Creating P atform

FOR CREATIVE PERFORMERS

ompliments of the season, by the time you will be reading this, I guess you are getting set for your Christmas shopping. It is finally here, the season of goodwill to all men. Thank you for sharing your time to read through the latest edition of Artflow magazine. In this issue, Minjae Lee is sharing some painting with us, briefly described as someone who draws things. The colours were eye catching. They were used for balance. Muktar Isa works as Architect and BIM consultant. He does a lot of Architectural visualization work. On page 17, we have Roy Margaljot, an illustrator who lives and creates from Jerusalem. He wants us to visit Jerusalem; his wife is a tour guide and he will cook our dinner. We also appreciate the contribution of Timothy Tim and Jon Norris, Editor of freelanceadvisor.co.uk Please keep your emails coming to info@artflowmagazine.com and let us know what you think about this issue and how best to improve. Please do keep in touch with us on Facebook, follow us on twitter @ArtflowMagazine and check our website for updates www.artflowmagazine.com

'AN

LLUSTRATOR WHO LIVESAND CREATES FROM JERUSAlEM HE WANTS US TO VISIT JERUSALE!v\; HIS WIFE IS A TOUR GUIDE AND HE WILL COOK OUR DINNER ,

Gbenga Mogaji I EditorialDirector

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Painter I Seoul

Mi~aeLee
Briefly described as someone who draws things. Loves all colour and use for balance. He uses any medium that you can put on paper

MURtarlsa

Architect I Abuja, Nigeria
Interested in bridging that which is perceived with that which is created Works with architectural firms to help bring their designs to life.

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Five hin s
wrong y every ay
Timothy Tim

Roy Margaliot
Illustrator

Graduated from the Academy for Art and Design in 2009. Since he was 6, he had actually lived onTy with women- mom, one sister and now a wife and an amazing baby girl.

I Jerusalem

I was pleased to read something different from your magazine. I knew it was not just about interviewing people. It was nice to read about

the three people not to be in a brainstorming room. I

can now relate that better with the experience I do have with some coliegeaus.1 hope they read it. Thanks.

Thank you Jossie for choosing to read Artflow Magazine and we are pleased to know that you found something useful for you. That was an article by Dan Gershenson. ED
Your Issue Ten cover was very colourful. It was bold and full of details. Just a question, why don't you have text on your front cover? It's unlike other magazines.

I almost did not want to pick up your magazine on my friend's table because I thought it was going to be a photo collections of artworks but I found it quite interesting. It has a new dimension and a creative approach. I was able to know more about the creative side of my friend. Wish I was an artist too. I have liked your page on Facebook and I hope to get updates from you. Keep up the good work.

Nice to know that you found our publication different. We appreciate your interest and we hope you will enjoy every other issue. ED

Thank you for the observation. The front cover image was photographed by Kati Masoop. Leaving the cover page without words isjust one of our differen t approaches to design. We don 't want to be like every other magazine. ED

We appreciate your feedback. Tell us what you think about our magazine by emailing info@artflowmagazine.com or on facebook or twitter.
Please note: we will assume that by sending us correspondence you are happy for It to be published In the magazIne - unless you spedfically state otherwise.

