You are on page 1of 26

Running head: Sustainability

1

Sustainability
Signature Assignment
Celeste Ulloa
Course #25966
PPE 310: Health Literacy for Schools
Dr. William Hesse

Introduction

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

2

Children who live a physically fit and active lifestyle perform better academically and
cognitively than children who do not. (Chaddock et al., 2011). This statement alone demands
the importance of physical fitness in a child’s life because physical fitness plays a huge role in
how well a student performs in the classroom. Because students spend the majority of their time
at school, it is imperative that their school environment is encouraging them to participate in
physical fitness activities inside and outside of the classroom. Schools must partake in programs,
such as the ‘Get Fit’ program, in which inspire students, families, and the community to ‘Get Fit’
and live a healthy and active lifestyle. From this, students will benefit and not only be healthier
individuals, but they will perform that much better in the classroom. Overall, it is vital that
students are given opportunities to become fit and healthy individuals at school and the ‘Get Fit’
program provides just that. The program empowers students to live a fit and healthy lifestyle,
which will result in high academic performance, overall, encouraging our students to grow into
‘physically fit’ and ‘cognitively fit’ individuals.
Review of Current Literature
Cognition and fitness are correlated in preadolescent development (Buck, Hillman,
Castelli, 2008). A group of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign led a
study, in which investigated the relationship between aerobic fitness and interference control.
The study included 74 children between the ages of 7 and 12. The children chosen for the study
were asked to complete a paper/pencil version of a Stroop color-work task. During this task, the
children were asked to read aloud as many words as they could in 45 seconds. The children were
also asked to participate in a FITNESSGRAM, which measured different components of physical
fitness. Through this study, the researchers discovered that the children who had greater aerobic
fitness related with better performance on the Stroop test than the children who were not as fit.

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

3

These finding suggested that increased levels of aerobic fitness might be beneficial to cognitive
development during preadolescence.
In 2012, a study was conducted in which investigated the relationship between academic
performance and childhood aerobic fitness (Chaddock et al., 2012). The group of researchers
recruited thirty-two 9- and 10-year old children from East-Central Illinois to participate in the
study. The children who were chosen to partake in the study were first assessed on their overall
aerobic fitness. During this assessment, the children ran on a motor-driven treadmill and had
their heart rates, oxygen uptake, and respiratory exchange assessed. The children were then
assigned a fitness group (higher fit or lower fit) according to their results. The results of this
assessment were 14-higher fit children (7 boys and 7 girls) and 18 lower-fit children (8 boys and
10 girls). The participants were then required to complete a modified version of the Eriksen
flank task, in which measured their cognitive control. All participants were asked to return one
year later after this initial testing to complete a follow-up visit. During this follow up visit,
participants were asked to complete the modified flank task again. After completing this study,
the researchers discovered that the higher-fit children had higher accuracy and a shorter response
rate than the lower-fit children on the compatibility task conditions. Over the time span of one
year (from the initial testing to the follow-up testing) the researchers discovered that the lower-fit
children became slower and higher-fit children became faster over the course of they year.
Overall, they discovered that aerobic fitness predicts future cognitive performance on a test of
cognitive control, as well as, relates to increased academic performance in mathematics and
reading.
A group of researchers conducted a study to discover the effects of aerobic exercise on
overweight children’s cognitive functioning. 94 overweight children, around the age of 9, were

