978 Genre Hard rock Length 4:12 Label Swan Song Writer Jones/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"South Bound Saurez" is the second song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1979 album, In Through the Out Door. The title may contain a typographical error; it is thought by some that saurez is an attempt at spelling the French word for an evening party, soirée. However, it is possible that there is no typo, as "Saurez" is a wine-producing region in Uruguay, South America. Some of the lyrics in the song attest to this theory, mentioning flying down (southbound), being happy to have his feet on the ground again, watching a woman walk and talk, heavy rhythm, and con carne, the Spanish term for a dish prepared with beef. Contents 1 Overview 2 Personnel 3 Cover versions 3.1 Live versions 4 Sources 5 References 6 External links Overview The song is centered around John Paul Jones s honky-tonk piano. It is credited to Jones and singer Robert Plant. "South Bound Saurez" is one of only two Led Zeppelin songs which Jimmy Page had no part in writing (the other being "All My Love", also from In Through the Out Door). At the time, Page and drummer John Bonham were spending a lot of time together and rarely appeared at the studio when Plant and Jones started working on songs for In Through the Out Door. Page made a few minor mistakes in his guitar part, but opted to leave them in. "South Bound Saurez" was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, keyboards John Bonham - drums Cover versions Live versions 1983: Kenny Price

 

 

Fool in the Rain - Wikipedia

"Fool in the Rain" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album In Through the Out Door B-side "Hot Dog" Released December 7, 1979 Format 7" Recorded November–December 1978 Genre Rock Length 6:08 3:20 (Promotional DJ edit) Label Swan Song Writer(s) John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Fool in the Rain" is a song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1979 album, In Through the Out Door. It was their final U.S. single released during the band s tenure, reaching number 21 on the Billboard Hot 100 in February 1980. Contents 1 Overview 2 Formats and tracklistings 3 Chart positions 3.1 Single 3.2 Single (Digital download) 4 Personnel 5 Cover versions 5.1 Album versions 5.2 Live versions 6 Sources 7 References 8 External links Overview The song exhibits a Latin feel. Drummer John Bonham plays a half-time shuffle beat similar to the "Purdie shuffle" rhythm attributed to session drummer Bernard Purdie, along with a samba-style breakdown. A master drum track shows that the samba breakdown (2:25) was recorded separately. Bass player John Paul Jones and vocalist Robert Plant developed the idea for the samba beat from watching the 1978 FIFA World Cup tournament in Argentina.[1] Guitarist Jimmy Page used an MXR Blue Box effect pedal during the solo to produce the octave sound. Lyrically, the song is about a man who is supposed to meet a woman on a certain street corner. When the woman does not appear, he is filled with grief at being stood up. By the final verse, he realizes that he had been waiting for her on the wrong corner, making him the "Fool in the Rain." This song was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts, as it was heavily studio-based. The piano was quite necessary in the song, but with John Paul Jones on piano, there could be no bass. There is also a twelve-string guitar line at one point in the song and the guitar solo that has to be pulled off. However, on October 5, 2005, Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performed the song with Pearl Jam at a Hurricane Katrina benefit show.[2] Formats and tracklistings

 

 

1979 7" single edition (US/Australia/Canada/New Zealand: Swan Song SS 71003, Ecuador/Uruguay: Atlantic 45-73015, Germany/Holland: Swan Song SS 19421, Japan: Warner Pioneer P-530N, Mexico: Swan Song Gamma G-2269, Spain: Swan Song SS 45-1295) A. "Fool in the Rain" (Jones, Page, Plant) 6:08 B. "Hot Dog" (Page, Plant) 3:15 1979 7" single radio edit (US: Swan Song SS 71003 SP, Italy: Swan Song PR 097) A. "Fool in the Rain" (Jones, Page, Plant) 3:20 B. "Hot Dog" (Page, Plant) 3:15 Chart positions Single Chart (1980) Peak position US Billboard Hot 100 [3] 21 US Cash Box Top 100 Singles [4] 31 US Record World 100 Top Pop Chart [5] 34 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [6] 12 New Zealand Top 50 Singles Chart [7] 44 Single (Digital download) Chart (2007) Peak position Canadian Billboard Hot Digital Singles Chart [8] 69 Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, keyboards John Bonham - drums, percussion Cover versions Album versions 1996: Maná (Hace Mucho Calor) 2001: Azz Izz Band (Based on a True Story) 2006: Hans Annéllsson (Return of the Son of One More Time for the World) 2007: Vanilla Fudge (Out Through the in Door) 2008: O.A.R. with Robert Randolph (Bluegrass Tribute) 2008: Rick Wakeman (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2009: Michael Cavanaugh (In Color) Live versions 1999: Umphrey s McGee 2003: Dave Matthews 2004,2009: O.A.R. 2005: Pearl Jam with Robert Plant Hot Dog (song) - Wikipedia

"Hot Dog" Single by Led Zeppelin from the album In Through the Out Door A-side "Fool in the Rain" Released 15 August 1979 Format 45 RPM Recorded November-December, 1978 Genre Rock, rockabilly Length 3:17 Label Swan Song Writer(s) Page/Plant

 

Producer Jimmy Page

"Hot Dog" is a recorded song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1979 album, In Through the Out Door. It is the only song on the album not co-written by bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones. A rollicking tune done in the style of a country hoe-down, it features some Elvis Presley-like vocals from singer Robert Plant. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Overview Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Overview The song was influenced by American Rockabilly music. It emerged from the band s London pre-production rehearsals, at which it was typical for them to run through old Elvis and Ricky Nelson material from the 1950s.[1] When compared to Ricky Nelson s Hello Mary Lou, there is a striking resemblance. The lyrics about a girl in Texas who "Took my heart" may have been based on a real woman in Plant s life, but he called this a tribute to Texas and the state of mind of the people who lived there. Plant also mentions the name "U-Haul" in one of the song s verses, referencing the American-based, "move-it-yourself" company. The title of the song - Hot Dog - refers to a distinctly American cuisine. Upon listening closely it is possible to hear Jimmy Page counting to four and a slight electronic buzz before the song begins. Page used a Fender Telecaster on this song, outfitted with a device called a B-Bender. This device, which raises the pitch of the guitar s B String via interface with the musician s guitar strap, can be heard at the end of the song s guitar solo. "Hot Dog" was performed live at Led Zeppelin s performances at Knebworth in August 1979, placed rather incongruently between "Ten Years Gone" and "The Rain Song" in the first concert on August 4th, and on their tour of Europe in 1980. It was made available to the record industry in America by Swan Song Records.[1] However, the track was omitted from the Led Zeppelin DVD , which was released in 2003 and instead featured various other songs performed by the band at Knebworth. This is possibly because Plant forgot some of the lyrics of the song when it was played at Knebworth. Formats and tracklistings See "Fool in the Rain" single. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, keyboards John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1993: Dread Zeppelin (Hot & Spicy Beanburger) 1996: Ritual Device & Killdozer ("When the Levee Breaks" CD single) 2002: Shawn Amos (In Between) 2002: Clumsy Lovers (Under the Covers)