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YOU TELLME. WE ALL SEE ART IN OUR OWN WAY. WE ALL ASSOCIATE DIFFERENTLYTO DIFFERENT THINGS, BUT IF I CAN SHOW YOU HOW I WAS FEELING AT A POINT IN MY LIFEWHEN I CREATE SOMETHING, WE HAVE CONNEOED AND WE HAVE SHARED SOMETHING.
Can you please briefly describe yourself? Someone who draws things. What inspired your interest in creative drawing? My feel ings towards another, which can be a roller-coaster. It's also important for me to see the beauty in nature so I sometimes watch nature documentaries Please can you tell us about your Educational background and how it has affected your creativity? Nothing special. But it has been the creative artistic people in my life who have affected me so much and in my work. How would you describe your style of Art? You tell me. We all see art in our own way. We all associate differently to different thi ngs, but if I can show you how I was feeling at a point in my life when I create something, we have connected and we have shared something. You cannot tell someone how to feel, what to think, but knowing I have touched someone, I have engaged them in some deeper way, it's beautiful. What med ium do you use? Marker pen/Pen/Pencil/Colored Pencil/Colored pencil for glass/pastel/conte/acryl ic/oi Is/ect I used almost any medium that you can use on the paper. But mainly I use marker pen. There are a lot of thoughts going through your works, how do you get inspired? It was almost thi ngs that I felt. If my feel ings are compl icated then my work get compl icated too. What was the idea behind the 'Blossom Des;re'l Blossom desi re is simple. Desire is getti ng bigger for something in my heart and in my mind. That's what It is. My work is visually a little compl icated so, I try to express slmply, like when my head is saturated with thoughts, then I draw compl icated thi ngs to head area of my work. As seen in 'Dace', you seem to like a lot of colours, what was your thoug ht on that? I love all colour, but I use all of them for balance. They are working together. Eachis beautiful, but I need a variety of colour to create balance. Tell us about the 'Indian' design. I want to show cultural minority in modern form. Not only "the Indian". I want to show the conflict of culture, nature, sex and show these things subtly. Some conflict of cultures/nature/sex. I want to put those things subtlety. Do you have your designs on Tee Shirts? We will seewhat happens in 2012,1 have had some offers of collaborations, but it's about find ing the rig ht fit. What other things do you do? Paint a lot of pieces for exhibitions. I seem to have a waiting list for commissions and new work, which allows me to have the freedom to focus on my work. Who are your favourite artists? "Kandinsky"f'Mondriaan". "Basquiat"/"Zak smith" in modern Isthere anything we should be keeping an eye on for the future? I'm working on almost ten works together now. So I'm going to show them suddenly soon. And I'll make my limited edition art book. Best job you have done. Hmm,l don't know. Nothing best yet I love my personal works, and I feel good when people love them. Anything else you want to share? Seoul issomewhere people should visit at least once in their lifetime.

MinjQeLee info@roth-mgmt.com http://renokim.com

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Featured Article
Timothy Tim

,

Lets face it;human beings are lazy, good-for-nothing bags of horny resentment and given the choice would spend every day sat in their underpants eating pot noodles and watching Quincy. Unfortunately Pot Noodles cost money so w_eall work and save our comfy pants for the weekend. Still, many people seem to forget!o make an adequate seP9ratio.n between home and work to the extent that their freelancing appears to be done while half awake on a sofa plied With Dorito detritus. It seems simple but so many people ignore the basics that it is worth reiterating.

Responding to clients.
You send an email to a client to try and clarify a small problem - for example- and you waited for an unspecified amou nt of ti me for the client to get around to deigning to respond, usually in an incoherent fashion that displays frightening lack of understanding of the project that you have been commissioned to do, and displays a childlike ignorance of the rules of grammar, spelling and punctuation. "Hey dude, I'm disorganised and largely apathetic about whatever it is I commissioned whoever you are to do. Take your time - as long as you get the bare minimum done I'll pay up" "Look dips hit, I com missioned you to do this so get to fecking work! I don't give a teflon coated ball-bag about your problems, I am up to my neck in work of my own wh.ich is why I outsourced it; apparently to a random feeble minded tool. JUSTFIXIT!" Basically just assume that the client is some kind of rabid fascist who expects you to have the patience of a saint with them, but respond like your nethers are on fire every time they ask something of you. Some clients may be nice, but you'll only find that out about 30 days after the end of your project. Respond immediately to every email or caII and you will definitely end up with happy clients.

"I think it would be good to get [insert semi-impossible taskloy [random but seml-tmposslbleto meet timescale], what do you think?"
It's new project time and the client has a few wild requests about things that are largely or totally impossible to complete without direct divine intervention or the Fonzie.

What you think they mean:

What you think this means:

"I'm a total idiot, please help me set a realistic timeframe and cost for my Iudkrous project"

What it actually means:

What it actually means:

"I've fecked something up, maybe time, maybe resource, maybe budget, probably all three. What I want from you is a magical get-out-of-ja iI-free card that allows me to go to my bossand tell them that it is all in hand and this was the plan all along." Tough one this, the client wants the moon on a stick and you are fresh out of celestial bodies. I tend to find that the best way is to pick a manageable core of the project and then be wildly enthusiastic about getting that core «which is most of the work" done then be really, really specific about time and work parameters. When the client inevitably starts trying to tack things on to the deal you have to put on your soothing voice and tell them that that would be a great addition AFTERyou do the work that is possible.