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

4

tested in this study. The children were randomized into different groups and were required to
either participate in 20 or 40 minutes of exercise a day, 5 days a week for 15 weeks. There was
also a control group in which did not participate in any exercise. The students were given the
Cognitive Assessment System, which is a standardized test of cognitive processes before and
after the study. The study showed that those students who were assigned to the 40 minutes of
exercise per day actually scored considerably higher than those in the control group. From this,
the researchers concluded that exercise plays a large role in improving children’s mental
functioning in which are imperative for cognitive and social development.
Not only does inactivity among children results in physical health, but it also results in
weaker cognitive health (Raine et al., 2013). A group of researchers investigated the relationship
between aerobic fitness, learning, and memory on a task that included recall of names and
locations on a map (Raine et al., 2013). When conducting this study, the researchers recruited
forty-eight 9- and 10-year olds. The children were required to complete VO2max text in which
used an indirect calimetry system on a motorized treadmill. While they ran, they were assessed
on their oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio, and wore a polar heart rate monitor. Every
two minutes the students were asked to point to a picture to show how tired they felt. After this
aerobic test was completed, the participants were required to attend learning and recall sessions
in. During this session, the students had to remember the names of specific regions in which
were made up of four letters on a map. The next day, the participants returned and were asked to
recall the specific locations (in which they studied the previous day) on the map. Overall, the
researchers discovered that the students, who were more fit, outperformed the lower fit children
in the recall of the regions. Their study further suggested that fitness and exercise has a
significant influence on hippocampal structure and function (which is responsible for memory).

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

5

A group of researchers conducted a study in which reviewed the effects of physical
activity on healthy and behavior outcomes and develop evidence-based recommendations for
physical activity in youth (Strong et al., 2005). During this study, the researchers conducted a
literature search in which they reviewed and evaluated 850 articles. Experts looked at the
evidence from each study and in January 2004, they met as a panel to discuss the research
discovered from the literature search. From there, they developed physical activity
recommendations based off of their research. From their research and the studies found, the
researchers concluded that school-age youth should participate in moderate to vigorous physical
activity for 60 minutes or more each day. They suggest that the 60 minutes or more of physical
activity is achieved at school, recess, and after school sports and programs. They also discovered
that there is a correlation between physical fitness and academic performance, in which physical
fitness positively influences concentration, memory, and classroom behavior.
Horseshoe Trails Elementary is in the Cave Creek School District. There are 669 students
enrolled at Horseshoe Trails in grades 1st-6th (SchoolDigger, 2015). The average class size at
Horseshoe Trails is about 19 students per classroom (SchoolDigger, 2015). 1.6% of students at
Horseshoe Trails Elementary School are eligible for a free/discounted lunch (SchoolDigger,
2015). There is no information on the proportion of English Language Learners at HTES.
Horseshoe Trails Elementary is located in the city of Phoenix; however, the majority of
families live in the city of Cave Creek. The school is located in a more rural type of area. There
are several horse farms and large houses with a lot of land around the school. The students at
Horseshoe Trails Elementary make up a range of various ethnicities. 85% of the students are
White, 0.6% are African American, 3.9% are Asian, and 9.6% are Hispanic (SchoolDigger,
2015).

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

6

According to the HTES website (2015), Horseshoe Trails is a public charter school. HTES
has received an A on their report card and is a Title 1 assistance school (Horseshoe Trails
Elementary School, 2015). Students in need of reading assistance are taken outside the
classroom to a program called ‘Title’ to work on their reading skills. Horseshoe Trails has also
met the Adequate Yearly Progress, or AYP (Horseshoe Trails Elementary School, 2015).
According to the the 2013 Aims Results for Cave Creek Unified School District (2013), 81% of
students passed the math portion of the AIMS assessment, 91% of students passed the reading
portion of the AIMS assessment, 83% of students passed the writing portion of the AIMS
assessment, and 87% of students passed the science portion of the AIMS assessment.
Synthesis Of Information
Overall, the majority of the articles determined that physical fitness has a positive
relationship with academic performance in elementary students. The articles shared a common
conclusion in that students who are physically fit will achieve more academically and cognitively
than students who are not physically fit. The various studies within each article also shared a
common theme. The majority of the studies consisted of a group of children who were first
asked to participate in a physical exercise (type and amount varied) and then were given a
cognitive assessment. These studies found that the more active and fit a child was, the better the
child did on the assessment. There was one study, however, that only used overweight children
in their study. Although, no other study did this, the results were still the same. The students
who were required to do more physical activity or were more physical fit still performed better.
Overall, the conclusion is that when compared to students who are unfit, students who are
physically fit and active have quicker response rates, retain concepts longer, and efficiently solve