Carouselambra - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Carouselambra" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album In Through the Out Door Released 15 August 1979 Recorded November–December, 1978 Genre Hard rock, Progressive rock Length 10:34 Label Swan Song Writer Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Carouselambra" is a song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1979 album, In Through the Out Door. The name Carouselambra is a reference to the first section of the song sounding similar to carousel music. It is the second longest song the band recorded in the studio (to "In My Time of Dying"), clocking in at over ten minutes in length. It is also a very unusual song for the band, as Jimmy Page s guitar work is pushed almost to the background, while John Paul Jones dominates with heavy use of synthesizers. These characteristics have sometimes invited comparisons with progressive rock. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Overview Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Overview "Carouselambra" was conceived during the band s rehearsals at Clearwell Castle in May 1978.[1] The song itself is split in three sections. The first section is a fast-paced showcase of Jones on synthesizer (he overdubbed a bass guitar part), with Robert Plant s vocals mixed down slightly underneath Jones, the drums of John Bonham and Page s guitar chord progression. The second section is much slower in pace, highlighting Page s use of the Gibson EDS-1275 double-necked guitar, the only time he used that instrument on a Led Zeppelin studio song,[1] while Plant sings some reflective lyrics. The final section returns to an up-tempo beat, with all four band members performing in unison. Some of Page s guitar was processed through a Gizmotron, a device that adds bowing sustain. Jones, in an interview, stated he had obtained the Yamaha GX-1 synthesizer from Keith Emerson after Emerson, Lake & Palmer had split-up after completing the album Love Beach. The song is in standard 4/4 timing in the key of C major. The lyrics to the first section of the song follow a rough "ABAB" rhythmical format. In the second and third sections of the song the format changes along with the instruments, but keeps the same tempo in 4/4 and stays in C major. Plant s lyrics, particularly in the first section of the song, are somewhat buried in the mix and are difficult to discern. According to an interview Plant gave in 1979, the song was about someone who, when one day realising the song was written about them, would say, "My God! Was it really like that?"[1] Plant has also said that the lyrics are related to "The Battle of Evermore" with clues at the end where he sings "But guard the seed."[citation needed] "Carouselambra" was never played live by the band at Led Zeppelin concerts. One fan vehemently claimed that the song was performed for an encore at the June 26, 1977 concert at the LA Forum, but bootleg video and audio prove that the song

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

was actually "It ll Be Me."[2][3] The band planned to perform the song on their 1980 North American tour,[1] and rehearsed it on the day that drummer John Bonham died.[citation needed] During the 1995-96 Page and Plant tour, however, Plant would often sing the middle verse of the song when he and Page performed "In the Evening".[4][5] Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, keyboards John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1999: Prague Collective (String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin) Performed by Riki T. Tavi

All My Love (song) - Wikipedia,

"All My Love" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album In Through the Out Door Released 15 August 1979 Recorded November–December, 1978 Genre Soft rock Length 5:53 Label Swan Song Writer Jones/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"All My Love" is a song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s final studio album, In Through the Out Door, released in 1979. Credited to Robert Plant and John Paul Jones, it is a slow-tempo soft rock song, featuring a synthesizer solo by Jones and lyrics performed by Plant. Plant wrote the song as a tribute to his son, Karac, who died from a stomach infection in 1977 at the age of five. He did the vocals all in one take, and the song changes key on the last chorus. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Overview Accolades Formats and tracklistings Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Overview A studio outtake of an extended "All My Love" exists, timed at 7:55 minutes. It has a complete ending, with Plant extending the last verse and a twangy B-Bender guitar solo by Page.[1] This version has been made available on a number of Led Zeppelin bootleg recordings. The original working title for the composition was called "The Hook". The song was played live on Led Zeppelin s concert tour of Europe in 1980.[1] It was one of the most well received performances of the tour. "All My Love" is

 

 

 

also included on the Led Zeppelin compilations Early Days and Latter Days, Remasters and Mothership. In an interview he later gave to rock journalist Cameron Crowe, Plant stated that this song was one of Led Zeppelin s "finest moments".[2] However, guitarist Jimmy Page has expressed less fond sentiments for the song. In an interview with Guitar World magazine in 1998, Page stated that he and drummer John Bonham ...both felt that In Through the Out Door was a little soft. I wasn t really keen on "All My Love". I was a little worried about the chorus. I could just imagine people doing the wave and all of that. And I thought, that s not us. That s not us. In its place it was fine, but I wouldn t have wanted to pursue that direction in the future.[3] "All My Love" is one of only two Led Zeppelin songs which Page had no part in writing (the other being "South Bound Saurez", also from In Through the Out Door). Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Radio CarolineUnited Kingdom"Top 500 Tracks" [4] 1999 239 Formats and tracklistings 1979 7" single edition (Brazil: Swan Song SS 11105, Paraguay: Swan Song 11.105) A. "All My Love" [mono] (Jones, Plant) 5:33 B. "All My Love" [stereo] (Jones, Plant) 5:33 1979 7" single edition (Argentina: Swan Song SS 79435) A. "All My Love" (Jones, Plant) 5:33 B. "Hot Dog" (Page, Plant) 3:15 1980 7" single edition (Peru: Capricornio 030 [RI 16288]) A. "All My Love (Con Todo Mi Amor)" (Jones, Plant) 5:53 B. "Rise"* (Armer, Badazz) 4:53 Notes: (*) B-side by Herb Alpert

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass and synthesizer John Bonham - drums Cover versions This section may contain excessive, poor or irrelevant examples. You can improve the article by adding more descriptive text. See Wikipedia s guide to writing better articles for further suggestions. (June 2009) 1993: Dread Zeppelin (Hot & Spicy Beanburger) 1997: The London Philharmonic Orchestra with Peter Scholes (Kashmir: The Symphonic 1999: Great White (Great Zeppelin: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2000: various artists (Pickin on Zeppelin: A Tribute) 2002: Mor Koren & Kirsten Laiken (Livin Lovin Played: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2002: Emerson Nogueira (Versão Acústica, Vol. 2) 2004: Ween (Live in Chicago DVD) 2004: Hampton String Quartet (HSQ Rides Again) 2004: The Classic Rock String Quartet (A Classic Rock Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2005: Led Zepagain (A Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2006: Greg Reeves & Erica Stock (Dub Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2008: Billy Sherwood (Led Box: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute) 2008: Edinho Santa Cruz (Na Estrada do Rock: In Concert)