How to overcome this:

How to overcome this:

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Featured Article
client, they might not notice that you are basically sucking all their ideas from them. Some clients will be like a stone wall and others with be like a fence made of pixie-custard, however the key thing is to make absolutely sure you don't agree to Jack until you actua lIy have (at le.asttacit.ly agreed) the general form of the idea that the client is happy with. Do not leave that meeting th inking; "I'll brainstorm that later with my cat" becauseyour cat wi II have chosen that day to be pium out of ideas and the client will not be sympathetic. What you think this means: "We are a hip trendy advertising/seo/web design agency. We dress like hipsters and probably have some kind of 'post-ironic' brand tag line like 'got pudding'. No one here is held back by crushingly boring things like deadlines." What it actually means: "We are pretty relaxed about timing, because it will be YOU doing all the work and you'd better get it done on time. Or else we won't pay you." How to overcome this: Pretty easy to do this one. Always have an agreed deadline and if you are going to miss it because your cat needed an emergency episiotomy or something then make sure the client is well aware ofthe delay and do everything possible to keep the delay to a bare minimum. i.e. Does that cat need all 12 stitches or can you use two and a staple gun? Vet fully booked? How about a taxiderm lst - they are kind of the same thing right? I'm not a massive fan of Twitter, probably because I have two followers, but I'll begrudgingly admit that it is a useful instant response tool for the termina I badly organised in this kind of scenario.

Ah the jingle ot change ana the rustle of crisply pressed notes. These are sounds that are never heard by (honest) freelancers. More likely is that you'll get a cheque, BACS payment or just a rude hand gesture. Now as you'll be well aware, most clients don't want to pay you. They want you to have been so fulfilled by working with them that you wi II wa ive payment and conti nue to support whatever work you did, just because you don't want to see cI ient Xfai I. Of course you might give a mild crap about this, but I'll bet you are more interested in getting fed regularly and buying the latest version of Angry Birds for your iPhone. What you think this means: "I'll get that paid assoon as I am able to." What it actually means: "That is that job is pretty nearly done then .... apart from all the after sales support presumably? We will probably get around to passing that invoice on to that department that pays the bill at my strip club for my expenses at some point when ... well when hell freezes over I guess." How to overcome this: How indeed. Without a debt collection agency there is not a great deal other than emailing, calling. and threatening that you can do. A great way I have found to "incentivise" clients to pay is random discounting in concert with late penalties. Add something important sounding, but ultimately fluff, to the invoice like 'Server Architecture verification' or 'Cyber-proofing'. Then write in a price that is about 5% -10% of the invoice value, then put a huge red line through the price and put '£0' or 'discounted to £0' or something like that. Now they think they are getting a bargain. Sure it is underhand and slightly dishonest but so is stiffing you out of your fee and the time to chase it up so I reason it breaks out about even. The inverse is to also agree in the upfront contract that for every week overdue then they owe you 5% interest or something.
Tim is the owner of the online agency; Timothy Tim ltd. When he is not working, he is criticising everything around him with a level of vehemence usually reserved for war crimes and ex-partners. Tim is generally held to be an obnoxious and miserable git but with the upside that he makes a mean cup of coffee and has an adorable cat called Sputnik.

"l'll get that paid straiqht away"

The illusion of creativity is important to most people. Most people also think that other people know much about the tantric arts as a dead porpoise called Gerald The Slob. What you think this means: "Use your natural creative something for us!" genius to come up with

"We'lIleave that up to you."