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

7

problems faster. Because of this, students who are physically active achieve more academically.
The more fit a student is, the better he or she will perform academically and cognitively.
This research shows the importance of providing students with opportunities to be
physically active inside and outside of the classroom. Not only is it important for students to live
a healthy and active lifestyle for their overall health, but it also benefits their performance
academically. It is vital that teachers provide students with time to move around and get active
because the more active the students are, the better they will perform in the classroom.
Practical Implications
To promote physical fitness throughout Horseshoe Trails Elementary, there should be an
after-school ‘Get Fit’ monthly activity (see Appendix A for more information on the ‘Get Fit’
monthly program and each monthly activity), as well as, a ‘Get Fit’ weekly newsletter (see
Appendix B for an example of the ‘Get Fit’ weekly newsletter). Because physical fitness
positively affects academic performance, it is vital that physical fitness is encouraged to the
students and their families.
After- School Program
The ‘Get Fit’ monthly program (see Appendix A) will occur once a month, all year long.
Every month, the staff, students and their families will be invited to the school to participate in a
different and fun physical fitness activity. Some of the physical fitness activities will consist of
relay races, Zumba, and yoga. Students will also be given the opportunity to perform these
activities within the classroom. Teachers at the school can ‘practice’ the activity of the month in
their classroom with their students. For example, in the month of January, teachers could play
Zumba Brain Break activities from GoNoodle.com for their students. This would not only
promote physical activity in the classroom, but it would also help students practice for the event
in January.
Newsletter

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

8

The ‘Get Fit’ newsletter (see Appendix B) will be given to all students to bring home
every Friday. There will be a ‘Get Fit’ newsletter club that will be made up of students and
teachers. This club will meet after school three times a week to prepare and write the newsletter.
The newsletter (see Appendix B) will consist of statistics on childhood obesity rates, information
on the relationship between physical fitness and academic performance, healthy recipes,
workouts and activities to complete at home, as well as, physical fitness events that students and
their families can attend within the community. The newsletter (see Appendix B) will also give
information on the monthly ‘Get Fit’ after-school activity (See Appendix A).
Proposal
This ‘Get Fit’ proposal includes a presentation in which will be presented to the principal
and the administration, a grant proposal requested from the Humana Foundation Grant, schoolwide marketing including fitness posters (see Appendix C for an example of the fitness posters),
‘Get Fit’ t-shirts (see Appendix D for an example of the ‘Get Fit’ t-shirt), newsletters (see
Appendix B) and video morning announcements, a newsletter committee/club made up of
students and teachers to prepare and write the ‘Get Fit’ newsletter (see Appendix B), an event
calendar (see Appendix E for an example of the calendar) and committee that plans each monthly
fitness activity, and student, parent, and teacher participation.
The ‘Get Fit’ proposal will not only teach students and their families about the
importance of physical fitness, but it will also promote them to become active and fit individuals
to overall create a healthier community.
Before any implementation begins, the administration and principal must be informed
about the ‘Get Fit’ proposal. A presentation must be created in which contains the mission
statement and main goal of the ’Get Fit’ proposal, the effects the ‘Get Fit’ proposal will have on
the school, administration, students, and their families, as well as, how the school will go about
implementing these ideas. It is also important to inform the administration about the positive

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

9

relationship between physical fitness and academic performance. This will show the
administration the importance of adding the ‘Get Fit’ monthly after-school activity (see
Appendix A) and weekly newsletter (see Appendix B) to our school. It will not only help the
students, families, and school staff become healthier and more physically fit individuals, but it
will also increase academic performance and lower the rate of childhood obesity in our
community.
Grant
The Humana Foundation Grant is a grant in which supports organizations focused on
promoting and improving physical activity and nutritional habits of children and their families.
The minimum grant amount is $10,000. The description of this grant can be found at
https://www.humanafoundation.org/grant-making. The district grant writer will assist with this
grant. The funds from this grant will support the activities (see Appendix A), newsletter (see
Appendix B), and advertising of the ‘Get Fit’ program.
Advertisement
To promote physical fitness and advertise the ‘Get Fit’ monthly after-school activity (see
appendix A) and weekly newsletter (see Appendix B), posters (see Appendix E for an example of
a poster) will be created and hung throughout the school. T-shirts (see Appendix D) will also be
made to promote the ‘Get Fit’ after-school activity (see Appendix A). The students and families
who participate in the ‘Get Fit’ after school activity will be given these shirts to wear. Teachers
will also be given these t-shirts (see Appendix D) to wear throughout the year. In addition to the
posters (see Appendix C) and t-shirts (see Appendix D), the students on the morning
announcements will read a healthy fact from the ‘Get Fit’ newsletter (see Appendix B) every
Friday. The ‘Get Fit’ after-school activity (see Appendix A) will also be advertised on the
morning announcements throughout the week of the event, as well as, in the ‘Get Fit’ newsletter
(see Appendix B) every Friday in preparation for each month's event.
Newsletter Committee