I m Gonna Crawl - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I m Gonna Crawl" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album In Through the Out Door Released 15 August 1979 Recorded November-December, 1978 Genre Hard rock Length 5:30 Label Swan Song Writer Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"I m Gonna Crawl" is a song on English rock band Led Zeppelin s 1979 album, In Through the Out Door. It was composed by John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Overview Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Overview Heavily influenced by the American 1960s soul-blues style of Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett, the music to "I m Gonna Crawl" was in large part composed by Led Zeppelin bass player John Paul Jones.[1]The song tells of a girl that "drives me crazy... she s the apple of my eye. I love the lady. I got to be her fool." However, Plant s passionate delivery, as well as the line "Every little bit of my love," is actually in tribute to his son, who had died suddenly from a stomach infection in 1977. "I m Gonna Crawl" was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts,[1]but drummer John Bonham noted this as one of Plant s best vocal performances.[citation needed] Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, keyboards John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1999: Jenna Mammina (Under the Influence) 2004: Hampton String Quartet (HSQ Rides Again)

Coda (album) - Wikipedia

Coda Compilation album (studio/live) by Led Zeppelin Released 1982 Genre Hard rock, Heavy metal, Blues-rock Label Swan Song Producer Jimmy Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Coda is the ninth studio album[1] by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released in 1982. This collection of outtakes from various sessions during Led Zeppelin s twelve-year career was released two years after the group had officially disbanded following the death of drummer John Bonham. The word coda, meaning a "tail" that ends a musical piece following the main body, was therefore chosen as an apt title. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Overview Reception Track listing Sales chart performance Sales certifications Personnel Additional notes External links References

Overview Led Zeppelin guitarist and producer Jimmy Page explained that part of the reasoning for the album s release related to the popularity of unofficial Led Zeppelin recordings which continued to be circulated by fans: Coda was released, basically, because there was so much bootleg stuff out. We thought, "Well, if there s that much interest, then we may as well put the rest of our studio stuff out". Led Zeppelin bass player John Paul Jones recalled: They were good tracks. A lot of it was recorded around the time punk was really happening... basically there wasn t a lot of Zeppelin tracks that didn t go out. We used everything.[2] According to the Led Zeppelin biography Hammer of the Gods, the band also owed Atlantic Records one more album from the five album deal that created Swan Song Records in 1974. As such, Coda can be seen as a contractual fulfillment. "We re Gonna Groove" opens the album and, according to the album notes, was recorded at Morgan Studios in June, 1969. It was later acknowledged to have come from a January, 1970 concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with the guitar parts overdubbed and the original guitar part removed—this can be heard in the original Royal Albert Hall show on 9 January 1970. "Poor Tom" is from sessions for Led Zeppelin III, having been recorded at Olympic Studios in June 1970. "I Can t Quit You Baby" is taken from the same concert as "We re Gonna Groove" but was listed as a rehearsal in the original liner notes. The recording was edited to remove overall "live" feel: the crowd noise as well as the beginning and ending of the song were deleted. Crowd tracks were muted on the multitrack mixdown on this recording as with "We re Gonna Groove". "Walter s Walk" is from the 1972 Houses of the Holy sessions, although it has been speculated that it existed only as a basic backing track until Coda was assembled.[3] "Ozone Baby", "Darlene", and "Wearing and Tearing" are outtakes from the In Through the Out Door sessions in 1978, though the drum sound is mixed with more reverb than the recordings present on In Through the Out Door - a trademark of 1980s recordings. "Bonzo s Montreux" is a 1976 John Bonham drum instrumental with electronic effects added by Jimmy Page. This song would later be included on both boxed sets, first in a combined form with the studio version of Bonham s seminal Moby Dick drum solo on the 1990 Led Zeppelin boxed set, and as an individual track on the 1993 Led Zeppelin boxed set 2. The inner liner features a collage of photographs. The main photo on the right side—showing the band members apparently clapping—was taken the day before their

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

Knebworth concerts in 1979 and in that village. However, the band were dissatisfied with the image, and their images—and the ground where they stand—are all that remain from that photo. Superimposed behind the band is a photo of a green field in Chaddesley Corbett, Worcestershire, England, near Bonham s home. Led Zeppelin parody cover band Dread Zeppelin released an album in 2007 entitled Bar Coda as a play on words of this album.

Track listing Side one #Title Writer(s) Length 1."We re Gonna Groove (Live)" King, Bethea 2:42 2."Poor Tom" Page, Plant 3:03 3."I Can t Quit You Baby (Live) (Edit)" Dixon 4:18 4."Walter s Walk" Page, Plant 4:31 Side two #Title Writer(s) Length 1."Ozone Baby" Page, Plant 3:35 2."Darlene" Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant 5:07 3."Bonzo s Montreux" Bonham 4:19 4."Wearing and Tearing" Page, Plant 5:32

1993 Compact Disc edition Four bonus tracks were added to the remastered compact disc edition included in the career-spanning box set Complete Studio Recordings (Disc 10), and subsequent Definitive Collection Mini LP Replica CD Boxset. The bonus tracks were not included on any other versions of the album. #Title Writer(s) Length 9."Baby Come On Home" (recorded 1968, appeared on Boxed Set 2, 1993) Berns, Page, Plant 4:30 10."Travelling Riverside Blues" (recorded 1969, appeared on Boxed Set, 1990) Johnson, Page, Plant 5:11 11."White Summer/Black Mountain Side" (recorded live in June 1969, appeared on Boxed Set, 1990) Page 8:01 12."Hey Hey What Can I Do" (recorded 1970, appeared on b-side to "Immigrant Song" single, 1970) Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant 3:55 Sales chart performance Album Chart (1982) Peak Position Norwegian Albums Chart [7] 18 UK Albums Chart [8] 4 Japanese Albums Chart [9] 16 US Cash Box Top 100 Albums Chart [10] 6 Canadian RPM Top 100 Albums Chart [11] 3 New Zealand Top 50 Albums Chart [12] 7 German Albums Chart [13] 43 French Albums Chart [14] 18 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [15] 6 Australian Kent Music Report Albums Chart 9 Singles No commercial or promotional singles were issued, although three tracks received independent radio airplay. These songs were Led Zeppelin s debut on the

 

 

 

 

 

 

Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, as the chart did not exist prior to 21 March 1981. Year Single Chart Position 1982 "Darlene" Billboard Mainstream Rock 4 [citation needed] 1982 "Ozone Baby" Billboard Mainstream Rock 14 [citation needed] 1982 "Poor Tom" Billboard Mainstream Rock 18 [citation needed] Sales certifications Country Sales Certification United States (RIAA) 1,000,000+Platinum [16] United Kingdom (BPI) 60,000+Silver [17] Personnel Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums, vocals John Paul Jones – bass guitar, piano, keyboards Jimmy Page – acoustic and electric guitar, production, electronic treatments Robert Plant – vocals, harmonica Additional personnel Barry Diament - mastering (original Compact Disc release) Stuart Epps – engineering Peter Grant – producer, executive producer Andy Johns – engineering Eddie Kramer – engineering Vic Maile – engineering George Marino - remastered Compact Disc Leif Mases – engineering John Timperley – engineering Additional notes Catalogue: (US) Swan Song 79 00511, (UK) Swan Song A0051. External links Coda at MusicBrainz References ^ While some external sources categorise Coda as a compilation album, Led Zeppelin s official album label, Atlantic Records, categorises it as studio album. See for example the liner notes for the Led Zeppelin Box Set, Vol. 2 and the label attached to the Complete Studio Recordings boxed set. ^ Liner notes for the Led Zeppelin boxed set.

