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VOLUME 3 | ISSUE 6 | MARCH 17, 2010

CONNECT I NG YOU TO VI NEL AND. WEEKLY.
Visit us online
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Front row, from left: Donald Barner, David Serlick, Dave Schad, Gene Yeon, Wade Brody, Diane
Fischer, Dottie Cullen, Leo Duquette, James Cooper, Back row: Alesia Shute, Paula Menzoni,
Dr. Charles Valentine, Louise Bertacchi, Grace Loyle, Cindi Smith, Karelys Baruffi (accepted
award for her husband Seth), Marion Blakeman, Terri Phillips, Judith Feinstein, Elviro Ocasio, Jr.,
Jose Ramos, Albert Kelly. Not pictured: Bob DeSanto, Julian Garcia.
Vineland’s 2010 Hometown Heroes turn out—and so do 250
of their supporters—to celebrate all they have done in the
community and to raise money for two local charities.
More photos inside (on page 16)
Another
Heroic
Evening
2nd Annual Hometown Heroes
Gala at Merighi’s Savoy Inn
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Local Educator, Attorney Join
FoodBank Advisory Board
Vicki Simek, the executive director of profes-
sional and community education at
Cumberland County College and Attorney
Alexander Wazeter, Esq. have been recently
appointed to the Community FoodBank of New
Jersey - Southern Branch Advisory Board, rep-
resenting Cumberland County.
Simek has a Bachelor of Science degree and a
Masters in Business Administration from
Western Governors University. In her position
at Cumberland County College, she is charged
with workforce development and non-credit
training. She makes her home in Vineland
where she lives with her husband Carl, a regis-
tered nurse at South Jersey HealthCare,
daughter Maggie and son Ian.
Alexander Wazeter has a private law prac-
tice in Millville specializing in Trial Law. He is
a graduate of Temple University and Temple
University School of Law. He lives in Vineland
with his wife Alexandra, a nurse at Shore
Memorial Hospital.
“We are pleased to welcome these two
community leaders to represent Cumberland
County on our Advisory Board. Their passion
to help others and their insight into the needs
specific to the community is very valuable”
said Margie Barham, executive director of the
CFB-southern branch. The Community
FoodBank of New Jersey- Southern Branch in
based in Egg Harbor Township, and has over
65 partner agencies in Cumberland County
through which the organization distributed
more than 1.5 million pounds of food to
Cumberland County residents in 2009.
As Advisory Board members, Simek and
Wazeter will assist the organization in promot-
ing awareness and fundraising activities to
support food bank programs and services. The
Advisory Board of the Community FoodBank
of New Jersey - Southern Branch serves volun-
tarily and is comprised of representatives from
the food bank’s coverage area of Atlantic,
Cape May and Cumberland counties. For infor-
mation on the Community FoodBank of New
Jersey agency partners in Cumberland County
call 609-383-8843.
Raup Earns Certification
Brittany Raup, an exercise specialist with
South Jersey Healthcare’s Fitness
Connection recently earned certification
as a cancer exercise trainer through the
American Cancer Society and the
American College of Sports Medicine. To
earn this certification, Raup had to
demonstrate the necessary knowledge and
skills to work with cancer patients and
cancer survivors who are referred to the
Fitness Connection.
Raup, who holds a Bachelor’s degree in
Health Promotion and Fitness
Management and is certified by the
American College of Sports Medicine as a
health fitness specialist, will also coordi-
nate the Fitness Connection’s new
Physician Referred Exercise Program
(PREP). This exercise program will meet
the needs of many special populations as
well as sedentary individuals and begin-
ning exercisers. The PREP program is
scheduled to open this spring.
SJH is a nonprofit, integrated health
care system, providing access to a continu-
um of health services. SJH provides hospi-
tal services, numerous community health
clinics, home health services, and specialty
services, which serve the medical and
health care needs of Southern New Jersey
residents. Please visit www.sjhealthcare.net
to learn more.
Faces in the News
I
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Custody, Child Support, Alimony
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{
STAFF
}
MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
LORI GOUDIE Art Director
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
PATTY ALI Production Manager
The Grapevine
3638 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2010. All
rights reserved.
{
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Editor’s Letter
I
Reaping What We’ve Sown
Governor delivers plenty of bad news about NJ’s economy
Those of you who tuned in to watch Governor Chris Christie delivering his budget
address on Tuesday night may have felt like you were watching a funeral. It was
somber and the picture Gov. Christie painted was bleak. This column was written on
Monday, 24 hours before the governor’s speech, and yet anyone who hasn’t been living
under a rock for the past year knew what the budget address would be about. The only
thing I couldn’t predict is how the speech would be received.
Many times, elected officials who deliver bad news try to
preface their speeches with “don’t shoot the messenger” warn-
ings. They’ll start out by thoroughly detailing the history that
has led up to the sorry state of affairs they’re about to detail
for you, being sure to name all of the predecessors who may
have been responsible. Gov. Christie will surely do the same.
Voters/constituents usually see through it when politicians
try to pass the buck. Sometimes, if the message is delivered
with just the right measure of sincerity, simplicity and logic, it
will be perceived as the truth and the public will rally behind the speaker. But hell
hath no fury like a voter scorned, at least in the eyes of a politician, and if Gov.
Christie’s speech doesn’t earn the public’s buy-in, it’s going to be a long four years.
If you got through the Governor’s woeful budget address, I’d like to hear what you
thought about his delivery. We all know how miserable the substance of the speech
will be; Christie would be the first to tell you that he had planned to be the bearer of
terrible news.
One need not be a soothsayer the likes of Carnac the Magnificent (sorry, you have
to be old enough to remember when Johnny Carson hosted The Tonight Show to get
the reference) to guess what Christie was going to say during his address. Here are
my prognostications:
He’s going to tell us that when ex-Gov. Jon Corzine left office, the top income tax
rate was 11 percent. He’ll contrast that with a reminder that when the income tax was
instituted by Governor Brendan Byrne, the top rate was 2.5 percent. Christie will
surely mention that our 7 percent sales tax is among the highest in the country. He’ll
point out that our corporate tax is among the most onerous in the nation and he’ll
bemoan our highest-in-the-land property taxes as well. In short, he’ll make a stirring
case that we New Jerseyans are the most over-taxed people in the United States.
He’s going to tell us that he can’t raise taxes any more, so he’s going to have to hack
away at spending. And that these cuts are going to be very unpopular.
As he said during a budget “conversation” last week in Haddon Heights, “I know
that the things I’m going to propose next week are going to anger some people,”
understated the Governor. “But what I’ll tell you is it’s going to be fair, they’re going
to cut against everybody. We have no way to make up this money unless everybody
leaves the corners of the room, protecting their own little piece of turf.”
In order to return to responsible governance and reign in and make up for decades
of unrestrained spending, I can guarantee your “turf” will be tread upon. It’s necessary
and it’s going to be painful. So tell me, are you buying what Gov. Christie is selling?
If you want to comment on the substance of Christie’s address, feel free to opine
about that. But the real question is, will you shoot the messenger? Obviously, Christie
hasn’t been in office long enough to be blamed for the problems we now face, but did
he convince you that he has the will and ability to lead the Garden State down a path
to economic recovery?
If I don’t hear from you, I’ll just assume you’re too busy packing up your things in
preparation for your move out of state to more affordable pastures.
MIKE EPIFANIO
Editor & Publisher
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3, 28 Faces in the News
6 Don’t Cry
Unless there’s a Kleenex around
and you can resist modern
marketing ploys. PAUL J. DOE
7 “Backwards” Inventions
Steps back now and then might
spell progress. DEBORAH A. EIN
8 Community Calendar
10 Hidden Problems
They’re not so easy to spot,
and even tougher to solve.
LUKE KORNBLUH
12 Leuchter’s Timing
He came to town intending to
start a newspaper.
VINCE FARINACCIO
14 Entertainment
18 DINING: Andrea’s Journey
A chef’s signature dishes attest
to his heritage. FRANK GABRIEL
22 Crossword
23 Recipe Corner
Remix recipe for moist carrot
cake. LISA DINUNZIO
24 Principals’ Lists
26 PET CARE
29 Hop Online
And learn about local, state and
national Main Street programs.
TODD NOON
29 Small Business Report
What the state can—and should
do—for small businesses.
ASSEMBLYMAN MATT MILAM
30 REAL ESTATE
3.5%
Sales
Tax
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A great dentist is no different then a great athlete. How good you are
depends on how much you train. Michael Jordan, Bret Farve & Peyton
Manning all share the common thread of total commitment to their sport.
That is exactly how I feel about dentistry. For 30 years I have focussed
virtually every week on being better than the week before. I’ve spent endless
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M
any years ago Kleenex made
a fortune with the slogan,
“Don’t carry a cold in your
pocket.” It was a stroke of
genius as a slogan because it made sense
and it didn’t require a lot of thought. It was
the end of handkerchiefs. Most young peo-
ple—and even people my age—don’t even
own a handkerchief and refer to all tissues
as Kleenex.
The problem with it is that most of us
don’t carry a box of Kleenex with us
when we go someplace—unless it’s a
funeral or a wedding—and, even then, the
wife usually just sticks a few tissues in
her pocketbook. In fact, this year our
children (grandchildren in my case) were
being taught in school to sneeze or cough
into their elbow.
Turns out handkerchiefs aren’t such a
bad idea but they won’t be coming back any
time soon. A useful, utilitarian product
erased from the public consciousness by an
effective ad campaign.
Sounds familiar. Those marketing
geniuses are always one step ahead.
Nowadays they seem to be focused on
keeping us upgrading products we already
have. It isn’t enough to have a working tele-
vision; you need one that has a flat screen
and high definition capability.
Got that. Then you need one with
Internet capability. Got that. Well, you’re
missing out if you don’t get your picture in
3D. Those 3 Ds, by the way, stand for
“dumb, dumber and dumbest,” if you get
sucked into that scheme.
But you never know. One thing that
changed when I officially reached my sen-
ior years was my television viewing. I used
to have a rule that there was no television
allowed before 8 p.m. Now, as a senior, I feel
compelled to watch Wheel of Fortune and
Jeopardy. I can’t explain why but come 7
o’clock and I just find myself drawn to the
family roomto plunk myself down and start
shouting out questions to Alex Trebeck’s
answers and watch Vanna spin letters.
The reason I brought up the Kleenex
thing before is that one of the things I’ve
noticed is how different the ads are during
those shows. I’m sure it’s because the mar-
keting geniuses have targeted seniors as the
primary viewers during that period.
And, because I’m sure that’s the case,
I’ve come to the conclusion that the mar-
keting geniuses figure that all seniors like
to gamble and have “quality of life” prob-
lems that can be cured with prescriptions.
The gambling ads are either for the non-
Atlantic City casinos (which feature senior-
friendly slots) or the Pennsylvania lottery
featuring the state’s second most famous
(but most annoying) groundhog.
Atlantic City is really missing a bet (no
pun intended) here. When I first moved
here, the casinos were hopping day and
night with bus trippers. Now, they seem to
be catering to a younger, hipper crowd.
And, of course, they are losing market
share and money. Ignore senior power at
your peril.
The biggest advertising bucks, though,
seem to be for the pill pushers. The thing
that always brings a chuckle for me are the
disclaimers after the ads where they
describe all the horrible things that could
happen to you if you use the product.
It always makes me wonder if it’s “truth
in advertising” or just more of that legalese
that companies use to cover their behinds
from the lawyers. I guess the ads must
work because you see so many of them but
I just can’t imagine going to the doctor and
saying “I saw this pill on TV that…”
Oh, the other thing the geniuses have fig-
ured out is that we’re more likely to vote.
During the campaign seasons it seems like
every other ad during that time period is
political. I just wish these ads came with
the same kind of warning that accompanies
the prescription ones: “Voting for this can-
didate could cause nausea, headaches and a
severe loss of income.”
Which, finally, brings me to the real
point of this column. The governor
dropped the budget shoe this week and
there’s going to be a lot of weeping, wailing
and gnashing of teeth by some people.
Expect a full-blown campaign telling us
how hard our teachers, police and firemen
and state and municipal employees work
for us. How they keep us safe, maintain our
streets, pick up our trash, teach our chil-
dren, and just generally, make this a regular
paradise on earth. They will make some
compelling arguments and paint some ter-
rible pictures of life without them.
But, guess what? Things have to change.
Our elected politicians have allowed a bad
situation to get worse and worse. Let your
elected officials know you support the
I
Doe’s and Don’ts
{ PAUL J. DOE, FORMER PUBLISHER OF THE CUMBERLAND NEWS }
Don’t Cry
Are public employees more useful than
3-D television?
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R
emember snow fences? There
aren’t many of them around
anymore, but I was feeling very
nostalgic about them a few
weeks ago as I was driving near some
open fields where the snow was blowing
and drifting across the road. In some
places, the snowplowing trucks were
enlisted to re-plow the roadways they
had cleared a day or two before.