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

10

Students and teachers who are interested in joining the after-school ‘Get Fit’ weekly
newsletter club can join in the beginning of the school year. The newsletter committee will be
made up of 2 teachers and at least 10 students. The club will meet every Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday after school for one hour (3:45 pm-4:45 pm). The students and teachers in the
newsletter club will be in charge of researching data on childhood obesity and the relationship
between physical fitness and academic performance, healthy recipes, physical activities that can
be completed by families at home, as well as, local community physical fitness/activity events.
The students and teachers involved will create a newsletter (see Appendix B) that includes the
information found from this research. The committee is also in charge of printing the newsletters
(see Appendix B) for each classroom and distributing them to the teachers’ mailboxes every
Thursday afternoon. The committee is also responsible for providing a copy of the newsletter
(see Appendix B) with one fact highlighted on the newsletter to the students on the morning
announcements every Friday. This fact will be read on the morning announcements on that day.
Calendar of Events
A calendar (see Appendix E) will be created to plan out each month’s ‘Get Fit’ event.
This calendar (see Appendix E) will include event activities, dates, and times. Staff, students,
and families can refer to this calendar, as it will be hung in the main office.
Participation
Lastly, the ‘Get Fit’ proposal includes student, family, and staff participation. For the afterschool monthly fitness events, the school staff is required to promote each event throughout the
year. The staff can wear their ‘Get Fit’ t-shirts’ (see Appendix D) to promote this event and hang
posters (see Appendix C) in their classroom. The staff, students, and families in which show up
to the event will be required to participate in some sort of physical fitness activity to get moving
and get healthy. As for the newsletter (see Appendix B), it is the committee’s (made up of

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

11

teachers and students) responsibility to participate and create the newsletter to inform students
and their families about the importance of living a healthy lifestyle.
Conclusion
Physical fitness and academic achievement are positively correlated; therefore, it is vital
that schools are promoting their students to be physically fit individuals in order for them to
perform their best academically. The ‘Get Fit’ program will accomplish this goal and promote
and educate staff, students, families, and the community on how to live a healthy and active
lifestyle. This program encourages students to take health and fitness into their own hands and
implement lifestyle changes to not only benefit their own health, but to benefit their academics as
well.
Because the ‘Get Fit’ program positively reaches out to the staff, students, families, and
community, the program should grow effortlessly and rapidly. In one to three years, this
program should grow district-wide. Hopefully other schools will quickly see the benefits of the
‘Get Fit’ program and adopt it immediately within their curriculum. Other health programs could
also be added and implemented into the ‘Get Fit’ program. Nutritional plans, other health clubs,
and even more ‘Get Fit’ events could be added into the ‘Get Fit’ program and be implemented in
the schools. In five years, the ‘Get Fit’ program should grow statewide and be adopted by all
schools. From this, not only will the students in Arizona become healthier individuals, they will
also become more successful in their academics, opening greater opportunities for their futures.

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

12

References
Buck S, Hillman C, Castelli D. (2008) The relation of aerobic fitness to stroop task performance
in preadolescent children. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 40(1) p 166-172.
Chaddock L, Hillman C, Pontifex M, Johnson C, Raine L, Kramer A. (2012) Childhood aerobic
fitness predicts cognitive performance one year later. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30(5):
421-430.
Davis C, Tomporowski P, Boyle C, Waller J, Miller P, Naglieri J, and Gregoski M. (2007) Effects
of aerobic exercise on overweight children’s cognitivee functioning. 78(5), p510-519.
DOI:10.1080/02701367.2007.10599450
GoNoodle Classroom Brain Breaks. (n.d.) Zumba.
Horseshoe Trails Elementary (2015). About htes. Retrieved from
http://www.ccusd93.org/education/school/school.php?sectionid=15

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

13

Raine, L. B., Lee, H., Saliba, B. J., Chaddock-Heyman, L., Hillman, C. H., & Kramer, A. F.
(2013). The Influence of Childhood Aerobic Fitness on Learning and Memory. Plos ONE,
8(9), 1-6. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0072666.
School Assessment. (2015). Active and Healthy Schools: Assess your school. Retrieved from
http://www.activeandhealthyschools.com/home/assess_survey.cfm.
SchoolDigger. (2015). Horseshoe trails elementary school. Retreived from
http://www.schooldigger.com/go/AZ/schools/0000102484/school.aspx.
Strong W, Malia R, Blimkie C, Daniels S, Dishman K, Gutin B, Hergenroeder A, Must A, Nixon
P, Pivarnik J, Rowland T, Trost S, Trudeau F. (2005) Evidence based physical activity for
school-age youth. The Journal of Pediatrics, 6(16), p732-737.
doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2005.01.055.
What we fund. (n.d.). Retrieved April 17, 2015, from https://www.humanafoundation.org/grantmaking.

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

Technology Link
Link to Padlet: http://padlet.com/Jordan_C_Nelson/Teach

14

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

Appendix A

15

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

16

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
Appendix B
Appendix C

17

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

Appendix D

18

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
Appendix E
Rubric for Signature Assignment

19

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

20

It is necessary to pass the Signature Assignment to pass this course.
A passing grade is a total score of 72.5 points or higher, which includes your 10 point outline
score. See Appendix B for description of Signature Assignment
Criteria with
Professional
Standards
Referenced

Outline
Outline Turned
In(Already
submitted for
points)

5
Exemplary
(97 – 100%)

4
Highly
Proficient
(93 – 96%)

3
Proficient
(83 – 92%)

2
Approaching
Proficient
(73 – 82%)

1
Unsatisfactory
(72%
and below)

Brief outline
with at least
5 original
peer
reviewed
references
written in
APA format
is
submitted.

Brief outline
with some
references but
not 5 original
peer reviewed
references
written in
APA format
are submitted.

Brief outline
No outline
with one or no was
references
submitted.
submitted.

Introduction
is fully
developed
with all
topics
introduced.

Introduction
is addressed
well,
somewhat
organized and
created a plan
for the paper

Introduction
is addressed
adequately.

Introduction is
omitted or
was
disorganized
and did not
create a plan
for the paper.

1. Literature
review
addresses
major issues
in the area.
2. Thorough

1. Literature
review may
address major
issues, but
issues may
not be

1. Literature
review does
not address
the major
issues in the
area; the level

1. Literature
review does
not have the
depth of
knowledge
appropriate to

10 Points

Logical,
detailed outline
with at least 5
original peer
reviewed
references
written in APA
format is
submitted.
5 x 2=10
points

Introduction

10 Points

Introduction to
the topic and
overview (In
your purpose
statement also
introduce all
subtopics)

Introduction is
fully
developed,
well organized,
introduces all
topics, created
a plan for the
paper and
invites the
reader to read
further.

InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8
Literature
Review
Adequacy of
Knowledge
(includes 5 peer
reviewed
original research
articles
references)

5 x 2=10
points
15 Points
1. Literature
review
highlights
major issues in
the area.
2. Through use

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8

of a range of
references to
support key
issues.
3. Description
of important
studies
establishes
context for the
reader.
4. Includes
more than 5
informative
references.

Synthesis of
Information
Synthesis of
Information
(what did the
articles
collectively say
about the topic?
Which authors
had similar and
different
findings?)
InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8

use of a
range of
references
to support
key issues.
3. Includes
descriptions
of important
studies to
provide
context for
the reader.

21

supported
with expert
knowledge.

of support for
the issues is
not adequate.

2. Good use
of references,
but additional
references
may have
strengthened
the paper.

2. Includes 3
references.

this upper
level course.
2. Includes
less than 2
references.

3. Includes 4
references.

4. Includes
5 or more
references.

5 x 3=15
points
15 Points
1. Studies
covering the
same topic
synthesize
related
research.
2. Described
similar or
differing and
detailed
themes
throughout the
articles
3. Demonstrate
thoroughly
how your
research and
the data
collected
supports your
stance on why
your healthy
and active

Studies
covering the
same topic
are
summarized
and
integrated
level work.

Information is
presented
study-bystudy rather
than
summarized
by topic.
2. Described
similar or
differing
themes
throughout
the articles
which were
not detailed
3. Somewhat
emonstrated
how your
research and
the data
collected
supports your
stance on why

The literature
review is a
mixed set of
ideas without
a particular
focus.

The literature
review does
not
demonstrate a
particular
focus and
lacks ideas
based on the
subject
chosen.
2. Described
similar or
differing
themes
throughout the
articles,
however they
were not
detailed
3. Did not
demonstrate
how your
research and

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
school plan is
not only
important for
hope and
engagement at
your school
and in your
community,
but ties to
academic
success in your
classroom as
well.

your healthy
and active
school plan is
not only
important for
hope and
engagement at
your school
and in your
community,
but ties to
academic
success in
your
classroom as
well.

5 x 3=15
points

Practical
Implications
Practical
Implications
(Discuss how
the findings can
or will later be
applied to your
teaching setting)
InTASC 1c,k;
5k; 9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8

22
the data
collected
supports your
stance on why
your healthy
and active
school plan is
not only
important for
hope and
engagement at
your school
and in your
community,
but ties to
academic
success in
your
classroom as
well.

30 Points
1. Practical
implications of
your event
details
including your
teaching level
and in a
particular
setting are
discussed
thoroughly. A
minimum of 6
topics are
applied.
2. Contains
thorough
discussion on
how each of
the 6
program/comp
onents that are
in place are
organized,

1. Pratical
implications
are
discussed
but not
related to a
particular
teaching
setting or
topic or
certain
details are
missing.

1. Pratical
implications
are discussed
but not at a
particularly
level or in a
particular
setting and
many details
of your event
are missing.
2. Contained
at least 4-5
components
of a
comprehensiv
e school
program;
however,
some of the
needed detail
is missing.

1. Practical
implications
are not
thoroughly
discussed and
only a few
details of the
event are
present

1. Practical
implications
are not
discussed and
no details of
the event are
present.
2. Contained 3
or fewer
components
of a
comprehensiv
e school
program
3. Contains
little
discussion on
which
programs/com
ponents are
currently in
place

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
conducted, and
overseen or a
detailed plan
about how
each
component can
be added.
3. All
programs/com
ponents
implemented
include
discussion on
modifications
for those with
disabilities.
4. Contained a
detailed
description of a
special event
that promotes a
healthy and
active school
environment
5. Contained
discussion on a
specific health
behavior
highlighted by
the special
event
6. Specific
target grade
level was
identified and
was
appropriate for
students of that
age
7. Contained
discussion on

3. Contains
thorough
discussion on
how most of
the
program/com
ponent that
are in place
are organized,
conducted,
and overseen
or a detailed
plan about
how the
components
can be added.
4. Most
programs/com
ponents
implemented
include
discussion on
modifications
for those with
disabilities.
5. Contained a
somewhat
detailed
description of
a special
event that
promotes a
healthy and
active school
environment
6. Contained
some
discussion on
a specific
health
behavior
highlighted by
the event

23

4. Contains
little
discussion on
how each
program/com
ponent is
organized,
conducted,
and overseen
and little
detail about
how the
components
can be added.
5. Few
programs/com
ponents
implemented
include
discussion on
modifications
for those with
disabilities.
6. Contained
little detail on
a special
event that
promotes a
healthy and
active school
environment
7. Contained
little
discussion on
a specific
health
behavior
highlighted by
the special
event
8. Specific

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
how to involve
the entire
school in the
event

24
target grade
level was not
identified
and/or not
appropriate
for students of
that age

7. Specific
target grade
level was
somewhat
identified and
was
appropriate
for students of
that age

5 x 6=30
points

9. Contained
little
discussion on
how to
involve the
entire school
in the event

8. Contained
some
discussion on
how to
involve the
entire school
in the event
Conclusion
Conclusion
ITASC 1c,k; 5k;
9f; 10h
NAEYC 6b
NETS-T 3a,d;
4a,c
CEC EC2S1;
CC7K1;
EC7K1;CC9K4;
CC9S8
Writing and
Referencing
Style
First Draft of all
sections
submitted with
changes made
integrating
instructor
comments from
the outline

10 Points
Major issues
support and
establish
conclusions.

Integration of

All comments

The major
issues are
summarized
under
conclusions.

The
conclusions
are not
complete.

Provides
opinions, but
not a
summary of
findings.

No
conclusions
are included.

Detailed
draft of ALL
sections
with some
errors in
content
covered,
headings,
writing style
and/or
refernces in
APA 6.0
style.
Most

Detailed draft
of MOST
sections with
some errors in
content
covered,
headings,
writing style
and/or
refernces in
APA 6.0 style.

Missing
sections or
paper has
regular errors
across content
covered,
headings,
writing style
and/or
refernces in
APA 6.0 style.

Incomplete
(missing half
of the
requirements)
or completely
missing paper.

Some

Very few

No comments

5 x 2=10
points

10 Points
Detailed draft
of all sections
of the paper
with
appropriate
content,
headers,
writing style,
and references
in APA 6.0
style.

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
instructor
comments from
first draft

from instructor
integrated into
final version.
All were
highlighted in
yellow

Writing and
referencing style

1. Cover page
included,
proper spelling
and grammar,
all references
in APA 6.0
style. Paper
was
appropriate
length (at least
5 pages)

comments
from
instructor
integrated
into final
version. All
were
highlighted
in yellow
1. Cover
page
included,
few
grammatical
errors and
misspellings
, all
references
in APA 6.0
style.

25

comments
from
instructor
integrated into
final version.
Most were
highlighted in
yellow

comments
from
instructor
integrated into
final version.
Most were
highlighted in
yellow

from
instructor
integrated into
final version.
The changes
were not
highlighted

1. Cover page
included,
some
grammatical
errors and
misspellings,
some errors in
referencing
style APA 6.0.

1. Cover page
not included,
many
grammatical
errors and
misspellings,
some errors in
referencing
style APA 6.0.

1. Cover page
not included,
major
grammatical
errors and
misspellings,
many errors in
referencing
style APA 6.0.

2. Paper was
too short for
the topic (1-2
pages)

2. Paper was
too short for
the topic (1-2
pages)

2. Paper was
too short for
2. The file
2. Paper was the topic (3-4
document
appropriate pages)
name
length (at
contains…
least 5
3. The file
Lastname.first pages)
name
name.assignme
somewhat
nt#.course#
contains the
Lastname.first
3. This rubric
name.assignm
was added to
ent#.course#
the last page of
the document
4. This rubric
submitted
was added but
not at the end
4. All
of the
sentences are
document
clear and well
submitted
developed
5. Most
sentences are
5. Proposals
clear and well
and events are
developed
appropriate
length with
6. Proposals
standard
and events are
margins, font,

3. The file
document
name does not
contain the
Lastname.first
name.assignm
ent#.course#
4. This rubric
was not added
to the
document
submitted
5. Many
sentences are
not clear and
underdevelop
ed
6. Proposals
and events are

Physical Fitness and Academic Performance
and size of text

mostly
appropriate
length with
standard
margins, font,
and size of
text

26
not of
appropriate
length with
larger than
standard
margins, font
and size of
text