We re Gonna Groove - Wikipedia

"We re Gonna Groove" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Coda Released 19 November 1982 Recorded January 9, 1970 Genre Hard rock, blues rock Length 2:40 Label Swan Song Writer Ben E. King/James A. Bethea Producer Jimmy Page

"We re Gonna Groove" is a song written by soul artist Ben E. King and his

 

 

   

songwriting partner James A. Bethea, and performed most famously by English rock group Led Zeppelin, as the opening number during their 1970 UK and European tours.[1] According to the liner notes for the 1982 album Coda, the song was originally recorded at Morgan Studios, London on June 25, 1969 just after a short British tour including some BBC appearances, and shows at Royal Albert Hall and the 1969 Bath Festival, but it was later acknowledged to have come from a January, 1970 concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with the guitar parts overdubbed and the original guitar part removed—this can be heard in the original Royal Albert Hall show on 9 January 1970. It was scheduled to appear on Led Zeppelin II, but like "Since I ve Been Loving You", "We re Gonna Groove" didn t make the lineup of the second Led Zeppelin album. It belatedly appeared, in a heavily produced version Jimmy Page made at his Sol Studios, on Coda, after the group had split following the death of drummer John Bonham.[1]

Poor Tom - Wikipedia

"Poor Tom" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Coda Released 19 November 1982 Recorded 1970 Genre Blues-rock Length 3:01 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Poor Tom" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin, but may also be a reference to several characters throughout literary history. Led Zepplin s song was composed in 1970 by vocalist Robert Plant and guitarist Jimmy Page when they were staying at Bron-Yr-Aur, a small cottage in Wales,[1][2] and was recorded at Olympic Studios in May 1970. Although the lyrics can be difficult to decipher, the song appears to be about a labourer named Tom who murders his unfaithful wife. Tom may also be psychic, as the lines "Poor Tom, seventh son/Always knew what was goin on" can be interpreted as a reference to the folk belief that seventh sons of seventh sons were clairvoyant. The title of the song may have been taken from a line in John Steinbeck s East of Eden, where Samuel Hamilton is telling of how his wife punished his son, Tom, "And Liza has the smoke of brimstone coming out of her nostrils Poor Tom." The title, along with John Steinbeck s use of the phrase, may also come from William Shakespeare s King Lear, where in the play, Edgar is falsely accused of murderous intentions and becomes "Poor Tom", a pathetically wretched madman whom only King Lear in his own madness understands, though Edgar is later able to reconnect with his family, reveal his true identity, clear his name, and take his rightful place as heir. The song was left off the album Led Zeppelin III but was eventually included on the band s album Coda, released in 1982 two years after the death of drummer John Bonham, having been produced by Page at his newly-acquired Sol Studios.[2] "Poor Tom" is viewed by fans as another one of Led Zeppelin s blues-influenced songs and contains a jug-band workout, as well as a semi-acoustic guitar part performed by Page. A harmonica, played by Plant, and a drum track are also

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

featured on the arrangement. The guitar tuning for the song is an open-C6 chord (C-A-C-G-C-E). The same tuning was also used by Page on the tracks "Bron-Yr-Aur" and "Friends".[2] The song was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[2] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Chart positions Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Chart positions Chart (1982) Peak position US Billboard Top Tracks[3]18 Note: the song was not issued as a single. Chart data represents radio airplay of album tracks. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals, harmonica Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 2005: Robert Walter (Super Heavy Organ) 2008: Kicksville ("Poor Tom" CD single) 2009: Hampton String Quartet (The Hampton Rock String Quartet: All Zeppelin) I Can t Quit You Baby - Wikipedia

"I Can t Quit You Baby" Single by Otis Rush B-side "Sit Down Baby" Released 1956 Format 7" 45 rpm, 10" 78 rpm Recorded Chicago summer 1956 Genre Blues Length 2:56 Label Cobra (Cat. No. 5000) Writer(s) Willie Dixon Producer Willie Dixon

"I Can t Quit You Baby" is a blues standard written by Willie Dixon and first recorded by Chicago blues artist Otis Rush, one of the leading exponents of the "West Side Sound."[1] The song, a slow 12-bar blues, was a vehicle for arranger/producer Dixon to launch Rush and Cobra Records, as it was the first single for both.[2] In this regards, it was a success, reaching #6 in the Billboard R&B chart in 1956.[3] In his autobiography, Willie Dixon explained that "I Can t Quit You Baby" was written about a relationship that Rush seemed to be preoccupied with at the time and that Dixon used that to draw out an impassioned performance by Rush.[2]

 

 

   

Otis Rush revisited "I Can t Quit You Baby" several times over the years, most notably when he recorded the song for the 1966 blues compilation Chicago The Blues Today! Vol. 2 (Vanguard 79217). This version featured an altered arrangement with an unusual turnaround (tonic chord followed by a half-step above the tonic chord) and staccato guitar fills. This is the version on which most cover versions would be based. John Mayall s Bluesbreakers covered it on the 1967 Crusade album (Decca SKL 4890/London PS 529). In 1969, Little Milton (Checker 1212) and the song s author Willie Dixon (Columbia PC 9987) also covered it. Since then it has been recorded by many blues and other artists.[4] Otis Rush s original Cobra single "I Can t Quit You Baby" was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1994.[5] Contents 1 2 3 4 Led Zeppelin version Other versions References Sources

Led Zeppelin version "I Can t Quit You Baby" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Led Zeppelin Released 12 January 1969 Recorded Olympic Studios, London October 1968 Genre Blues-rock Length 4:42 Label Atlantic Writer Willie Dixon Producer Jimmy Page

English rock band Led Zeppelin recorded "I Can t Quit You Baby" for their multi-platinum 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin.[6][7] Their rendition generally follows Otis Rush s 1966 Vanguard version, but with different instrumentation and dynamics.[8] It also incorporates a break during the guitar solo where Jimmy Page plays a four-bar unaccompanied set-up before relaunching into the solo. Although missing the turnaround coming out of the solo, "I Can t Quit You Baby" "ends up as one of the most successful pieces on the first album, with no flat spots and a perfectly symmetrical form, all within the classic blues tradition."[8] Led Zeppelin regularly performed "I Can t Quit You Baby" in concert from 1968 to early 1970.[9] Two live versions from 1969 are included on the 1997 Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions. A performance of the song on 9 January 1970 at Royal Albert Hall is included on the 2003 Led Zeppelin (DVD) (an edited version of this performance was released on the 1982 Coda album). In 1970, the song was dropped from Led Zeppelin s typical concert lineup as they incorporated material from Led Zeppelin III into their shows, with "I Can t Quit You Baby" essentially being replaced by "Since I ve Been Loving You." It was however revived as part of the "Whole Lotta Love" medley during some Led Zeppelin concerts in 1972 and 1973.[9] The song was rehearsed by the surviving members of Led Zeppelin for the 14 May 1988 Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary Celebration, but was not performed during the event.[9] Other versions 1989: Nine Below Zero (Live at the Venue) 1990: Dread Zeppelin (Un-Led-Ed) 1999: Todd Wolfe (Live from Manny s Car Wash) 2002: Lennon Page (L.A. Rockabilly Blues) 2004: Gary Moore (Power of the Blues)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