What it actually means: "Oh balls. We should really have thought about this ourselves but as we are largely interested in not doing that. .. we haven't. What we want from you is for you to use your psychic freelance powers to work out what we should have done ... and then do that." How to overcome this: You have to fake psychic powers or have psychic powers. If you have psychic powers; congratulations! If, like me, you don't have Professor X-like magical powers then unfortunately you are going to have to take a bit of feather ruffl ing. If you start vague and then quickly work into

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Mu~tarlsa
Can we meet you please? Who is Muktarlsa?
I am a 29 year old creative person who loves the most challenging tasks. I am a patriotic Nigerian trying to make a difference in my society. I hate being idle, it makes me sick. I love the process of creating something new. I developed a passion for art at a tender age. I remember drawing a lot of the famous "stick man". I work as an "architect" and BIM consultant. I also do a lot of Architectural visualization work. This has aided me in communicating my design ideas to my clients. If I were to describe myself in one word, I would say "artist". government boarding school in Odogbolu town. I attended the Ahmadu Bello University Zaria where I enrolled in the department of Architecture.

What is your artistic outlook on life 1
My Artistic outlook on life is as dynamic as mans experiences and thoughts. Creating something positive and timeless out of every experience, even when the subject is a negative one.

Please share your experience about Architectural School. How was life like studying Architecture 1
Every time I think about it, I remember the studio and how lively it was. We would work, listen to loud music and make jokes all night. We were a family. We all helped each other. Presentations were nerve racking though, but that prepared us for the real world.

'ALWAYS 00 YOUR BEST, PUSH YOURSELF AND YOU WILL SUCCEED. THERE IS NO LIMIT TO ARTISTIC EXPRESSION, SO DO NOT LIMIT YOURSELF,

What's your strongest memory of your childhood?
I went for a walk with my father, we came across a man who was so poor, he had no shirt. I remember my father asking him to come with us. When we arrived at the gate to where we lived, my father took off his shirt and gave it to the man. That was my most important lesson in life; compassion.

What was your final project in the University?
I designed an office building where I sought to show how BIM(Building Information Modelling) influences the design process. What Computer softwares do you use? I use Graphisoft Archicad for design and modelling as it is my favourite BIM software. I also use Autodesk 3d studio max, Chaos group Vray for rendering, Adobe Photoshop and After-effects for post work.

Any memorable experience with Rotring instruments?
I loved using Rotring instruments. I have used them since I was 7.1 used them throughout my Architectural education, as we did everything manually. The compass was my favourite instrument. I do miss those instruments now. I should start collecting them before they become obsolete.

What developed your interest in Architecture?
I have always been fascinated by the form and texture of things around me, the way light plays a major role on how such forms are perceived. I sought to capture that which I perceived by drawing. I also learnt a lot from my father, an engineer who taught me how to solve problems by reverse engineering. My interest in architecture developed when I realised that by combining art and problem solving, I was in fact designing.

Tell us about your educational background? Which school have you attended?
My education began as soon as I was born. I don't remember most of it now. I do remember my first day at school. I was four years old and I was terrified. I attended a private primary school in Lagos, Nigeria. Upon graduation, I proceeded to Ogun state for my secondary education where I attended a

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MURtarlsa
You were approached to come up with ideas to remodel a residence. How was the experience working on the architectural design and 3d visualization 7
It was a pleasant experience. I felt like the building was begging for it. Every part of the structure just surrendered to my design. It was amazing. The ability to turn a complete wreck into a thing of beauty is only achieved with great care and attention to details. I treat each project like a tasty dessert. The dimensions, texture, colour and location of every element has to relate properly to every other element that makes up one unique structure where all elements just blend in. This is what I tried to achieve with this remodelling project.

After

AS DYNAMIC AS MANIS EXPERIENCES AND THOUGHTS. CREATING SOMETHING POSITIVE AND TIMELESS OUT OF EVERY EXPERIENCE, EVEN WHEN THE SUBJEG IS A NEGATIVE ONE.,

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Mu~tarlsa
Whatjobs have you done other than being an Architect?
When I am not designing, I work as an Architectural visualization and Building information modelling consultant. I would rather be called an artist. I believe the term "architect" limits an individual to the creation of form and manipulation of space only. I believe I am more artistic in nature.

What superpower would you have andwhy7
like the character, Hiro Nakamura in the "Heroes" TV series, I would love the ability to bend space and time. That way, I would freeze time and get ahead of everyone. But that's impossible, so Ijust stay awake when everyone is asleep. It is working so far. I love the works of Architects like Tadao Ando, Zaha Hadid, Michel Rojkind and David Adjaye, including Herzog and de Meuron. My father has been my greatest mentor. Professionally, I would say, the Architects I have worked with have all taught me a thing or two.

