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Rules Review Lesson Plan

Teacher: Kelly Carlson


Subject/Grade: US/AZ History 2
Standards:
State Standard: HESHS S4-01
Strand 4: Use of communication skills to enhance health
PO1: Utilize skills for communicating effectively with family, peers and others to enhance health
Concept 7: Emergence of the Modern United States
PO 1. Analyze how the following aspects of industrialization transformed the American
economy beginning in the late 19th century:
a. mass production
PO 2. Assess how the following social developments influenced American society in the
late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:
a. Civil Rights issues (e.g., Womens Suffrage Movement, Dawes Act, Indian schools,
lynching, Plessy v. Ferguson)
d. mass media (e.g., radio)
e. consumerism (e.g., advertising, standard of living, consumer credit)
f. Roaring Twenties (e.g., Harlem Renaissance, leisure time, jazz, changed social mores)
PO 3. Analyze events which caused a transformation of the United States during the late
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:
c. Progressive Movement (e.g. Sixteenth through Nineteenth Amendments, child labor)
g. Red Scare/Socialism
Objective: Students will create a picture pertaining to a vocabulary term coinciding with 1920s America standards
listed above in order to generate a response (guess) from their peers of said term.
Health Objective: Students will evaluate their peers drawings (non-verbal communication) in order to select the
proper wordage to communicate their guesses verbally.
Sub-Objectives:
Students will apply their own understanding of a certain concept to give examples of its meaning through drawing
a picture.
Students will analyze their peers drawings to dissect the meanings and definitions of individual concepts related
to the study of 1920s America.
Students will be able to comprehend the picture definitions (drawn on the board) and then convert their meaning
into an effective essay (short question) answer on their test.
Evidence of Mastery:
Students will be able to comprehend the picture definitions (drawn on the board) and then identify the exact word or
concept (pertaining to 1920s America).
Key Vocabulary:
Materials:
anarchist
Pictionary powerpoint
fundamentalism
Classroom white boards
consumerism
Dry erase markers and erasers
double standard
Scorekeepers
leisure
timekeepers
mass-production
4 sets of notecards with vocab written on them

suffrage
Communism
Red Scare
Installment plans
Prohbition

Healthy snacks for positive reinforcement,


extrinsic motivation

Guided Practice

Instructional Input

Opening/Anticipatory Set: Teacher begins the Pictionary powerpoint and asks the students if they have ever played
pictionary before.
Teacher Will:
Introduce the Pictionary powerpoint which includes the
rules of the game and answers any questions to further
understanding and/or clarification of the upcoming
activity.

Students Will:
Read the powerpoint as well as listen to their teacher
give instructions, ask any questions as needed, and give
feedback when prompted by teacher.

Differentiation:
The powerpoint while being read aloud also has pictures next to each written instruction and at the end a
demonstration with a student volunteer and class participation is presented. Thus ensuring that the instructions are
presented in a tri-modal format to incorporate as many learning styles as possible.
Teacher Will:
Students Will:
Play the part of a cheerleading facilitator as she and the Play the game as outlined and demonstrated by the
class together go through the first couple of contestants powerpoint, teachers directions and also look for ways
and the students suggest modifications that will
to suggest and enhance their own learning experience as
enhance the game. The teacher (aka cheerleading
well as activity experience.
facilitator) makes adjustments as needed.
Specifically: Teacher will ask for a volunteer or
pick a student to be voluntold and they are the
drawer
Said student will go and get a card from the
scorekeeper
Student has 10 seconds to figure out what they
want to draw
Student has 45 seconds to draw and the rest of
the class has those same 45 seconds to guess
the correct answer.
Game repeats as such and is stopped at a
designated time.
Differentiation:
MODIFICATION: For students with cognitive disabilities they will be given a choice of three prearranged cards to
pick from. These three cards will have easier concepts/terms on them as opposed to using the regular deck of
cards.
MODIFICATION: For a student with a physical disability, for example being on crutches, they could pick the term
and then tell a peer what they would like to draw for them on the board, a pictionary designated drawer of their
choosing.

Independent Practice

Teacher Will:
Continue to function as a cheerleader with positive
praise for the students and reduce facilitator role as
students take ownership of their role as participants in
the activity.

Student Will:
Play the game by participating in the activity as a
drawer, a scorekeeper and also as a guesser.

Differentiation:
MODIFICATION: For students struggling with their particular term/definition (either due to language barrier
issues, cognitive barriers and/or a learning disability) the facilitator will be monitoring in order to guide along the
guesses of the class as well as give a more in depth and helpful verbal interpretation of the students attempted
drawing on the board.

Closure/Lesson Summary:
Teacher will ask students to write down, in their opinion, the three most important terms/concepts pertaining to 1920s
America and draw a picture explaining/defining each of the three written terms/concepts. This will be the students ticket
out the door.

Words/Phrases written on notecards:


Farm

Prohibition
Immigrant
Speakeasy
Bootlegger
Flapper
Mobster (Al Capone)
Police
WWI
Isolationism
Communism
Nativism
Search warrant
Red Scare
Sacco & Vanzetti
Ku Klux Klan
Automobile
Gas station
Highway
Shopping mall
Restaurant
Refrigerator
Bank
Stock market
Radio
Hollywood (movies)
Electricity
Money
Credit card
Installment plan
Evolution
Scopes Trial
Charles Lindbergh
Airplane
Jazz music
Baseball
Anarchist
Consumerism
Double standard
Leisure
Mass-production
suffrage