2006: Mike Manne and Tiger Blues (Mr. Blues and I)

Walter s Walk - Wikipedia

"Walter s Walk" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Coda Released 19 November 1982 Recorded May 1972 (basic track; vocals recorded at an indeterminate later date) Genre Hard rock, heavy metal Length 4:31 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Walter s Walk" is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was recorded at Stargroves in May 1972 during the sessions for the group s fifth album, Houses of the Holy, but it remained unreleased until 1982 when it was included on the album Coda.[1] The date of singer Robert Plant s performance on the song is debatable, as it might have been recorded later than 1972. Plant s tone in this track is far more reminiscent of In Through the Out Door than the rest of the material recorded during the Houses of the Holy era. Others have suggested that Plant s vocals may have been recorded at Jimmy Page s Sol Studios in 1982.[1] It is quite possible that the song existed only as a basic backing track until Coda was assembled.[1] "Walter s Walk" was never performed live in its entirety at Led Zeppelin concerts, though instrumental snippets of it were regularly included into "Dazed and Confused" during the band s 1972 and 1973 concert tours.[1] and also occasionally during 1975. One example of this arrangement is presented on the live album How the West Was Won, where it also appears with "The Crunge" during a 25-minute version. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1998: Cinnamon (The Song Replays the Same II)

Ozone Baby - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Ozone Baby" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Coda Released 19 November 1982 Recorded 1978 GenreHard rock Length 3:35 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Ozone Baby" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin. The song was recorded at Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden during the sessions for the band s final studio album In Through the Out Door in November 1978 but it was decided to leave the song off the resultant album. After the death of Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham in 1980, the band released an album of studio outtakes in 1982 entitled Coda, and this song was included on it. It was one of three songs recorded at Polar Studios which were omitted from In Through the Out Door and later released on Coda, the other two being "Wearing and Tearing" and "Darlene".[1] "Ozone Baby" is a straightforward, up-tempo rock song, featuring some harmonised vocal effects from singer Robert Plant.[1] Few Led Zeppelin studio songs included harmonised vocal effects, but it had been increasingly utilised by Plant in live performances from 1977 onwards. Despite this, "Ozone Baby" itself was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] This song served as inspiration for the Fuel song "Ozone (sucker)" from their 1998 debut, Sunburn. Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Chart positions Personnel Sources References External links

Chart positions Chart (1982) Peak position US Billboard Top Tracks [2] 14 Note: the song was not issued as a single. Chart data represents radio airplay of album tracks. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums

Darlene (song) - Wikipedia

"Darlene"

 

Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Coda Released 19 November 1982 Recorded November 1978 Genre Hard rock Length 5:06 Label Swan Song Writer Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

"Darlene" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin. It was recorded at Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden during the In Through the Out Door sessions in November 1978. Due to space constraints, the song was not included on In Through the Out Door. It was left unreleased until 1982, when it was eventually included on the album Coda. It was one of three songs recorded at Polar Studios which were omitted from In Through the Out Door and later released on Coda, the other two being "Ozone Baby" and "Wearing and Tearing".[1] John Paul Jones plays piano on this track. The end of the track includes a lyrical nod to "American Pie" by Don McLean. "With a pink carnation and a pickup truck." This is the only song from the In Through the Out Door sessions which was credited to all four members of the band. It was never played live at Led Zeppelin concerts.[1] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 Chart positions Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Chart positions Chart (1982) Peak position US Billboard Top Tracks[2]4 Note: the song was not issued as a single. Chart data represents radio airplay of album tracks. Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar, piano John Bonham - drums Cover versions 2002: The Section (The String Quartet Tribute to Led Zeppelin, Vol. 2)

Bonzo s Montreux - Wikipedia

"Bonzo s Montreux" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Coda Released 19 November 1982

 

 

Recorded 1976, Mountain Studios Genre Hard rock Length 4:17 Label Swan Song Writer John Bonham Producer Jimmy Page

"Bonzo s Montreux" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin. The song is a solo by drummer John Bonham, recorded in September 1976 at Mountain Studios in Montreux, Switzerland.[1] Jimmy Page added the electronic effects afterwards.[2] The song was left unreleased until 1982, when it was included on the album Coda. The song was also included on both of the band s boxed sets, released in the early 1990s. It was presented in a medley with Bonham s solo on "Moby Dick" on the first boxed set in 1990, and as an individual track on the second boxed set in 1993. Although the version of Coda included on the career-spanning boxed set The Complete Studio Recordings featured the new songs that were released on the boxed set series, the "Moby Dick/Bonzo s Montreux" medley (released on the first boxed set, in 1990) was omitted. This is one of the few Led Zeppelin songs where it is possible to hear the squeak of John Bonham s bass drum pedal in the recording studio, the others being "Since I ve Been Loving You" from 1970 s Led Zeppelin III, "The Ocean" from 1973 s Houses of the Holy, and "Ten Years Gone" from 1975 s Physical Graffiti. "Bonzo s Montreux" was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts, however, Bonham would perform parts of the song during "Over The Top" in 1977.[2] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1999: Munetaka Higuchi & Maya (Super Rock Summit)

Wearing and Tearing - Wikipedia

"Wearing and Tearing" Song by Led Zeppelin from the album Coda Released 19 November 1982 Recorded November 1978 Genre Hard rock, Heavy metal, Punk Length 5:31 Label Swan Song Writer Page/Plant Producer Jimmy Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

"Wearing and Tearing" is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin. It was recorded at Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden during the In Through the Out Door sessions on November 21, 1978.[1] Due to space constraints it was one of three songs recorded at Polar Studios which were omitted from In Through the Out Door and later released on Coda, the other two being "Ozone Baby" and "Darlene".[1] "Wearing and Tearing" is one of the band s hardest rockers and was intended as a statement that Led Zeppelin could compete against the popular punk bands of the time.[1] The band considered releasing the song as a special commemorative single in time for their performance at the 1979 Knebworth Festival, but this plan was abandoned because of time constraints.[2] This song was never performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts, although it was played by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant at their reunion at Knebworth in 1990.[1] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 Personnel Cover versions Sources References External links

Personnel Robert Plant - vocals Jimmy Page - guitars John Paul Jones - bass guitar John Bonham - drums Cover versions 1990: Robert Plant with Jimmy Page (Knebworth: The Album) 1994: Cinnamon (Cinnamon III) 2000: Wasteland (Dead Zeppelin: A Metal Tribute to Led Zeppelin) 2009: Hampton String Quartet (The Hampton Rock String Quartet: All Zeppelin)

BBC Sessions (Led Zeppelin album)