I go to the movies and sometimes,l cook in my spare time.

Anything else you want to share?
I would love to commend you guys at Artflow magazine for what you are doing. I also want to say to everyone out there, always do your best, push yourself and you will succeed. There is no limitto artistic expression, so do not limit yourself. Thank you.

Where do you see yourself in the nearest future? Any great plans?
I see myself reaching my full potential and fulfilling my destiny. I don't know what it is but I picture myself doing a lot in the built environment. I will not wait for commissions; I will create projects and opportunities for my company. I will use my design and visualization skills and all that it takes to make this possible.

Who is lare your mentor(s)?

What else would you be doing? What do you do in your spare time?
I would be making movies. I like to walk and think in my free time because with every step comes a new idea or solution.

What makes you angry?
All forms of oppression make me angry.

MinjaeLee muktar@naijacreative.com www.naijacreative.com

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He lives and creates in Jerusalem. Born in 1982, Roy graduated in the Academy for Art and Design in 2009. Since he was 6, he had actually lived only with women- mom, one sister and now a wife and an mazing baby girl.

Roy Margaliot
Can you please briefly describe yourself? Fat, hairy, kind of ALF maybe? But with better taste in food (no cats in menu) I really try to describe myse If to myse If as a small pin in a humongous machine that is called life. But a pin important enough that needs a special care every day. How was your background growing up? I grew up in a Jewish - orthodox house, my father passed away when Iwas 6, and since then actually Ilive only with women - mom, one sister and now a wife and an amazing baby girl. What was your ambition, while growing up as a Child? To win death. What got you attracted to designs? The balance. I really enjoy when Isee something when at first look it seems like a mess, but everything is right in place actually. Please share your experience at Bezalel Academy for Art and Design. How much influence has it had on your design? The first rule that I took on myself is to compete with no one. Take my own time and develop. The influence came down the pipes of my knowledge only one year after I left, and I learned there a lot.I had one great teacher for illustration that I think I learned from him 'discipline', his name is ltzik Rennert. How would you describe your subject theme? I think lit's a tricky question, because illustration for me is like a filter for the soul so it depends on my mood, but a lot of my works are spi ced wit h He brew letters and my interpretation for kabala ideas. How do you boost your creativity] How do you get inspired? I read Jewish midrash, it's like folk stories 2,000 years ago, and watch old kong fu and violent Asian movies. ...... ........ Do you use Mac or PC PC Anyone in particular who inspires you? None. Is there anything we should be keeping an eye on for the future? My wife wrote a book and I am planning to illustrate it. What do you do in your spare time] Cook, really love to cook, and eat. Cooking and feed friends. Cooking is giving. Illustration is working alone and on my spare time I have to see people. Best job you have done. My baby girl. Which of your design is your favourite? One of the illustrations I did for "Hagirsa" blog - a blog of young Israeli illustrators who interpret Israeli stories. The book was "book of beggars". How is life being a new Dad? More responsibilities? If I had any questions about what am I doing in this world orwhat is my purpose in life - being a dad is a very good answer. I enjoy every second. Anything else you want to share1 Come visit Jerusalem, my wife is a tour guide, and I will cook you dinner!

COME TO VISIT JERUSALEM, MY WIFE IS A TOUR GUIDE/ AND I WILL COOK YOU DINNER!

Roy Marga/iot humusjan@gmail.com http://roymargaliot.com

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Jby Margaliot

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Roy Margaliot
LOGO I MADE IS FORA CAFE' IN MY NEIGHBORHOOD, WHICH IS CALLED "CARISSELLA"- CARROUSEL IN ENGLISH. AT THE BEGINNING MY FRIEND WHO OWN THE PLACE WANTED TO BRING A REAL CARROUSEL TO THE PLACE BUT IT WAS TOO MUCH FOR HIM ANYWAY THEY HAVE REALLY GREAT FOOD THERE'CAUSE THE CHEF IS A JAPANESE WOMAN THAT LEARNEDCOOKING IN FRANCE AND MARRIED AN ISRAELI. HE IDEA T OF THE LOGO WAS TO ILLUSTRATE A CARROUSEL FROM ABOVE, 'THE

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Roy Margaliot

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