It made me remember an earlier dis-
cussion (I think it was summertime) with
my kids, who asked me what the red
picket fences were for (so there’s at least
one of them still around). It was one of
those déjà vu moments, as I think I asked
my mother the same question, back when
the fences were regularly put up in
autumn in anticipation of winter snows,
then rolled up in spring and stored away
for the summer.
So I explained to my kids (as my
mother told me) that the fences were
there to prevent the snow from drifting
across the roadways. Then, I told them
that the fences used to dot the landscape
in southern New Jersey, but there
weren’t so many around anymore because
we often don’t get enough snow to make
it worth the time and effort (and taxpayer
money, I thought to myself and maybe
even said aloud) to put them up and take
them down each year. Since it was sum-
mer, I assumed that the one we saw was
forgotten when that decision had been
made and was now left up year-round. Its
condition certainly backed up my
assumption.
Anyway, this is one of those years
when the time, effort, and taxpayer
money might have been worth it…if snow
fences even still exist in city stockpiles.
The money paid in overtime to keep the
drifting snow off the roads would have
gone much further with employees put-
ting up snow fences during regular work
hours in autumn. Less wear and tear on
city trucks, too.
Another good idea that was done away
with is the wing window. Anyone who
grew up in, let’s say, the 1970s or earlier
will remember the little triangular push-
out windows that all cars had toward the
front sides, and sometimes in the back
corners, too. You could have just some or
all of these windows open and get a nice
cooling breeze in summer without get-
ting windblown, as you do today with car
windows down even a little bit.
I don’t know if this is a coincidence,
but as soon as those windows disap-
peared from our cars, automobile air
conditioning became a much-needed
luxury, and is now a standard feature in
just about all new cars. Now, I know that
the carmakers have enough to worry
about these days, but if they really want
to make the cars “greener” and more
efficient, it seems that cutting out air
conditioning would give the cars better
gas mileage as well as give the car manu-
facturers major points for saving the
ozone layer.
Along those same lines, our son
recently participated in a school science
project that required him to “invent”
something, then to create a prototype of
it and go through the procedure of apply-
ing for a patent on it. Operating under
the premise that no idea is original, he
adopted something that his grandfather
had rigged to make a particular task on
the farm easier. (I can’t tell you what it
is—it’s top secret and may get patented
one day.)
The beauty of it is not so much in its
originality (since my father tells me he
fashioned it based on a mechanized ver-
sion he had borrowed from another
farmer at one point), but in its simplici-
ty. I urged my son to promote the fact
that the “invention” could make a huge
difference to farmers in Third World
countries, where using a mechanized
version might not be feasible, but the
simplified version might turn some local
economies around.
In order to solve global problems and
address an ailing global economy, we
might just have to pare our problems
down and think locally first, even to the
point of recycling perfectly good inven-
tions for a modern society that could use
a big boost…or a lot of little ones. I
“Backward”
Inventions
Even in our Internet age, we might do well to take
a couple of steps back in order to advance.
I
Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EI N, MANAGI NG EDI TOR }
When Only The Best Will Do
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HAPPENINGS
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
Zoning Board Monthly Meeting. City
Hall, Council Chambers (2nd floor),
Seventh and Wood sts. 7 p.m.
Business Ethics. One Stop-Center, 275 N.
Delsea Dr., Business Resource Center.
Octavia Nash, MBA, Cumberland County
College, presents the seminar. 9 -11 a.m.
Build-a-Rain Barrel Workshop.
Cousteau Center at the David Sheppard
House, 31 W. Commerce St., Bridgeton.
The hands-on workshop is designed to
educate participants on the benefits of
rainwater harvesting. Participants will
leave the workshop with a completed rain
barrel from food-grade containers. 9:30
a.m.-noon. 825-3700.
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
Game and Card Party. Millville Woman's
Club, Third & "E" sts. Enjoy an afternoon of
cards, board games or just conversation.
Reserve at 765-9203.
“Meet and Greet” PTA Meeting. Notre
Dame Regional School, Landisville.
Principal Dr. Mary Alimenti presents a slide
show of the year in review and her vision of
the future of Notre Dame. All are welcome.
7 p.m. 697-3456 ext. 112
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
Free Luncheon. First Presbyterian
Church, Second and Pine sts., Millville.
Health & Hope Ministries invites Millville
residents. Noon.
Ranch Hope Spaghetti Dinner. South
Vineland United Methodist Church, Main Rd.
and Sherman Ave. 4:30–7:30 p.m. $7.50
adults, $4/6-12, free/under 6. Takeouts
available. 696-3944 or 696-1044 or pur-
chase tickets at the door.
Spring Dance Party. The Ellison School,
Spring Rd. For all area 1st through 4th
graders. Music and entertainment from
Derick "D" Clown. 1-3 p.m. Admission is
$7. 691-1734.
Free Workshop. Rock of Salvation
Church, 513 Grape St. Two speakers dis-
cuss “How the American Cancer Society
is Saving Lives from Cancer.” 10 a.m.-
noon. 794-8898.
Craft and Sports Fair. Vineland High
School, E. Chestnut Ave. The VHS All
Sports Booster Club is hosting crafters,
vendors, and people selling sports memo-
rabilia. 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Healing Mass and Anointing of the
Sick. Our Lady of Pompeii, 4680 Dante Ave.
Father John F. Campoli, a priest of the
Voluntas Dei Institute will be the main cele-
brant. 3 p.m. All invited to attend. 691-7526.
MARCH 20 AND 21
A Garden of Quilts. WheatonArts, 1501
Glasstown Rd., Millville. About 250 exam-
ples of quilters art, from traditional bed
quilts to contemporary wall hangings.
Presented by The Garden Patch Quilters.
Spinning demonstrations on Sunday with
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
THE VINELAND HEALTH
DEPARTMENT will hold an H1N1 vacci-
nation clinic on March 17 for anyone ages
6 months and older wanting to be vacci-
nated. Both nasal vaccine and injections
will be available. All children 9 and under
vaccinated at any of our previous flu clin-
ics that are due for their second dose,
please bring your vaccine cards. The clin-
ic will be held at the Sacred Heart High
School Gymnasium on East Avenue, from
4 to 7 p.m., or until the supply runs out.
SACRED HEART CHURCH will host
Breakfast with the Easter Bunny on
Sunday, March 21, following the 10:30
a.m. Mass. The program includes a
Continental breakfast, Easter egg hunt, a
craft and a picture with the Easter Bunny.
Cost is $5 per child. Make your reserva-
tions by calling 696-0243. Sacred Heart
Church and Hall are located at Landis
Avenue and Myrtle Street. The church and
hall are wheelchair accessible.
THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
Chapter 2531 will sell palm crosses after
Mass on March 20 and 21 at Sacred
Heart Church. Each Cross measures 24
by 18 inches. A limited number available;
call 794-8294 or 794-3884 to reserve
your cross or for delivery.
A LENTEN SUPPER will be hosted
by Notre Dame Regional School on two
Wednesdays, March 17 and 24 at the
Landisville Campus. Dinner—pasta,
meatballs , salad and bread—will be pre-
pared by Ed and Cecelia Bachinsky. Doors
will open at 6 p.m. and the cost is $7 per
adult, $4 for children. All are welcome to
attend. 697-3456 ext.112.
THE 2ND ANNUAL YOUTH ART
AUCTION has been set by the
Riverfront Renaissance Center for the Arts
to raise money for its Art Creates
Excellence program and its scholarships
for area youth. If you are an artist under
18 who would like to donate a piece of art
for the auction (paintings, jewelry, sculp-
ture, photographs), call the center 327-
4500 or email your name, number and
age to rrcarts@yahoo.com by May 7. Work
will be sold via silent auction with all mini-
mum bids beginning at $5 with incre-
ments of $2. Auction date is Saturday,
June 5, from 10-12 p.m. All work not sold
must be taken at the end of the event.
THE DOCTORS AT FOOT CARE
Centers (238 W. Chestnut Avenue) are
offering free shoe evalutions for the
month of March. Call 691-2152 for details.
A BUS TRIP TO Sight and Sound’s
Millennium Theater in Strasburg, PA, to
see the new production, “Joseph.” is
scheduled for Saturday, April 24. Ticket
price includes round-trip transportation
by motor coach from Vineland to
Strasburg, an all-you-can-eat smorgas-
bord dinner at Hershey Farms, and ticket
to the 7:30 p.m. show. Tickets are $125,
with teen ticket (13-18) at $100, children
(3-12) $75.
Tickets must be paid in full in order
to hold a reservation. Make checks
payable to Trinity Episcopal Church.
Deadline for ticket purchase is April 1, or
until 45 tickets are sold. Bus leaves the
church at Eighth and Wood streets at
2:30 p.m. on April 24. To purchase your
ticket, call 692-1589.
OPENING DAY AT New Jersey
Motorsports Park is Saturday, March 20,
when you can get behind the wheel and
race for as little as $35. Also, Team Pro-
Motion Sportbike Club will organize and
conduct race practice and the CCS Race
Licensing school for the NJMP Sportbike
Championship Cup Series. Practice days
and the licensing school will be conducted
on the Friday prior to each race weekend,
allowing seasoned racers to practice on the
course they will be racing on during the
weekend. In addition, riders who are new
to racing will be able to attend the licens-
ing school on Friday and begin their racing
career the same weekend.
Park officials also have unveiled three
Rally America sanctioned European-style
rally cross races this year on Lightning
Raceway. Rally America, Inc. is the premier
sanctioning body for performance rallying
in North America and is bringing this wild-
ly popular racing to the United States for
the first time.
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
Wrestleplex. Landis Intermediate School
61 W. Landis Ave. Damn That's Wrestling
presents Rikishi vs. Big Vito, Hasheem vs.
Jojo, Crazed vs. Patch, and more. 7:30
p.m. bell time. Advance tickets $16, kids
5-12 $10. At the door $20, kids 5-12 $12.
For more information or to reserve ring-
side tickets($25), call 563-0124.

Joe’s Butcher Shop
711 Gershel Road, Norma
On Landis Avenue (Rt. 56) Corner of Gershel Rd.
(2 minutes from Vineland * Just off Route 55)
Monday – Saturday 8 am – 6 pm
(856) 690-5637
A Full Service Butcher Shop
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Gina Allewelt, 10 a.m.-noon and 1-3 p.m. in
the General Store. The Millville artist will
use fleece from area sheep and alpaca
farms. A variety of hand-carded, hand-
spun, and hand-dyed yarn and handcrafted
knitted items will be available for purchase.
10 a.m.-5 .pm. both days. $8, kids 5 and
under admitted free.
SUNDAY, MARCH 21
138th Church Anniversary. New Bethel
African Methodist Episcopal Church, 414 N.
Seventh St. All-day event with morning and
afternoon services. 691-1349.
TUESDAY, MARCH 23
City Council Meeting. Council
Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood
sts. 7:30 p.m.
Open House/Project Fair. Cumberland
Christian School, W. Sherman Ave. Parents
and children may visit classrooms 9 a.m.-4
p.m. and 7:30-9 p.m. Middle School Project
Fair opens its doors 6:30-9 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24
Tips and Tactics to Generate FREE
Publicity For Your Business. One Stop-
Center, 275 N. Delsea Dr., Business
Resource Center. Todd Noon, Executive
Director, VDID/Main Street Vineland, pres-
ents the seminar. 9 -11 a.m.
Colon Cancer Awareness. SJH Regional
Medical Center, 1505 W. Sherman Ave.
Presentations from SJH physicians on the
signs and symptoms and treatment of colon
cancer. Participants may speak with doctors
and ask questions. Refreshments and prizes,
including an iPod Touch. 5-8 p.m. 641-7854.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
VHAS Lecture. VHAS, Sixth and Elmer
sts. Speakers will discuss notable women
in Vineland’s history. 7 p.m. Admission is
free and a tour of the museum will follow.
Monthly Dinner. Semper Marine
Detachment #205, 2041 W. Landis Ave.
Spaghetti and meatballs, roll, salad, bev-
erage and dessert. 4-7 p.m. Takeout avail-
able, one meal per ticket. $7, children 6-12
$4, kids 5 and under free. 692-4300.
FRIDAY, MARCH 26
Spring Bling Club Night Dance Party-
Class of 2010. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth
St. All area teens are invited by Mayor
Romano. DJ Slick Rick from Bob Morgan
Entertainment. All proceeds benefit VHS
Project Graduation. 7-11 p.m. Tickets $10
per person. School ID is required for
admittance (must be a Vineland resident
under age of 20). For tickets or sponsor-
ship information, call 794-4011.
SATURDAY, MARCH 27
VHS Wrestling Fundraiser. Five Points
Inn, Rt. 557 and E. Landis Ave. Buffet din-
ner, music, dancing, door prizes, basket
auction and 50/50 drawing. Cash bar. All
proceeds benefit the VHS wrestling team.
7-11:30 p.m. Tickets $25. 293-8465.
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I
n our daily newspaper last week, there
were three headlines that added up to a
single huge question: Howmuch has the
recession cost our counties and munici-
palities? In the fewhours I devoted to online
research, I realized that, without a teamof
economists, I probably wouldn’t get anything
close to an answer. Federal and state data is rel-
atively easy to gather. While they are both
complex entities, they each have a single
administration and bureaucracy and this leads
to a coherent production of reports and data. If
you’re interested in one state or one county or
one city you will probably find the information
you’re looking for. However, try finding cumu-
lative data for cities or counties in NewJersey
or for the 50 state governments combined and
you’re going to need much more patience to
get any accurate numbers.
In this column, I will present some of the
data that I found. And I will ask several ques-
tions that more fully develop the scope of the
problem, especially as they relate to the impact
of the recession on our two largest cities,
Vineland and Millville.
The three issues in the headlines are:
1) Vineland may charge fee to use fields;
2) Millville plans to sell land to raise cash; and
3) School tax may go up in Millville. I could
also mention another itemon the March 5th
front page, “Snowtakes toll on local govern-
ments: cities seek federal aid to recover costs.”
It was this last that really grabbed my attention
and led me to put all the others in context. Sure
we had a lot of snowthis winter, but are you
telling me that NewJersey, the second richest
state per capita in the nation, can't plowsome
snowwithout federal assistance? Howmuch
did the private sector spend on snowremoval
fromretail parking lots and howmuch federal
assistance will they receive? If municipalities
in NewJersey can simply turn to Trenton or
Washington when gaps in their budgets appear,
howmeaningful are those budgets? And what
does this say about the fiscal sustainability of
our municipalities?
Both Vineland and Millville have raised
taxes recently, claiming there is no other way
to contain their costs. Millville approved an
$.08 tax-hike in December 2009 for a total rate
of $1.21 per $100 of assessed value ($1,210 in
taxes for a $100,000 home). Some four-fifths of
the newrevenue was needed principally to
cover $772,000 in health-care premium
increases for roughly 60 municipal employees.
In Vineland, taxes were increased for 2008-
09 by $.09 and again for 2009-10 by an addi-
tional $.03. In the space of one year, then, the
tax rate in Vineland rose from$1.138 to $1.258
per $100 assessed. These are only municipal
taxes; property owners also face county and
state portions on their tax bills. Our state
already pays the nation’s highest property taxes.
Now, back to the headlines that started this
whole investigation. Residents will possibly
face fees to play baseball and soccer on munici-
pal ball fields. The proposed fees are $5 per
resident ($10 non-resident) for youth leagues
and $10 per resident ($20 non-resident) for
adult leagues. Howcan a service that was easi-
ly provided by the city for so many decades
nowrequire increased taxes to maintain?
Secondly, why choose a special-use fee to
fund the field maintenance rather than the nor-
mal budget process that has been in place for so
long? Isn’t this a double charge for our local
athletes who pay property taxes and nowmust
pay again for their kids’ soccer, baseball, etc.?
Lastly, in an era where public health
debates are center-stage (obesity, healthy-food
choices in schools) why would community
leaders consider a tax that effectively penalizes
Guest Column
{ LUKE KORNBLUH }
HiddenProblems
Our municipalities have a few too many...
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healthy athletic activity, especially for our
youngest residents?
In the second place we find the City of
Millville selling land to raise cash. The article is
not specific, but about a half-dozen “connect-
ing and buildable lots” will be offered, the
mayor said. There are other undersized, non-
connecting, and wetland properties that may
also be offered for sale. Howmuch cash can be
raised by these sales? Howdoes the city find
itself in the real estate business in the first
place? Who decided that nowis the best time
for the city to enter the real estate market? Of
course, a city fromtime to time comes into the
ownership of a property and it is quite routine
to sell themat public auction. What confronts
the taxpayers’ sensibilities in this matter is the
attempt at a one-time budget fix through the
disposal of property. This principle was round-
ly rejected when Governor Corzine attempted
to lease the NewJersey Turnpike. The city
ought to publish the locations of all its dispos-
able properties and put it to a vote.
Both of these issues—the athletic fields fee
and the sale of properties—invite us to wonder
what benefit really accrues to residents. In the
latter case the transaction is one-way: Once liq-
uidated and added to the municipal general
fund it cannot be repeated and any other
potential value is permanently lost. In the for-
mer case, we’d like to see an expiration-date for
fee increases, otherwise, it too begins to look
like a one-way deal. We are all familiar with the
principle that prices and taxes defy gravity,
going up but never coming down.
While neither of these issues is a direct tax-
hike, the third is precisely this. Millville’s Board
of Education is likely to ask for a $.029 increase
on top of the municipality’s 8-cent tax increase
two months ago. We understand the need—
Gov. Christie chopped $475 million in state aid
for education in the current budget year (i.e.
the final Corzine budget) and was expected to
unveil a slashed state budget in his budget
address on Tuesday. The shortfall will have to
be made up by cities and towns.
These increases will be forced even after
Millville saved $1.6 million by switching to a
cheaper health-care plan but they obscure an
even more provocative figure. Of Millville’s
$96 million school budget, some $68 million
was provided from state coffers. Both Vineland
and Millville qualify for special state funding
intended for “poorer urban districts” and “spe-
cial needs districts.”
In Vineland the situation is even more stark.
For the present year, the local tax revenue for
education is $22.5 million while state aid totals
$136.7 million, forming a total operating budget
of $169 million. Considering the recent budget
disasters in Trenton and the overwhelming
state debt (no small part of which is entitle-
ment spending for NewJersey’s 700,000 public
workers, such as teachers), this is money that
neither the municipalities nor the state have.
The outcomes, therefore, can only be increased
debt or increased taxes.
This article cannot take into account all the
examples of these sorts of problems statewide.
For instance, as UEZ funding is presently
frozen a number of agencies, many of them
non-profits that enhance our quality of life, and
projects are in jeopardy. Economic losses such
as these only worsen our local experience of
the Great Recession. What this article can do is
open eyes to the quality of life in America that
is slipping away because typical Americans like
us simply cannot afford it any longer. So we
turn to Trenton or to Washington for help.
This is the turning point in the game of fis-
cal hide-and-seek that we have been playing
for a long time. Let us sort national, state, and
local issues so that we can understand better
how they are connected. Above we saw that
school taxes may have to be raised to compen-
sate for lost state aid to education districts. Yet
we also saw that Vineland and Millville (and
Bridgeton) receive more than half their school
budgets from Trenton in the first place. And
where does the deeply indebted Trenton—
New Jersey is on the list of the top five states
facing fiscal crisis—find funds to send to these
poorer districts?
The federal stimulus bill (American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act) of February
2009 provides nearly $135 billion in flexible
emergency funding for states. These funds can
be broken down into the Federal Medical
Assistance Percentage for $87 billion (once
again, government spending driven by
increased health-care costs) and the State
Fiscal Stabilization Fund for $48 billion. This
allowed states to avoid even deeper cuts, espe-
cially in education and social services.
What we’re looking at, then, is a scenario
where there are huge shortfalls at every level of
government. Rarely do we ever speak of these
problems as a connected whole. Our munici-
palities rely on state aid, but the states are
about one-trillion dollars in debt for their gen-
eral funds and another trillion or so behind on
their pension and retiree health benefits funds.
Our states rely on the federal government to
stabilize their budgets, but the U.S. government
is $12 trillion in debt and expected to run large
annual deficits for the rest of the decade.
We must begin planning for the next reces-
sion right nowbecause our public funding
needs on Main Street do not synchronize auto-
matically with the business cycles on Wall
Street. The crisis in state budgets, specifically
in NewJersey, was first revealed by the 2001-
02 recession. With state revenue down 16 per-
cent last year, a contraction caused by the
reduced tax receipts normal during a recession,
the short-termsituation affords no resources to
contribute to a long-termsolution. When we
are forced to raise taxes and fees while reduc-
ing services at the municipal level in a year
when the federal budget deficit is $1.5 trillion
we are forced to reckon with the fact that what
is trickling down in this economy is debt, not
wealth. When you can clearly see the increases
in municipal taxes and fees despite their
eclipse by the astronomical state and federal
deficit spending, then you can see the hidden
problems of townships and municipalities in
our state and in our country. I
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• Gas Logs • Mantels & Accessories
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N
ot many of the early Vineland
newspapers were founded
here on chance, but Max
Leuchter’s Vineland Times
owed its existence to the whim of the
fates. The publication was born as a three-
cent, eight-page weekly on Thursday
October 15, 1925, yet the story of its estab-
lishment begins many years earlier.
According to reports published in the
Times Journal, Leuchter grew up in an
orphanage in Germantown, Pennsylvania,
where he developed a love of writing and
a friendship with another youth named
Sylvan D. Einstein. The two friends parted
ways when it was time to enter the world
as adults and Leuchter took on a job as
clerk and window trimmer for a men’s
haberdashery business. Turning his atten-
tion to writing, he soon became a reporter
for the Camden Courier and established a
reputation for human interest stories
about city life under the pseudonym
“Lord Camden.”
Leuchter married the niece of a former
employer, and the couple began cultivat-
ing plans to establish a newspaper. During
this time, Leuchter was also serving as
secretary of the Camden County Real
Estate Board and it was because of this
position that he came into contact with an
ad placed by the Vineland Chamber of
Commerce. The ad itself was of no signifi-
cance to the reporter, but one name listed
in it, that of Sylvan D. Einstein, caught his
attention. Wondering if this was his child-
hood friend, Leuchter sent a letter inquir-
ing about Einstein and received a confir-
mation from his acquaintance.
A trip to Vineland reunited Leuchter
and Einstein, and the latter, upon discover-
ing his friend’s journalistic background and
aspirations, was successful in convincing
the future editor to establish his enterprise
here. It was a gutsy move when the failure
of numerous other publications in Vineland
had already set an ominous precedent.
“The Vineland Times has come to
town,” Leuchter proclaimed in the open-
ing of his first editorial. “Just what is it
going to do? It will present news as news,
and not as views, confining its opinions of
events or persons to the editorial page
where opinions properly belong…It will
seek to establish the truth of all statements
appearing in its columns, since apologies
mean little in many cases, and count
less…For the modern conception of a
newspaper is not that it is merely a mirror
Historical Vineland
{ VINCE FARINACCIO }
Leuchter’s Timing
As a reporter for the Camden Courier, Max Leuchter began
cultivating plans to establish a newspaper of his own.
I
VINTAGE VINELAND
Over the years, the Vineland Historical and
Antiquarian Society has acquired many
old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the
Society, is busy cataloging the photos from
Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the
help of The Grapevine readers in identify-
ing the people and places captured on film
so long ago. If you know some-
thing about this photograph, we
ask that you contact either
Harbold at the Society or use
the contact information on page
4 to inform us.
The mission of the VHAS is
to acquire, maintain, and pre-
serve Vineland’s history. The
Society was founded in 1864,
just three years after the
establishment of the town of
Vineland. It is the second old-
est historical society in New
Jersey, second only to the New Jersey
Historical Society. The VHAS consists of
a museum, library, and archives, open to
the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m.,
same hours Tuesday through Friday for
research. It is located at 108 South
Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111).
This looks like a winner to us, but we’d like to fill
in the blanks. Do you know this butterfly?
Contestant 42
“Fabulous at 50”
Lynn Doyle
Motivational speaker from CN8
Women and
Alternative Wellness
Karen Shields, CNM
Gentle Beginnings
Elmer
Women and
Primary Care
Robert Smick, DO
South Jersey Healthcare,
Department of
Occupational Health
Vineland, Elmer, Bridgeton
Women and
Cardiac Wellness
Gladwyn Baptist, MD
Bridgeton
Women and
Traditional Wellness
Sussannah Walsh, MD
Cumberland Obstetrics
and Gynecology
Vineland
Speakers
www.SJHealthcare.net
Keynote Speaker
Tickets available at SJH
Foundation office until
April 7, 2010.
Limited to first 200.
Tickets not sold at the door.
For additional information please call
856-691-6551 or visit www.sjhfdn.org.
RcIa×ation Tcchniqucs for Woncn
What everyone should practice
WcIIncss for Woncn
A professional team approach to care for you
Advance
Tickets
Includes all activities
and Luncheon
$
40


Continental Breakfast • Wellness for Women Lectures • Luncheon • Chinese Auction • Vendors
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D&D Bargain
Mall & Indoor Flea Market
NEW & USED FURNITURE
Highest Quality – Lowest Prices!
30 Day Layaway Available – Visa & MC Accepted
Corner of Landis & Gershal
(856) 696-3611
MOVIE SALE
$
5
99
or 2 For
$
10
00
229 S. Delsea Dr, Vineland, NJ
856-696-4123
in which are reflected the whims and fan-
cies of Time, but rather an instrument by
which progress may be measured and
industry and high purpose encouraged.”
Leuchter and his wife Cecelia wit-
nessed their dream coming true. Cecelia,
an attorney, would soon give up her law
profession to handle the duties of business
manager full time.
On March 30, 1926, a little over five
months after debuting, the paper became a
semi-weekly, published Tuesdays and
Fridays at two cents an issue. By December 9,
1927, it became a daily, a move Leuchter
explained as “another forward step made
possible by the encouragement and support
of its readers and advertisers.” Along with
the publishing schedule, the newspaper also
received a newname, the Evening Times.
The publication continued its success-
ful run, and on February 27, 1942, consoli-
dated with Vineland’s first long-running
paper, the Evening Journal. The merger
altered the name to the Times Journal, and
the popular column “Keeping Up With the
Times” was removed from its 17-year front
page location to make room for more
world news articles. Its reappearance on
page one several weeks later was accompa-
nied by Leuchter’s explanation that it was
restored due to “suggestions and requests
from many old readers whose judgment
we deem better than our own.”
By 1952, the Audit Bureau of Circulations
confirmed that the Times Journal had “the
largest readership ever attained by a news-
paper published in this area.”
The Times Journal served the communi-
ty of Vineland for more than 60 years, cov-
ering the events that define the 20th centu-
ry and capturing the evolution of the town
beyond its first 100 years. The final edition
bearing the title Vineland Times Journal
was published Saturday May 21, 1988. By
the following Monday, the Times Journal
joined the historic list of publications that
had brought the news to Vineland. I
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
Static Addiction. Sidelines Sports Bar, 2
S. Sharp St. (corner Rt. 49 aka Main St.),
Millville, 825-1667. St. Paddy's Day Bash!
10 p.m.-1 a.m.
MARCH 17 THROUGH 20
Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar
House Irish Pub, 123 N. High St., Millville,
293-1200. Wed.: Retrospect (with an Irish
flair), 8 p.m.-midnight. Thurs.: Open Mic
Night with Danny Eyer, 8 p.m. Fri.: Red
House, 9 p.m.; Sat.: Joe & Terry, 9 p.m.
MARCH 17 THROUGH 22
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s
and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink
specials) 8 p.m.-midnight, Thursday.:
Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue
Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin
Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday:
Country Western Dance Party (beer and
shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight.
MARCH 18 THROUGH 20
Nightlife at Villa Fazzolari. Villa
Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding
Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night,
Mike Yacovelli Project, 7 p.m. Fri. Jazz night
with professors and students from Rowan
University Sat.: Italian Accordian.
Nightlife at The Rail. The Rail, Cedar
Ave. and Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-7245.
Wed.: Frank Comparri, 9 p.m. Thurs.: Mark
Hanson, Sat.: Last Exit Band, 9 p.m., $5.
MARCH 18 THROUGH 22
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wednesday: Ladies
Night, 1/2 price appetizers all night.
Happy Hour Monday-Saturday, 4-6 p.m.
$1 off alcoholic drinks. Friday and
Saturday, live entertainment.
FRIDAY, MARCH 19
Peanut Butter Lovesicle. Fuel House
Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
563-1400. 6:30 p.m., $10.
Book Signing/King Eider. Bogart’s
Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714.
Book signing with author Keith Jackson and
his I Forgot My Lunch Money 6-8 p.m.
Original bluegrass. 7-10 p.m.
Gene Cortopassi. Merighi’s Savoy Inn,
4940 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 691-8051.
Live music while you dine. 6:30-9:30 p.m.
The Ataris. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St.,
Vineland. 6 p.m. $10-12.
www.frontgatetickets.com.
Robert Lipkin. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W
MARCH 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20
Steel Magnolias. Little Theatre,
66 E. Sherman Ave., Vineland.
Cumberland Players open its
64th season with the play by
Robert Harling. 8 p.m. except 2
p.m. matinee on March 14. All
tickets are $13. March 14th mati-
nee only offers a special dis-
counted ticket price of $6.50 for
senior citizens.
www.cumberlandplayers.com.
ENTERTAINMENT

COMMUNITY THEATER, THIRD FRIDAY ON HIGH STREET, JERRY
BLAVAT DANCE PARTY AND ST. PATTY’S DAY BASHES.
SATURDAY, MARCH 27
VRDC Spring Dance Program:
Taking the Stage. Frank Guaracini
Jr. Fine & Performing Arts Center,
Cumberland County College,
Sherman Ave. and College Dr.,
Vineland. The Vineland Regional
Dance Company honors dancer and
choreographer Jonathan Phelps.
7 p.m. $35 for front mezzanine and
front orchestra and $25 for back
mezzanine and back orchestra. A pre-
performance cocktail reception from
5:30 to 7 p.m., $25. 691-6059 or
www.vrdc.org.
1853 Vine Rd. Vineland
691-4848
Fax: 856-691-2294
marcaccimeats@verizon.net
SPECIALS
March 17-20
EBT
All restaurant and diners are welcome to get the freshest meat,
cut the way they want at wholesale prices
FRESH
PICNICS
AVERAGE
(8-10 lbs)
BEEF
SHORT
RIBS
BOLAR
ROAST
BUTTER
STEAKS
PORK
ROAST
FREE
SEASONING
DELMONICO
BONELESS
RIBEYE
FRESH
CHICKEN
DRUM
STICKS
$
1
79
lb.
$
1
69
lb.
$
2
79
lb.
$
2
49
lb.
$
2
99
lb.
$
6
99
lb.
OUR OWN
SWEET
OR HOT
ITALIAN
SAUSAGE
.69
lb.
¢
.89
lb.
¢
Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Guitar and
vocals as you dine in wine cellar. 7:30-11 p.m.
MARCH 19, 20 AND 21
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Fri.: Salty Dog, 9 p.m. Sat:
Sing-along. Sun.: Nascar.
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
Steve Testa. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High
St., Millville, 327-3714. 7-9 p.m.
Static Addiction. Steakouts Home Plate,
85 Harding Hwy. (Rt. 40), Pittsgrove, 358-
3144. 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Savoy Unplugged: Johnny's Cousin
Steve. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, 4940 E.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 691-8051. 8:30 p.m.
Secret Service. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 704-9797. 10 p.m. $10.
Jerry Blavat Dance Party. New Jersey
Motorsports Park, Millville. The Glasstown Arts
District is sponsor. 7 p.m.-midnight. $35 per
person, cash bar, buffet supper 7-9pm.
Reserve: Marianne@glasstownartsdistrict.com.
David Wilcox and Patty Larkin in
Acoustic Doubleheader. Appel Farm Arts
and Music Center, 457 Shirley Rd., Elmer.
Wilcox and Larkin, both renowned for their
thoughtful and introspective lyrics, gutsy
vocals and deft guitar-playing, display the
fun and friendship they’ve shared for many
years. 8 p.m. Tickets $30, 800-394-1211.
SUNDAY, MARCH 21
Poetry on High. Bogart’s Books, 210 N.
High St., Millville, 327-3714. Host is Rita
Lyman, original poetry and music, 2-5 p.m.
Platinum Mustache. Hangar 84, 20 S.
Sixth St., Vineland. 9 p.m. $10-12.
www.frontgatetickets.com.
Ron Levy. A residence in Mauricetown.
Renowned pianist in a recital rescheduled
from last December 6.Seating limited, reser-
vations required. Donations accepted. To
reserve seats and receive directions, call
506-0580.
FRIDAY, MARCH 26
Fish in a Cup. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 704-9797. Live acoustic
duo starts 9:30 p.m. Cover is $10.
THROUGH MARCH 28
Curator’s Choice. WheatonArts, Museum of
American Glass’ Special Exhibition Gallery,
Glasstown Rd., Millville. The exhibit show-
cases pieces from the collection not often
seen by the public and new pieces obtained in
2009. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Free admission.
THROUGH MARCH 31
Dressmaking Art of Nilda Velez.
Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. A collection of
figure sketches honoring the poetics of
dressmaking, by a Mennies School guid-
ance counselor.
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The Thomas Heist Insurance
Agency is pleased to announce
Laurie Walters has joined our
agency. Laurie is a lifelong resident
of Vineland, and has been providing
insurance for businesses in the
South Jersey area for over 11 years.
Her professional service and
attention to detail make her an
excellent choice for your business
insurance program. Call Laurie today.
609-399-0655
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Tickets: 1-800-736-1420;
www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted.
HEADLINERS
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
House of Pain. Showboat House of
Blues. 7 p.m. $25.
FRIDAY, MARCH 19
En Vogue. Showboat House of Blues.
7 p.m. $30, $35, $40, $45.
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
Brian Regan. Borgata. 8 p.m. $43.50.
1-800-298-4200.
The Cast of Broadway's Jersey Boys.
Caesars. 9 p.m. $65, $45, $35.
Chris Botti. Harrahs. 9 p.m. $35-$55.
Ace Frehley. Showboat House of
Blues. 8 p.m. $25, $30.
Alicia Keys Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. $75.50-
$150.50.
Trump Comedy Series: Kathleen
Madigan. Trump Marina. 8 p.m. $30.
COMEDY & MORE
Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music
Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m.
(except during headliner engagements)
1-800-298-4200.
Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comics
nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and
11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28.
Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop
Box Office: 1-877-FUNNY-AC or 609-348-
0920. comedystop.com.
Crocodile Rock. Tropicana. Mon. 8 p.m., Tues.
and Wed. 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sat. 9 p.m., Sun
7 p.m. $25.
Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles.
Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North
Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25.
AT BOARDWALK HALL
MARCH 18 AND 19
ECAC Hockey Men's Championship.
Division I teams from Brown, Clarkson,
Colgate, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard,
Princeton, Quinnipiac, Rensselaer, St.
Lawrence, Union and Yale. Call
Ticketmaster for times and ticket prices.
AT THE CASINOS
HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS AND MORE
The Hometown Heroes Gala was held on
Friday, March 12, at Merighi’s Savoy Inn.
The event was held to celebrate the 24
Hometown Heroes honorees who were
nominated by the Vineland community
(as announced in the February 17
issue of The Grapevine). The Gala
was attended by 270 people and
raised several thousand dollars for the
Dream Foundation and Vineland Rotary
Charities Foundation.
Photography: Mickey Brandt and Jay Parks.
Cover Photo: Deborah A. Ein
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The Grapevine, The Dream Foundation and The Vineland Rotary Charities Foundation
thank the sponsors listed below, and the businesses and individuals listed on the
opposite page, for their generous contributions in support of our Hometown Heroes.
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Event Donations
Congressman Frank LoBiondo – Honoree Citations
Senator Jeff Van Drew – Honoree Citations
Assemblyman Nelson Albano – Honoree Citations
Assemblyman Matt Milam – Honoree Citations
Cumberland County Clerk Gloria Noto – Honoree
Citations
Anton’s Florist – table centerpieces
Champion Awards & Gifts – commemorative
plaques
Diamonds & Design - gift certificates to honorees
Dreamz Café & Gelato – gift coupon to honorees
Fabrizio Chiropractic - gift certificates to honorees
Fro Me a Party – balloons
Jim Mains Bakery, sheet cake
Krust n Krumbs, sheet cake
Merighi’s Savoy Inn – gift certificates to honorees
Auction Item Donations
Andrea’s Trattoria: Gift Certificate
Appliances Plus: DVD Player
Bellview Winery: Gift Certificate
Big Apple: Gift Certificate
BJ’s: One Year Membership
Casa Dori: Gift Certificate
Chow’s Garden Chinese Restaurant: Gift Certificate
Congressman Frank LoBiondo: Breakfast or lunch
in Congressional Dining Room with the legislator
Conte’s Pasta: Gift Certificate
Cosmic Spice: Gift Basket/Certificate
Cosmopolitan: Gift Certificate
Dondero’s: Gift Certificate
Garoppo’s: Gift Certificate
Gina’s Ristorante: Gift Certificate
J&D Furniture: Decorative Wine Holder
Kawa Sushi: Gift Certificate
Larry’s II: Breakfast Buffet for 4
Latorre Hardware: Pizzelle Maker
Limpert Bros.: Gift Basket
Lorenzo’s Barber Shop: Gift Certificate
Lucia’s: Gift Certificate
Mainiero’s: Upright Vac and Seiko Watch
Marciano’s: Gift Certificate
Maria’s Hair Salon: Wash, Cut and Blow Dry
Michelle’s Country Salon: Gift Basket
Moe’s Southwest Grill: Gift Coupons
Neptune Seafood House: Gift Certificate
Old Oar House Irish Pub: Gift Certificate
Salon Fabrojae: Gift Certificate
Scott Meyer: Art Glass (two pieces)
Sherry Munyan, Art of Massage: Gift Certificate
South Jersey Landscaping: Gift Certificate
The Little Gym: Gift Certificate
Uncle Ricky’s: Gift Certificate
Williams Totally Tobacco: Box of Cigars
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O
n a dusty, country stretch of
America’s longest highway, just
north of Vineland’s city limits, the
culinary odyssey of Chef Andrea
Covino continues its elaborate composition.
Covino, youthful despite having recently
crossed the half-century mark in years, owns
and operates—along with wife Lucy—Andrea
Trattoria Italiana at 1833 Harding Highway
(Route 40) in Newfield.
Like many aspiring chefs, the Neapolitan
native spent much of that early career tour-
ing Italy in pursuit of his craft. Employed
first in Naples, then Navara—midway
between northern hubs Milan and Turin—
and eventually Tuscany, he worked at,
learned and incorporated those distinct
regional styles.
Only recently has the American public
come to the understanding that Italian-
American food and bona fide Italian dining
are two very different gastronomic species.
Covino’s cuisine has always been on the cut-
ting-edge of that learning curve.
The young chef’s travels landed him state-
side nearly a quarter century ago. He initially
worked for the Iovino family—
already prominent clothiers—at
their new Philadelphia venture,
Girasole restaurant.
Opening an Atlantic City outpost
of Girasole in 1992, Covino remained
ensconced there until a Vineland
opportunity emerged. In 1998, he
leased a corner property, which
became the short-lived, critically
acclaimed Café Centro near the
intersection of Main Road and
Chestnut Avenue. Five years later, he
helped inaugurate Millville’s presti-
gious Winfield’s, which has gone on
to become one of southern New
Jersey’s favorite gourmet destinations.
Enticed by a persistent landlord who
owned a building formerly housing a pizze-
ria, Covino admits he didn’t expect much
when first visiting the site of his present
business. Although the physical space had to
be drastically redistributed to accommodate
larger crowds and an upscale atmosphere,
the chef saw potential. Turning counter
areas and unused space into additional seat-
ing led to today’s facility, with a capacity for
90 seats, bathed in soft, amber tones.
Shortly before, wife Lucy had given birth to
the couple’s son, Luca. In Covino’s words, his
progeny has literally grown up at the Newfield
restaurant. Which would only make sense—
true Italian trattorias are almost invariably
family-operated joints, often attached to the
living spaces of their proprietors.
But Covino, always on the lookout for
opportunity, wasn’t quite finished. In the
spring of 2005, he unveiled a seasonal Jersey
shore eatery, in Vineland’s sister city of Sea
Isle. Located at 4216 Park Road near the bay,
Cape May County’s Trattoria Andrea will be
reopening again over Easter, after a disas-
trous roof collapse during February’s ava-
lanche of snow.
In the meantime, Covino’s southern
Gloucester facility remains this empire’s real
linchpin. Showing up in his kitchen on an
unseasonably warmMarch morning, we
found himstudiously putting the finishing
touches on a healthful, elegant soup. Potatoes,
Andrea’s Journey
Chef Corvino’s trek has taken him from Italy to Philadelphia,
Atlantic City, Vineland, and presently, Newfield.
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Gabriel’s Horn
{ FRANK GABRI EL | PHOTOS: DEBORAH A. EI N }
Monday - Madness Bar Only
7:00 pm - Close
5 Patron Shots,
$
3
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Corona’s
$
4
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Margarita’s
Tuesday - Sing-A-Long Karaoke
$
2
00
Domestic Draft,
$
3
00
Imported Draft
$
2
50
Domestic
$
3
50
Imported Bottles
Wednesday - Ladies Night
$3.00 House WINES, $4.00 PREMIUM WINES
$4.00 Flavored Cosmopolitian’s
Thursday - College Night
$2.50 Domestic Bottles, $4.00 Rum & Coke
$5.00 Vodka Red Bull
Saturday Night
Enjoy Dancing All Night Long
Friday Night Dance Party
Dance the night away, DJ 10:00 pm - 2:00 am
At The Lounge
Hours: Mon-Fri 11am-2am, Sat 9am-2am, Sun 8am-2am
Gift Certificates Available • Major Credit Cards Accepted
RESTAURANT • LOUNGE • BAKERY
3513 Delsea Drive, Vineland
Ph. 856-765-5977 • Fax 856-825-0707
www.cosmopolitannj.com
Planning a Holiday Party or Special Event?
Speak to our Banquet Coordinator
Sunday Brunch Buffet - Largest in Town!
Cosmopolitian Gift Cards Available
Dinner Specials Everyday - 2 For $21.99
Monday is Family Night - All you can eat buffet $9.99
Kids are 1/2 price!
Jo-Jo The Clown is Here
16 Flat Screen Televisions
Happy Hour Mon-Fri 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Free Buffet & Drink Specials
Wi-Fi Available All The Time
CHEF’S OMELETTES made to order featuring:
VEGETARIAN OMELETTE – peppers, onions, asparagus,
baby spinach, mushrooms
WINTER OVER LEEK OMELETTE –
lump crab meat, soft gouda cheese
LOBSTER OMELETTE –
sweet basil & Wisconsin cheddar cheese
SPIRAL HAM CARVING STATION
LUCIA’S FAMOUS WHOLE SCOTTISH SALMON BOARD
with a cucumber dill sauce
ALSO FEATURING: Scrambled Eggs, New Potatoes Italiano,
Homemade Sage Sausage, Bacon, Homemade Crepes
with creamy ricotta cheese topped with fresh berries &
mascarpone whipped cream, Thick Cut French Toast drizzled
with grand marnier syrup & powdered sugar
MIXED FIELD GREENS SALAD with Lucia’s special
red wine & balsamic dressing
ASSORTED FRESH BAGELS & PASTRIES
FRUIT JUICES, TEA, COFFEE
FRESHY TOSSED DANDELION & CAESAR SALAD
PRIME RIB CARVING STATION
with au jus & creamy horseradish sauce
STUFFED ROAST PORK ABRUZZESE
with Jersey broccoli Rabe & sausage stuffing
CHICKEN ROLLATINI – chicken breast stuffed
with roasted peppers, proscuitto, sharp provolone
& baby spinach in sage & brown butter sauce
PENNE MEDITERRANEO – fresh mussels sautéed with
plumtomatoes, herbs, capers & artichokes in a spicy sauce
TILAPIA ROMA – topped with baby arugula,
grape tomatoes, capers in a white lemon butter sauce
ITALIAN PASTA STATION – penne & fettuccini pasta
with choice of pomodori, pesto, or alfredo sauce
BABY NEW POTATOES, FRESH STRING BEANS, CREAM CORN
ASSORTED ITALIAN DESSERTS
COFFEE, TEA, SOFT DRINKS, CHAMPAGNE AVAILABLE
TAX AND GRATUITY NOT INCLUDED
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Lucia’s Ristorante
EASTER BRUNCH & DINNER BUFFET
785 WFST SHFRMlN l\FNUF, \íNFLlND NJ O83óO
85ó.óº2.O3OO - WWW.LU0ílSNJ.00M
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Hours
Lunch Dinner
Tuesday 11-3 4-8
Wednesday 11-3 4-8
Thursday 11-3 4-8
Friday 11-3 4-9
Saturday 1-9
Closed Sundays & Mondays
BYOB
1 Year Anniversary
Mention this ad
and be entered in our
Gift Certificate Giveaway
All gift certificates
to be drawn on March 31st
110 North High Street, Millville
(856) 825-4241
leeks, escarole, carrots and celery bubbling in
a true vegetarian broth, vivid and fragrant. A
pleasant reminder that blessed springtime is
mercifully only days away. Simultaneously, a
Latino cook attentively labored on multiple
sauces, bringing themto temp, then “shock-
ing” each with ice to prevent overcooking
until needed later in the day.
An unabashed ambassador for local grow-
ers, Covino mentions that “in summertime all
our produce comes fromVineland.” He partic-
ularly lauds Dan Graiff Farms of Newfield for
providing extraordinary baby arugula,
spinach, basil, dill and other herbs, all promi-
nently featured among his warm-weather
menu additions. Satisfied customers seemto
have embraced the restaurant’s lunchtime
“pranzo” bill of fare, too, evidenced by a table
of six walking in well prior to a planned noon
reservation on this weekday.
The Trattoria is open Tuesday through
Friday from 11:30 a.m to 2:30 p.m. Dinner is
served Tuesday through Saturday, from 5 to
10 p.m. and 3 to 8 p.m. on Sundays.
Themed evenings are another of the ele-
ments Andrea and Lucy have begun to
incorporate of late. Mrs. Covino, who hails
from the cooking Mecca that is the southern
Mexican state of Oaxaca, helps prepare
authentic ethnic meals honoring her own
family traditions. The next scheduled as of
press time was to celebrate Cinco de Mayo,
in less than two months.
Asked about his personal favorite dishes,
Covino doesn’t hesitate, naming “tomato
basil sauce, my specialty” adding with a
shrug “I’m from Naples.” He also mentions
the Mozzarella affumicata, a “pan-seared,
smoked mozzarella” accompanied by roasted
peppers, extra virgin olive oil and garlic.
With the rattle and hum of traffic on busy
Route 40 only a few feet away, this little
piece of Jersey soil serves to artfully illus-
trate what food, and life, is all about in a
simple Italian village. I
Whet
Vineland's
Appetite.
Get your restaurant
noticed by advertising on
these dining pages in
The Grapevine.
Every residence in
Vineland receives
The Grapevine...
There's no better way
to drawcustomers into
your establishment!
Call today for
advertising information:
856-457-7815
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Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield,
697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up
Italian specialties in atmosphere of fine dining.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas
style, catering, private parties. Extensive wine
list. Live music Thurs. night.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland,
691-0909. Breakfast and lunch spot offering
sandwiches named for colleges near and far.
Bain's Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-
1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.
Daily specials, coffee of the day.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S.
Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade
chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink spe-
cials. Take-out. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7
p.m. NBA games &NASCAR on flat-screen TVs.
Bernardi’s Restaurant &Lounge, 140 E. Wheat
Rd., Vineland, 696-1461. Lunch and dinner spe-
cials. Open 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m. (until 11 p.m. on
Friday). Closed Sun.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-
5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet
friends at bar. Daily lunch and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring “Gutbuster” a
21-oz. burger, pizza, wings, subs, dinners.
Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville,
327-8011. All food is homemade, including the
potato chips.
Bruno’s, Cape May Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd.,
Dorothy, 609-476-4739. Breakfast, lunch, din-
ner and delicious pizza. Open Mon.–Sat., 7
a.m.–8:30 p.m.
Buena Tavern, 761 Harding Hwy. (Rts. 40/54),
Buena, 697-9848. Seafood, homemade Italian,
Wednesday specials, half-price meals to volun-
teers Thursday nights.
Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch
and dinner; catering available.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St., Millville, 327-
3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-can-eat buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge, Bakery,
3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 765-5977. Happy
hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. free buffet, reduced drinks.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main/Magnolia rds.,
690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, dough-
nuts, ustom wedding cakes.
Dakota Prime Steakhouse & Sushi Bar, At the
Ramada Inn—W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 692-8600. Steaks, seafood, sushi.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main
Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and din-
ner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-
round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m.
DeLeo’s Good Sports, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9200. Daily food/drink specials,
late-night menu till 1 a.m., 22 draft beers, NFL
tailgate menu, live entertainment.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-
1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-out, too.
Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours.
Kids eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored
recipes, fresh ingredients.
Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-
1777. Cheesesteaks made on large, fresh pop-
pyseed rolls.
Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing,
Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads,
soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts,
smoothies, and frappuccino.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta
dishes at this Italian restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800.
Greek and American cuisine, pizza.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Tuckahoe
Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and
dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned.
Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd.,
Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes,
Black Angus burgers.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it
all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sun.
Gina's Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville,
825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner,
BYOB, $20 or less.
Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena,
697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily.
Italian cuisine, pizza.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course,
4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant
and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-
Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St., Millville,
825-2288. All-you-can-eat buffet.
Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 694-5700.
Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, din-
ner, happy hour, Sunday brunch.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
362-5978. Serving subs, sandwiches, and take-
out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-
8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, home-
made sides, catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St.
(Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese
cuisine. BYOB.
Landicini's Family Restaurant & Pizzeria
Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland,
691-3099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads.
Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday
breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners.
Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-
9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood,
salad bar. Closed Monday.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal,
chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun.
Lucia's Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave.,
Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and
regional cooking.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cuisine,
seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and din-
ner, Sunday breakfast buffet.
Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery.
Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-
5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery.
Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614
E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick
oven pizza, risotto, polenta.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union
Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/ wedding
facility and intimate restaurant. Chicken Pot Pie
Night ($13.95) every Wed.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head
rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and
dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville,
825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-
9825. Full bar menu, drink specials.
Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge,
1554 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2800. Live
lobsters, seafood, prime rib, steak, cocktails.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High Street Millville,
293-1200. Featuring under $15 dinner menu.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—
lamb dishes and salads.
Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr.,
Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your
special occasions.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-0500.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient
drive-thru, mini-meal specials.
Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-
9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs,
wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-
1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink spe-
cials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-8878.
Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry,
hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian.
Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd.,
Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, homemade
ice cream, party cakes.
South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner
daily. Seafood and prime rib.
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-8600. Open daily 6
a.m.-11 p.m. Dinner specials $7 and up.
Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022
Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and
dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual.
Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-
8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery.
Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd.,
Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks.
Always clams, eat in or take out.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista,
697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish.
Lunch and dinner daily.
Vintage Rose Tea Room, 132 N. High St.,
Millville, 293-0500. Open 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed-
Sat. lunch and afternoon tea. Reserva-tions
suggested. Book for parties/events.
Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd.,
Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd.,
Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwich-
es, wings.
Wilmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland,
696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli,
breakfast pizza. Take-out or eat in.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-0909.
Continental cuisine and spirits served in a
casually upscale setting.
Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served
in a picturesque setting.
EATING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to
bakeries, the area has choices to
satisfy any appetite. Call for hours.
2007 Buick LaCrosse
2009 Buick Lucerne
2010 GMC Sierra
2010 GMC Terrain SLE
Merlot, 4 Cyl., 4 x 2,
Sports Utility, AC, Power
Windows, Power Locks,
Rear Defrost, Tilt Wheel,
Cruise Control, Mileage
14, Stock #GM0055, Vin#A6305273 MSRP $24,995,
$
750 Pontiac
Owners Rebate. MSRP $24,995.
2010 GMC Acadia
$
17,995
808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton, NJ
(856) 451-0095
www.bobnovick.com
To qualified buyers: See dealer for complete details on select models.
Price includes all rebates & dealer incentives. Price includes all costs ex-
cept tax, tags, and licensing fees. Not responsible for typographical errors.
Silver, Auto, Sports
Utility, AC, Power
Windows, Power
Locks, Rear De-
frost, Tilt Wheel,
Cruise Control, Alloy Wheels, Mileage 14, Stock#
GM0052, Vin#AJ181341 MSRP $32,615, $1,000 Factory
Rebate, $1,000 Bonus, $1,000 Toyota Rebate.
$
23,995
Gray, 4 Door, 8 cyc., AC, Power Windows, Power Locks,
Tilt Wheel, Cruise Control, Adjust Pedals, Mileage
35,273 Stock#400010, Vin#71147883, MSRP $19,995
$
28,567
BEST SELECTION..
BEST PRICES..
White, 6 cyc., V8, AC,
Power Windows,
Power Locks, Tilt
Wheel, Cruise Control,
Heavy Duty Trailering, Mileage 11, Stock #GM0036,
Vin# AZ129520, MSRP
$
25,070.
$
1,500 Factory Rebate,
$
1,000 Bonus Rebate,
$
1,000 Bonus Aged Rebate. TOTAL
$3,000 IN REBATES!
$
24,245
$
20,767
Gray, 4 Door, 6 cyc., Auto/OD, Power Steering, AC, Power Locks,
Power Windows, Rear Defrost, Tilt Wheel, Cruise Control,
Mileage 15,083, Stock #Y00009 Vin# 94144501, MSRP $25,995
WAS $19,995
WAS $25,070
WAS $25,995
WAS $24,995
WAS $32,615
Easter Buffet
Sunday
April 4th
For Reservations Call: (856) 697-1200
301 Country Club Lane Buena, NJ 08310
www.allforeclub.com/bvcc
Salad Bar
Caesar Salad • Italian Style Pasta Salad
Fresh Fruit Salad • Marinated Mushrooms
Tomato & Cucumber Salad w/Champagne Vinaigrette
Carving Station
Baked Ham with Pineapple Glaze
Entrée
Broiled Founder w/ Fresh Herbs & Garlic Sauce
Grilled Beef Tenderloin w/ Rosemary Cabernet Sauce
Sautéed Penne Pasta w/ Broccoli Rabe,
Tomatoes & Italian Sausage
Roasted Chicken Tenderloin w/ Wild Mushroom
Brandy Sauce
Vegetables
Rice Pilaf w/ Confetti Vegetables
Sautéed Mixed Vegetables
Dessert
Cheesecake w/ Whipped Cream & Strawberries
Cash Bar Available
Sunday, April 4th
Seating at 12:00 pm & 2:30 pm
in the Grand Ballroom
Adults: $19.95 Children 10 & Under $9.95
Prices exclusive of NJ Sales Tax
Extends an Invitation
to you and your family to join us for our
Country Club
BUENA VISTA
On The Buffet
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www.dineindie.com/BigAppleCafe
528 N Harding HwyVineland, NJ
(856) 697-5500
8:00 am – 2:00 pm
With All of Your Favorites & Omelet Station
Adults:
$
9
99
Children 10 & Under:
$
6
99
DINNER BUFFET
EASTER SUNDAY
BRUNCH
4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Carving Station,Encrusted Tilapia
Chicken Dishes, Potatoes
& Vegetables & Dessert
Adults:
$
13
99
Children 10 & Under:
$
8
99
Early Dinner Returns
Tues. thru Thurs, 3:30PM-5:45PM
Entire Party Must Be Present to be Seated
Last Seating 5:45 PM
Crab Cake Platter, Chicken Parmesan Dinner,
Veal Parmesan, & Clams Linguine
Includes: Choice of Beverage, Soup or Salad & Dessert
Eat In Only
$
10
95
(Gratuity not included)
The Best
Jumbo Lump Crab Cake
Is Back For Lunch!
856-794-1888 • Brewster Rd. & Chestnut Ave.
(Across From High School) Now closed on Sun. & Mon.
Tues-Fri Lunch 11am - 2pm • Tue-Sat. Dinner 4pm-Close
We invite you to our famous
Easter Sunday Champagne Brunch
& Dinner Buffet at Merighi’s Savoy Inn
4940 E. Landis Ave.
(corner of Union Rd) in East Vineland
www.savoyinn.com
Call 856-691-8051 for Reservations
Since 1954
Easter Champagne Brunch – 10 am – 2 pm
Omelet Station • Belgian Waffles • Main Buffet
Adults: $21 Children 10 & Under: $10 Children 3 and under FREE
Easter Dinner Buffet – 2 pm – 6 pm
Antipasta & Salad Bar • Italian Pasta Station
Main Buffet Station • Dessert Station
Adults: $24 Children 10 & Under: $12 Children 3 and under FREE
C
ome and join the Merighi family
for a taste of home at the
Savoy Bistro. This gem is locat-
ed in the heart of southern New
Jersey’s largest Italian community at
the comer of Union Road and Landis
Avenue in East Vineland.
The Savoy Inn was founded by
Ernest and Rose Odorizzi-Merighi in
June of 1959. At that time, the Savoy
was a hotel with four bedrooms and
downstairs was a “shot and beer bar,”
explains owner Tom Merighi, Jr., who
adds that his grandmother Rose
cooked in the kitchen and the menu
consisted of her savory homemade
meatballs, pizza and their staple, the
Black Angus steak sandwich.
In 1969, Tom Merighi, Sr. and his
brother decided to add a ballroom onto
the Inn. His father, Ernest Merighi
thought they were crazy. Well, crazy or
not, 40 years later the ballroom and
bistro are going strong. This is because
“everything comes full circle,” says
Tom Merighi, Jr.
Thousands of couples have celebrated
their lives together at the Savoy Inn.
Merighi’s Savoy has a history of serving
a clientele that is four generations old.
Many of these clients are relatives and
friends of a long line of patrons at the
Savoy since the Inn’s inception in 1969.
In the Bistro, one can enjoy fine din-
ing or casual cocktails, both are guaran-
teed to please the palate. The entertain-
ment is also another great feature. On a
Friday evening it is a wonderful place to
kick back and relax while listening to
the sounds of Gene Cortapassi.
Saturday evening is acoustic night,
which begins at 8:30 and features the
best local talent. The real nightlifers
need to check out the website to view
popular bands that are hosted by the
Savoy and staged in the ballroom.
Hurry, though, these events sell out fast
so purchase your tickets early.
If you are planning a wedding,
Merighi’s Savoy Inn takes the lead in
creating a perfect evening of enchant-
ment, for the bride and groom. Each
couple receives individualized atten-
tion. For party plans, Merighi’s Savoy
Inn is unbeatable for the price, food
and service.
The Savoy Inn features an Old World
Italian-style menu that includes the
recipes and cooking style of
Grandmother Rose Merighi. If you have
never visited this historical establish-
ment, then you must, as it is five-star
rated. —Rachele Fanucci-D’ippolito
Restaurant Profile: Merighi’s Savoy Inn
Then & Now: The Hotel Savoy circa 1960 and the present-day Merighi’s Savoy Inn at the corner of Landis Avenue and Union Road.
Dalla Nostra Familigia Alla Vostra (From Our Family to Yours)
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The Grapevine’s
Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1. Self help Carnegie
5. At the peak
9. Syrup tree
14. Gorse genus
15. D___: non-musical play
16. aka
17. A citizen of Denmark
18. N.E. fruit: ____berry
19. Candied fruit
20. Google and Bing
23. Prompted
24. A way to sink
25. Cosseted
28. Standards
33. Expression of sorrow
or pity
34. Collect funds for a
purpose
35. ___nezer Scrooge
36. Nostrils
38. Heat unit
39. Indian frocks
41. Association for
Research &
Enlightenment, (abbr.)
42. Santa’s helpers
44. Hitler’s party
45. One who write the
words for songs
47. Two-dimensional
49. Foot digit
50. Where computer
nerds meet
51. Act of making
into a product
57. In a grip
59. Hebrew kor
60. River into The Baltic
61. Imminent danger
62. Christian ____,
designer
63. Swain
64. Comic book hero Dick
65. Man____: type of roof
66. Pinnas
DOWN
1. Informal clothes
2. Wings
3. Singer Horne
4. Workout
5. Bowed
6. S____: gazed intensely
7. Arabian Sultanate
8. Stabbing twinge
9. Business leaders
10. Assert to be true
11. Uto____: perfect
places
12. ___tose: milk sugar
13. Point midway
between E and SE
21. Signal or prompt
22. Egyptian goddess
25. Unoriginal
26. Wing shaped
27. Less covered
28. Insert mark
29. Tractor-trailers
30. Showed old move
31. Island SW of Majorca
32. Gods dwelling in
Asgard
34. Increases motor speed
37. In the second place
40. Organism that does
not require oxygen
43. In place of
46. Right slanting
typeface
47. Bomb used to breach
a gate
48. Romanian monetary
unit
50. Ethereal fluid
51. A short syllable
(poetry)
52. Government officials
53. W. Samoan capital
54. The content of
cognition
55. Close by
56. Crane genus
57. Strikingly appropriate
58. Of she
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G
reetings! Who says you can’t eat
cake? You certainly can enjoy a
piece in moderation, and you can
actually feel good about it when
you know you’re putting good-for-you foods in
your body. The original recipe in today’s col-
umn is submitted by my grandmom, who is 87
years young! This cake recipe is already
healthy, but I bumped up the fiber intake, and
also lowered the fat and sugar in the remix
version (if you forgo the icing!).
This story and recipe were submitted by
Flora Panzino, who writes: “I have been making
this carrot cake for family, friends and church
functions for as long a I can remember. It’s one
of the most requested baked goods I make. It’s
also been published in nationally knowfood
magazines and cookbooks, including my grand-
daughter Lisa’s cookbook, Lisa Ann’s Seasoned
With Love II; Lisa actually uses the recipe to
make her “Maple Carrot Cupcakes.” This cake
is great with or without the icing, and I’m
happy to share this recipe with you!”
Flora’s Moist Carrot Cake
2 cups unbleached flour
3/4 cup granulated sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
3 cups shredded carrots
1 cup canola oil
4 eggs
1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
Preheat oven to 325°. In a large bowl, add
flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt,
cinnamon and walnuts. Give a quick stir to
incorporate ingredients. Add the carrots, oil
and eggs and mix gently with a large spoon,
just until batter is moist and comes together.
Grease a 9 x 13-inch cake pan with non-stick
cooking spray, then pour batter into the pan.
Bake 50 to 60 minutes or until a toothpick
inserted into the center of the cake comes out
clean. Let cake cool in pan several minutes
before inverting onto a serving dish. Let cake
cool completely before adding the cream
cheese icing (see recipe).
Cream Cheese Icing
1 (8 oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup butter, softened
3 – 6 tbs. pure maple syrup
1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
In a bowl, beat ingredients with an electric
mixer until fluffy. Start out with 2-3 table-
spoons of maple syrup, adding more until you
reach desired sweetness. Add icing to cooled
cake, sprinkle with a fewadditional chopped
walnuts and shredded carrot if desired, and
serve. Refrigerate any leftover cake.
Flora’s Moist Carrot Cake
(Healthier Remix)
1 cup unbleached flour
1 cup whole wheat pastry flour (also known
as white wheat flour)
3/4 cup raw sugar
2 tsp. non-aluminum baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. sea salt
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
3 cups organic shredded carrots
1 cup safflower or sunflower oil
4 eggs
1/2 cup organic walnuts, chopped
Preheat oven to 325°. In a large bowl, add
flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt,
cinnamon and walnuts. Give a quick stir to
incorporate ingredients. Add the carrots, oil
and eggs and mix gently with a large spoon,
just until batter is moist and comes together.
Grease a 9 x 13-inch cake pan with non-stick
cooking spray, then pour batter into the pan.
Bake for 50 – 60 minutes or until a toothpick
inserted into the center of the cake comes out
clean. Let cake cool in pan several minutes
before inverting onto a serving dish. Let cake
cool completely before adding the cream
cheese icing (see recipe).
Cream Cheese Icing
1 (8 oz.) pkg. light cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup butter, softened
2 - 4 tbs. pure maple syrup
1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
In a bowl, beat ingredients with an electric
mixer until fluffy. Start out with 2-3 table-
spoons of maple syrup, adding more until you
reach desired sweetness. Add icing to cooled
cake, sprinkle with a few additional chopped
walnuts and shredded carrot if desired, serve.
Refrigerate any leftover cake. I
Lisa Ann is author of Seasoned With Love,
Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned
With Love II. Send recipes for publication to
lapd1991@aol.com or The Grapevine, 3638 E.
Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361.
Recipe Remix
Grandmom’s carrot cake recipe is made
even healthier.
I
Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO }
Barse Elementary
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Brown
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Orlando Sotomayor
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GRADE 8
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Liliya Bondarenko
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Principals’ Lists
Vineland Public Schools has released the list of the students in grades 3-12 who earned Principal’s
List honors for the second marking period. To achieve this distinction, high schoolers must have a
grade-point average of 3.75 or above. In elementary and middle schools, students must have all As.
Grades at the high schools are “weighted.” As a result, grade-point average for achieving
Principal’s List at the elementary and middle schools is 4.00 while at the high school it’s 3.75.

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Brittany Procopio
Amanda Reuben
Catrina Rodriguez
Kassandra
Rodriguez
Michelle Rodriguez
Robert Romano
Esperanza
Santiago Ruiz
Cori Rose Schroer
Eladio Scott
Diane Severino
James Sickles
Sean Smith
Amber Stubbs
Alexis Taylor
Monica Thomas
David Toddish
Gina Trivellini
Mariami Tsulukidze
Elvira Usmanova
Erica Weber
Shontese Womack
Amanda Yacovelli
Alexandra Yeager
Vineland High
GRADE 12
Samantha Ader
Ashley Andrews
Kathleen Aragon
Rebecca Arsenault
Jennifer Bauer
Kevin Bauman
Yekaterina
Beletskaya
Angel Beltran
Samuel Benfer
Jessica Bertoldi
Abigail Bertonazzi
Courtney Bickerdyke
Ashley Birmingham
Corinne Boesz
Sacha Borrero
Daniel Bradbury
Rosica Brown
Brian Browne
Ivelies Burgos
Talia Burkhart
Kelsey Burns
Angelica Caraballo
Anajelly Cardoso
Kerry Cerana
Craig Chammings
Song Chen
Victoria Christopher
Kasey Cornish
Shantail Cox
Jennie Crescenzo
Oscar Cruz
Crystal Cuevas
Nigely Cuevas
Kellie Debellis
Anthony Deon
Liane Drastal
Vadim Drozd
Jonathon Dzindzio
Ariana Escobar
Mariah Fonville
Sophia Garrahan
Marisa Gentilini
Nicola Gilmore
Thomas Glatfelter
Diana Glavnik
Shanice Glover
Charles Graff
Gary Guadalupe
Casey Guessford
Shirley Guzman
Shakerra Hayes
Monique Hibbert
Jose Jimenez
Bethany Johnson
Pahola Juan
Theresa Kagan
Alexandra Leonelli
Katie Leonelli
Sara Leonelli
Kenneth Lopez
Gabrielle Lovisone
Odalis Luciano
Chelsea Marcacci
Franklin Marsh
Tabatha Martinez
Samantha Mason
Melanie McCormick
Rosa Melillo
Lindsey Monahan
Caroline Montagna
Jessica Moratelli
Jailene Morcelo
Barbara Moroz
Anthony Morrow
Sara Munsick
Amanda Musso
Angela Muzzarelli
Ashton Nelson
Maria Ocampo
Jodi Ocasio
Jesus Onofre
Amber Opromollo
Amanda Parks
Atisha Patel
Melissa Perez
Justin Petronglo
Riley Phillips
Mikhail Pikulik
Omarie Quiles
Samuel Ratcliff
James Riendeau
Grizel Rivera
Joshua Rivera
Melanie Rivera
Sindi Rivera
Tamyra Roberts
Hillary Rodriguez
Jennifer Rodriguez
Monica Rodriguez
Stephanie Rodriguez
Zuleika Rodriguez
Suleina Roldan
Brian Rowan
Ashlee Rowe
Elye Schenk
Rebecca Sheridan
Chelsea Shiloh
Navpreet Singh
Natasha Sotnychuk
Angelica Suppi
Robert Tonetta
Eliza Torres
Craig Traina
Andrew Turner
Jenna Vargo
Matthew Wallace
Latanya Watts
Brittany Wells
David Worden
Anna Yurchak
Monday, March 22
Pretzel Sandwich
Hot Dog on Bun
Turkey & Cheese
Sandwich
Potato Smiles
Green Peas
Tuesday, March 23
Hot Roast Pork Sandwich
Pasta with Meat Balls
Yogurt Parfait
Bologna/Cheese Sandwich
Broccoli Florets
Tossed Salad
Wednesday, March 24
Chicken Patty on Bun
Sloppy Joe on Bun
Grilled Chicken Chef Salad
Turkey & Cheese
Munchable
French Fries
Baby Carrots
Tossed Salad
Thursday, March 25
Taco
Salisbury Steak with Gravy
& Dinner Roll
Tuna Chef Salad
Ham & Cheese on Wheat
Whipped Potatoes
Corn/Tossed Salad
Friday, March 26
Pizza
Fish Sticks
Chef’s Surprise Soup
Submarine Sandwich
Veggie Sticks/Tossed Salad
Cookie
Vineland Public Schools Lunch Menu / Week of March 22-26
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Therapy Dog Gypsy
Wows Group
The WOWgroup recently hosted a program
on SJH’s Heart Failure Programs. Sami
Abate, RN, BS, CCRN, Assistant Nurse
Manager of the SJH Regional Medical
Center Cardiac ICU and Step-down Unit,
talked about heart failure initiatives and
the therapy dog program used to encour-
age patients to walk in the hospital.
Abate’s therapy dog Gypsy joined her for
the program.
The WOWgroup began as a women’s
organization promoting awareness and
empowerment. Quickly growing, the group
evolved into an outreach program for men
and women responding to various life chal-
lenges. Whether a person is a single par-
ent, elderly, unemployed or ill, community
members can depend on the WOWgroup to
help them make connections to the appro-
priate federal, state and local resources
that are available. For more information
about the WOWgroup, contact Valicia Finch
at 609-501-3596.
4-Hers Recruited To Raise
Seeing Eye Pups
Since 1942, 4-H club members have been
raising puppies that will one day be trained
as dog guides for the blind. The Seeing Eye
4-H Puppy Raising Program is a joint effort
of The Seeing Eye and the 4-H Youth
Development Program.
The Seeing Eye, Inc. headquartered in
Morristown, N.J., breeds primarily German
Shepherds, Labrador Retrievers and
Golden Retrievers for its dog guide pro-
gram. 4-H families volunteer to provide
homes for the puppies and instruction dur-
ing their early months of development.
When a puppy reaches the age of 14 to 16
months, they are returned to The Seeing
Eye to start their formal training.
4-H clubs that are part of the Seeing
Eye Puppy Raising Program provide guid-
ance on training techniques for the dogs
while club members learn how to take on
important responsibilities in caring for the
animals and ensuring that they receive the
required training.
Puppies are placed with 4-H families in
New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania,
Delaware and Warwick, New York. These are
areas that are geographically close to The
Seeing Eye headquarters and have a net-
work in place to provide guidance and sup-
port to puppy raisers.
To sign up for the program, families are
asked to attend at least one Seeing Eye
Puppy Raising Project 4-H Club meeting
before applying. Once accepted to the pro-
gram, participants will receive a puppy that
is between 7 and 8 weeks of age. An area
coordinator from The Seeing Eye will deliver
the puppy and spend time with the family to
explain the puppy’s care. The Seeing Eye
covers all veterinary costs.
Puppy raisers are expected to attend their
4-H club meetings along with the puppies. It
is a chance for both people and animals to
socialize. Learning to be around other people
and animals is especially important to a
puppy’s development and training.
When the day arrives that the puppy
must return to The Seeing Eye, it can be an
emotional time. Attending 4-H club meet-
ings helps to prepare puppy raisers for that
eventuality and reminds them that by rais-
ing a puppy and training it well, they will
have a major impact on the life of another
human being. Their puppy will one day be a
dog guide that will help a blind person to
achieve independence. Many families that
have served as puppy raisers will, after
returning an older puppy, choose to remain
in the program and raise another puppy.
In Cumberland County, past and present
members of the Puppy Power 4-H Club
have raised more than 50 puppies for The
Seeing Eye. This club, headed by 4-H leader
Joan Maloney of Upper Deerfield, is accept-
ing new members. The Puppy Power 4-H
Club is open to both youth and adult mem-
bers. Current members include Katie,
Shannon, Holly, Doug and Jacob Forbes of
Vineland; Rachel Rottkamp and Courtney
Ewing of Bridgeton; Blake Maloney of Upper
Deerfield; Bob VanHassel of Millville and
Mildred Caltabiano of Pittsgrove.
If you would like more information on the
4-H Seeing Eye Puppy Raising Program or
other 4-H clubs and programs in your area,
please contact the Cumberland County 4-H
Center at 451-2800.
AFF Offers Cat Shelters To
Colony Caretakers
The Animal Friends Foundation, Inc. (AFF)
has a limited number of “cottages” available
for area caregivers who are maintaining a
feral cat colony. The “cottages” are insulated
and filled with straw for bedding. Designed
and made by an AFF volunteer, they are
about 20 inches high, said Carolyn Vinci,
President of AFF.
“We still have some cold weather ahead
and the houses give cats used to being out-
doors a warm, cozy retreat,” she said.
“They are washable and can be easily taken
apart for cleaning.”
Vinci explained that feral cats are former
domestic cats or their descendants who no
longer trust humans. They have learned to
be wary due to abuse or neglect. If they are
born to a feral mother, she will teach them
to avoid human contact, Vinci said.
“Compassionate people feed these ani-
mals and are sometimes overwhelmed
with their needs,” she said. “If the cats are
not spayed or neutered, they will cause a
population boom.”
AFF regularly works with area residents
who have identified or established feral cat
colonies and provides finan-
cial assistance in some
cases. In a process called
Trap, Neuter, Vaccinate,
Return and Manage
(TNVR/M), the caregivers
humanely trap the cats and
transport them to area clin-
ics. The cats are spayed or
neutered and given rabies
and distemper shots. The
animals are then returned
to the original location,
where the caregivers con-
tinue to provide them with
food and shelter.
“These cottages are
excellent shelters,” Vinci
said. “They are low-profile,
easy to move and are
roomy enough to allow sev-
eral cats a place to sleep
safely and warmly.”
AFF volunteers are com-
mitted to finding solutions to the overpopu-
lation of unwanted companion animals
through education and financial support at
existing low-cost spay-neuter programs and
supports individuals and organizations that
are doing good work with animals through-
out southern New Jersey.
For more information about it or AFF’s
other programs, email animalfriendsfounda-
tion@yahoo.com, call 503-5572 or visit
www.animalfriendsfoundation.com.
Pose Your Pet with the
Beloved Bunny
WHAT: Break out the Easter bon-
nets and bunny ears— for your
furry friends—as this year local
pets from classic dogs and cats to
exotic iguanas and birds are invit-
ed to visit their pal, the Easter
Bunny, at Cumberland Mall. A
variety of photo packages are
available to capture springtime
memories with the Easter Bunny.
Animals must be domesticated
and transported on a leash or in a
pet carrier.
WHEN: Tuesday, March 23, and
Wednesday, March 31, 7-9 p.m.
WHERE: Cumberland Mall Center
Court (Owners and pets should
Enter and exit through the mall
entrance near Liberty Travel.)
100 Cumberland Mall
Vineland, NJ 08360
Puppy Power 4-H Club
member Courtney Ewing of
Bridgeton, with Riva, a
Seeing Eye golden Labrador
retriever she is raising until
the pup is 14 months old.
Save the Date for Pet Walk
WHAT: Cumberland County
SPCA’s 16th Annual Step for a Pet
Walk is the local group’s biggest
fundraiser of the year. All money
raised goes directly to support
homeless and neglected animals
at the shelter. Prizes, refresh-
ments, T-shirts, pet photos. Call
CCSPCA at 691-1500) for details.
WHEN: Sunday, April 18. Register
at 9 a.m.
WHERE: Parvin State Park, 701
Almond Rd., Pittsgrove
Assistant Nurse Manager Sami Abate with
Gypsy, her therapy dog, used to encourage
South Jersey Healthcare patients to walk.
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Holy Thursday
7:00 PM OLP
Adoration in the Chaple till 12:00AM
Good Friday Stations Outside
12:00 OLP
Service 3:00 OLP
Holy Saturday Mass
8:00 PM OLP
Easter Sunday:
7:30 St. Mary
9:00 OLP
10:30 OLp
Healing Mass
March 21 at 3:00 PM FR.John Campoli
The Passion Play
March 26 at 7:00 PM
Palm Sunday Masses:
5:00 PM Saturday March 27 OLP
7:30 AM Sunday March 28 St. Mary
9:00 AM Sunday March 28 OLP
10:30 AM Sunday March 28 OLP
Pasta Dinner
12- 5:00 PM Rosary Hall
Tickets available at the church ($8.00)
St. Padre Pio Parish
Invites You to Our Lady of Pompeii Church
4680 Dante Ave. Vineland NJ • 856 691 7526
alternative
physician
Family Practioner
Ivan Krohn, M.D.
Why Chelation Therapy?
Because it Works!
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Report Improved Health From Chelation
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office in Vineland Specializing In
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Please call for an appointment
(856) 691-6866 or (732) 616-5917
Faces in the News
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Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS
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Ag Convention
New Jersey’s agricultural youth ambassa-
dors were honored at the New Jersey State
Agricultural Convention. Miranda Hill of
Salem, the Salem County Outstanding 4-Her
and Leevon Kate Lacy of Woodstown, the
2009 Salem County Fair Queen, attended
the delegates’ dinner along with 23 other
young people, representing county 4-H and
various commodity groups. More than 200
of the state’s agriculture leaders attended
the convention.
In the photos, from left: Roger Kumpel, State
Board of Agriculture President; Andy Hill
(Miranda’s father); Miranda Hill; and NJ Secretary
of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher Bottom photo:
Kumpel; Nadine Chrzanowski (Leevon’s mother);
Leevon Kate Lacy; Secretary Fisher
TD Charitable Foundation Donates to CCC Foundation
Attendance is important in school and in the workplace. Cumberland County College Foundation
and Cumberland County College, in a partnership with the Bridgeton Public School District, will
instruct more than
3,500 k-8 graders and
their parents about the
importance of atten-
dance and punctuality.
The program,
Attendance Counts!,
promotes strong atten-
dance and punctuality
by showing the statis-
tics for furthering edu-
cation and obtaining
free-tuition scholar-
ships to the County
College.
Earlier this month,
the TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, awarded a $5,000 donation
to the Cumberland County College in support of Attendance Counts! The donation will help offi-
cials monitor the performance and improvement of the Bridgeton students.
In the photo: Executives from TD Bank present CCC and the Bridgeton Public School District with a
grant from the TD Charitable Foundation in support of the Attendance Counts! program.
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I
t didn’t take long, after being elect-
ed to the state Assembly two years
ago, for me to come to this conclu-
sion: If state government is ever
going to pull itself out of the deep fiscal
hole in which it finds itself, the adminis-
tration and Legislature must take the
steps necessary to run the statehouse
more like a business.
I went to Trenton, and am returning
for a second two years, with what I con-
sider a unique skill set—as the owner and
CEO of a successful business in Vineland.
The opportunity to bring my business
expertise to Trenton was one of the most
important reasons I ran for elected office
the first time, and the same applies this
time around. That approach is fully sup-
ported by my 1st District colleagues,
Senator Jeff Van Drew and Assemblyman
Nelson Albano. We have worked hard
together, and will continue to work to
change the way the administration and
the Legislature does business.
The operative word here is business,
more specifically small business. For too
long, the state has made it too difficult for
small businesses to survive in New Jersey,
much less thrive, by burdening the hard-
working, tax-paying, job-creating business
owners with unnecessarily harsh and
costly taxes and a regulatory system badly
in need of both short-term and long-term
reform. Senator Van Drew, Assemblyman
Albano and I have been saying clearly and
publicly for months that the state must
slow down the number of its new rules,
regulations and other requirements that
affect the owners of small businesses. If
that doesn’t happen, these businesses will
continue to disappear by either shutting
their doors and putting their employees
on the street, or moving their businesses
to other states where the state govern-
ments understand their importance and
provide a business-friendly environment.
It’s really as simple as creating incen-
tives for small businesses and reducing the
regulatory and bureaucratic burdens they
are forced to bear. It’s equally as easy as
understanding the importance of our small
businesses that significantly help stimulate
the economic activity by creating addition-
al revenue and promoting job retention
and creation that is so important to our
state. Putting it another way, no matter
what issues occupy our time and energy—
be they related to health care, public safe-
ty, education, the needs of the most vul-
nerable, or anything else—nothing can
move the state forward if we don’t get our
fiscal house in order. This includes a more
helpful, business-friendly approach that
our small businesses need to exist and
flourish, instead of penalizing their hard
work and sacrifice. Only by doing so, I
believe, will our children and grandchil-
dren have an opportunity and a desire to
live and work and thrive in New Jersey.
Just as Senator Van Drew and
Assemblyman Albano do, I have an open
door policy for businesspersons who have
ideas for creating a better business envi-
ronment. I will share with you the sugges-
tions I have already heard from my meet-
ings with several Chambers of Commerce
in Cumberland, Cape May and Atlantic
counties. I held these meetings to get a
better sense of what the business commu-
nity needs and wants from Trenton, and I
will continue to seek out and value input
from those who have ideas to share with
me. We all should have a common pur-
pose—positive changes that will lead to a
better future. I
Small Business
Report
The State of New Jersey has made it too difficult
for small businesses to survive and flourish.
I
Official Words
{ MATTHEW MILAM, ASSEMBLYMAN, FIRST LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT }
“No matter what issues
occupy our time and
energy... nothing can
move the state forward if
we don’t get our fiscal
house in order. This
includes a more helpful
approach that our small
businesses need....”
I
n past columns, I have been
telling you about the many great
things that Main Street Vineland
has been doing for our down-
town—the events, project, and initiatives
that are being spearheaded locally by our
dedicated volunteers. However, a lot of
this would not be possible with out the
leadership of the Main Street organiza-
tions at the national and state levels that
power organizations like ours, here and
throughout the country. For that, I would
recommend taking a look at the national
Main Street website at
www.mainstreet.org and the Main Street
New Jersey website at
www.state.nj.us/dca.
On the national website, you will
learn about the National Trust Main
Street Center®, the central organization
that leads the more than 1,200 state,
regional, and national Main Street pro-
grams. You will see an explanation of the
revitalization and preservation-based
purpose and mission of Main Street. You
can learn about the Main Street Four-
Point Approach®—the Organization,
Promotions, Design, and Economic
Restructuring Committees that are nec-
essary components of every Main Street
organization in every city across the
country and that carry out the mission of
Main Street locally.
In addition to these basics, the nation-
al Main Street website contains a link to
resources—a valuable one-stop location
for downtown revitalization information.
Another link will take you to a listing of
upcoming conferences and trainings,
such as the annual National Main Streets
Conference. This year, Main Street
Vineland will have the honor of seeing
two of its members as presenters at the
conference, which will take place from
May 2 to 5 in Oklahoma City.
Main Street New Jersey’s website
address is actually a page of the State of
New Jersey Department of Community
Affairs website. There you will see an
explanation of the Main Street program
from the state level. See the many bene-
fits of becoming a Main Street New
Jersey community—strengthened tax and
revenue base, a visually appealing and
economically viable downtown, new
businesses and jobs, increased invest-
ment in the downtown, and more. Learn
about the services available to Main
Street New Jersey communities—train-
ing, consultants, small business develop-
ment services, and help with marketing,
public relations, architectural design,
and other services.
So much more information can be
found on this website, but the section
that really resonates is the economic
impact Main Street New Jersey commu-
nities have had since 1990:
• Net New Businesses
Created/Expanded: 1,587
• Net New Jobs Created: 7,142
• Building Improvement Projects: 4,335
• Private Reinvestment in Main Street
Districts: $930,865,920
• Value of Private Volunteer Hours:
$11,338,242
• State Return on Investment:
$204.00 to $1.00
Check out the national and state Main
Street websites to see why we are so proud
and privileged to be a Main Street commu-
nity and see why this is a programthat
works—and is working in downtown
Vineland. Stop by the office at 603 E.
Landis Ave., call us at 794-8653 or visit the
website at www.mainstreetvineland.org. I
I
Downtown Vineland
{ TODD NOON, EXEC. DI R. , VDI D/MAI N STREET }
...to learn more about Main Street on
the local, state and national levels.
Hop Online
This year, Main Street
Vineland will have
the honor of seeing two
of its members as
presenters at the
national conference,
which will take place
from May 2 to 5 in
Oklahoma City.
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W
ith the recent record
snowstorms followed by
last weekend’s abundant
rainfall, you might be
experiencing basement seepage or flooding.
New homeowners may not even be safe from
the water Mother Nature delivers each year.
The majority of homeowners' water seep-
age problems can be attributed to seasonal
conditions. Rapid runoff and the frozen
ground's inability to absorb the water leave
only one place for the water to go—and
unfortunately, it's right through the walls.
Typically, the spring and fall rainy seasons
are peak times to experience water seepage.
Homeowners commonly associate water
problems with expensive excavation and
drainage. But, a waterproofing project can
be completed for around $500.00 using a
high-quality masonry waterproofing paint,
such as DRYLOK(R) Masonry
Waterproofer by United Gilsonite
Laboratories, a Scranton, Pennsylvania-
based manufacturer that has been helping
homeowners safeguard against water seep-
age problems since 1957.
The first thing to remember when looking
for a product to stop water seepage is that you
need a waterproofer, not a watersealer. There
are differences between the two. Watersealers
only repel water but will not stop actual water
penetration. Awaterproofer, however, pene-
trates the surface and bonds itself to the
masonry to act as an integral barrier to stop
water seepage. Ordinary paint merely adheres
to the surface, and oncoming water pressure
can force it off.
Here are the steps to take to address
seepage and stop basement damage.
FIND THE SOURCE
Homeowners must remember that a wet
basement wall might be a symptom of a
larger problem. Water may be coming from
a variety of sources such as leaky down-
spouts or gutters, blocked drainage pipes,
improper grading, or ruts that direct
ground runoff toward foundations.
Correcting these problems—combined with
the application of a quality waterproofing
paint—is the best way to prevent water on
masonry surfaces.
Similarly, it is necessary to find out if
seepage or condensation is the source
behind wet walls. This can be determined
by performing a sim-
ple test. Tape a one-
foot square piece of
aluminum foil tightly
to a dried interior
basement wall. You
can dry a small area to
test with a cloth or
hair dryer. Remove
the foil after several
days. If the room side
is wet, the problem is
condensation and a
dehumidifier should
be used. If the wall
side of the foil is wet,
there is seepage.
Remember that both
problems can occur at the same time.
Once you determine your problem,
there are two main parts of any water-
proofing job: Surface preparation and
application of the waterproofer itself.
SURFACE PREPARATION
As in any painting job, surface preparation is a
critical step. Loose or broken mortar, dirt, dust
and other foreign matter should always be
removed before putting on a newcoat of paint.
Before applying the waterproofer, clean
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Real Estate {
ASoggy Basement
Don't let the recent rains leave you with a
water-damaged basement.
the surface thoroughly. Waterproofing paint
works best when applied to a clean, bare
masonry surface. It may be applied on a slightly
damp surface but best results are obtained
when applied over a dry surface. To determine
if the wall is too wet to paint, try this simple
test: Rub your fingertips over the surface you
want to paint. If your fingertips are wet, do not
paint the surface. Wait 48 hours and repeat the
test. For best results, wait for a dry spell.
Remove old paint by wire-brushing, sand-
blasting or another suitable means. The worst
enemy for any masonry paint is efflorescence,
or white, crystal-like salt deposits that prevent
a waterproofer fromadhering to a surface.
Muriatic acid or a product containing it
should be used to rid the surface of efflores-
cence. Holes should be patched with an
hydraulic cement.
Acommon area that may be overlooked as
a source of water seepage is the floor/ wall
joint. Normally, when concrete floors cure,
they shrink and pull away fromthe wall,
allowing a space for water to enter. That's why
it’s necessary to seal all gaps between floor
and walls with a fast-drying cement. Clean the
area and wash with water prior to sealing.
APPLYING THE WATERPROOFER
Now, you’re ready to apply waterproofer to
your basement walls. For best results,
apply the first coat with a nylon or poly-
ester bristle brush. The second coat can
be applied with a brush or masonry roller.
Work the paint thoroughly into the pores
of the masonry. For optimum bonding,
apply to a dry surface.
Followdirections for application carefully.
If the area you covered is more than the rec-
ommendation on the label, you’re spreading
the paint too thin. Two coats are usually suf-
ficient to stop seepage. However, if seepage is
still present after several days, an additional
coat may be necessary.
Open windows and use a non-sparking
exhaust fan to provide adequate ventila-
tion when applying a waterproofer in
closed areas. In places, where good cross-
ventilation is not possible, or if you are
sensitive to solvent odors, the experts at
UGL recommend using a latex-based
product. Remember to read the label of
the product thoroughly for application
and ventilation requirements.
For the free booklet, "Waterproofing
Made Easy," and a dealer nearest you,
write to UGL, P.O. Box 70, Scranton, PA,
18501, visit the Web site www.ugl.com, or
call toll free 1-800-272-3235.
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