BBC Sessions Live album / compilation album by Led Zeppelin Released 11 November 1997 Recorded March and June 1969, 1 April 1971 Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock, folk rock Length 138:58 Language English Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page Compiler Jimmy Page

BBC Sessions is a compilation album featuring studio sessions and a live concert recorded by English rock group Led Zeppelin for the BBC. It was released on 11 November 1997, by Atlantic Records. This was the first release of new Led Zeppelin material in 15 years. Disc 1 consists of material from four different 1969 BBC sessions. Disc 2 contains most of the 1 April 1971 concert from the Paris Theatre in London.[1]

 

Countless bootlegs of these recordings circulated for years before the official release. This release was widely welcomed by Led Zeppelin fans as the first live release since The Song Remains the Same in 1976. Others have criticized the decision to edit some of the songs and drop others that were recorded for the BBC. Most notable are one session from 1969 which included the unreleased song "Sunshine Woman," and large portions of the "Whole Lotta Love" medley from 1971.[2] Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Track listing Recording information Sales chart performance Release history Personnel References External links

Track listing Disc one "You Shook Me" (Dixon/Lenoir) – 5:14 "I Can t Quit You Baby" (Dixon) – 4:22 "Communication Breakdown" (Bonham/Jones/Page) – 3:12 "Dazed and Confused" (Page) – 6:39 "The Girl I Love She Got Long Black Wavy Hair" (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham/Estes) – 3:00 "What Is and What Should Never Be" (Page/Plant) – 4:20 "Communication Breakdown" (Bonham/Jones/Page) – 2:40 "Travelling Riverside Blues" (Johnson/Page/Plant) – 5:12 "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant) – 6:09 "Somethin Else" (Cochran/Sheeley) – 2:06 "Communication Breakdown" (Bonham/Jones/Page) – 3:05 "I Can t Quit You Baby" (Dixon) – 6:21 "You Shook Me" (Dixon/Lenoir) – 10:19 "How Many More Times" (Bonham/Jones/Page) – 11:51 Disc two "Immigrant Song" (Page/Plant) – 3:20 "Heartbreaker" (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant) – 5:16 "Since I ve Been Loving You" (Jones/Page/Plant) – 6:56 "Black Dog"(Jones/Page/Plant) – 5:17 "Dazed and Confused" (Page) – 18:36 "Stairway to Heaven" (Page/Plant) – 8:49 "Going to California" (Page/Plant) – 3:54 "That s the Way" (Page/Plant) – 5:43 "Whole Lotta Love{inc. Boogie Chillun (John Lee Hooker), Fixin to Die (Bukkah White), That s Alright Mama (Arthur Crudup), A Mess of Blues (Doc Pomus, Mort Shuman}" (Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant) – 13:45 "Thank You" (Page/Plant) – 6:37 Recording information Session one John Peel s Top Gear Venue: Playhouse Theatre, Northumberland Avenue, London Recording date: Monday 3 March 1969 Original broadcast: Sunday 23 March 1969 (in a show with sessions from Free, the Moody Blues and Deep Purple) Tracks: Disc 1; 1,2 and 4. Also included a version of "Communication Breakdown". Producer: Bernie Andrews Engineer: Pete Ritzema Tape operator: Bob Conduct Session two

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Alexis Korner s Rhythm and Blues, (BBC World Service) Venue: Maida Vale Studio 4, Delaware Road, London Recording date: Wednesday 19 March 1969 Original broadcast: Monday 14 April 1969 Tracks: "I Can t Quit You Baby", "You Shook Me" and "Sunshine Woman". The session was wiped or lost by the BBC, although recordings survive on bootlegs. The show was re-run later in 1969, adding the recording of "What Is And What Should Never Be" from the June 16 session. Producer: Jeff Griffin Session three Chris Grant s Tasty Pop Sundae (although originally commissioned for Dave Symond s Symonds On Sunday show) Venue: Aeolian Hall studio 2, Bond Street, London Recording Date: Monday 16 June 1969 Original Broadcast: Sunday 22 June 1969 Tracks: Disc 1; 3,5 and 10. The session also included a prototype version of "What Is and What Should Never Be". Producer: Paul Williams Session four John Peel s Top Gear (Double recording session) Venue: Maida Vale studio 4, Delaware Road, London Recording date: Tuesday 24 June 1969 Original broadcast: Sunday 29 June 1969 Tracks: Disc 1; 6-9. Producer: John Walters Engineer: Tony Wilson Session five One Night Stand Venue: Playhouse Theatre Recording date: Friday 27 June 1969 Original broadcast: Sunday 10 August 1969 Tracks: Disc 1; 11-14. Also included a version of "Dazed and Confused", plus "White Summer"/"Black Mountain Side" (which was released on the 1990 Led Zeppelin boxed set.) Session six In Concert (Emcee John Peel) Venue: Paris Theatre, Lower Regent Street, London Recording date: Thursday 1 April 1971 Original broadcast: Sunday 4 April 1971 Tracks: Disk 2; all tracks. Also included a version of "Communication Breakdown" and "What Is and What Should Never Be". Producer: Jeff Griffin Engineer: Tony Wilson Sales chart performance Year Chart Peak position Certification Sales / shipments 1997 Japanese Albums Chart [3] 10 1997 French Albums Chart [4] 38 1997 New Zealand RIANZ Top 50 Albums Chart [5] 26 1997 Finnish Albums Chart [6] 28 1997 Swedish Albums Chart [7] 50 1997 UK Albums Chart [8] 23 Gold [9] 150,000 1997 Norwegian Albums Chart [10] 36 1997 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [11] 122x Multi-Platinum [12] 2,000,000+ 1997 Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart [13] 30 Release history Region Date Label Format Catalog # United States 11 November 1997 Atlantic Records 4 LP83061-1 2 Compact Disc 83061-2 2 Cassette 83061-4

 

 

 

 

 

United Kingdom 2 Compact disc 7567-83061-2 Japan WEA Japan 2 Compact disc 11756-7 Personnel Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums, percussion, backing vocals John Paul Jones – bass guitar, bass pedals, keyboards, mandolin, backing vocals Jimmy Page – acoustic and electric guitar, backing vocals, mastering, production Robert Plant – vocals, harmonica Additional personnel Andie Airfix – art direction, design Jon Astley – mastering Luis Rey – liner notes Chris Walter – photography

How the West Was Won (Led Zeppelin album) - Wikipedia

Live album by Led Zeppelin Released 27 May 2003 Recorded 25 June 1972, L.A. Forum, Inglewood, California, United States and 27 June 1972, Long Beach Arena, Long Beach, California, United States Genre Hard rock, heavy metal, blues-rock Length 150:27 Language English Label Atlantic Producer Jimmy Page Compiler Jimmy Page

How the West Was Won is a triple live album by English rock group Led Zeppelin, released by Atlantic Records on Compact Disc on 27 May 2003, and DVD-Audio on 7 October 2003. These original performances are from the band s 1972 concert tour of the United States, recorded at the L.A. Forum on 25 June 1972 and Long Beach Arena on 27 June 1972. Guitarist Jimmy Page considers Led Zeppelin at this point to have been at their artistic peak, as is mentioned in the album s liner notes. For many years, live recordings of these two shows only circulated in the form of bootlegs, and even then only certain audience recordings were available to fans and collectors (for example, Burn Like a Candle). Though several soundboard recordings of Led Zeppelin concerts were circulated amongst fans after having been stolen from Page s personal archive some time in the 1980s, no soundboards of the 1972 Long Beach or LA Forum shows were taken, meaning the release of How the West Was Won was the first chance fans had of hearing the soundboard versions of these concerts.[1] The songs from the two shows underwent some extensive editing and audio engineering by Page at Sarm West Studios in London before being released on the album. A comprehensive analysis of live tracks edits for the album can be found at The Garden Tapes. Some songs which were played at the concerts, such as "Communication Breakdown", "Thank You" and a rare version of "Louie Louie" from the 25 June show, were left off How the West Was Won. Contents 1 Reception 1.1 Accolades

 

 

 

2 3 4 5 6

Track listing Sales chart performance Sales certifications Release history Personnel 6.1 Additional personnel 7 References 8 External links Reception The album debuted on the Billboard 200 chart for the week ending 14 June 2003 at number 1, with sales of 154,000 copies. It remained on the chart for 16 weeks.[2] It was certified gold and platinum (1,000,000 units) record awards by the RIAA on 30 June 2003.[3] The album became the first Led Zeppelin album since 1979 s In Through the Out Door to reach the #1 position.[4][5] How the West Was Won is tied with SMiLE by Brian Wilson, Live at Reading by Nirvana and Van Lear Rose by Loretta Lynn as the best reviewed album of all time by Metacritic, with an average score of 97%.[6] Accolades Publication Country Accolade Year Rank Classic Rock United Kingdom "The 50 Greatest Live Albums Ever" [7] 2003 4 Les Inrockuptibles France "2003 Best Reissues" [8]2003 4 Record Collector United Kingdom "New Albums: Readers Top 10" (2003) [9] 2004 4 The Village Voice United States "Albums of the Year" [10] 2004 37 Q United Kingdom "10 Live Albums You Must Own" [11]2005* Q United Kingdom "The 20 Greatest Live Albums" [12] 2006 11 (*) designates unordered lists. Track listing Disc one "LA Drone" (Page/Jones) – 0:14* "Immigrant Song" (Page/Plant) – 4:00* "Heartbreaker" (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham) – 7:25* "Black Dog" (Page/Plant/Jones) – 5:41** "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page/Plant) – 5:08** "Since I ve Been Loving You" (Page/Plant/Jones) – 8:02* "Stairway to Heaven" (Page/Plant) – 9:38* "Going to California" (Page/Plant) – 5:37* "That s the Way" (Page/Plant) – 5:54** "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp" (Page/Jones/Plant) – 4:55* Disc two "Dazed and Confused" (Page) – 25:25** "What Is and What Should Never Be" (Page/Plant) – 4:41* "Dancing Days" (Page/Plant) – 3:42* "Moby Dick" (Bonham/Jones/Page) – 19:20** Disc three "Whole Lotta Love" (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham and Dixon) – 23:08** "Rock and Roll" (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham) – 3:56* "The Ocean" (Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham) – 4:21** "Bring It On Home" (Dixon) – 9:30** *From the Long Beach Arena. **From the LA Forum. Sales chart performance Chart (2003) Peak position French Albums Chart [13] 11 Italian Albums Chart [14] 7 Irish Albums Chart [15] 9 Canadian Albums Chart [16] 1 Polish Albums Chart [17] 24 Norwegian Albums Charts [18] 10

 

 

 

Finnish Albums Chart [19] 23 UK Albums Chart [20] 5 Spanish Albums Chart [21] 39 Austrian Albums Chart [22] 17 Japanese Albums Chart [23] 3 Swedish Albums Chart [24] 16 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [25] 1 US Billboard Top Internet Albums [26] 1 Belgian Albums Chart (Walloon) [27] 2 Dutch Albums Chart [28] 15 Australian ARIA Top 50 Albums Chart [29] 10 German Albums Chart [30] 15 Swiss Albums Chart [31] 20 Belgian Albums Chart (Flemish) [32] 9 New Zealand RIANZ Top 50 Albums Chart [33] 13 Danish Albums Chart [34] 25 Sales certifications Country Sales Certification Brazil (ABDP) 50,000+Gold [35] United Kingdom (BPI) 180,000+Gold [36] United States (RIAA) 1,000,000+Platinum [37] Canada (CRIA) 100,000+Platinum [38] Release history Region Date Label Format Catalog # United States 27 May 2003 Atlantic Records Compact Disc 83587-2 7 October 2003 DVD-Audio 83587-9 Japan 27 May 2003 WEA Japan Compact Disc 11585-7 Personnel Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums, percussion, backing vocals, co-lead vocals on "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp" John Paul Jones – bass guitar, bass pedals, keyboards, mandolin, backing vocals Jimmy Page – acoustic and electric guitar, backing vocals, production Robert Plant – vocals, harmonica Additional personnel Jim Cummins – photography James Fortune – photography Drew Griffiths – sound assistant Ross Halfin – package creative consultant Eddie Kramer – engineering Phil Lemon – design, artwork Jeffrey Mayer – photography Michael Putland – photography Kevin Shirley – engineering, mixing

The Song Remains the Same (album) - Wikipedia

The Song Remains the Same (album) Live album soundtrack to The Song Remains the Same by Led Zeppelin Released 28 September 1976

Recorded 27–29 July 1973 at Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, United States Genre Hard rock Length 99:45 Language English Label Swan Song Producer Jimmy Page

The Song Remains the Same is the soundtrack live album of the concert film of the same name by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. The album was originally released in 1976, before being remastered and re-issued in 2007. Contents 1 Overview 2 2007 reissue 3 Track listing 3.1 Reissue 4 Sales chart performance 5 Sales certifications 6 Personnel 7 External links 8 References Overview The recording of the album and the film took place during three nights of concerts at New York s Madison Square Garden, during the band s 1973 concert tour of the United States. All songs were recorded by Eddie Kramer using the Wally Heider Mobile Studio truck, and later mixed at Electric Lady Studios in New York and Trident Studios in London. The album was released on 28 September 1976, by Swan Song Records. The sleeve design depicted a dilapidated movie house located on Old Street film studios in London, which was used by the group for rehearsals prior to their 1973 tour. Upon its release, the album received some poor reviews, with some critics considering it to be over-produced and lumbering.[1] Indeed, the band s members themselves have since expressed a lack of fondness for the recording. Guitarist and producer Jimmy Page has admitted that the end product was hardly the best representation of Led Zeppelin as a live band: Obviously we were committed to putting this album out, although it wasn t necessarily the best live stuff we have. I don t look upon it as a live album...it s essentially a soundtrack.[2] In an interview he gave to rock journalist Cameron Crowe, Page elaborated: As far as Led Zeppelin s studio recordings went, every single one of them has a certain ambiance, certain atmospherics that made them special. When it came to the live shows, we were always trying to move things forward and we certainly weren t happy leaving them as they were. The songs were always in a state of change. On [The] Song Remains the Same you can hear the urgency and not much else. The live shows were an extension of the albums.[3] Until both the album and the film were remastered and re-released in 2007, there were significant differences between the two in terms of the songs included on each. These differences were as follows: The film included "Black Dog", but not "Celebration Day". The soundtrack album included "Celebration Day", but not "Black Dog". The film also included "Since I ve Been Loving You", the introduction to "Heartbreaker", the instrumental "Bron-Yr-Aur" (which appeared on Physical Graffiti) and a hurdy gurdy piece called "Autumn Lake", none of which featured on the album. Of the songs that both the album and the film had in common, some of the recordings featured on the album were of different performances from those in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the film. Other tracks which were recorded at Madison Square Garden, but omitted from both the film and the soundtrack album, included "The Ocean" and "Misty Mountain Hop". A comprehensive analysis of the sources of the original album and the edits is available at The Garden Tapes. 2007 reissue The Song Remains The Same soundtrack album was reissued on CD on November 20, 2007, with the surviving band members having overseen the remixing and remastering of the original release. This coincided with the re-issue of the film, available on DVD. The new version of the soundtrack included six songs that were not on the original album release: "Black Dog", "Over the Hills and Far Away", "Misty Mountain Hop", "Since I ve Been Loving You", "The Ocean" and "Heartbreaker", plus new liner notes by Cameron Crowe. Thus, with the 2007 re-release of both the album and film, the songs were synchronized so that the full set-list from the concerts was available on both, with each song mixed the same way (the only exceptions being "Bron-Yr-Aur" and "Autumn Lake", both of which continued to be absent from the album). Jimmy Page stated: We have revisited The Song Remains The Same and can now offer the complete set as played at Madison Square Garden. This differs substantially from the original soundtrack released in 1976, and highlights the technical prowess of Kevin Shirley, who worked with us on How The West Was Won.[4] Due to legal complications, the band decided not to change the video portion of the original movie for the re-release.[5] Instead, Shirley created an entirely new mix of the three 1973 Madison Square Garden concerts so that the audio portion of the film would better match the on-screen visuals. The audio on the new CD release was nearly identical to the soundtrack of the new DVD release. One difference was that the songs included on the CDs that were not featured in the original movie were included as bonus tracks on the DVD.[6] The audio mixes also differed from those found on the 2003 Led Zeppelin DVD. The most obvious example is that "Black Dog" was two minutes longer on the 2003 DVD than on the 2007 releases. Disappointment with the 2007 reissue is echoed by many fans due to deleted sequences from some of the most memorable moments of the original release. Most notably among these was a drum and organ sequence by Bonham and Jones in "No Quarter", which was completely cut from the reissue. On 29 July 2008, a four-LP edition of the 2007 re-issue, on 180 gram audiophile vinyl, was released. It was presented in a deluxe archival two-piece box with foil-stamping. It includes a 12-page oversized full-color booklet with dozens of previously unpublished stills from the film, as well as four individual jackets with new and unique artwork. A special white vinyl edition was also printed in very limited numbers. Just 200 were produced, with only 100 being made available to the public (only from Led Zeppelin.com). Track listing Side one "Rock and Roll" (John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant) – 4:03 "Celebration Day" (Jones, Page, Plant) – 3:49 "The Song Remains the Same" (Page, Plant) – 6:00 "Rain Song" (Page, Plant) – 8:25 Side two "Dazed and Confused" (Page) – 26:53 Side three "No Quarter" (Jones, Page, Plant) – 12:30 "Stairway to Heaven" (Page, Plant) – 10:58 Side four "Moby Dick" (Bonham, Jones, Page) – 12:47 "Whole Lotta Love" (Bonham, Willie Dixon, Jones, Page, Plant) – 14:25 Reissue All tracks written by Jones, Page, Plant, except as noted. Disc one "Rock and Roll" – 3:56

 

"Celebration Day" – 3:37 "Black Dog" (with "Bring It On Home" intro) – 3:46* "Over the Hills and Far Away" (Page, Plant) – 6:11* "Misty Mountain Hop" – 4:43* "Since I ve Been Loving You" – 8:23* "No Quarter" – 10:38 "The Song Remains the Same" (Page, Plant) – 5:39 "The Rain Song" (Page, Plant) – 8:20 "The Ocean" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) – 5:13* Disc two "Dazed and Confused" (Page) – 29:18** "Stairway to Heaven" (Page, Plant) – 10:52 "Moby Dick" (Bonham, Jones, Page) – 11:02 "Heartbreaker" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant) – 6:19* "Whole Lotta Love"/"Boogie Mama" (Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant, Willie Dixon) – 13:51 (* Not on original soundtrack release) (** Longer than the original soundtrack release) Sales chart performance Original release Chart (1976) Peak Position Japanese Albums Char t[7] 6 UK Albums Chart [8] 1 US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart [9] 2 Norwegian Albums Chart [10] 21 Swedish Albums Chart [11] 29 Canadian RPM Top 100 Albums Chart [12] 8 New Zealand Top 50 Albums Chart [13] 6 German Albums Chart [14] 28 Spanish Albums Chart [15] 23 Re-release Chart (2007) Peak Position Japanese Albums Chart [16] 5 UK Albums Chart [17] 73 Belgian Albums Chart (Walloon) [18] 86 US Billboard Top Soundtracks Chart [19] 9 US Billboard Tastemakers Chart [20] 11 US Billboard Top Hard Rock Chart [21] 11 US Billboard Top Pop Albums Chart [22] 23 US Billboard Comprehensive Albums Chart [23] 92 German Albums Chart [24] 65 Digital download Chart (2007) Peak Position US Billboard Top Digital Albums Chart [25] 24 US Billboard Top Internet Albums Chart [26] 18 Notes: (*) Remastered and expanded edition Sales certifications Country Sales Certification United Kingdom (BPI) 300,000+Platinum[27]* France (SNEP) 75,000+Gold[28]* Germany (IFPI) 100,000+Gold[29]* Argentina (CAPIF) 30,000+Gold[30] United States (RIAA) 4,000,000+4x Platinum[31]* Note: (*) Pre-remastered sales only Personnel

 

Led Zeppelin John Bonham – drums, percussion John Paul Jones – bass guitar, keyboards, Mellotron Jimmy Page – electric guitars, backing vocals, Theremin, production Robert Plant – vocals Additional personnel Cameron Crowe – liner notes Barry Diament – mastering (original Compact Disc release) Peter Grant – executive producer George Hardie – record sleeve Hipgnosis – record sleeve Eddie Kramer – engineering, mixing Bob Ludwig – remastering on 2007 re-release Kevin Shirley – remixing on 2007 re-release External links The Garden Tapes - a study of sources of the live material and the edits for release on this album.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful