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There
like

is

no frigate

a good booh"

k

r-x

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS,
In

Eommanp

WITH METRICAL. ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS.

CHARLES

G.
E.
AND

LELAND,
H.

PROFESSOR

PALMER,

JANET TUCKEY.

|3fjilnticlpl)ia

J.

B.

I. I

PPIN C OTT
1875.

ik

C

O.

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year ISVO,
J. B.

by

LIPPINCOTT(fcCO.

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

Scliiratrt)
(BY PERMISSION)

TO

ALFRED TENNYSON.

PREFACE,
When
guage," writing "Tiie English Gipsies and their LanI

was desirous of adding specimens of Rom-

many

songs to the collection of proverbs and tales con-

tained in the Avork, but could obtain none possessed of
interest except as indifferent illustrations of the tongue.

There

is

beyond doubt a great deal of singing in Romit is

many, but

like tliat of
in

American Indians, without

form and void, wanting

metre and rhyme, and chanted

to wliat only a very impressible disciple of Sugg(»stiv(*

Art could recognise as a tune.
kind of
Grip.sy

I

have often heard
not

this

ballad
full

— indeed,

it is

many days

since
I

an old danic,

of gratitude for a shilling which

had
licr-

bestowed on
s(!lf

her,

having converted

it

into gin,

and

into its recci)tacle, followed

mc

through the streets

of

Happy Hampton,

singing
ohl

my

praises in

Kommany.
that his

On

.inother occasion, an

Oijisy

toM me
it

sister,

who

hail for

some time announccMl

as her firm

VI

PREFACE.

intention to die on the fifteenth day of the following

month, had passed the previous evening
she called her Death Song.
learn respecting song,
it

in singing

what
"

All,
it

however, that

I could

was, that

was a " werry lonesome

and " about a yard and a half long," as
his arms.

my

infor-

mant indicated by extending
in pertick'ler "

It had " no tune

— and, her

brother seemed to think, no
I

meaning

in particular either.

am happy

to say,

by

the way, that the prediction was not

fulfilled,

though
it

the old woman's relations were quite persuaded that

would be so on the day appointed.

Not

finding

what

I

wanted,

I

had given up the inten-

tion of forming such a collection,

when

the perusal of a

few excellent
fairly claim to

Rommany

ballads

by a friend who may

be among the " deepest " of the deep in

the langiiage, as well as others by Professor Palmer and

Miss Janet Tuckey, suggested to
impressed with true Gipsy
spirit,

me the idea that
and

poetry,

perfectly idiomatic,

might be written and

lionestly classed as

Rommany,

even though not composed by dwellers in tents or caravans.

The experiment was made,

great

care

being

taken to avoid anything like theatrical Gipsyism, or
fanciful
idealisation.

With

this

constantly kept in

mind, the writers have done their best to use simple
language and to keep strictly to real English

Rommany,

PREFACE.
both as regards words aud exi^ressiou.
of doing so was very great,
set forth
it

Vll

The

difficulty

being often impossible to

new ideas correctly without exposing ourselves
making a new language, or
an affected
style.

to the charge of

ci'eating, in

the

dilettanti

spirit,

We

have, I

trust,

done nothing towards forming a lengua
as exists in Spain

del Ajicion,

or

sham Gipsy, such
is

among
Not that
I

sporting
I

men, and

unintelligible to Gipsies.
test,

would

regard this as an infallible
Gipsies so ignorant that
it

for

have known

was impossible without much

explanation and

many

repetitions to

make them
I

under-

stand the simplest English verse.
that in
if
tliis

But

venture to say

collection there

is

hardly one

poem

M'hich,

read in a natural and prosaic manner, M'ithout dwell})lain

ing on the-rhymes or metre, will not be perfectly
to

any

intelligent
Vjy

Gipsy

;

indeed, I have amply satislied

myself of this

experiment.
in a

There are many to wliom writing ballads
l)Osses.sing

language

no

literature,
will

and almost unknown, save to a
lik(^

few vagabonds,
I

seem

a mere eccentric fancy.
that of late years

would say

in

answer to

this,

Komiirst

maiiy has Ixton a subjijct of great interest to the
philologists of

Europe

;

that in

Kiighind
;

it

has

\'ur

several
is

centuries been

a distinct dialect
acquire.

and

tliat

it

soft,

musical,

and easy to

As

it

contains an extra-

Vlll

PREFACE.
number
it

ordinary

of Hindi-Hindustani,

Sanskrit, and'

Persian Avords,

can be of some assistance to persons
those languages.

who would study
ferred

This

may

be

in-

from the

ftict

that an Indian military friend of

mine once
with
its

visited a

Gipsy camp, and did his best to talk

occupants through the

medium

of Hindustani.

Afterwards one of the Gipsies informed
that

me

privately
it

my

friend talked "

werry bad Rommanis, but
it

was Rommanis

— such
rye."

as

was

— and
Mr
;

the

gentleman

was a

Rommany

The reader

will find in this work, in addition to the

poems, a Glossary, suggested by

Tennyson, and
also a

prepared by Professor E. H. Palmer

Rhyming

Vocabulary by Miss Janet Tuckey.

The Introduction
by
myself.

and Notes appended

to the

poems

are

Charles G. Leland.

CONTENTS.
Iktrodcction

....
Gdv
.

Charles G. Leland.
E.

Kdrri mullo y61 a lulled

H. Palmer.

Home
I'ush
i

they brought her warrior dead
Krdllisas

A. Tennyson.

Told near Windsor

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.

Jaldn! Move on
I

!

.

Kdrdngri

.....
Po.s.serben adro o
in the

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E. H. Pal.mer. E. H.

The House-Dweller

Palmer.

Rommani

Puro Ch

A
<)

Gipsy Burial

Old Time

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckev.

Tdcho Horn
.

The Real Gipsy
<)

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E. H. Palmer.
K. H.

Tover

The Hatchet
Moriben for Kaminoheu
Gipsy Death for Love
.

Palmer.

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckev.

O

F<5tograf(5ngro

.

The Photograiihcr
Ri'tmmani Gilli

Charles 0. Leland. Charles O. Leland.
i;.

II.

Palmer.
J'almkk.

A
()

Gip.ty

Song

!;.

11.

Livincjngri

Tom

Kent, or the Hopping-time

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.

CONTENTS.
I

Shunali Rakli
Girl

.

The Wilful

.

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E.

Rdmandsto K^lloben The Gipsy Ball
.

H. Palmer.

E. H. Palmer.

A Tacho
A

Cdwaben
.

Keal Incident

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.

Koramani Chlriclo

The Gipsy Bird
Bacon and Eggs

.

Charles G. Leland. Janet Tuckey. Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.

Bdllovas an Y<5ras
.

Minsha tu Cheer up
!

.

Bdckelo

Gilli

.

The Song
Tdchopen

of Starvation te

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E. H. Palmer.

Wafodipen

Gipsy Morals
Kairin Kamraoben

E, H. Palmer.

Gipsy Love-making
Jukalo R6mmanis

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.

Dog-Gipsy

.

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E. H. Palmer. E. H. Palmer.

Sa o Rdmmani chal mukked piin L^vi Why the Gipsy left off drinking Beer

Kushto Dukkerin The Pleasant Fortune

.

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.

The H6nnalo o' the Panni The Roar of the Water

Matthew Cooper.
Charles G. Leland.
M. Cooper. Charles G. Leland.
E. H. Palmer.

MuUo

Balor
.

Dead Pig

Petuldngro te o Pure Beng Smith and the Devil
.

E. H. Pal.mer.

Sa

lis

jinsa tu

?

.

How

do you know

it

?

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.

CONTENTS.
I

XI

Tsni Mullos
Little

....
.

The
I

Bubbles

ChlrikI

.....
.
!

The Stars
I

Charles G, Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E. H. Paljier.

Puri Etjmmani Dye's Dui Chdvior The Old Gipsy Woman's Two Daughters
Lei Rilk
!

E. H. Palmer.
j.vnkt tccket.

Jjook Sharp

Janet Tucket.

Miri Kameli Pirryni

The

Girl

who Loves me Well

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E. H.

Rommani Jinabcn
Gipsy Philosophy

Palmer.

E. H. Palmer.

Frank Cooper Frank Cooper
Dukkerin
.

Charles G. Leland. Janet Tdckey.
E. H. Palmer.
.

Fortune-telling

E. H. Palmer.

The The

Oilvdngroes
Police
.

.

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.

R6mrnani8
All
is

lei Siir

Fish to the Gipsy Net

Janet Tucket. Janet Tuckey.
E. H.

Charlie o Rdahimdngro

Palmer.

Preaching Charlie
I Rilni te o Rye The Lady and the Lord
.

E. H. Palmer.

Frovi MiKLosicH.
CiiAiiLKS G.

Leland.

PiGro DivA'Cisko

Dlvvus

Matthew

Cooi'kk.

The Judgment- Day
Roman(^8Cro Kriininobc

Charles G. Lkland.
Jankt Tuckky. Janet Tuckby.
(JiiAiiLK.s

Gipsy Wooing
1

CliGviliani
.

G. Leland.

The Witcii

(lUAiiLES G.

Leland.

Tu

Shiln

i

Choue

Jani:t Tuckky.

The Moon, Soft-moving

Jankt Tuckky.

xu
Kiimmoben, Tilttopen
Love-time
is

CONTENTS.
Janet Tuckev. Janet Tdckey.

Summer-time

Shah The Shah
GiUi
.

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.

Song

.

Piitteran

The Gipsy Sign

.

Charles G. Leland. Janet Tuckey.
.

1 Ratteskri Pireugvi

The Seven Night-walkers
Lei tiro

Charles Charles

G. Leland. G. Leland.

Kam
!
.

Help Yom-self
Ddlaben
.

Janet Tuckey. Janet Tuckey.
Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
E. H.

The Gift

.

Wafropen o' the Beshomdngroes The Injustice of Judges

Palmkh.

E. H. Palmer.

A Ndsherin C6vvaben A Hanging Matter
Trin Bitti

Charles G. Leland. Charles G. Leland.
Lee.

Rommani

Chals
.

Three Little Gipsies

Charles

G. Leland.

Desh Taui Chavis Duriken Ten Little Gipsies' Fate

H. Smith. H. Smith.

The Rawney on the Tober The Lady on the Road
Giili of a

From a From a

Gipsy.
Gipsy.

A

Rommani Juva Gipsy Woman's Song
.

From, a Gipsy.
Frovi a Gipsy.

Pbonunciation Rhyming Dictionary Glossary
.

.

Charles G. Leland. Janet Tuckey.
E. H. Palmer.

INTRODUCTION
English-Gipsy, as now spoken, presents the appearance of a language which was perhaps never fully developed,

and

is

now

in a state of rapid deterioration.

At the end
covered that

of the last century, J. C. C. Riidiger dis-

Kommany,
all

as the

Gipsy tongue

is

pro-

perly called in
this
lie

countries,
in

was of Hindu
entitled,

origin,

and

announced

a

work

" Neuester

Zuwachs der Sprachkundc,"
searches,

Halle,

1782.
specify

Later
those

re-

among which
("

I

would

of

Pott and Miklosich
Zigeuner,"
&c.,

Ueber die Wanderungen dor
1873),

Wien,
it

have more

accurately

determined that
Indian
"

belongs

to the

so-called
its its

" recent

family, as a large proportion of

words are

to be found in Hindustani or Persian,

and
its

grammar
is

resembles that of these languages.

Yet

difference

on the whole so marked, that
as a language.

it

must be ranked
originally

l)y itscjlf

Whether

it

was

formed

in

INTRODUCTIOX.

India, previous to the

exodus of the Gipsy
centuries,

race,

between
it

the

tenth

and

fourteenth

or

whether

assumed new grammatical forms during the wanderings
of the people of the " dark blood,"
is

not as yet known.

The problem has excited great

interest,

and Miklosich,

one of the most indefatigable of German philologists,
is

busily engaged

in

its

solution.

I

would observe,
that

with

regard

to

the

origin

of

Rommany,

my

fellow-labourer. Professor E. H. Palmer, of Cambridge,

has decided, on examining a vocabulary of more than
four

thousand English-Gipsy words collected by me,
of

that nearly all
origin,

them, not of Greek or

European

are Hindi or Persian,
It
is

the Hindi greatly pre-

dominating.

also

to

be remarked, that
old

many
im-

Rommany words
and
that,

have
the

an

Sanskrit
diluted,

character,

despite

mutilated,

and

poverished state of this very singular language, there
are

reasons

for

believing

that

it

contains

the frag-

ments or framework of some extremely ancient Aryan
tongue, preserved from the earliest times

among

those

wandering

tribes,

which have, since

tlie

days of

the

Vedas, maintained a privileged and separate existence,

as, for instance,

the

Dom.

Dr

Miklosich has, with great ingenuity, pointed out

from the fragments of Greek, Slavonic, and other tongues
found in the different dialects of European Gipsies, the

INTRODUCTION.
course of their travels, and conjectured the time they

remained in different countries.
that

It

is

a curious fact

the

Anglo-Rommany,

to

judge

from

my own

researches, contains far

more Hindi and Persian words

than any of the Continental dialects.
Until within
fifty years,

English

Rommany was
it

spoken

with something like grammatical accuracy, and in that
condition very
in

much resembled
It
is

the tongue as

now

exists

Germany.

not long since

Dr

Zupitza, of Vienna,

discovered that the specimen of so-called Egyptian in

Andrew

Borde's

"Boke

of the Introduction of
is

Knowquite

ledge" (London, 1542)
intelligible

really

Rommany, and
is

to

most Gipsies.

It

to

be observed,
three

that

English

Rommany

contains

only two or
all

French or German words
ful

— the

former being

doubtit

— and

that, to

judge from Borde's fragment,
time to Anglicise.

had
still

begun even
in

in

his

There are

England a few old Gipsies who pride themselves

on preserving many grammatical forms and "deep"
words, and
use them.
changt'd,

many more who understand
But the language
is,

l)ut

do not

on the whole, greatly

and to write

it

as

it

practically exists, without
falling into

affecting archaisms

on the one hand, or
is

mere

jargon on the other,
It

a very difficult task.
for

was accordingly no easy matter

my

colleagues

and myself

to determine exactly the character of the

4

INTRODUCTION.
should adopt.

Kommany which we
mined to write
it,

We

finally deter-

in the tongue as
it

we
old

familiarly understood

and
;

as

we had found

i.e.,

in the current

modern
as could

form

but retaining as

much

Eommany

be done with truth and ease.
Gipsies in one part of England understand

many

old

words unknown to those

in another,

and very often an

individual will recall some obsolete and curious term,

apparently retained by him alone.
that

I

therefore trust

nobody
if

will set it

down

to the discredit of these

poems
first

he should find that, on reading them to the
fortune-teller,

basket-seller or

he or she should
call

declare

many words

to

be unintelligible, or
I

them

"Dictionary Eommanis."

am

not apprehensive that
fail

the more intelligent Gipsies will

to understand the

work.

The reader

desirous of further information on

the

subject of this language

may

consult the "

Eomano Lavo

Lil" of George Borrow (London, John Murray, 1874),

and the excellent book on the English-Gipsy language by Dr Bath
C.

Smart (London, Asher
is

k, Co.,

1875), in

which the tongue
archaic form.

given in the so-called deep or

C. G.

L.

KERRJ MVLLO VOL A LULLED.

Kerri mullo
Laki's
Pali
o'

yol a lulled

kuramengro rom
jelled,

ye tauya
les

Chiwed

truppo prd the dr6m.
alay,

But odoi yoi bashed

Sim a
Keker

mullo, 'pre the

puv

shelled or hatched aprd,
rtivv.

Kek'nai kairdas laki

Sar

o'

lakis juvas dick
sasti

Rakkerin yoi
Else
yoi'Il

ruvv

;

muller 'dr6 ye chick,
apre ye puv.
alay,
iV;c.

Muller

'doi

But odoi yoi beshed
Pukk'das
leii

a

inf.shto

pen

:

" Yiiv SOS a but kushto mush,

Kairin pAlor tdchipen,

Kairin g<jrgio geeror diish."

But odoi yoi

bcslied alay,

Ike.

ENGIJSH-GIPSY SONGS.
Sims a chor fon
lakis tdn
^
;

But shukdr a juva welled
Pirried kdti mullo An,
diklo
'vri les'

mui

lelled.

But odoi yoi beshed
Hatched apr6 a puri dye,

alay, &c.

Lak's chdvo pr6 her chong she chlvs

:

Sims a brishin ruvel yoi
"

Tukey kammaben, mi

jivs

"
!

Translated hy E. H,

PALMER.

HOME THEY BROUGHT HER WARRIOR
DEAD.

Home

they brought her warrior dead
:

:

She nor swooned nor uttered cry
All her maidens watching said " She must

weep or she

will die."

Then they
Called

praised him, soft and low,

him

wortliy to be loved,
;

Truest friend and noblest foe

Yet she neither spoke nor moved,
Stole a

maiden from her
tli<;

place,

Lightly to

warrior stcpt,

Took the

face-cloth

from his face

Yet she neither moved nor wept.
Rose a nurse of ninety
Set his
cliilil iijxiii

years.

lier

knee
:

Like summer tempests came her tears
" Sweet,

my

child, I live for thee."

Alfukd Tknnyson.

FASH I KRALISSA

GAV.

" DORDI,

mi pal

— ko jivela
1 i

Adr6 o boro ker adoi
"

Tu

dinnelo chal,

ki-cillissa

!

Ma

pen

tu's

kekker sliuned

o'

yoi

" I kushti rani

—avali

Yoi kamela o churo mush,

Te

y6i's sa sTg 'dre lakis zi
i

For sar
"

kali fokis dush.

Sd viandy
Del kdn

sostijin
:

o' lis

?

adre o waver besh

Mdndy

te mlri roniani
krdllis'

Sos pirryin' pash o
"

w^sh.

Mdndy

te mlri romaiii

Sos jalHn k6ti gav acai

Te moro

chdvos, ketteni,
o'

Besbed pr6 o dumo

ye gry.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
"
'

Oh, hatch a kusi, deari rom,'

Mi
'

poori juva penela

Ma jal

anduro

—klnlo shorn
i^al

!

Kair nioro

l)itti

tan kenna.'

" Sos yeck wenesto divvus,

puv

SOS

pano saraprd

;

bdvol pudered fon shimdl
yiv peUed surrelo tul^y.
" Sos dush ta hatch a tan adoi

Adre adovo
Ko'll sikker

shillopen

:

mengy

cavacoi

Sossi Miduvel kairs o "
I

w^n

1

chavor rudered

pr(5

a hiy
tull'

Ta

latcher koshter

o yiv,

Te mdndy kaired o yag aprd
Sos diisheri ta kair
" Hukki,
til

lis jiv.

jins, aiiiAiidi
.sfirja

Idlrd

Trin chavus,

Iwckcli

Adre

ad6\'o ratti welled,
tikiior, kdttenl.

Dui waver

" Ovavo divvus vias a

mush
;

Sos

i

kralllssas

yagengro

'Ma

hatch kekunii 'dro o wesh

!'

Yuv

])fikked aiuengy, liiinualo.

lO
"

ENGL/SH-GJPSY SONGS.
Yeck
'

o'

mi

clulvos shelled avri

Rye,

(lick

a wongisli 'dr6 o tan-

Dick y^ckora, sa rlnkeni
I (lui ii6v\'i

tiknor slidu

!

"

Yuv

cliivdas sherro pash adrfe

:

Ah, SOS but dukkeri ta dick
I juva, shillerin' dovalay,
I tiknor,

beeno 'pr6 o chick.
'dv6 lester

" Sos
'

kammoben
Dai, dui
si
!

yak

:

'

pendas yuv aja

;

Ad6vo

too buti bak

For tute
" An' sa
'

— tAcho, mlro ba
pii'ried sig
!

1

yuv

adr6m,

Dui, dui

'

SOS yuvs lAstus lav.
'drd

Pal,

shun kenna:
a

dovo shdm

Dlckdum
"

l)itti

Av^irdo av.

O
Si

yagengro sos
'

tullin lis
!

;

Rom,

dvacai

'

yuv pukked

aja,

chummeny

kushto, dick a
i

lis,

Sar bitchered fon
"
'

krdllissa.

Yoi's shuned
I dui tiknor

o' tiro

dukkerben
acai

chiwed

Ac6vo's lakis d(ilaben

For

tiri

chdvor te

i

dye.'

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" Sos buti 'dre o wdrdo, pal

II

Dui bOro coppas
Habben,

— avail
liillo

!

j^eck wdliu
i

mol

Miduvel^st'

Eanis

zl

" Pasli riiikeni lieezis

— shun kenna
;

Sos buti Utti hovalos

Yoi tivdas len
I rani pre
i

i

krAllissa
!

Gorgios
i

"

I

buro chdvos, sar

trin,
:

RivA'ed duvo hovalos apr6

Yul dicked sa kushto, prdsterin
Sa rinkeni chukkered, pre a
" Tacho, shan bdrvelo Gorgios,
Buti, adr(i acdvo tern,
lay.

Ko'd

kam

ta sikker hovalos
i

Tivvc<l pa

Kaiiis

nuko

fern.

"

Mi kamli juva
Tal'

Asti miiX
:

mOro

Tlanis delabon

Tdcho, mi kainava ta kair
Varisso, lakis

kammoben.

" If yoi kfuiK Fu niusli ta kur,

Shorn sar acai

!

I'al

4v aja

Mukks

pT a tds o' levinor
o'

For kam

moro

krdllissa !"

.Iankt Tuckkv.

TOLD NEAR WINDSOR.

" Look, brother

tell

me

if

you know
?

^\^lo lives in that big castle there

"

The Queen, you stupid

!

Now

don't go

A-sayin' you've ne'er heard of her.

" For she's a right good lady

yes,

She loves the poor,

ay, that she

do

!

And

she can feel for the distress
folk like

Of wandering
"

me and

you.

And how
Were

do I know that
last

?

Well, hark

:

One day

year

my

wife and

me

travelling

by Windsor Park
do you see
?

Those
"

trees out yonder,

My wife
The

and me were going along

Towards Windsor

^just

afore

you there-

children, all together, clung

Upon

the back of our old mare.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
"

But

my

poor
let

girl said
rest,

'
:

Stop a bit

And
I can't

me

husband dear
fit

go further, I'm not
little

Just set our
"

tent

up

here.'

That was a

Avintry day,

my

lad

!

One whiteness over The
bitter north-wind

all

the place
like

;

blew

mad

The snow came
" I tell

stinging in one's face.

you 'twas no easy task
all

lu

that cold to jntch a tent

And

here's a thing I'd like to ask
is tlie

Why
"

cruel winter sent?

Under the snow the

children sought,
:

And
I

found some
a
fire

sticks, just four or five

made

of

what

tliey

brought
aHve.

'Twas hard to keep
" Already,

tlie fiaiiio

do you mind, we had

Three sons

— cnougli to nuuiage for
my
lad.

:

Well, on that very night,

The
"

wife,

had twins
alter

— ay, two boys more
I

!

The morning

came a gent

The Queen's head-gamekecptT,
Siiiil

knew

:

he

'
:

How

dan^ you stick your tent

Up

here,

you lazy Gipsy,

youT

14
"

ENGLISH-GIPSY

SOJVGS.

One
'

of

my little

chaps called out

Sir,

won't you look a bit in there,

And

see the babies
little

mother s got 1


!

Such pretty
"

things they are

He

put his head just half-way in

:

Ah, 'twas a cheerless sight he found

My wife,
The
"

poor dear,

a-shiverin',

babies, born

upon the ground.

He
'

looked with pity in his eyes
!

:

TA\dns, twins

'

he cried —

'

why

there you got

Rather too much of a

surprise.

My
"

poor old fellow, did you not/?
he turned and
!

And when
'

left

us soon,

Twins, twins
:

'

again I heard him say.

Now listen

that same afternoon

A
"

little light-cart

came our way.

The gamekeeper wan driving
'

it

Come

on,'

he cried,

'

you've never seen

A

cart-load such as this, I bet

And
"
'

it's

a present from the Queen.'

She's heard

what

trouljles

you have had

Your two poor

babies,

born in there,

ENGL/SH-G/PSY SONGS.

1

And

of your wife who's lyin' so bad,
for her."

So she has sent these things
" Well, there

was plenty in that

cart

A

pair of blankets for

my

Avife,
;

Food, and a bottle

full of
all

port

God
"

bless that

Lady

her

life

!

There Avere some clothes

too,

and between

Lay

children's woollen stockings, those

She'd knitted

— she herself— the Queen,
!

The Lady
"

of the Gorgios

The

biggest children,

all

the three,
;

Put each a pair of stockings on

They looked

as pretty as could be,

Well shod, and trotting up and down.
•'

Thought

I

:

there's

many

a Gorgio
the land,

Rich lords and

ladi(;s in

Who'd br

uiicDiimiiiii

proud to show

Socks knitteil by

tin- (^hiccn's

own

hand.

"

But

for that

Lady

I'd liavc hiid
;

To

8ee

my

wife die over there

Von needn't wonder, need you,
Tluit I'd

lad,

do anytiiing

for her.

I

6

ENGLISH-GIPSY SON OS.
So
she wants a

if
I'll

man

to box,

fight her battles,

never fear

1

'Twas dry work talking of them socks
Let's drink the Queen's

good health

in beer."

Janet Tuckey.

The

editor

lias

often lieard the incident here narrated from

an old Oipsy, well

known

in Windsor.

''JAL

AN!"

Pasii o 'the

boi',

kai stekka' sl)4n,

Pash o the rukk' sar p6ggadi

Beshdom kan

pTrdos chivved a tan
rfUvker Ii(jmniaiiy.

Te shund'em

Ye

bitti ch^vi' jian avrl
lei

To
I

a

bitt'

o kosht for leu

;

puri Liz,

—but hunnali

liakkerdas bitti tiknos pen.

L6s.si

a nlsseri cuvva, kuu
puroiii

tanopen sims ye

Te

bijrodir paiAss to sliuu

Ye
Te
sa

tiknor rakkcrau

lu'iiuinniiy.

i

graior jian to

clifir,

Te

8a,

the yag sos kerclo

;

Avri o drum, te

prd' tlie bor,

Vas moro gdv-niush,

liunualo.

I

8

E.VGLJSH-G/PSY SOA'GS.
" Ja vrl
"

!

yuv rakker's
'11

as he willed

Or mAudj'

klisiu tiite, sar

"—
:

" K^ress tu 'dulla," Lizzie shelled,

"Star laaudy
" Jal dn
"

'di'6

o kltchema."

!

pens o gavengero,

" Tute's

kek

sig to hatch acoi

"
!

" Tdcho "

;

"

pens Petuldngero

Kek

sIg to jiv

'kai or odoi

!

Sa sar ye pTredor

jailed An,
;

Awer

sigdn sos kushti sa

'Dre waver

drum

leu kairde tan

I 'kAvI bulleriu aja.

Te

sliunin lenders sdvvyins,
:

Pendum
Te

sa

kushto c6vva
jins,

si

For buti geeros mandy

sasti ja, sa sIg avrl.

Avrl o Lundramescro

jiv,

Kairin an' rakkei-in diunalo,

Avrl the k^rya,

vri the chiv,
slu'ui

Kai

ytil

sarjA

huunalo.

Hunn'lo o tdtto kairoben, Hunn'lo o sar
that's rlnkenl

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
Hunn'lo o kushto kammiibeu

1

Or

kairin sig sarja to be.

O, SOS a boro, kushto

pom
:

To shun

a mullo rakker
'dre

"

Man

!

Yeck gav-mush
Sav' p^n'lLa
:

Miduvels tem,
!

" Tul your chiv

jal

an

!

Charles

G. Leland.

''MOVE ON/"

By

the ragged hedge and stragghng fence,

Beneath the broken willow-tree,
I sat,

while Gipsies pitched their tents

Around, and chaffed in Rommany.

Tlie children,

who

could hardly walk.

Were
Old

sent to pick a bit of

wood

;

Liz, so fierce in all her talk, as a little infant should.

Spoke

Ah when old age grows young again And such old age— it's strange to see And stranger still to think there should
!

;

Be baby-talk

in

liommany.

But, as the horses went to graze,

And
Out

as the fire

began

to burn.

of the lane,

among

the strays.

Came

our Inspector, grim and stern.

ENGl.ISH-G/PSY SONGS.
"

21

You know
"

that this won't do," he cried.
!

Be

off,

or I shall lock you up
that," old Liz replied,

" If

you do

" Please lock
"

me

in a cookin' shop." this forthwith

Pack and be out of

!

You know you have no
'•

business here

!

Xo
"

;

we

hain't got," said

Samuel Smith.

No

business to be Anywhere."

So wearily they went away.
Vet soon were camped in t'other
lane,
ga}-.

And soon they laughed as wild and And soon the kettle boiled again. And
I

as they settled

down below,

could but think upon the bliss
1m;

'Twould

to

many men

I

know
tliis

To move
Out
of
tlii.s

as lightly " out of
life

"—
:

of

morning

calls.
;

And weary
Thc.-^e

work, and wasted breath

prison cells of pictuicd walls,
arc.

Wliere they

always "

liorctl lo dcitii."

liorcd ])y ail kinds of cleverness,
ll(irc(l

by

tlic licautifid

and

fair
;

;

l!y love,

and joy, and tenderness
not bored, pretend they

Or,

if

an;.

22

F.NGUSH-GIPSY SONGS.
Oh, what a blessing
it

would be

To hear some
Some heavenly
Who'd
say, "

angel cry, "

Be gone

"
!

Inspector

C,
this

Now

none of

—Move on

!

Charles G. Leland.

It is

perhaps almost neeiUess to say that this
I recall,

is

a sketcli

from
liave

life.

however, that

it

was not a Smith, but one

of the Matthews,

who remarked

to the Inspector that "

We

no right

to

Avho told
people."

me

be anywhere." Old Liz is the same Rommaiiy that she was sure the Shall was one of " the;

/

KERiiNGRI.

Tu pendas mengy " Sarishan ? De waver divvus, pal, acai
Adre acovva werry
Pens m^ndy "
" So's sikkereil
So's
tan.

ad6vo rye ?
sfi

lis

to be

flick,"
?

I pens, " at rrikkeriu luminiany

"

Kek

biiti

chals does

mandy

dick

For nmiidy's a kerdngeri. Ah, rye
a gAvs a wilfro tan

!

;

Shorn Piommani, / kfuns ye droni

!

Avo

!

fon

tv.lp.

" s.irislian

"
%

And

gorgio's

jil)

fon

nnko rom

!

Iv

II.

I'Ar.MHi:

THE HOUSE-DWELLER.

You

passed

me by
1

this

weny

way,

An' " Sarishcm
I've often

"

you said

to me.

wondered, since that day,

What
Says

sort of person

you might be

%

I,

" Them's Gipsy words he spoke,
ha' learnt,

But where could he
I

and how % "—
folk,

don't see

much

o'

Eomm'ny
sir,

I'm

livin' in

a house,

now.

I hate this sort o' life, I

do

!

I'm Rommany, and want
Just fancy
!

to roam.

" sarislian

? "

from you,

And

only English talk at

home
E.

!

H. Palmkk

This

poem

ii3

true to

life

in every line, as

it

was expressed
ofi"

lo the writer

by a Gipsy woman who had
tlie

left

wandering.

The word pal

or Ijrother is very characteristic.

man who

addresses

humblest Gipsy in
It

Any gentleRommany jnust
it is

expect to be called pal, not disrespectfully, but because
incident to the language.
is,

prala in

otlier countries.

o

r6mmani posserben adre
CHlRUS.

o

puro

A TIKNO, rya ?

— Avali, yeckorus araandi
mOro puro
tAii,
o'

lelled yeck,
;

A

l)itti

chdvi, sa rinkeni sa tute

kamessa ta dick

Kana
Sos

yoi vias aratti adr(i

peiisi

o

dud

the sfda a-iifikkeriu Sruishrui.

Mill juva SOS but mishto, te sa lakis tikno te yoi

Sos b(islun tuller

i

rukkor
yeck

t(^

masker

i

ruzhior adoi,

Mi

lAtclierdum

mui6ngri

man

dicked

drO

a

buddika, rye,
1

fuki

p6ndis SOS Miduvel a-beshin
juva, te
'dr6

pfisli

k'sker dyt

I

myla,
i

i

mdndy

jflssede k6tteiu;.s 'pre o didia

'Sur

cliiivi

yeck trusharo

oli,

shomas a

Ijfiktdlo

lioin
Tt! ki'iiia
i

!

ratti sos wcjllin, sar
iiioro

dur

foii

i

;j,;'ivior,
<»'

Anidudi hatclied
iTisli

tan pash o tatto rikk

the

boi'.

o yag, rikkoru.s o tan, mendfii bcslidina alay,
aja kiln
i

Te rakkered'
8a men

(

liavi sos

sutto
i

])rd\'i'ni)

ailn'.

sosti sikker laki ta kil 'drc

wellgitn'ts,

Tf

lei

but a<iusta won'Mir a-dukkerin Gortrios.

26
Awer,
'dr6 o

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
rinkeno chlrus, te pali o boro wen,
;

Moro
Lakis

d^aii kfimeli chilvi lelled o wdfro ndflopen
taiii i)IiTor

sos shillo, sar shilleri sims
lulkle,

i

yiv,

Awer

lakis

chAmyor

peusi ruzhior raAsker

o

giv.

Miri juva pukkcrdas K6ti gav, te

mdndy

:

"Eom, hatch

apr6 te ja

mang

o drabengro ta klster acai kenna."

Mi

lelldum drabengro, awer kun amdndi welled ketteni,
iiasti

Mi dickdum yuv Mi juva

kair

cliIcliT

i

chavi sos s6ved avrl.
lav,

rov6lla buti,

awer mandy pendum kek

Till apre o

waver pash-dfvvus a mush

avell' fon o

gav

;

Lester ruderpen sikkeras

mdndy yuv
k(5

sos a boro rashdi

Yuv kamed
Yiiv

to rakker bat covvas

m^ngy
till

te mlri chi.

rakkered,

te

mandy shundom,

lAstus

yuv

pukker's aja
" Tute'll

kam

to chiv tiri chAvi 'dr6 o

kdngry puv kenna

?

Si a kushto

c6vva to hatch 'dr6

i

lock o' Miduvel's

ker "
" K^kker,

kekker,

r^a

!

"

mi

sh6lldum,

" mi'd

kam

siggadiro to mer."

" Si ad6vo a tAcho covva, mi rya, so tute pen,
0' ye f6ki hdtchin apr6 'dr6 o boro shunaben,

Miri

cliAvi'd

m6r

apopli, yoi'd Icl sa tr.-isheni,

If yoi dickdas a tan o' Gorgios

pash lakis kokeri.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" I tani sosti sov kai

2/

i

kameli ruzliior shdn
dials avellan to hatch o tan
i

Kai

i

tdclii

Rommani

Kai, sar o tatto divvus

invv'i

chiriclos

pukk,
apr6 o rukk."

Te o rukestamengro huckers, lelhn

}iIvlor

Mi ghiom
Tuller

adre o w(jsh, te

mi kairdum

a

hev shukAr
:

Yeck boro rinkeno rukk
biiti

sos

mi

dearis sherro-bar

ruzhior yoi bdsheka pukeno adre

Awer mdady

penAva, mi rye, yoi'U kekker hushti apr^

!

Janet Tugkey.

A GIPSY BURIAL IN THE OLDEA TIME.

A A

BABY,
little

sir

?

surely, yes

!

a long while since

we had

one,
;

daughter, as pretty as e'er you set eyes upon

She came to our poor old tent in the darkest hour of the
night.

And,

I tell you, it

seemed

as if day'd

broke sudden, to

cheer us with light.

My

wife was wonderful glad

;

and when she and that

baby of ours

Were

sitting together,

sir,

under

trees, in

the midst of

flowers,
I

used to remember a picture I'd seen in a shop long ago;

'Twas the Lord by His mother's side
there told

at least the folk

me

so.

We'd travel along all
good

day, the donkey, myself, and

my wife,

With the baby in one of the panniers
real
life
!

— ah

!

that was a

And when

the evening came on, in the quietest spot

we

could find.

We'd pitch our tent by the hedge, on the opposite
from the wind.

side

EA'GUSH-GIPSY
Xear the
fire,

SON'GS.

29
and myself

just close to the tent, mj' wife

would

sit,

And

talk for a

while of the child, Avlio'was sleeping

inside of

it

How
An<l

careful we'd

bring her up to dance at the fairs

some day,
tell

Gorgios' fortunes,

S(t

as to

charm

their

money

away.

iJut just as

the winter passed, and the beautiful spring-

ilawn smiled,

A

fever

went through the
!

land,

and she took

it

— our

only child

Cold, ay, colder than sn(»w
little feet,

was the touch of her poor

Hut her cheeks
the wheat.

wc.-re

burning red,

like the poppies

among

Said her mother to

me

at night

:

" Ki.^e quickly.

O

hus-

band dear
(Quickly,

and run

to the town,

and fetch us

tlie

doctor

here."
1

went, and

I

fetch<,'<l

liini

back, l)ut as soon as

I

looked

at the Ijed,
I

knew
wa.s

that he'd cfone ton

late, for

my

little

daughter

dead

I

RNGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.

My
And

wife

cried

bitter,

but

I

could only

sit

stupidly

down,
I

hadn't a word,

till

next day a gentleman came

from the town

A

preaching gentleman,
d'ye see

sir,

I

knew

it

by

his clothes,

And

he

set himself

down by my

side,

and preached

to

my
He
Till

wife and me.

talked,

and we

let

him

talk,

and never answered a

word,

he

said, " You'll
?

be wanting to bury your baby in

our churchyard
In
tlie

shadow of God's own house
"

'tis

a blessed thing

to lie

But " Never, never!"
die
"
!

I cried

;

" no,

sir, I

would sooner

Said

I

:

"If

it's

really true, certain

and

true, Avhat

you

say.

That the folk

will rise

from their graves on the Lord's

great judgment-day,

Why,
She'd

if

my

child

was

to

wake with a crowd

of Gorgios

in sight,
feel so strange, I believe she'd die

over again with

fridit.

E.XGL/SH-GIPSY SONGS.
"

My

little

darling

must

sleep

where the beautiful flowers

grow;
"Where
tlie

squirrel gathers his nuts, leaping merrily to
;

and

fro

Where
of

the Gipsies

may

pitch their tent at the closing

summer

eves,

And

birds thrijugh the

summer days may

sing under

shadowing

leaves."

So

I

went and
wood,

I

dug a grave

in the quietest part of the

Where a

tree,

grown higher than the
;

rest, for

my

baby's

headstone stood

And
But,

there,
still

under many flowers, she

is

lying so calm and

sir,

as for rising again, why, I don't think she ever

will.

Janet Tuckey.

In the old times, or
tlieir

till

witliin fifty years, the
jilaces
;

Gi]).sio.s
tlii-y

Iniricd

dead

in lonely

and remote

l»ut

now

mani-

fest ^Teat

anxiety to .secure

Ciiristiiui Inirial,

and incur con-

siderable expense in funerals.

Tiic .«ame clian^'e has taken

place with regard to tlieir iiHlillerence to a future sUvte, or
11

disbelief in

it

;

tlieir

irreli^don
all

liaviii},'

been

in

reality

ignorance of and hostility to
of civili.sation.

tlie

rules
tlie

and

institutions

The younger

Gipsies of

better class

wouM

now

generally be offended

if

any

doul)t of tlieir Cliristianity

32
were expressed.
or, rather,

ENGLfSH-G/PSY SONGS.
But that some
relics of the

" creed outworn,"

mind of the modern Gipsy, may be inferred from the fact that very recently, and since the foregoing ballad was written, a young
of ancient custom,
still

linger in the

Rommany
some wild
\t\\c]^ tlieir

girl

of superior attainments

protested that she

w'duld not like to be buried in a churchyard, but rather in
place, wliere lier
tents.

Gipsy kinsfolk would come and
J. T.

O TACHO ROM.
drom,

Oh, mundy's ydck

o'

lender as jrd apre

tlie

A

tdcho Petul6ngro an' a kushto pure Kom.
si

Miro kako

a Chilcott, miri dya

si

a Lee,

Awer mdn

sliura ferridlro an' a

kalo

R6mmany.

An' a tacho Rommany,
'Pre

ml

niortclii, 'dre

mi

zl.

Wlio-op

!

Dick adre ml yakkor, an pukker

:

"Avali

"
!

Mdndy

jals to

ye welgoras, radndy's sarasar adui
te

Yeck divvus longo-duro, Vcck divvus

waver kavacoi

:

kusliti rudered, dickin sims a boro rye,

Dcnn' sa a mangerm^ngro, a-tulin of yer gry.
" Just a rupp'ni bitto, rye,

For
Wlio-op
!

a-tulin of yer
arfitti

gry

!

mfindy jins

to klstcr off a gry

!

Wlien I'm cliinnin

o' tlio

peggor, maiidy dicks
si

sfi

pilkkenn,

Tute'd pen dnv' Pctuliingro

a tdclio vaccaslio
lion),

But

Pm

flicknor

o'

my

wAstors nor any waver
jrd.s aprti

An' can muller any geero as

the drom.

At

kurin, m.-lndy sliom

Sig to bonger, sig to sloni

Oh, at ddllin or at kcllin

Pm

a t.-'uhodiro lloni.

34
Sarishan,

ENGfJsn-G//'SY SONGS.

mi

gudli rani
lei

;

sarishdn,

mi kushto rye

!

Milndy's juva'll

your wongur kAn yoi

av^ll' akdi.

Tute'll kani to del la

cliummeuy

to pi

your kammoben,
she

So

I'll

hatcher pal' the kuiisus while

pens your

ilukkerin.

Oh
Then

!

there'll

be a pukkerin,

An' a boro rakkerin,
I'll

pen you kushti

ratti

till

I

w6ll this

dr6m

again.

Charles

G. Leland.

THE REAL

GIPSY.

Oh

!

I'm a jolly Gipsy, and

I

roam the country round
:

;

I'm a real Petulengro as can anywhere be found

My
15iit

uncle

is

a

Cliilcott,
all

my

mother
and

is

a Lee,

I'm the best of

of 'em,

real Ilonnnany.

A real Rommany
From head
to foot I be.

Whoop
go to

!

look into

my

peepers

if

a Gipsy you would see

!

I

fairs

and

races, thea-

I'm always to be found

:

One day

across the country, then back ui)on the
swelly, like

ground

:

One day I'm dressed up
course,

the gentleman

(if

Then the
horse.

lu-xt

I

come the beggar,

a holdin'

of yer

" Just a tiirccpcfnce,

sir.

All right

For
\Vlio-oj)I

I

held him
a.s

jolly tight."
to run a hor.M

I'm the boy
night

knows the way

—by

36

ENGUSH-G/PSY SONGS.
a cuttin' of

When

my

skewers, so peaceable I am,
is

You'd say, " That Petuleiigro

the pattern of a lamb

!

But I'm handy with
showed,

my

maulies, as I

many

a time have

An' can do

for
!

any traveller as goes upon the road.
at fightin' I'm at

Oh
For

home,

Quick to dodge

an' quick to

come

;

at hittin' or at shyin' I'm

an out-an'-outer

Kom
my
lord
1

How

are you,
I say

my

sweet lady

1

how

are you,

My

wife'll

take your

money when

she comes along this

way.
You'll

want

to give her something

^just

to keep

away

the cold

So

I'll

step

round the corner

--vhile

your fortune's bein'

told.

Then

there'll

be a patterin',

An' an awful chatterin'
So
I bid

you

all

good evenin'

till I

come

this

way

again.

Charles

G.

Leland.

O

TdVER.

Wanty
Kdk dur

had cliivved a

bi'tti

tdn,
;

fon Lilengrdsky gAv

Te dlckdas a ml and a push

o' ran',

A
A

boro'in pasli
as

o'

the duiyav.

Awer

yuv

sa sig
o'

and

flick

wasta-pord

de rdnya chins,

Sc4vo should well adoi an' dick.

But

mush

as l6lled

de tan, you jins
!

\

Avail, Wiifro,

\v;ifro si

Te wafro bak
An* Wanty

for de

Rommani

dials.
acdi,

For de Gorgiko rye has welled
lias

nashered his tiWer, pals

Adovo

sus

dilsli

for the mu.sli,
/,T
;

\w.

welled

K6rri apopli with p(')ggado

Kek rdnya
Te
"

keti de tanya

1l'11c(|,

yiiv's rinkeni tover jailed avri.
!

Oh

mi'indy wouldn't ha' lulled a

biir,

Nor

dfii

— nor yet

if

yer delled mi trin

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
For adova t6ver
o' tc')vers

;

sar

Ad ova

sus kushtiest ta chin.
si
!

Avail, wAfro, wdfro

&c.

Oh

!

deari juva

!

oh

!

\mv\ dye
!

!

Oh, pAlor and

cliAlor

and Romni and
G6rgiko rye.

Rom

!

Oh An

!

prAster

a^•rI

k6ti

pen sar ttikeno mdndy shorn,
ja

Te mAndy'll kek-kekkumi

A

chorin' covvas at Idsker tan,

Kek-kumi apdpli

k^ir aja,

Kek-kumi

apopli chin a ran.
sT
!

Avali, wafro, wafro

"

c^'c.

Oil

!

l6sker pal

and
and

l(5skri

pdn,

Te

U'sker dddas

Idskri dye,

Shall jalliu ta mfing de shunaben

0' de boro, bArvelo, Gorgiko rye.
"

Oh

!

161
i

the tan tal6 o bor
so shAn adr6
sar,

Te

sar
!

C(')vvas

Oh

1(j1

de wArdo, o gry te
(\A
lis

A\ver d^l de tover

opr6
si

"
!

Avail, kushto, kushto

Oh
An'

!

kUshto bak for de Ronimany dials.
jailed avrl,
!

For the Oorgiko rye has

Wanty

has latch ered his tdver, pals
E.
IT.

Palmer.

THE HATCHET.

Wanty
When

had pitched

his little tent

Near Cambridge

in the

meadows wide,

he saw an osier-bed that went

A

mile along the river-side.
as he cut so fast

But

and

free

Tlie osiers with a nimble hand,

Whoever should he chance
Tint the

to see,
tlie land.
!

gentleman wlio owned
!

Oh, dear

we

ain't in luck to-day

Oh

!

it's

bad, bad luck for the Gipsy lad

:

Ff)r the farmer's

come and

lie's

taken away

The

Iteautiful

axe that Wanty

liad.

Oh

!

that was bad for the lad
l)ri>ken-he,art('d

:

he went
;

HdiDc

ami

all

alone

Never took an

osier

back to the
wjis lost

tent,

An' his beautiful axe Says he, "
I

and gone.

wotddn't ha' taken a pound,
if

Nor two

— nor yet

y<T

'_'iv

nie three,

40

ENGUSH-G/PSY SONGS.
For that axe
in all the country

;

round

There was none
Oh, dear
"

like that for fellin' a tree.
!

we

ain't in luck to-day, &c.

Oh And Oh
!

run dear wife, and mother too,
brother and
sister,

and

lass

and lad
!

;

!

run away to the farmer, do
so sorry I'm almost

Say I'm
I'll

mad.

never

— never go there no more
land
;

A

stealin' anythin' off his
I'll

And

never do like I've done before,
osier with this 'ere hand.
!

Xor touch an

Oh, dear
Off went his

we

ain't in

luck to-day
his mate,

!

"

&c.

sister, off

went

Off went his father, and mother too,

To beg
With
"

for

pardon

anri

make

it

straight

that good, kind farmer so well to do.
!

Oh

take

away the
to

tent we've pitched.

The camp from top

bottom sack

!

Oh
To

!

take the van and the horse that's hitched

the shafts

—but give us the hatchet back."
hooray
!

Hooray

!

well done, I say

!

Good
The

luck for the Gipsies, instead

o'

bad

;

farmin' gent has gone away,

And

given the

liatcliet

back,

my

lad

!

E. H.

Palmki;

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
Tlie story of Waiity
11

4

is strictly triie,

with the exception of

The Gipsy \vas engaged with a friend in getting -wood from a hedge when they were suri^rised by the farmer, who punished them in the manner described. I was in the camp by the river when the two unfortunates
returned, and were obliged to give an account of the loss to a

change of name and place.

who had lent them the hatchet. I have heard "wales" and outcries in my life, but nothing like what occurred on this occasion. The reader who would form an idea of the scene niay, however, find something resembling it ill the Prologue to the Fourth Book of Eabehiis, where the small country gentlemen bewail their loss of the same instrument. '' Verily, they cried out, and brayed, and prayed, and bawled, and invoked Jupiter My hatchet my hatchet Jupiter, my hatchet The air round about rung again with the cries and bowlings of these rascally losers of liatchets." The .solemn tone with which the owner, looking out from the window of his van, pronounced an oration over the missing article, thereby tacitly wounding the feelings of the losers, was a study for an actor. " I wouMn't a' taken four Ijob for
third Gipsy
:
I ! .

.

.

that hatchet," he said
I

;

" and

I

wouldn't
a

a'

taken

five,

nor

.si.\

:

wouldn't

a'

taken eiyht
a'

—nor

jiound

— and
it.

(rising to
I've

a
it

clinia.x)— I wouldn't

taken NO money for

had

with

me

in all

my

travels— it was the best hatchet on the road

week since I gave a man a Here the loser, in accents (jf con" Nobody could a' done more than I diil trition, e.\claimed to get it back. and I most went down on Jiiy knees for it by an' by, when I goes to beg him again, I vil/. Ami I never will be siicli a fool as to gr) a chorin kosh (stealing wood) out of any man's hedge by daylight agin never no more."
or anywhere.
It an't inori-'n a
shillin for siiarjienin of it."
:

He

did, presently, reinforced

by

his family,

make

iin

.ippcal

which was successful, and the axe was returned

to liiin.

MERIBEN PA KAMMOBEN.

Mi ghlom aduro
Te o G6rgio

dyescri tAn,

vias to latcher

man

:

Sos s^lno pAtrinor 'pr6 o shock Sos kushto
teller
i

rukkor lock

;

Yuv
Kek

(lickdas a iiK^ngy sa kameli

jindas mi shomas

Kommani.

kiim pushed rlnkeno 'pr6 mendai

Yuv Yuv
Fon

dickdas 'dr^ miro kalo mui,
:

Mirl krdi yakkor, mi kalo fern

pandas
a

:

" Av^ss' fon a wjiver temhuti-dur avrl?"

tiltto tern

Kekkcr jiukkdom mi slidmas R6mmani.
" Av6ss' sar

mdndy

!

"

yuv manged
te

aja

:

Man mukkerdom
Kekkumi ghiom
To pukker
i

dddas

dye

te sa

kdti tan tulAk,

palyor kushto hak.

Yuv rummerdas mdndy sa tacheni, Awer kekkor jinned shomas Kommani.

ENGLfSH-GIPSY SONGS.
Jiviiv' 'drill o

43

rinkeno ker kenna,
:

Awer

shorn but trisheni sarasa

,

Yeck divvus ml rye

shunella, shyan,
tilii

Leskri chi sos beeno adrln a

Te

i

f('tki

'vel

pukker sa vassavi
so

" Dick o

mush

rummered a Rommani
shorn kek Gorgio,

"
!

Si shunella ke

man

Yuv

te vel sa laj lester k6kero,

Yuv'll

kam

to gaver adrin o ker
!

Oh, kanilo rom, mdndy'd sigger m^r

Mandy'd

sTgger jal sarasar avrl
lAj

T(5nna kair tut'

ap

i

Kommaiii.

Yoi ghias sa

sig keti doe^'av

Yoi pukkdas y^ckli o ryas ndv Yoi hdtchdas ad6i pilsh o paiini kin,

Te wusserdas kokeri
" Pa tiro

sTg adriu

:

kammoben
tlri

— avali
Jankt
rrcKF':Y.

Merava kenna,

licimmani.

GIPSY

DEATH FOR

LOVE.

I

WANDERED
leaves

far

from

my mother's

tent
I

Alone through the shade of the woods

went

:

Where

grew greenest, wliere
shadow,

trees
I.

were high,

We

met

in the

my

love

and

So kindly and fondly he gazed

at

me

But he did not know

I

was Kommani.

He

led

me

out Avhere the sun shone down,

He He He
I

looked at

looked in
said,

my my

face tliat
eyes,

was Gipsy-brown

;

and he took

my
%

hand
"

;

"You come from
I M-as

a distant land

From

a warmer country across the sea

never told
love

Rommani.
said.

"Come,
I left
1

!

"

he

AVlien I heard
all

him

call,

my

mother and home and

never turned to the tent again,
bid goodbye to the Gipsy men.

To

My

Gorgio married

me
I

faithfully,

But he never knew

was Rommani.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

45

And now
They'll

I live like

a lady here,

But I'm never
tell

safe

from a thought of fear
scorn,
;

my

husband some day, with
his wife

Of the Gipsy tent where

was born
"
!

And

the folk will cry

when he

passes, " See

The man
If

that married a

Eommani

he knew

me

for

one of the Gipsy race,

He

could never look Gorgios in the face,
all

He'd be glad to hide in the house
husband
!

day

:

I'd sooner

go far away,

And

death would be easier far to
seeing you ashamed
of your

me
Rommani.

Than

.She rose,

and soon to the stream she came

;

But once she whispered her husband's name
She stood awhile by the water-side.

:

Then

cast herself in the flowing tide.

" 'Tis for love of you,

dear heart " said she;
]>y

!

"Now

you'll never

be shamed

the liDininani."

Jam"!' Tuckky.

I Ijclievc

Alice Cooper told

that the story given in this \w\\\ is rjuitc tnie. me of a Gip»y girl who, liaving niarrii-il n

rcsjiectable Englialiman,

committed

suicide, the reaHon being

that she had kept licr Eoiimiaiiy origin a secret,

and was

afrai.l,

46
if it

ENGLISIJ-G/PSY SONGS.
were found out, her husband would be ashamed of her.
herself.
"

Alice was quite sure that no fear of his anger caused her to

drown
would

Roniuiany
find

— " She

She was alaj licr rye would latcher she was was ashamed her gentleman-husl)and that she was Gipsy," was the simple explanation

"

of the sad event.

In Weybridge Churchyard, within a mile from the })lace where I heard this, there is a tombstone placed over the grave of another Gijisy gui named Roland, who drowned herself for love.

It

may

be easily seen from the road, as

it lies

just

by the

wall.

O FOTOGRAFENGRO.

"

MiRO
" 'S

rya," pendas o
is

Rommani,
?

tiro

prettygraph lolled

Tu

sosti dlckavit

— uvali
was
dolled.

'T divvus nil noko

"

The mush

as kair'd o'

ml landskip

Pitsered to k6iavit buro.

Fdndom

mdiidy,

'

Sutcho

— if

t isn't

tdchu,

Tu
" Lis

nAsti lellav a horro.'

rigdom adru miro

slicrro aja,

That apre mlro

liovalo
crdfnies, hi,

Shdn tdcho deshdui

Te y6ck
"

crdfni sos ndsherdo.

An' kdna
It

t'

landskip soi
o'

lullo,
zT,

aye,

kaired mdn' sTg
sfir o'

mi

For

them

cnifnies shdnas cidoi,

'Cfpt the ycck as sos polled avri.

48
*'

EN'GL/Sn-G/PSY SOiXGS.

So peiiava

'dul'

mush

si

a
:

Ucheno mush

As ever

plrried

a puv

Kdna Rommanis kum

muidngerls,

Bitchava len sar to yuv."

Charles

G.

Leland.

THE PHOTOGRAPHER.

"

My

master," said the Gipsy man,
?

" Is your prettygrapli in your ])ook

You ought
So
tliat

to have seen

it

wlieu mine was drawn,

not a thing was mistook.

" Tlie fellow

who took my
it

landscaj-)e perfessed

He'd make
'

the best in
I,
'

town
don't, I'm blessed
!

Wery

well,'

says

if

you

If I gives

you a

single

brown
f)n

"

Now,

I

says to myself,

'

my
:

leatiier tiglits

A
A

dozen of buttons

is

sewn

dozen he ought to give by
Ilexceptin' the one as
is

riglits,

gone.'

"

But when that landskip was done
I tell

so fair,

you,

it

took
o'

me down

;

For every one

them

buttf)ns

was

there,

Ib'.xceptin' the

one as was gone.

50
"

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
So
I 'olds that

chap

is

a Ao«orable chap,

As hever on earth

I see

An when
I

any one wants a prettygraph done,

sends 'em along to he."

Charles G. Leland.

The

incident embodied in this song was narrated to

me

in

all seriousness

by a Gipsy

;

and were

it

not for the rhyme and

metre, I might say that it is here given almost in his words, " prettygraph " and " landskip " being used, under the iml)ression that they

were quite

correct.

ROMMANY GILLI.

"

Kai

SOS tu, rinkeno chAvo, kai

%

" Apr(5 at ye well-goro, pals;

An'
An'

I

huckered a gry,
a rye,

I cli('jred

An' sar for ye

kum

o'

ye

Rommany
'

chAls

!

" "

Kai

SOS tu, riiikeni juva, kai
at ye l)5ro gdv,

?

Apre

my

pals

An'

I

dukkered a

rani,

An' chored a kani,
An' sar for ye

kam

o'

ye Il6mmany

chills

"
!

"
"

Kai 80S tu

dfvvus, puri dye

"
1

Apr6

at ye farmin' kdr,

my

]ials

;

And
I

kalico sala

drAljljod a biilo,

An' sar

for

ye

kam

o'

ye

IWmmany

chAls

!

52

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

"Kai shdn
''

tu,

boshom^ngro, kai?"

Oil,

mdndy
An'

shorn sar akAi,

mi

pals

nicindy'll kill,
gill,

An' ye juva'll
An' sar for yc

kam o'ye Eommaby
E.

chdls

"
!

H. Palmer.

A GIPSY SONG.

"Oh, where have you
"

been,

Oh,

I

have been up at the

my bonny lad T' fair, my boys,

With a hack

to sell,

And
Anil
all for

I

cheated a swell.
!

the love of the Gipsy boys

" Oh, "

where have you been,
I

my

pretty

maid?"
boys

Oh,

have been up at the town,

my

And
Wliich
I

a fortune I've told,

iVnd this chicken b(;hold,
stole for the love of the Gij)sy boys
"
!

'•

Oh, where have you been, old mother, to-day
I

1'

" Oil,

have been up at the farm,

my

boys

;

And
I

I

needn't say

how
"
!

poisoned a sow,
the
lovi-

And

all for

of the (Jipsy boys

54
"

ENGL/SH-G/PSY SONGS.
Oh, where are you now,

" Oh, I

am And

all

here at

my fiddler lad hand, my boys
;

"
%

I'll

scrape the strings,
sings,
"
!

While the romali

And

all for

the love of the Gipsy boys
E. H.

Palmer.

O LIVIN^NGRJ TEAL

Talla grya
Well
Jiisa

sir

shau prdstered,

te o

Uttopen's avrl,

Si the livinengo chlrus for the poori dn,

R6mmani
feiii.

mi

tAchi palya,

if

you've chichi 'dre your

mengy kctteuescrus

kcti Livini^ngrl-tem.
gill aj.i,

Mukk amandi Mukk amandi
w^U

gill sar-sa

Si the livin(5ngri kedyin

kcnna

!

Oh,
I

i

\v6shor

safrdni, te

i

ruzhior sove adrc,
:

pivlia sh.^n sar bruni, tc patrinj-a pciU alAy

^la kcssur for the ruzhior,
I

ma

kcssur for the rukk,
;

liviniingrT ruzhior

shau kushtider to dick

Yiil

shan sa rinkeni
j'rd

Milkk's

sTg avrl

81 the livinongri chlrus

— avali
selno sim a w<5sh
:

The
An'

kushters luUch sar ruzno pensa karom(ingro mush,
tiie

livincngris kair leu'

Ijfiti

Oh,
T.'

tute'll

kekker Idtcher a rink'nodiro pem,
tlie

a tAtto kushto divvus 'dvd

Livineiigrl-tein.

Oh, the dadas an' the dye,

An' the

ch.-'ivo

an' the chi
I

Adoi

f-arll lei

sonnakai

5(3

ENGUSN-GIPSY SONGS.
livindngror shau sa buti sumeli aja,
:

T

Tu'd pAtser tu sos beshin 'dnn a boro kltchema

Tu sum^ssa
Te
()

kushto l^vinor kun tute tAders bAv'
prdstram^ngro ndsti i)ukk a chinger'n Idv
!

Avdfro

Tid the gry, tAcho pal
Lei the tan avrl, ml chal

Amdndi
KAua

shorn

kammoben

to jfd.

ratti veil' adoi, ten amdndi'll

besh akiy,

Mandy'll kair o yag, an' pander the kekavi dovapre
If Gorgios pilkker

"SossTl" mdndy'll rakker

'em—
"
!

" Chichi,
T>ut a

droppus muttermdngri for

i

chOri
gill,

Rommani

An' amdndi'U kam

to

An

we'll

kur an

we'll kill,

An' sove 'dr6 the kalopen sar shiU.
Tdlla sar the kddyin's kcirdo, te

mdndy

lels

ml wye,

Mdndy'll kin a rink'no cliukko an' a shuba for ml chi

An

mendui'll kin trushnls to bikin Idngs o
si l)ut

drum

:

Oh, the livinengro chlrus

kushto for the linm

!

Adrin o kalopen,
Adrin o
shillo

wen,
!

Mukk's

gilli o'

the Livinengrl-tem

Janet Tuckey.

KENT;
OR,

THE HOPPING-TIME.

When
Our

the summer-time

is

gone, and the races

all

an- run,
:

luck's not over yet, for the

hopping has begun
everything
is

So come,
We'll
all

my
be

Gipsy brothers,

if

spent,

off

together to the pleasant land of

Kent

And And

well

all

sing in time,

"we'll all

sing in rhyme,

A

song of the merry hopping-time.

Oh, the flowers are fading
])rown
;

fast,

ami the nuts are growing

Tin; leaves are turning yellow,

and the wind

will

l)low

them down
I')Ut ut)

;

matter

for tiie flower,

and no matter

for tin-

trt-c,

Tin; hops are

all

the flowers

I

would ever cam
all

to

sei;

They're the best of

that grow,

So get up,

lads,

and go
Iom'.

To

the country where the hops luing

58

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
in line, like the

There the poles stand
Queen,

men

that serve the

And

the hines twist around them, and cover

them with

green

:

There's no prettier sight,

Irt

the rest be what they may,

Tlian a fine Kentish hop-field on a sunny

autumn

day.

Come, Gij^sy boys

so tall,

Come, Gipsy children small
There's

money waiting yonder

for us all

Oh, the
are,

air smells so

sweet where the ripe hop-blossoms

You'd think you
It's

Avere sitting in a jolly alehouse bar

just like drinking beer in with every breath

you

draw
Oh, sure
'tis

a wonder that

it's

not against the

law^

Bring the horse and the tent
We'll none of us repent

Having gone

to the pleasant land of Kent.

We'll pitch our
done.

little tent,

and at night when work

is

We'll

sit

round the

fire,

and

we'll
it,

hang the

kettle

on
should

And

if

Gorgios ask what's in

we'll say, "

What

there be

In the poor Gipsies' kettle but a

little

drop of tea

"
?

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

59

And And
Then
"When
all

we'll sing half the night,
we'll

dance and we'll
till

fight,

we'll sleep

the sun rises bright.
Ave'll

the hops are picked, then

travel to the

town.

And And

I'll

buy a

coat,

and

my

Avife will

buy a gown.

we'll get a stock of baskets

and sweeping-brushes

too

Oh, the hopping keeps us going
through.

all

the dreary winter

So when nights are cold and long,
Let us sing loud and strong,

And remember

the hopping in our song.

In answer to the cominon (iuestion, "
a living
?

How

do Gipsies make

would say that during spring and summer they attend races and fairs, or haunt picnics and merry-makings, where their Aunt Sallys .ind cocoa-nuts are in demand, and where fortune-tolling and begging arc tolerated, as giving When tin's liai>i)y tiiue is over, occasion for fun and raillery. many of them go " linpping," ami tlius earn eiiougli to lay in a stock of baskets, clotlies-lines, and similar wares. Tliey then wander all over England, each fandly taking its particular " l>eat." Afl the men have less to do at this season, the peddling baskets being entirely in the liands of the women, they
" I
i>ccu]»y
i.e.,

making

themselves with " chiimin koslilors," or cutting sticks, SonietimcH feeders or clr)th»s-pins and skewers.
baskets, but this

they

make

owing

to the cheapness of

becomes every year more unusual French basket-ware. Those among

6o
them who
are

ENGLISn-GlPSY SONG^.
more prosperous
hard and
or intelligent deal in horses
traffic.

at all times,
(lipsies -work

many

becoiuing rich by the
retire early.
;

As

a rule,

There

is

an impression
not

that they subsist
fathers

by

stealing

but whatever the sins of their
present

may have

been, the

generation does
I

generally deserve such a character.

From what

have seen
as honest

of Gipsies, I should say that they are,

on the whole,
them.
I

as the corresponding class of equally ignorant

English people.
can recall, in
Carlyle,

Tliey rarely betray a

man who

trusts

lelation to this, having once heard,

from

Mr Thomas

an interesting anecdote of a Scottish Gipsy, who, having borrowed a sum of money, faithfully returned it. I have never heard of a " Rommany Rye" being robbed by a Gipsy.

/

SHVNALI RAKLL

SfG asa apr6 o BOro Divvus,

Kek'no gudlo shundom man

tasala,

Awer

i

pan6ngri loiigoduro
sliillo Ixlvol.

Gillyin 'drc o piddviio,

Sig asa apr(i o Euro Divvus,

Muscro tamlopen

to Irdlo sula,
i

K4na

Chfrki gliids sar
anvias sara

cliii"klor

Kdna dud

lifdcus.

Viinka shundom

mu

adrd

i

wdslior,

Pdnsa choro mdiiiish te martadas,

Te

ad(inna cljingerben, te korbcn,
o' Indi.

P(5nsa boro hotchcrin

Slgdum

ni(i

adoi ta dfck atlullo,
l)ar nic

Te

aprci

a br>ro

dfckdoni,

Pash

o' lister

wanlo

hutcliiio surnT,
bcslida.«.

Vaster Lock o IJoinaiiny puk'no

62

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
Putchdom Te
" Tfikey
si

:

o dadas puvdo,

hotcliessca tu

kenuu o vurdo,
:

P^nsa

taclio

Eomalo, Silvester

P^nsa

niort piireiii

Eomi

fuki

1

" Ora tukey

si I

kusliti dya,

Savo dlckdas dr6 sa-buti wAstor 1

Yoi Sa

te v6l

pen dukkerin kekkumi,

viAs la k6ti hev, patsava."
sT

" Miro ddda

kenna dr6 Lundra

:

Minni dya

si

akai,"

yuv pdndas,

" ]\lAn hotcliciva dul' pa jidi rakli,

Awer
*'

miillo si sarja

amcngy.
utar,

Jala

Irdii

purus

;

ktiti

Boro-panni-tem

— slilmAl amdngy,
si

Dulla wafri rakli
Piivdo, miillo
"
si

amdngy

avrl te divvus
kiirikus ta

Mendi shdnas

rummer

Boro kushto halabeu sos kiido

Liom mdndy
(M6ro
"

kushtidlro cuvvar

;

Eommauo
b(5slidas

rye sarkan pessddas).

Eya

pre o bOro

skdmmin
:

;

B^sh^lla rashai apasli o

l(iste

Vilrtem m^ndi sdr apre ()tchdra6

;

Awer kek Otchamci m^n

avella.

F.NGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" Sal" SOS cbingerdo, sarkrui sos tuguo

63

;

Sar amandi gliiom adr6m sar lajno,
Sig sa mdndi

hadem mOro habben,
avdlla.

Awer kek Otchdm^ men
" 'Pr6 tasfda

shundom

Irdci

pendas,

K^das

les ta kair paidss

o niengi,

Te kamava

la sa boro-buti,

Man

tfcvdl

nai

kam

ta

mukkov'
lati si

lati.

" Ldtcbedem.

Pandas

atukno,

Pandas yoi

te v6l ta

rumma mandy,

Te o paslmo

chirus yoi avella

Kdti rummaben, te sTg te tdcho.
"

Awer pcudoin

:

Sa
si

sT

cliikno bavol

Pr6 o dromya; sa
I)re o dueyav,

londo paiuii
sovahal'lis,

mdndy

K(;kker

men

tevcil te

rummer

tiite.

" Si sar krdo bal pre tiro slierro

Sos a s«)nnakeskro

suriii kiittor,

Man

tevel kekfimi kamer tutc

Buti shunali slian tu amandy.
" Vnngustor te vel sar but! tfikey

Sa o

spiiigor lela liotcliewitclii,

Pt'jrdo saro s<')nnakc.skro covvar,

Mdndy

Java

'vr!

kun

lute vfas.

64

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" Te pa dullo gudlo tu

man

kddas,

Te pa

(lulla

lavya tu penessa,

ShAnas tu sarja am^ngy mullo,

KAna mushor
*'

pen'lan tute jido.
ttite sAs

Te pa mAndy

sa wdfro,

Kedas m^ngy

dullo dushno gudlo,
'0

MAndy

hotcherov

kuslito vardo

SAvo iriAndy pendom d6l a tukey."
E,6vades.

Amen

o wAver g^eror

SAvo

atclidd 'd6i to

shun a

l6ste,

Dikdom m6

a Gorgio hatchdlla,
asArla.

Te o Gorgio rov6s Putchdom
:

" Si

rakkerben, mi-rya

SAvo anner^la dullo pAnni
Tiri

yukkor

;

sa o tuv, te k^ssur,

Kairen tute boro wAfro tuknus 1

Awer pdndas
Pa

:

"

MAndy kek
pa

kessava

lo tuv, te chichi

rakker,
Idski
"
!

Awer bikdom dovo vArdo
PAtserdo.

— te ynv te
si si

A'el

kek p6ssur

Tacho

SOS o lAv, te

te kdkker,

Sa o panni d6eyav

pordo,

L6la G6rgio a yijckno harra

Fon

Komalo, sar zi-jiOggAdo.

Charles G. Leland.

THE WILFUL

GIRL.

So

early on Christmas morning,
otlier

No
But

sound was there,

bells far off a-rinfrinw
silent frosty air.

Through the
So
early

on Christmas morning,

Between the daik and dawn,

When
As
I

the stars were going like pigeons.
;

the day like a liawk came on

heard a noise

in the forest,
;

The

voice of a wailing )nan

And

then a rustling, crackling,
fire

As though a
I

began.

hurried to the Inirning,

And

there upon a rock,

Beside his blazing waggon.
Sat the fiipsy Vestcr Lock.

66

ENGLISH- GIFS Y SONGS.
" Oh, have you buried your father
?

And,

like a

liommany
his

true,

Are you burning up

waggon,
1

As the
"

real old

Rommanis do

Or

is it

your good old mother,

Who
She

looked in so

many

a

hand

1

will

read no more the future

Since she's gone to the future laud."

"

My

father

is still

in
is

London,
here," said he.

And my mother
" This is

burnt for a

girl

who

is living,

But dead
"

for ever to me.

And whether
Or
live

she walk the South or West,

by East or North,
girl is in

That wicked

her grave
forth.

To me from
" Last

this

day

week we were

to marry,
;

With

a dinner and a ball

And

our liommany rye
it

—you know him
all
!

Got
"

ready, and paid for

The

rye

was on the was

sofa,
;

The

priest

in his chair

We

waited for Otchamci,
there.

But Otchame was not

ENGLISH- GIPS Y
" So
it all

S OxVGS.

6/

l)roke
all

up in sorrow,
off in
till

And we

went

shame,

-

(Though we

staj-ed

dinner was over),

Otchame never came.
"

And

I

heard that she said she did
I

it

Because

loved her so,

That
I

for twice the trick
let

and trouble

never would

her go.

"

We

met, and she said she was sorry,
I still

That

should be her

roni,

And

the next time to the wedding
really he sure to

She would
"

come

!

But

I said: ^\'hile there's dust

on the highway.

And
There

water

is

in the sea,

will never he a

wedding

In the world lietween you and me.
"
It"

every hair of your ringlets
a spangle of shining gold,

Was
I

never would ask to marry

A

maiden so
had
a.s

Ijad

and

l)(;ld.

" If y(»u

many

fingrrs
to

As a hedgehog has pins

show,

And

all willi

rings close crowded,
I'd go.

Whenever you came

68
"

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.

And because you have been so And served me sucli a turn,
waggon
I

cruel,

I've a

meant

to give you,
I'll

And

n(jw that

waggon
tlie

burn."

He
I

wept, and

among

people

Who
And

had stayed

to hear

lum through,

saw a Gentile standing,
the Gentile was weeping too.

And

I

asked him, " Is

it

the story
?

Which
That so

causes the tears to rise
of
tlie

Or the smoke

burning waggon
"
?

affects

your eyes

He answered, " I'm not affected By the smoke nor by what he
Cut
I

said

;

sold
I

him

that

waggon on

credit,

And

know

I shall

never be paid."

No more

he wasn't, and never,
is

While water

in the sea,

Will he ever get a copper

From

the heart-broken

Eommany.
G. Leland.
all

Charles

English Gipsies not only frequently burn or destroy
that belonged to their dead relations, but sometimes,

when

urged by strong emotions,

make

sacrifices like the

one de-

EA'GL/S//-G/PSY SONGS.

69

-cribed in the foregoing ballad.
to the

It is all literally true,

remark as

to the hairs of the
tlie

The only
a

liberty taken with

even head being spangles. truth has been in making

the unfortunate

man from whom

the

waggon

waj> i>urchased

weeping eye-witness. It is, however, a fact that this highly I Iiave omitted interesting sacrifice was entirely " upon tick." to state that the mortified lover also broke his watch to fragments; but,
(

Avith

lipsies,

Indians,

some of the inconsistency characteristic of and other grown-up children, he carefully
as the iron portions

uUected and sold the fragments, as well

O

ROMMANESTO KELLOBEN.

Pash-A-SHEL
Pash-a-sh6l
keesis,
o'

o'

kalo
kalo

E6mmanis

iu kushto dickin heesis,
in

Rommanis with wongur

their

A-w6llin saro kdtteni and p6nnin sarishAn

;

Pash

o'

lendy Beshaldys and pash o lendy Petu](^ngros,

Tachodiro kalo Rommanis and fino k^Uom Ingres,

A

wc'llin 'dre

the gav to

lei

a k6llam6sto tan.

Butidosta G6rgio mushor kraned ta dickaA'it adovo,

Ynl ddled the kalo-rati foki sar o l^ndy's l6vo,

Te the chAlor mukked the G6rgio mushor hav adre
the k6r.

The

n'lklis

sos a k6llin, a savvyin

and a

glllin,

The

puri dye a sh6llin,
!

and the b6shermengro
rati

killin

;

Oh

to dick a
lis

waver

sim ad6vo m'an'y'd mer.

The habben
Te

sos kushto te o pTopen sos tatto,

prdler bitti chlrus sar the chdls

and chais

sos matto,

An' the

j)aiass sos the kushtidlrest tfite 'd ever dick,

Siggadiro killed the t^nis, sigger killed the bosherm^ngro,
Till the Beshaliiy-sherengro

willed atut the Petul6ngro,

An' yuv an' Usters chai sos wussed alAy opre the chick.

ENGLISH- GIPS Y

SO.VGS.

7

PSl 'ad6vo SOS a chingari ap6sh adovo dui,

Te the Petuldngro kured the BeshaMy opre the

mfii

Te

the dui niklis tAdered yek-a-wfiver by the bal.
to hatch opre their

Te the waver mushor prdstered up
pAlor,

Te milled opr^ a-kurin

sor the chior

and the

chdlor, to kfir an'

Te they mukked the bosh and kolloben
s^vahal.

Oh,

'd(')i

SOS sh<-rro3 poggado, te rink'ni krdi yakkor,

Te

lullo

mol a

W(5llin

out

o'

kali

chAvvos nakkor,
sfir

Te the curror and

the chauros wussin
an'

adre

tlic liav.

Te the Gorgio ryes
meriben,

ranis

prasterellan

tor

tlicir

Tf the

riltfully

chok<ingros welled to

lell

us

sfir

to stari-

ben,

Tute

sasti

pen the beng sos

jallin loosus in the g;lv.

Te

kaiia

leii .sos

kinlo, iq) the Petuldngro prasters,

Te chiva

his dfii wasts adri; thiIcsters

waver geero's wasters,
tlicy kaircil
lis

Te cliumers
oprci

ch;iniyor— sa

snr

Te they

Ijitchercd for

some

livciior an'

<li'll<'d

it

to (Im-

bfilor,

Te

piid te

kuHed

againiis

till tiie

wellin

o'

the salor.
al.iv.

Then they

pelt opre the puvus, an' they sovclan

7

ENGLISH-GIPS Y SONGS.
dovo's savo

Now

mandy pens

a kushto sort

o'

c6vva,
:

For we'd

Itivina te paiass an'
yrJdj;or,

we

kaired adosta lovo
!

An' as for krdor

dovo's rinkeno aja
it

For the chingeri
An'
I

sos bltti, but the pdiass
bitti Ion

was buro,
;

pens ad6vo sims a
if tute'll dell

opre the moro

An'

a kelloben I'm

kammobeu
E. H.

to ja

!

Palmer.

THE GIPSY BALL.

Fifty dusky Eommanis dressed so
Fifty

fine

and grand,

sir

;

dusky Itommanis with money

at

command,

sir,
all.

A-meetin' and a-greetin' in the village one and

Half

o'

them was Smith and
Stanley,

t'other half of 'cm

was

Gipsies out

and

out,

and dancers elegant and manly,
to hire a place to give a ball.

Comin'
Lots
o'

in the

town

Gorgio people longed to see a sight so funny,
all

So they gave the dark-faced Gipsies pretty nearly
their

money

\

And

the

Rommanis they
inside.

let

the Gorgio gentry

come
Tile girls they

was a

daiicin'

and a

laiighin'

and a hum-

min'.

The grandmoth(;rs a
strummin'

chaflin',

and

\\w,

nui.sic

hand

a

Oh

!

to see another such a night as that
died.

1

would

iia'

74

ENGUSH-GIPSY SONGS.
victuals

The

they was
very

first-rate,

and the drink was

first-rate,

And

'twasn't very long afore

the boys and girls got

merry

And
Faster

the sport

it

was the best you ever

see, sir, I'll

be bound.

danced
faster,

the

ladies,

and

the

fiddler

fiddled

Till the captain of the Stanleys

and the Smiths' head

man and master Bumped one agin the
the ground.

other and was thrown upon

And

then there was a shindy very quickly in the place,
sir,

The Smith he gave the Stanley such a oner
sir,

in the face,

And

their partners took to tearing one another

by

the hair.

Then the men of both the
his brother,

parties

came up each

to help

And

the lads and lasses fought and

all

got mixed with

one another.

And

they
fight

left

the dance and music and began to

and swear.

EA'GL/SH-GIPSY SONGS.

75

Oh

!

tlie

broken heads and
sir, it

Ijlack eyes

which they

got,

was

stunnin',

And

the claret

from their noses pretty freely was a

mnnin',
An' the pewters and the platters was a
tiyin'

hy

your

face.

The

Gorgios
arisen,

ran

away

Avhen

the

row

had

first

An'

tlie

bobbies they came runnin' up to take us
prison

all

to

You'd ha' said the very deuce was broken loose
about the place.

When

they

all

was

tired

o' fightin',

the Smith hr iuad<-

a stand,
.\nd he com<'
\\\)

sir,

to the
sir,

otli<'i-

chap and slionk him by

the liand, .Vnd kissed

him on the

ciicck

and made

it

wy

fiT

evermore.
Thfii they sent and b-tched
giv(; it to

some more

beer,

and tiny

the Ifnnners.
daiice(l

And

tliey

drank and

again, until

the mcrnin'

broke, like oner«,
.\n<l

then

tlu-y all fell

down and went

to sleep

uimn

the floor.

^6

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
that's

Now

what

I

should

call

a werry pleasant sort

o'

party,

For we'd beer, and made some money, and enjoyed ourselves quite hearty.

And

as for Ijlack eyes,

why

black eyes are prett}- as

you know

!

For the row was only
sir,

little,

and the fun was Averry

great,

Just like a pinch
sir.

o'

salt

upon your bread,

I calculate,

And

if you'll

give another ball, Avhy I

am game

to go.

E. H.

Palmer.

eye-witness.

This description of a ball was given to Professor Palmer by an The dance in question was held at Aberystwitli.
late years Gipsies often give these balls,

Of

charging a price

for admission.

They

are, in reality,

Gipsy exhibitions.

A TJ Clio COVVABEN;
OR, O

ROMMANI

BENG.

On, tube

jins mTro kuko, rye,
;

Oh, tute jins lester nAv

Yeck divvus yuv pTrdas
Foil yeck
'eti

siir

Idstcr

gry

Avaver

giiv.

Yuv

jdssed adrd a kitcliema
pT a
t.is

To
But o

levinor

;

pfiro

gry

Icllas cliTcliI to

li;T

But

o wafio cliAr tuller o

lior.

But' luviiior kairs a mu.sli surrelo,

An' mi kako

gillied sar 'sar,

Awer
Te

lester
sfi

gry sos bockelo,

yiiv ])inTed slifiKdr.

Penned

o Jioni, " Jvaii' a
givella kuslito
ajfi,

niu.sli lela

adiista nuls,

Yuv
To
Tu'd

Icilldas

tute a bitti kiss,
siran,

iilrri

ml

bii

78

ENGLISH- G/PS Y SONGS.
"

Dov
bor,

6 lo, niiro gry,

d6v

6 lo

?

'Driu puv, 'pr6 o waver rikk
si

a boro kAssengro,
to dick."

Te kekker adoi
Akovalo

Rom jas

mishto

aja,

To

hocker adrin o puv
n4sti jiuav a

:

Yuv

waver mush

Chidas lester yakkor 'pr^ yuv.

A tano,

bongo, kalo dial
tAller o

Sos beshiu

kosh

:

Miro kako pendas yuv kekker
S'

jin's

a wAfro-dickeno mush.

Ml kako SOS gillyin " Kushto bak Awer sTg yuv tuldas cbib,
For
pfiro

"
I

chavo horkerud aprc,
:

An' shelled in Romniani jib
"

Beng
So
's

tdsser tute, tu wdfro chAl

tute kairin

kenna

1

Man

bltcherav' tut' to stdripen,
aja."

For chorin ml k4ss

Mi pooro kako

sos trdsheno

:

Yuv
Dordi
!

pukkeras

" So-sT

lis

?

— o l)engis own

kokero,
!

'S a-rakkerin

Kommanis

ENGLfSfJ-G/PSY SONGS.
Tacho, mi rva, yuv ndsti hatch

79

A-pukkerin

Sririshaii,

Awer
Till

hutered apre au' kistered avri,

yuv lAtched o Rommani
:

tkn.

Te

adui yuv peiidas

" Deari pals

Kdna
Dick

tute jasa to chore,

firstus if

a

Rommani beug
hor
"
!

Kek

beshela taller

Janet Tuckey.

A HEAL INCIDENT.

I'm thinking you

know my
his

uncle,
I'll

sir,

And you know
The other day

name,

be bound.

his horse

and he

Were

travelling the country round.

My

uncle Avent to a public-house,
there he got beer enough
to eat

And
But

But the poor old horse had nothing
nettles

and such

like

stuff.

Oh, beer

is

the thing to cheer one's heart.
;

So

my

uncle whistled a song

But the poor old horse had
So,

little to eat,

he went but slowly along.

Said the man, "

When a man has

enough

o'

meat,

He whistles aloud for joy, And if you'd a mouthful of hay
You'd go
faster than
this,

to eat,

my

boy

!

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
'

8

Wliat

is

that,

my

horse

;

oh,

what

is

that

?

On

the other side of the way,
it,
!

"With never a soul a watching

There's a beautiful stack of hay

So

this

my

Gipsy

loses

no time
stile
;

A jumping over
He

the

didn't guess there

was somebody
the while.

A A

watching him

all

little,

crooked, yellow-faced

man

Was

sitting

beneath a tree

]

My
My

uncle told

me

he'd ne'er beheld
he.

Such an ugly fellow as
uncle was singing "
let

Good

luck,

good luck

'
!

But he soon

singing alone,
at him,

For the man jumped up and hollered
In

Kommany

like his

own

" Deil take you, mischievous good-for-nought

That game you are
I'll

at won't [tay

get you a month, and no mistake,
tlicre

For stealing of that

hay

"
!

My

uncle was frightened out of his wits,
cried, "

Ho

What
is

is it I

see?

That ugly chap

the dcil's

own
"
!

self

A

swearing in liommany

Si

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

You may

take your oath that he didn't stop
of,

A
But

saying
lie

How

do you do

%

jumped on

his horse

and galloped

like

mad,

Till

he got to some tents he knew.
said, "

And

he

My

lads,

when
from

you're going to steal,

Take

this bit of advice
first if

me
deil
"
!

Just find out

some Gipsy

Ain't watching you under a tree

Janet Tuckkv.
The
which
iucideiit related in this ballad is given,

with the exin

ception of
it

rhyme and metre,

in almost the

same words

was told. It should be mentioned, however, that the old Gipsy who contemplated stealing the hay, invariably denies that anything of the kind ever took place. But as his Rommany friends are fond of " chaffing" him about the " Gipsy devil," and as he himself will sometimes, with a grave face, In insist that he never heard the story, it is probably true. Ilommany one negative is generally equivalent to an atfirmative.

O

RdMMANI

CHtRICLO.

ROMMANI chiriclo 'pr6 o rukk, Shunalo Rommani chiriclo pukk
Givelliii kushto, givellin sar,

Wavero

chiriclo tiillera bur.

" Pal, so's tiite dickdo

kciiiifi,
?

Te

tQ ghivdssa sa kushto aja

" Tallero

rukk kAi mandy shoni

Rinkeiii rani rovuU' adnJni.

" Laki

si

kekeiii iiirr/ni)
si

Churedir

tonna chiriclo
zi,

;

Si bOro tug' adrii laki

Kcirela pduni ndshcr avri.

"

Awer,

tnlpal,

ycck

luT

Ion

akiii.
:

Tulla Avaver rfikk bcshclla ryo
Yiiv te del
l)ri.sh

o' yilvs wtnigiir adiVim
liiiiis

Te

vel 'dillla n'likiMii

roni."

84

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" Oh, mlro pal, sos tdchenus

Kairav

i

dui k6ttenus

!

Yeck
"

pirrfni te yeck pTriyno
sa,

"
!

Awer

6sti tute

kairavit so

?

" Besh^lla rani 'dr6 boro tuv

;

Lakis paiio dikklo's apr^ o ptiv

;

Chorava

lis,

te miikker' avri,

Ta
"

lei lis

avella prdi ml.

Te

vel pdller(^lla

mAn
lis

ap' an' alAy,

Awer kekera dava
Te sikkerava
"

apre

Talla lifipperava la fon akdi,
la ruzlo rye.

Te

kuslito asa o mTli rye,
sa tAclio
i

TVel rakker

giidli chi

:

Awer kamescri

te ka,mescr6

Ndstis jin sos kcrdo o chiriclo."

Chakles G. L eland.

THE

GIPSY-BIRD.

The And

Gipsy-bird
talks to his

sits

on the oak-branch high,
;

mate on the hedge hard by

He's singing loudly, he's singing well

Hear what the Gipsy-bird has
His mate
says, "

to

tell.

What

is

the matter, dear,

That you sing
"
I sing,

so loud, that

you sing so

clear

?

because under this very bough,
is

A

beautiful lady

resting now.

" She's all

by

herself,

no inate has she.
so poor can be
grief,
I

No
For

bird in the
is

wood

Her heart
I

heavy with

know,

am

watching her tears

tiiat llnw.

"But

listen,
sits

a mile from here

I

.see

A

youth

un<ler another tree
liis

;

He'd give the half of

gold ami I.ukI

To win

such a beautiful ladv's hand."

86

ENGLISH-GfPSY SONGS.
" Little wife,
it

were a good deed, in truth,
together, the
to

To bring them

maid and youth
"
!

;

And

of the

two

make but one

"Pleasant to do,
"

if it

could be done."

Look

doAvn, little wife

;

on the grass below

Is the lady's handkerchief white as
I'll

snow

:

hasten to steal

it,

and on
it

my

track

She'll surely follow, to get

back.

"

And

I'll

lead her on over brier and fern
I'll

;

I'll

never stop and
let

never turn,
all

Nor

her linger through

the chase,
face.

Till she

and the youth

shall

be face to

"

Then never again
he'll

will she

weep

alone.

For

woo her

softly to

be his own,
softer word.

And

she'll

answer him back with a
will

But they never

know

it

was done by the

bird."

Janet Tuckey.
The
Gipsy-bird, or Water-wagtail, can hardly be correctly

spoken of as singing.
Gip.sies regard it as

But both in Germany and England,
it.

belonging peculiarly to them, and attach

strange superstitions to

Thus they

believe that

it

portends
it
lie

the presence of Gipsies, and whenever a traveller sees
will

meet with the
is

Eommany not long

after.

The Kipsi Kdsht,

or willow,

the Gipsy-tree.

bAllovas

an

yoras.

BaLLOVAS an

yoras,

Bdllovas an yoras,

An

the rye

an

the

rani

A

plrryin dp the dram.

If tutes

mandys

pirryni,

If tute's miri pTrrynT,

Te

well tu

iii;'ui<ly'.s

pTrryiii,

Tlicn

in.'indy'll

be your Rom.

Mdiidy latched a

hotcliewitclii,

A A trdlo

boro hotchewltchi
hotchewltcbi,

A jrdlin
kusbto rye

Mru the wesb.

'Doi welld6 rye te rani,
te rani,

An'

adoi,

'tnll

the rfikkor

;

Mdndy

dicked tbc

dfii besli.

88

ENGLISH- G/PS Y SONGS.
Yul kekn'ai
jind(i

mdndy,
m.-indy,

Yul kekn'ai p^nd'te
Yul ndsti

sliand(3 inAiidy

Dikdom
If

sar o l6ndy kaired

:

they jlnned I dicked the chumors
bitti

The kushti

chumors
shuned the chumors

If they'd jinned I

Oh

!

—the rrmi would a-mered.
ain't a-hockerin,

Oh, hdtchin

An' An'

gillyin ain't rrdtkerin,
gillyin ain't pfdvkerin,

Penava mAn

asa.

So leUv ak6vo kunjernes,
Itikkava
lis

sar kunjernes,

Ilikkav' akovo kunjernes^r

Sa tu shundssa

k'na.

Charles

G. Lelanu.

EGGS AND BACON.

Oh

!

tlie

eggs and bacon

;

And And
And And And

oh

!

the eggs and bacon

;

the gentleman and lady

A
if
if
if

walking up the way

!

you
you

will be will
])e

you

will be

my sweetheart, my sweetheart, my darling,

I will

be your own, to-day.

Oh
Oil

!

I

found a jolly hedgehog
found a good

;

!

i

fat hcilgcOiog

;

Oh

!

I

found a good big hedgehog,

In the

wood

beyon<l the town
lord and lady,

And

there

came the

The handsome

lord an<l lady.

Ami umlerneath
1

the branches
sit

saw the two

down.

90

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
They
didn't

know

the Gipsy,

They
They

didn't think the Gipsy,

didn't hear the Gipsy

Was
If they

looking
I

— or could hide.
kisses. kisses.
!

knew

saw the

The pretty
If

little kisses,

they knew

I

heard the

Oh, the lady would ha' died

Oh And
!

sitting

still's

not springing.

talking isn't singing,

So

I tell

you nothing,

singing,

That's the
I

way

I

make

it

square.

So
I

keep

this thing a secret,

keep

it all 'a secret,

A

very sacred secret,

As

all

of you can hear.

Charles G. Leland.

A

part of this trifling song
to

is

of

Gipsy

origin,

and well

known

most

"travellers."

The remainder was composed

one day in a tent on the banks of the Thames, with the help of several Gipsies, who greatly admired the rhymes, especially those contributed by themselves. Nothing can be said for it,
except that
it

gives a tolerably correct idea of the style of
singing.

much Rommany

MANSHA TU!

Mi ghiom

a-plrraben 'pre o drom,

Shfindom a kalo-rattdscro Rom,
\\\v gillides kushto,

yuv

glll'des aja-

" SossT maiidy to kair kenna'?

Mdnslia

tu, pal,

mAnsha

tu

!

O
"

bak avella

tasala.

Miro bltto wArdo

si

hutchado

;

Li'sos sa buti rinkeno

'Pr6

mlnno

lAv,

ml R6mmani

lAv,

K^k

sa kfislito adrln o gav.

Manslia

tu, pal,

mdnslia tu

!

O
" 'Drd
A(l(')VO
\

bak
()

avella tasala.

ratti li'sos liutcliado
!

;

dud SOS rinkeno

bitti rliingaror

nird<kered avrl,

F\.6ti

Miduvelus-tem aprd.
Manslia
tu, pal, nianslia
tti

O

bak avella

tasala."

92

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" So-sl tu givellin, mlro
Si wAfro covva,

paH
cliAl

ml krdo

Sos
"

man

te vel tute, rovav' o'

dush!

Aver

tute shAn

k6k R6mmani mush

MAnsha
bak
" Soski

tu, pal,

mAnsha

tu

!

avt^lla tasala.

Eommani
myla,

ch4l to riiv

1

Y^ckorus, 'drln o giv^scro puv,

Mi chordom
Mdnsha

i

mjla m^red
1

Pukkeras tute so mdndy kaired
tu, pal,

mAnsha

tu

!

O
"

bak avella
dickdas

tasiila.

A

riini
i

mdndy b^sh
:

Pash
'

mfdlo myla adrin o w^sh
pal
sT

Yuvs

muUo', pandas adrom

'

choro, pduvero, kalo

Rom

!

Mclnsba

tu, pal,

mdnsha

tu

!

bak

av6lla tasala.

" Y6i sos a gudli, bdrveli chi

DAs m6ngy l6vva

to kin a gry
aja,

Aver mi ch6rdom a gry

Te kindom wardo
MAnsba
bak avdlla

kun's ndshered kenna.

tu, pal,

mdnsha tu

!

tasala.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" Tdller o bor beshav' sliukAr,
Givellin kushto sarasar,

93

Te miro

gry, oh, kai

sT

yuv

1

Chorin lescro liabbeii adrin o puv
Maiisha
tu, pal,

!

mansha

tu

!

bak
" Givfiva

avella tasala.

maiidy adrum, mi rye,
avell' akAi,
si

A

gudlo covva

For kushto bak

o

Ucho

pal

Keti mlshto, ruzno Iiommani chAl.

Mansha

tu, pal, mi'insha tu

!

bale avella tasala."

Janet Tuckey

CHEER UP

I

Along

the road I was wandering,
I

When
"

heard a brown-faced Gipsy sing

Oh

dear,

my

drag

is

burnt and gone
%

!

Who

can

tell

me

what's to be done

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow

!

Luck

will

come again to-morrow.
up and down,

" Search everywhere, search

You'll find none better in all the

town

;

Upon my

word,

my Eommany
fit

word.

That waggon of mine was

for a lord.
!

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow

Luck
•'

will

come again to-morrow.

'Twas burnt up only yesternight
fire

You've never seen a

so bright

The sparks flew out, flew up so high.
They
didn't stop
till

they touched the
!

sk}'.

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow

Luck

will

come again to-morrow."

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
Said
I,

95

" Your story

is full

of woe,

Then why do you smg,
If I

I'd like to

know
"

?

were you,
sir,

I couldn't

be glad
lad.
!

" But,

you're not a

Kommany

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow

Luck
"

will

come again to-morrow.
?

Why

should a merry Gipsy weep

Once,

when
an

the farmer was fast asleep,

I stole
I

ass,

but soon she died

:

sat

me

dcjwn by that donkey's side.
!

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow

Luck
"

will

come again to-morrow.

A

Gorgio lady came through the wood,
rich

The Gorgio lady was
She
looke<l at

and good.
;

my

donkey, she looked at nnis

'Oh, the Gipsy's friend

dead,' said she.
!

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow

Luck

will

come again to-morrow.
a purse, a beautiful piurse,
;

"She gave me

Lots of mon(!y to )>uy a horse
I'ut
I

stole a liorse, as I well

km-w how.
burnt up iiow
!

Ami bought
Luck

the

waggon

tlial's

Cheer up, brother, never son-ow
will

come again to-morrow.

96
"

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
Under
the hedge at

my

ease

I'll

stay,

Singing so jolly the livelong day.

My

horse

is

a

Rommany,

just like me,
see.
!

He's stealing the farmer's oats, you

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow

Luck

will

come again to-morrow.

" If you care for nothing, you needn't doubt

But luck For
jolly

will

come by and

will find

you out
see,

good luck, as you well may

Is a friend to the regular

Rommany.

Cheer up, brother, never sorrow,

Luck

will

come again to-morrow."

Janet Tuckey.
The
incident here described
is

substantially the

same

as one

narrated by an old Gipsy in Surrey as having occurred to
liiinself.

In justice to the old man,
is

it

should be admitted that

the theft of the donkey and horse

a poetic fiction.

I

BOCKELO GILLL

Yeck
mani
aprc
a tan

dlvvus pirdum

me

trin-desh

meeya

sar

mlro

puro Pirengro, pari
kair<jngror

chumbor
adr6
bitti

te hdvya,

dickin

E6m-

g^vya,

ora

ndckerin

puri

chiruses.

Kennadoi yuv sikkerdas m(ingy
a

adru o

char, kai

Gorgio

te

well

dick chi-

chi, ilwer

odoi yuv sikkerdas
alay, sasti

mengy

sikko, kai yuv's

pal o

kako beshede

beshya kenna.

Sa mendui

ghiom pash 'Ginny Pdnni,
te Staines, kai a

te pari o Stans Chumbei',

waver kushto pdl o mdndy kairdas a

boro kuraben apre ye prasterin o 'ye grya, te so vioni
an k6ni, kcti niTro Boro Kitchema,
'pre

nAwo

Giv-Puvior,

Borgav, te yuv rlkkerdas mlro chukko.
pirressa,

Awer

.sa

sig

mendui

ghiom amande agal

buti kusi kitche-

mor, talla jfdlin
bar, sa

adr(i, for

mlro chukko boricd paslicr a
kanidas

dennc miro
o
levinor.

rikkcrin-mu.sh

kcnnadci
o' tlic

a

cutter

Kennasig apru
ta

yo nak
niizzcr
to

liivvu.-^, lis

miro puro pdl aiikairdas

mujtr
o'

adr6 Icster shorro, te

mdndy IcUcdum
Te
sa

a

drum

dellin lescro a pash kordnna.

yuv

so6 a kcllin

98
an ludderin

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
lestis

kokero apr6 the drom, givelldas yuv

adre a buti paiAscro shunaben akovo givelli
" Mdndy's clidvvis shau bokelo

— okelo—kokelo.
lllaben.

—hlllaben — — obbin — abobbin Yul chuvveni — piivveni — huvveny Shan pauveri, chlngerdo— hingerdo — blngerdo Man'ys bitto tan St sar in cutter-6ngerees — mingerees — ye h6vyor— sh6vyor, bdvol puderla
Shan muUerin
o'

shillaben

lena lek habben
te

si

fingerees.

shillo

'dr(3

SarrAti
Sdrrati

mdndy shunova

ye wafo bavo bdvcla.
for
;

mendui ruvv, m6rin

muro pr6 the puv.

Man'j's chdvvis got kek dye

high de dy, dy dy

Diddle

dum dum.
die
if

Mandy'd
Diddle

'twasn't for mlro kushto rye

!

dum dum, dum dum,
dam dum.

Diddle, dim

Mdndy's a churedo

—hurredo —kurredo.
"
!

High Te
sa

diddle diddle

mendui viom

keti kunsus

o'

the drum, diom

m6

l6sco lesters

pash kordnna.

Te

o puro

mush kairedas

kin, te ghias k6rri, sa

kumi

te

kushto sa bokro.

Charles

G. Leland.

THE SONG OF STARVATION.

One day

I

went
hills

thirty

miles

a-foot

with

my

oUl

Walker, across
dwellers in the
as
in

and

dales, calling

on Gipsy house-

little villages,

or talking over old times

we

went.

Now

and

tlicn lie

would point out a place

the grass where a Gorgio (white

man) could

see

nothing, but there he would
his

show me exactly where

brother or uncle had camped, perhaps years ago.
W(!

So

two
Hill,

i)a.ssed

by Virginia Water, and across Saint
Staines,

Ann's

and through

where another good

friend of

mine had a great

fight at the last races,

and

then went homeward to
A\'alton.

And

he

my hotel, called Oatlands, near iJut as we walkeil, carried my coat.
going
in, for

we passed very

{y^w jniblic-houses witliout

my

coat weighed almost a pound, and

my
ale.

carrier,
I'y

of

course,

needed now and then a drop of

and

by, towards the

cud of

tlic

day,

my

old fiicud began In
I

turn

it

over in his hcafj, and reflect that
;

had a way of
of
it,

giving him a lialf-crown

and, to remind

me

while

100

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

he was dancing and shaking himself on the road, he
sang, in a very jolly voice, this song

" ]\Iy children are hungry

— hungry—wungry, They're dying of the bitter cold — diddle diddle dum. They haven't any victuals — skittles— They're perishing in poverty — turn teedle turn tent's in tatters — hatters — My —highin' — skyin'. All in rags The cold wind a-blowin'— lowin' — owin', whistle — — diddle. hear All night
tittles.
!

little

scatters.

a-flyin'

I

it

sissel

All night we're a-cryin'

for a bit o'

bread

a-dyin'.

My
I

babes ha' got no mother

—nor father— nother.

Certainly I should die, but for ray master standing by.

am

poor

—boor — oor —dam—dum.
diddle." to the

Diddle
Diddle,

dum dum, dum dum,
dim

High diddle

And when we came
road,

end (corner) of the road,

I

gave him his half-crown.

So the old fellow got

off the

and went home

as quiet

and good

as a lamb.

Charles

G. Leland.

TACHIPEN AND WAFODIPEN.

Man

dickdum a Rommany
leste " Sarishan

'dr6 tho
"
%

t:'in,

Te pendum

Yiiv sdvvdas

amAndy and
si

sli(5lled avri,

" Avali, pala, kushto

Shorn matto sa
I clulvvi

l)uti
f

a rye sliould be."

kairdas the yag opr6,

tuvus welldas the tan adre,
" Oh, hcngis the ratfully tuvis
zi
!

A

w6llin adre

mi yakk

!

"

pens

lie,

Sa matto

sa buti a rye could
avrl he wells
liis

Ix;,

Out of the tan

The b6sh

an' the kiVslit in

vast he

lolls

Te

'pr6 the char beshdlla he,

Oillin adroni in

Kommany,

Sa matto

sa buti a rye should be.

The gurgiky milshor

welled an to dick

;

Beshellan Icndy opru the chick,

102

ENGUSH-GIPSY SONGS.
Ta shun
" Dordi
!

lis gill

ache

Rommany
"Mister Lee,

" pencjllan,

Si matto sa buti a rye can be."
Leiskri chAvvi sos liAtchin adoi

Shiin^lla givelli, rov^lla yoi,

"

Ma

mukklis

giller

!

" yoi shells avri,

" A-sikkerin Gorgios

Rommany

Sa miitto sa buti a mush can be."

P^ndom
Te

a hiv 'drin lister's kAn,

lulled the

Eommany Wrd
!

the tan

:

" D6rdi's a kalor

bitcher avri

For a

ciirro livenor

mukkelas
rj^es

pi,

Till am^ndi's

matto as

should be."

The

wriver kurikus a rashd,i

Sar a kalo rudaben vias akAi,

Te pandas

:

" Lessa kek sig ta pT."
'si

Pens man'y, " Adovo

hockeny
"
!

Tute kok'ro's matto as yeck can be
I kfims to dickavit

Eommany

chals
:

Gillin te killin sar Idndy's pAls

But

I

pens as

ac(')Vvo si wAflfodi
si,

To rakker
If a miish

the jib kai G6rgios
is

as

matto as yuv can

be.

E. H.

Palmer.

GIPSY MORALS.

A
"

Gipsy lad

in his tent did lie

:

How

do ye do,

my

boy

1

" said

I.

He

laughs outright, and says, says he,
is

" Things

a-goin' all right with

me,
"
!

I'm drunk as a gentleman need to be

The

girl

she gave the

fire

a poke

;

Into the tent came clouds of smoke
" Bother
it
!

;

I

can hardly see,
into

The smoke has got
As drunk
Out of the
as a

my

eyes," says he,
be.

gentleman need to

tent he bundles quick.

And takes the fiddle and fiddlestick Down on the grass outside sits he.
Singing away in liommany

As drunk
The

as a gentleman need to be.

Clorgios,

whon they heard

the sound,

(Janie

nnining up, and crowded round
sing in lioramanj',

To hear him

104

r.NGLISU-GIPSY SONGS.
Crying, " Oh, look at Mister Lee,

Drunk

as a

gentleman need to be

"
!

The Gipsy's daughter was standing
And, hearing him
"
sing,

by,

began to cry

Oh

!

stop his singin'," she says, says she,

" A-teachin' of Gorgios

As drunk
I

as ever a

Eommany man can be."
in his ear,

went and whispered

Took him
Says
I,

inside to have

some beer

" I've got a shillin', see

Send

for a gallon,
till

and you and me

Will drink
I

we're drunk as gents should be."
t'other week,

saw a clergyman

A
"

black-coat fellow with lots of cheek

You
I,

oughtn't to drink no beer," said he
" You're a-tellin' a
lie

Says

to

me.
can be."

You're as drunk yourself as a
I loves to see a

man

Gipsy lad

A-singin' and playin'

away

like

mad
me,

But

this is

what seems a

sin to

To
If a

talk afore Gorgios in

liommany,

man

is

as

drunk

as a

man

can be.
E. H.

Palmer.
is

The above scene was witnessed by
exactly described in the ballad.

Prof.

Palmer, and

KAIRIN KAMMOBEN.
{Adre

puro

chinis.)

I

PURI dye

si jillo

Ke

'duvo g:lv kenna

puro dad' beshella

Adrin o kitcheraa

Kek mush
K(!k
clii

'dre sar o tdnya,

to

pukk a

lav

:

Mi

shorn akdi, akonyo
!

Av, miro kamlo, av
Dordi, sossi

mandy kainn
yag
pa
?

Push o

lullo

Buti, buti, sar

tute,
!

Tuki-y kushto bak

Mi

<h'ikk('rdmii
'd(')Vo

i

laiii
:

'Die

bnro ker

Kek

krdi choviliaiii
lis

Vel kair

kushtider.

I06

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
INIan

pukkdom'

rink'ni c6vva,
:

A
Y(')i

bArv'lo rye, te sa

das a-mengy Iowa,
aja.

Mi pordowast
Oh, mi

susti rakker,

dukker

Gorgios adr6m,
Buti, buti, sar

pa tute
!

Miro kamlo rom

Oh, R6mmanis shan j6nger

!

Mi

shorn kek dlnneli chi
o W('>ngur,
kai.

Mi gdverdum

Te kek'no jindas

Mi kindum kushto
Iratti,

voro,

kunjerni
sT

O

moriclo

korro
si
!

Av, deari, tdcho

Pano

voro,

pano kWva,

'Drill a moriclo,

Buti, buti, sar

pa

tute,
!

Kamlo
Hdtch

pirrjno

prd'

bor,

mo
pali

clidvo
lis
:

HAtch pfikeno

Kenna mAn

tut'

avava,
:

Sar sig o Rommanis

ENGLISH- G/PS Y SONGS.
Avava,
pdl, ta

I

O/

wusser

mor'clo 'tut o bor

Oh, tute

Asti pessur

Adusta

Idvinor.
?

Lei a chumer, del a chiimer

Avo, avail
Buti, buti,
]\IIro

!

sfir

pa
zl

tute,

kumlo

Janet Tuckey.

GTFSY LOVE-MAKING.
{In the old time.)

My
My

mother's gone a-wandering
to

Away

yonder town

;

father in the alehouse

Is safely settled

down

There's not a girl to gossip There's not a lad at

;

home

:

I'm

all

alone and waiting

So come,
Tell

my

darling,

come

!

me what I'm doing By the fire-light here,
all for

All for you, love,
All for luck,

true love,

my

dear.

1

told a lady's fortune

In that big house hard by

:

No

Gipsy could have done
cleverly than I

it

More

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
promised that she'd marry

TO9

I

A
She

lord with heaps of gokl
filled

my hand

with

silver,

As much
I

as I could hold.
flatter

can chatter,

Gorgios far and near,
All for you, love,
All for luck,
all for

true love,
!

my

dear

Oh, Rommanis are cunning
I

know what I'm about
out.

I

hid away the money,

Where no one found
I

it

bought some
I

flour last

evening

bought

it

secretly
is

Come, now the cake

ready.

And nobody
Meal

to see.

so white,

money

bright,

Baked together

here.

All for you, love, all for true love.

All for luck,

my

dear!

Wait near the hedge

awhile,
stay

lail.

Stay yet a moment,
I'm coming

now

to

meet you,

In our old Gipsy way.

I

lO

ENGUSH-G/PSY SONGS.
I'll

throw the cake right over,
is

Although the hedge
Go, drink to me,

high

:

my
1

lover.
!

Go drink the What is this

tavern dry

First a kiss
;

?—

Plenty, never fear

All for you, love,
All for luck,

all for

true love,
!

my

dear

Janet Tuckey.
It would appear, from an account given by au old Gipsy woman, that formerly, in Rommany wooing, the more valuable gifts were made l)y the girls, possibly as a proof of their

ability to contribute to the expenses of married

life.

She

laid

especial stress'

on the

fact that the

damsels would hide as
it

much money
in a cake,

as

they could out of their earnings, and bake
usually'

which was

thrown

o\'er

the hedge to the
itself

expectant lover.

Among

such people, courtship reduces

to very simple principles.

JUKALO ROMMANIS.

Yeck Rommani

clu'il

te

a Gorgio,

Ye

puri dyeskri dye,

Pdnj chdvor, te a geero

A

chureno didikai
o

Awer
Te

Rom

sos ruzno,

All' br)ro

aprd the chib,

sliordas sa lestur kukero,

'S deep'dlrus 'dr6

Rummaui

jil).

I

dye SOS kali Romni,

Te a

bitto liuiinalo

;

O

churcdo rikkenlas
Sos kek'iiai
l)ut'

stadf,
;

surrelo

Av' o

Rommani

musli sos buno,

Te dickdas

sfirja avri
jiiiiifii

Asfirla sar milkkela

Sos gdvered 'drO

Icster

zi.

1 1

f.ncjLish-gips y songs.

churedo kairdas a kusno
O' papero, leskro

drom

:

Sos

chitti,

aver kenna-slg

Yiiv dlckdas o boro

Rom:
pen

Pa Mister Ayres,

sherrescro,
shcirro to
:

Kun

hdderdas

" Pukkerava

man

tdchodir Idvus

Sliundes tiro niiraben

" I'u jasa fon 'kai to Lundra,

Te I6dder Te rakker

'dr6 y^ckli

gAv

sar Anglat^rra,
jufra Idv

Te shun kekker

Si o deepodiresto pennis

Te
Si

si

adr6 E6mmani,

kek but mi-deari Duvel
Jindlla 'dull'

Idv— te

mi."

1

puri dye dicked kalo,

Te

dias o yrdvk asa,
:

Sa buti to pen

"

Ma

pukker
!

Agal

'this

Gorgio aja

But the churedo dicked

at

mdndy

To

kair sa but' as I could,
kair
o'

Awer

chummcny

sikker

For the pdtser o G6rgio blood.

EXGLISH- GIPS Y SOXGS.
Pens

1 1

Mr

Ayres, sherr^skro,
avri his dukk,

As he mukkered
" Gurnidver^s the

lav, mi-rya,

An'
I piiri

if

tute can

pukker

it,

pukk'

!

sAvvyed at mdndy,

chiiweny chur'do, yuv Dicked putchin
An'
'diu niiri

yakkor,

tale apre the puv.

" GurniAver," pens Ayres, sherr^scro " GumiAver's the lAv I pen
;

;

You

ryas with

lils

jins buti,

But

this ain't in

your jinaben."
tale,

An' we bdshed with our sherros Bdshed pukcni
tAller o bor.

An' never rfikkerdom

chichi.

For the

l.iv

had

kfiried us sar.

Awer

Ayres, sa bOro, sos kuslito,
niili
:

Sa yuv rakkerdas

" Sir,
:

Mandy'll sikker tukey adovvo
Gurniaver's a

cowcumber
'dre lioni'iiis,

For

Giiriti's

a

cow

An' Av, tute

jin.s, is

come,

An' the dui kairen cow-comer,

As

sikker an mdn's a

Kom."
II

I 1

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS. Then we hadered our
sherros apopli,

At

the bOro lilv6ngero,
au' sar o' the an'

An' ye dye

chAvor
shelled, "

mdn shundom mAndy a Kekker
An' the chur'do

Oh/"

gudli

Sa duro

te boro.

No.
te

Penava

te

rukkor

pdnni
:

Kedivvus shdn pukkerin

"

Oh

!

Charles

G. Leland.

DOG-GIPSY.

A

Gipsy and a

Gentile,

A A

grandmother dark and wild,

Five children, and an uncle
half-blood poor

and mild.

But the chief was bold and haughty,

And

often declared to me.
in all the country
lie.

That no man

Was
The The

so deep in their tongue as

crone, a dark old Gipsy,
to hear

Seemed angry

me

speak

;

half-blood sported a stove-pipe,*
I

And
But

saw that the man was

wralc.

tlio

chief looked jirouilly almiit, him.

And
To

every motion said
all
//./«

the world, that
in

things worth kiiowiiii great
liea<l.

Were hidden

• Stove-pipe or chiiuney-pot

;

a high luiL

1

1

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
The
half-blood

was weaving a basket

Of paper,
Mere

quietly,

trifling,

and

as

he wove

it
:

He glanced at the Rommany At Mr Ayres the captain,

Who
"

lifted his

head

to say

I'll tell

you the deepest word now

You
"

ever heard in your day.

You may go from
talk all

here to London,
is

Wherever our tongue

heard
over.
:

;

You may

England

And
It's

never hear sitch a word

the very deeperest tarn, Sir,
is

There

in all

Rommany
word

:

There's none but the Lord above us

As knows

o'

that

—and me."
wiidc,
it
!

The grandmother looked angry.

And

gave him a hurried
as to say
:

As much

" Don't tell

Before these Gentiles,

— think
eflfort.

But the half-breed gave me another.

To do
But

the best I could.

to certainly

make an

For the credit of English blood.

JtNGL/SN-G/PSV SONGS.

II

Said

Mr

Ayres the captain,

And

Ids voice

came

far

from below
master,

;

" Gumidvei^s the word,

my

And
The

if

you can explain

it

— do

!

old woman's laugh was scornful.

The half-breed glanced around

Up

into

my

eyes, inquiring,

Then down upon the ground.
" Gurniaver," said

Ayres the captain
It's

;

" Gnrniaver^s the word.

true

You

gents with your books

knows something.

But
So we

this here is-ahead of you."

sat with our

heads

all

Ijowing,
;

iVnd never a sound was heard

And we

never uttered a whisper

;

We

were crushed by that awful word

But Ayres, though
So he
Tins

great,

was human,

said politely, "Sir,

liere is

wot

is

the nieanin'
:

Gnniidve)'^s a cow-cumbC-r

For a

;/iir/ii's

a cow in (lipsy.
is

And
And
As

dv,

you know,
of 'em

'come
"
I

;'

tlie

two

make cow-come-r.

certain as I'm a liom

I I

8

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
Then we
lifted

our heads together

To

the linguist

all

in a

row

And the grandmother and the children, And the half-blood and I, cried, " Oh /"
I never

heard an utterance
earnest.

So deep and so
I

No.

ween that the wood and water
In that dell are
still

murmuring, " Oh!"

Charles G. Leland.
This incident, for which
precisely as
it

I

am

indebted to a friend, occurred

is

told.

It is not

unusual for a simplestudy,

some extraordisome translation of them from Enfrlish, on the strength of which invention he patents himSometimes a Gipsy is the possessor self as deep Eommany. of one " deep " word, which he imparts only as a great favour. Jfikalo Rommanls, or Dog-Gipsy, is a term like " Dog- Latin." Thus lei, signifying to It is applied to mis-applied words. take or get, would become decidedly jukalo if one were to say " get up lei avri for " get out," or lei up 2)al'i, apre the wdrdo behind on the waggon." -^ Mandy dui" {i.e., I two), for I too,

minded Gipsy to form, nary compound of words,

after long

or

may be occasionally lieard. The Old Professor, so frequently mentioned in " The English Gipsies," on being asked the -word
ior a daisy, suggested that " ,Sprcadamengrd-adre-the-sdla-an'-

pandamengro-adre-tlie-rdtti "
literal

woidd be a very good word its meaning being "A spreading thing (or umbrella) in the morning, and a shutting-up thing at night." My friend, to whom this was said, had suggested that, for want of a better word, daisy might be literally translated divvusko yah, but the Professor would not hear of this— it lacked the dignity and poetry of his own formidable epithet.

SA O

ROMMANY CHAL MUKKED
LEVINOR.

FIIN

*'

Mat, hav
Sar
'sh.^m

acai

!

mu

pur aja

;

tu kushto, puro pAl

?

Tu's dickin buti nAflo, ba,

Tu

chindes tiro kalo

Ijiil.

" 'Kai, pi a ciirro levinor

!

"

"

Kek

Kek, pals kenna

;

for
o'

mandy's kdired
ycck,

A

kurran kek to sum
Siiicti iniri

poori jfiva mdred."
"

" Mdred

!

sar sos \]<Wo

?

" M.in<ly"ll pen,

O

tikno, m.'lndy, yoi tc sar

Aprc a

buti shillo wiin,
t;i1ay

Sos hatched
"
Y(')i'd lulled

a br.ro bor.

a tlkno, to yo
ta

b.-'iv',

A

wdlin

fit

mOr a mush,
fun y« gav,

Atiit yc

puv

fb'ir

Kaired miri

cliori r/ikli (h'lsb.

1

20

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
" Y6i pendas mdncly
'

:

Deari rom,
;

Shorn

shillo

!

Kair a yag apre
ye drom,

'Doi's buti k6shters 'prci

Sa ja
"

t(5

rikk a

bitt' adrd.'

Sa mdndy But

pirries kw, t6 wells
;

sTg apr^ a k6shter-stogg

A
"

bitti

kosbter 'doi I

l^ls,

To

kdir a kushtodirus yag.
'

Mi p(3ndom

:

Java man ad6i
Idii

Ke' 'd6vo kitchema, te

A
"

curro levinor for yoi
Y6i'll

kam

a droppi botched, I jin.'

Awer

a mtiscro 'prd a giy
Icl

Dicked m6ngy
'

ye k6sht,
lis

te

panned

Tu

kalo chor, wus'
tute'll s!g

akAi,
!

Or
"

be stdrriben'd
:

Ad6vo kaired mi hunnalo
'

So's tute

!

bdngis 'dr6 your
tu dlnnelo,
sig avri
!

zl

Mukk m6ngy jal,
Or
" Sa
lei

your truppo

mdndy

hiitched to kur

mi rye

;

But

slggerdir as tu could dick

Yuv pusimegried l6ster gry, And wussered mdndy 'dru

ye chick.

ENGLISH- G/PS V SONGS.
•'

I

2

I

Adovo kaired
Sfi

m*^ divio, pals,
-

mdndy

lulled a cluiri 'vri,
jals,
zi.

An' as to ktcher mi yuv
1

kurs

lis

sig at lister

"

Awer
Te

yliv dolled a purabeu,
;

miri churi pelt alay

Mi

sigabeu sos buckerpen
wAsterm(ingris cliivved apru.

Ye
"

Avo

—yuv

lelled

mi

keti

gAv

:

Ye

bitcberin-mushor sliuned ydv pen,

Kek mukked

a raAndy pen a lAv,
ta starripen.

Td bitcbered mi

" Pasb drd cbone yol imlkked

mi

j;i

,

Awer

yol i)enned mi at ye gav,

Mi-deari juva, tlkno

— sar
ye shlUo
z\,

Had mfdlered
"

'drii

b;iv

!

Adovo

p<')ggercd miri

Vanka man miikk<lom
Kekumi droppi

jjasli

<>

bur

,

An' sensus miindy kams to
l(ivinor."

pT

I-:.

II.

I'AI.MKi:

IVI/V

THE GIPSY LEFT OFF DRINKING BEER.

"

Mat, come

here, lad, don't turn

away

;

How

are you, brother?

I declare
;

You're lookin' awful bad to-day

You've been and cut your long black
" Here, drink a drop
o'

hair.

beer, lad
I can't

!

"

"

No

No
The

thank
o'

ye, boys.

abide

sight

beer
since

now

;

it's

been so

With me
" Died
!

my

poor missus died."
1

How
you.

was that
I,

"

" Well, by your leave,

I'll tell

the babe, and she

Was

camping, one cold winter's eve.
little

Against a

blackthorn

tree.

" Across the open field the

wind

Came

blowin',
she,

fit

a'most to kill

A

man, and

but just confined.
chill.

Poor deary, took a nasty

ENGIJSII-G/PSY SONGS.
" Says she to

12$

me

:

'

Matthe^v,
the
fire,

my

dear,

I'm cold

;

make up
o'

lad,

do

!

There's lots

faggots close

by

here,

Just run outsitle and get a few.'
"

So

ofiF

I goes,

and on the road
;

I sees

some

nice dry faggot-ricks

And takes from one To make a better
"

a

little load.

fire o' sticks.

Says

I

:

'

I'll

just go over there

To yonder

public-house, and
o'
it

buy

A

half-a-pint
She'll like

beer for her

;

warmed up by and

by.'

"

A

mounted p'liceman from the town
seen

Had
'

me
'

take the sticks, and so

You

black

thi(,'f,

throw them faggots down,"
'
!

Says he,
"

or off to jail you go

That made
'

my
!

temper
I

far
'

from cool

;

Curse you

'

cried,

you've got no right

To touch me.
Or take
'•

Let

me

go,

you

fool

!

off that there coat

and

light

I

An«l

I stoofj

up

to fight, of course

;

l)Ut quicker

than a wink, he rodo
iiis

Straight at me, ppurrin' of

horse,

And knocked me

over on the road.

1

24
"

ENGLISH-GIPS V SONGS.
That only made me twice
So out
I pulls

as

mad

;

my

pocket-knife,
lad,
life.

And

as

he come to seize me,

I struck at him, to take

lii.s

"

He gave a sudden turn I stopped, And saw at once that I had missed
chance that time
;

My

my

knife had dropped

;

The handcuffs were upon
" Yes, off he took

my

wrist.

me

to the jail

!

The beaks heard what
But wouldn't
let

he'd got to say,

And
'•In

locked

me tell my tale. me u}), right straight
let

away.

two months' time they
in the village I

me go
so.

But

was

told,

My
"

babe, the wife that loved

me

Had

died that same night in the cold.

My

heart was broken by that there,
I'd lost,

For those

and loved so dear
I
o'

;

And now you know why
To touch another drop

don't care
beer."

E. H.

Palmer.

It should be stated in explanation of this poem that Gipsies reverence their dead by abstaining frctm some favourite food.

E^rGL/SH-G//'SY SO.VGS.

12$

amusement, or

habit.

This

is

generally connected in some

way with
will, in

the deceased.

Thus, a Gipsy having smoked a pipe

with a friend the

last time he met him, and bisfore his death, memoriam, refrain from tobacco lor several years. (See "The EngUsh Gipsies and their Language," chap. iv. Triibuer&Co., 1S73.)

KUSHTO DUKKERIN.

"

Kai

SOS tu, mlro kamlo,
rAttescri
?

Av^ssa sa

Te kai

sos tu,

mi tacho kamlo,
"
1

Tiro wongur's sar ndshered avri
"

Sh6mas 'drm o
Kai
sar
i

w6sii, miri kamli,
gill,

chiriclor

Kai o

bitti
i

rukki^ngro li6ckers,
kill.

Kai

tani kukalos

" Sos a

Sar

E6mmani dye ad6i, kali sims o wen
:

Y6i dickdas

'dr6 miri wdstor,

Te pukkcrdas dukkerben.
"

Y6i p(indas mi rummav' a
Sar safrdni bdlyor,

rani,

Sar rlnkeni

nlli

yakkor,
ruzhior."

Te chdmor sim

ENGUSH-G/PS Y SONGS.
" Miri yakkor sbdn sar
nili,

I

2

Miri balyor slidn safrdu "" Lis

mukkdas Iowa, mi

kamli,

Shuiiav tu rum^ssa m4n."

Janet Tuckey.

THE PLEASANT FORTUNE.

"

Where

have you been,

my

darling,
]

That you come so late at night

And where have you

been,

my own

love,
?

That your purse has grown

so light

" 1 have been in the forest, darling
I

;

have heard the wood birds

sing.

Where

the squirrel picked nuts for the winter.
the fairies had

And
"

made

a ring.

A

Gipsy came through the forest

She was wrinkled, brown, and old

And
To
"

she looked in

my

hand, and
slie told.

1

listened

the fortune that

She told me

I

soon should marry

A lady
A
And

with yellow hair

lady with flower-blue eyes, love.

cheeks like the wild-rose

fair."

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
' '

1

29

J/y hair

is

yellow as sunshine,

My
•'

eyes are violet-blue "

Ah

!

wasn't

it

worth the money
I'll

To hear

that

marry you ? "

Janet Tuckey.

Shun

the hunualo

o'

the panni,
pdnni,

The hdnnalo bore
Huunalln
'Cos
it

sarasa',

can't jal anduro,
!

An' guryin aja

M.

C.

Hear

the roar of the water, great and raging sea,
on,

Of the

Raging ever
Because
it

can get no further,
all

And

roaring

alone

*
!

C. G.

L

* The

Rommany original
bciii;,'

of these lines

was the utterance of

a tent-Qip.sy on

asked what was his word for " roar."
it,

There
rage.

ia

a doublo lucauing iu

since hunnalo also siguilicB

I

MULLO BALOR.

Oh

!

I

jassed to the kdr,
I tried to

An'

mang

the baler

Tried to

mang

the mullo brdor.

When

I jassed to the k^r.

But the rani wouldn't del
For she p^nnas
les 'os

it,

drdbberd,

For she p^nnas

les 'os

drAbberd,

Pcnn's the E6mniany chdl had drubbed the
balor.

M.

C.

DEAD

PIG.

I

WKNT

to tlic I

farmhouse
a pig had died.

Where

knew
it

And

to get

I

emplored 'em

Till I pretty nearly cried.

But the lady wouldn't give

it,

And
As

she 'inted rather free

'twas pisoncd

by some Gipsy,

And

that Gipsy

man was

vie.

Charles G. Lkland.
Tliis trifle,

which

I

heard

buii;^

hy a CdpHy

in Bri;,'liloii, will

recall to

many

readers the ballad in

Mr

I'orrow's " ilonnnany

Rye."
their

It is said tliat poisoning; pigs for the .'iake of feeding
fle.sh is
;

on

no longer practised but I venture to jussert, with some confidence, that it is by no means one of tlie lost arts, and that a wcnkness for mnllo hftnlor, or jtork which died by " the hand of CJod" (or by disease), as the Continental f lipsics say, is certainly not one of the lost tastes, as I doubt whethtT there is a real Cjip?y, old or young, in Knglaml who has not

I

32

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
it.

eaten

This

is

a subject wliicli has, however, never Leen

really understood,

and

it is

a gross injustice to base on

it

an

indiscriminate appetite for refuse food of any kind.

No

Gipsy

would touch

horse-flesh,

and

I

have known one who professed

a fondness for mullo baulor, but did not like anchovy paste

and similar dainties. Thus, the Chippeway Indians, who have some eccentric fancies as to food, do not like oysters, though truth compels me to admit that one among them whom I once met went far in the opposite direction. When camping in the wilderness in 1868, at the western extremity of

Lake Superior, I sent a tin of oysters to a dozen Indians who were eating their dinner at a little distance from where I was The open canister, containing a seated with my friends. quart of the shell-fish, was gravely passed from one to the other without examination or comment, until it came to the last man, who as gravely lifted it to his mouth, and, almost without a pause, drank off the entire contents to the last oyster, and with it all the liquid. On asking some explanation of this extraordinary proceeding, I was simply told, " Him likee um oyster." There was something very Gipsy-like in the grave manner in which this was done, and I find myself continually detecting a great similarity in the Eommany saying and doing of many strange things, common to Indians, Gipsies, and
Negroes, which
it

would be extremely

difficult to

explain or

even

set forth to a " Gorgio."

very large caste or

There is a whose names, Dom and Domni, strongly suggest Rom and Eomni, who are probably in part ancestors of the European Gipsies. These Doms, who are wanderers like Gipsies, resemble them in the peculiarity of eating " dead " animals, particularly pigs. The Doms also carry out corpses, flay beasts, and exercise other functions, all of which were for centuries peculiar to the Roms in Europe, and which have remained their sj^ecialty
to mullo baulor, the taste is traditional.
class of outcasts in India,

As

ENGLISH- GIPS V SONGS.
to the present generation in

I

33

Denmark.*

In

all

the countries

in

which they have

lived,

nothing has ever been so character-

istic

of the Roms as this fancy for rmillo banlor nothing has tended more to separate them from Gorgios in popular preju-

dice,

and there

is

nothing to which they have adhered with

greater obstinacy.
fact that

One reason
is

for this is unquestionably the

mullo baulor

extremely agreeable to Gipsy palates.

I have never eaten it myself, but I have eaten hedgehog, which is really very nice, being tender, with a flavour like pheasant and Gipsies have assured me that it is precisely
;

and hardly to be distinguished from it. Another Rommany excuse for such food is that it is wholesome, and tliat no one was ever yet made ill by eating it, which is certainly more than can be said of the best of
like mullo baulor,

game with a haut
that mullo baulor,

gout.

It

is,

however, more than probable
evil effect
is

who
ing,

lives in

which produces no the open air, and who

on a Gipsy,
All
tastes

constantly exercis-

would

half- poison a kerengro, or house- dweller.

Gipsies

who have

eaten mullo baulor persist that
;

it

better than

any other food whatever

and

I

am

quite con-

vinced that they feel a certain pride in being emancipated

from a prejudice to which "Gorgios" are enslaved. I have very little doubt that the legends of ghouls, whicli are simply the supernatural form of the Aghora (or Ogre) sect in India, sprung from the extravagant emancipation from all "prejudice" which was developed by advanced thinkers among

and it is not entirely impossible that botli Western cynicism have their origin in this Oriental source. It may yet be found that the orthodox Oriental prohibition of pork as food involved more than is now known, and that it was truly a jnice de resistance between
sages
;

Hindu

Eastern and

• Vide Tatorc og Natniandafolk Kopeiihagen, F. Ilcgel, 1872.

i

Danmurk.

Af

F. Kyrliiml.

1

34

ENGLISH- GIFS Y SONGS.
ultra -emancipationists of
so
to

the

early

ages

and
so

tlie

"Conif

servatives,"

speak.

Christianity,

progressive in

many respects, may judge by
that,

avoided this degree of
the
significant

Radicalism,

we
of

miracle of the driving
It
is

the herd of swine into the sea.

tolerably apparent

from the earliest Egyptian times, the wild boar or pig was identified with the evil principle, just as the emancipated or Free Thinkers have been, very naturally indeed, by the Orthodox and it may be that while those who dared to eat pork which had been butchered were simjily wicked, those who went a step farther, and ate mullo baulor on principle, were "damnable." More than one of the mysterious sects of heretics in the Middle Ages had the pig for a symbol. It would be curious to know if eating pork ever formed a charge against the Knights Templars. The reader will excuse
;

the length of these very speculative remarks, should he
possible that there exists in

deem

it

in such unnatural diet

whose persistency was partially derived from early Indian
class

England a

illumination.

petulAngro te o puro beng.

Tute's shuned o

R6mmany

drom, shai4n,
;

Ta pen
But

sor religionus h6ckerpen

I jins

ke

raslidior sor

Ucheni shan,
tan,

For ml dickdom o b6ng adr6 a

Yek

divvus, sar

minno yackerpen.
'pre a p6v,

Miindy hdtcherduiu

Arati, tal6 yeck boro

rukh

;

Awer mdndy

ndstis jfnned sur to sOv,
'drc
si

Te chummany

ml Ankaired

to

rciv,

" Tiro bitti myla

welled to dukh."
;"

Pcndiim mandy, "luQks dick avri

Sa

avil ad re o bd.v I wells,
od<'»i

Te To

in the rati,

avaU

!

IIatch6lla o myla, to kushto
Iciskor

si,

habbcn

o'

pus yuv

Idlls.

" Ildvacdi,"

ml rakk'dom,

tdchipen,

Mendui shAmas kushti

pdls,

1

3

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
Yuv'd prAster apre
Chiv
his
at

my
de

shunaben,
till

nak

in

my

vdst,
o'

tute'd

pen
chAls.

'D6vo myla sos y6ck

Kommany
jins sar,

Awer

'd6vo chirus

—ml kek

Awer jindom kushto

the trAsh I lulled
bdr,

Hatch^lla pukkeno sims a

Awer
The
Te

jailed

anduro sarasar,

durodirus te

mAndy

willed.

pal'

a bittus yuv yilzhered avri,

Te

the sala jindom the tAchipen,
si

D6vo sl6mmado myla
Te minno

h6ckeny,
si

puro bengs noko k6kero

sos chido dr6 pAnderpen.

KAvakai's kek tAcho te f6ki pen,

K6

sar

o'

de ch6vveny

R6mmany

chAls

Shan Duvvel-nAsherdo wAfFodipen
For o Bengis
av6lla a durriken len,

P6nsi k6ti sar wavior f6ki

— pals

!

E. H.

Palmer.

SMITH AND THE DEVIL.

Mebbe
To
For

you've heard

it's

the
;

Roramany way

say that religion
I

is lies

But

know

it's all

true

what the parsons

say,

I

saw the Devil myself one Jay,
these 'ere blessed eyes.

With
I

was campin' out on a
I couldn't sleep a
I

field

one night,

But
For

wink
fright.
all right,

suddenly got a sort of a

And

I fancied tlie

donkey warn't

Now
Then

'twas prophecy, that, I
"

tliiiik.

I says,

I'll

take a look around,"

So out

in tlip air I

wont;
half-light I foiirxl
safe

And

there in the

dim

Tliat the

donkey was standin'

ami souml,

A-grazin' outside the tent.

"Come

huj) !" I says, says

I,

to the mok'',

For him and

me was

friends

I

38

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
An' he
alius

knew me when

I spoke,

An' he used to cantor up and poke
His nose into

my

hands.

But

this 'ere time,

and

I

needn't say

That

I

thought

it

rather rum,
as
still

Though he stood The nigher At
last

as a

lump

of clay,

Yet the furder he seemed
I tried to

to get

away

come.

he wanished out of sight,

And

I

knew, when day came round,
I'd followed all

That the donkey

through the night
'twas light

Was
I

the Devil himself,

for

when

saw

my own

in the pound.

It's

a wrong idea most folks have got.
like

That Rommany chaps
Haven't any dear

me

God

to look after the lot

For the Devil he tempts us quite as hot

As any one

else,

you

sec.

E. H.

Palmer.

This story was told by a Gipsy in Suffolk,

who

firmly

believed, like the rustic in the old Joe Miller story, that he

had actually seen the Devil or a ghost in the likeness of a
" great ass."

SA LIS JINSA TU?

•'

Oh, jfnsa

tu,

ml

chdvi, sa rinkeni
"
?

tiite

shin

"
?

" Avo, dvali, miri dye
"

Awer

si

kek dickam(*ngro
tute
lis,

'drd
1

moro

bitti tAn,

Sa jlnsa

miri chi

" I f6ki 'pr6 o drcjm,

G6rgio

te o E6ra,

8h4n

sig ta

pukker mdndy

sa rinkeni

mi
f6ki

sliom."

" 'Drd sdvo jih,

mi

cluivi,

pukkelan

i

lis

?

Ma

pen mcngy

liockaVjen,

ml

chi

Rakker yul Gorgiones or tdcho Kcimmanis 1"
" Oh, ydl ndsti rakker chichi, miri dye

Y(d

susti

pen kek

idv,

Awer

dick aja te sdv,
i

Te jinava shorn

kamlidiri juva 'drc o g4v

"
!

Jankt Tuckky.

HOW no YOU KNOW IT?
my

"

Oh, do you know,
face
?

daughter, that you've a pretty

" Surely, and surely, mother mine
"

"
!

But

see, there's

no mirror, not one
it,

in all the place,
"
1

So how do you know

daughter mine

" Oh, up the road and down,

The "fair
They
tell

folk

and the brown,
no beauty
like

me

there's

myself in

all

the

town."
"

And how do
this

they talk to you

1

— make
;

haste to answer

And tell me no fibs, daughter mine Do they speak the Gorgio language, or good
manis
"
1

old

Rom-

" Oh, they needn't say a word, mother mine
Tliey need only smile so bland,

;

And
There
isn't

I'm quick to understand
all

such a beauty as myself in

the land

!

Janet Tuckey.

ENGLISH- GIPS Y

SO.WGS.

1

4

I

tAni mullos
sar
i

'pid o

d6eyav
o'

Shan

sani

chumer
i

the bdv

lullopen apr6

pdbor chdm
o'

Li

si

i

tdtti

chumer

the

kdm

;

Te 'dovo

riiikeni dipplor tiri inui

Shdn mlii chumer,

oh,

mi kameli

TiiK

little

bubbles floating on the wave
kisses

Are

all soft

which the west wind gave

The

luscious

glow upon the peach's face
;

Bears blushing witness to the sun's embrace

And

those two dimples, Sweet,

tliat
is it

come and
so
?

go,

Tell talcs of true-love kisses

/

CHIRIKL

"

PuRO

p4l,

pen y6ckcovva am^ngy,
stars 'drd chlrns
?

Pukka Rommanescro
" Avo, rya.

"

Stdrya shan shirkis,

D6vo
Te

lAv fon chiricli avdlla.

Chlricli shun^lla pensi shirk!
i

shirk'li

shAn sar dodni

chircli

:

Pa

yfil

mukkcran duro
chlricl6r aratti
si

prdller sh^rro.

Yagni

jdna
the chlrus.'

Te o chone
Y6i av6lla
'Pr6

rani

o'

sig jin6s' sarrfiti

puv

ta poller Ifikis kdnnis."

Charles

G. Leland.

THE STARS.

"

Tell me

tliis,

old friend,

if

you can

tell it,
?

What's the
" Yes,

Rommany

for stars in

heaven

my

master.

Stars with us are shlrkis,
it.

And from

chlridis or birds, I take

For the birds and

stars are like in nature

:

Stars are only birds of light in heaven,

Flying far above our heads for ever
Birds of
fire

which only

fly in

darkness

:

And

the moon's the lady of the heavens,
nightly, certain in her coming,

Coming
O'er the

meadow,

just to feed her chickens."

ClLiRLES G. LeLAND.
Chirki, or ghirici, a star in

Rommany, may

pos.sil)ly

have
tlic

Homfithing in

common

witli the Per.->ian chirkh^

meaning

aky, or chirn/ih, a lamp.

The

i<lca Iktc; oxjircssod

is

given very nearly in

tlie»woriii«

of an old 'Jijisv.

/

PURI rOMMANY DYE'S DUI CHAVIOR.

Jassin yek divvus adr6 a gdv,

A
Te

cla6vvany bitti k6r I Mtched,

a puri

R6mmany, Bunce by ndv
'dre

Ak6nya

ad6vo hatched.

" Sar'shdn tu,"

p6ndum,

" piiri

dye

"
?

Te
(Tu

my

stdrdy leldum slidrro avri

s4sti k^ravit

sims a rye,

Katn^ssa tu rakker 'dr^ R6mmany).
" S6ssi," putched

mdndy, " deari dye,
?

A dye
Te
"

sims tute kairengri shdn

Kai's tute

mukkered your

f6ki,
1

kai

%

kai tu cbldas o bitti t4u

Ah

!

a cli6vveny juva
'dre

mdndy

shorn,

Sor ak6nya

puripen I jiv

Buti chirus ndsherdum miro rom,

Te

as for tdnya, I've

kek

to chiv.

ENGL/SH-GIPSY SOXGS.
"

1

45

Awer
Yek

dui chdvior
o'

mdndy

lells,

l^ndy's riimmor'd a Gorgiko

mush

;

Ah

!

rya, to waffodipen she wdlls,
rdtfelo

For the
"

Gorgio kairs her

dusli.

Kek
Tho'

kamiiva
lier

lati

sa l)uti

ajfi,

waffody jhvin

it

kairs

me

r()v

;

Awer yek

so

kamava

i

kushtidir,

Sov(5lla ad re o kdngri pov."

E.

H. Palmer.

THE OLD WOMAN'S TWO DAUGHTERS.

Walking about in a village, On a wretched little hovel
Where was
living a lonely

I

came

once,

Gipsy dame,
of Phoebe Bunce.

Who
"

went by the name
are you,

How

mother

%

"

And

as I spoke

I lifted

my

hat from off
to talk to

my

head
folk,

(If

you want

Gipsy

You must
"

act like a gentleman born

and bred).

My

dear old lady,"

I

asked, " how's this?

A

house

isn't surely
left

the place for you
1

Where have you
Your
tent
;

your folk

I

miss
1

why, where have you put that to

" I'm a poor old
I live in
I lost

woman, and

all

alone
;

my

old age as

you see

my

husband long years agone,
is

And

as for tents, there

none for me.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
"

14/

But two dear daughters

I still

have

got,
;~

One
Ah,
sir

of 'em's married an English lad
!

but hers

is

a hard, liard

lot,

For the wretched fellow he
"

treats her bad.

The

love as I bears to her
to think of her

is

small,
I often
all.

Though

sorrow

weeps

;

But the one

as I loves the best of
sir,

In a lonely churchyard,

she sleeps."
E. H.

Palmer.

Tlie

above conversation, recalling
it

"'

We

are Seven,"

is

given

nearly as

was

carrieil

on between an old Gipsy

woman

anil a friend of the writer.

LEL RAKi
Lel
Jal
i

rak, pal

graiya

—hatch apr5 —piaster
!

!

PrAster pa tiro miraben
rye av6lla, tAchipen,

Tu
Te

lurdas o graia kaliko
vel

;

yuv dicksa

tute,

Yuv
Te

sh6llela avri

talk yakengro,

bitcherav tute ke stAripen.
lel

Lel vin,

trAd

!

J. T.

Look sharp, brother hurry away Run Run the horses I'm telling you Run for your life
! !

!

true,

The

farmer's coming
stole the horse
if

— the one
from yesterday
;

You And

he gets a glimpse of you,

He'll call the police,

and then the beak

Will keep you

in jail for
!

many a

week.

Take care

!

beware

J. T.

MIRI

KA MELT PIRRtNI.

JiNAVA

m<5

tdcho ndv

Ku-shtiko c6vvar adre o gav

Aver kushtidiro a m^ngi
Si mlri

z\

kameli pirryni.
adriii o tan,
:

Bdshava sunlivviis

Penava

i

foki, " Sarishan
b(5sli,

"

Aver

Itushava

ta dlckav o

mui

0' miri kameli pirryni.

Kaniuva

te vol

a boro rye

\

Kamava
To

ta

l(5l

a kQslito gry
i

:

Aver wiisserava

dui avrl,

chuincr mi kameli pirryni.
CiiAi:i,i;s

G. Lklanh.

THE GIRL WHO LOVES ME WELL.

I

CAN

tell

you the name right down

Of the

prettiest things in all the
isn't

town
sell

:

But there
So

a thing the people

fine as the girl

who

loves

me

well.

I sit in

And,

"

my Gipsy tent all daj-, How are you all " to the
%

folk I say
tell,

;

But

I'd sit for a year,

and

it's

truth I
loves

For a glimpse of the

girl

who

me

well.

Oh, I'd like to he a lord, of course,

And

I'd like to

have a hunting-horse

;

But the one and the other
For a
kiss

I'd gladly sell,

from the

girl

who

loves

me

well.

Charles

G. Leland.

set

This ballad is founded on no especial incident, but may lie down as Roniniany, havin;^ met willi a cordial reception
tent-Gipsies.

among

R OMMANY JINA BEN.

Apre
Yag

a ratti 'dre a shillo
'vri

wen

poggerella

adr6 a ker,

Ye mushor
Yeck
"

sar for yngeris miraben
:

Praster, te k(ikkeno jins sa ta kair
rikk'la p4ni, te a

waver

shells

:

Huker ye ciWvus
gruvni gujers te
liitti

sar apr6 ye
i

puv
;

"
1

Ye
Ve

grdsni dells

tlknos te

i

juvas ruvv.

Awer
An'

a chovveni RummaTiy jiiva wells,

h.itcliin

push o ye yagescro club,
penla

Hotclit'lla w.lstor,

Kom'ny

jib

:

"

A

yag's a kushti ccWva Mii; o wen,
sT

Yeck's wfifro bfik

wfivior's

kainmabcn."
K.

H. Tai-mku

GIFS Y FHIL SO PHY.

One

wintry night, upon a certain farm, broke out
;

A

fire

the folks in great alarm,
to Jo, all run about.

Not knowing what

Some bring up
The oxen

water, others only shout
"
!

" Fetch out the things into the field here, quick

bellow,

and the horses kick

The

little

children and the

women

cry

;

But a poor Gipsy who was passing by
Stood near the flames
tliat

from the building sprung,
:

And warmed
"

her hands, and said in Gipsy tongue

A fire

in winter does

one good to see

;

What's your bad luck may prove good luck
E.

to

me

!

H. Palmer.

FRANK COOPER.

A
A

l6rdus

vias

kt^ti

wd]g6ro

Eya

te

raniya shan bdrveli

tano rye te a kaiuelo

Avo, mi pirrynl, avali

O

rye yuv dickdas Frank Cooper

ad(ji

Avo, mi pirrynl, avali
Sar buti dudeni
pivlioi

For

lurdi.s an'

swolli sa barvoli.

If'irdus

sliundas

mi Rummani pdn,
sa barveli

" Well dn,

mi ryor
lei

Sig 'dusta you

your l6vvy again

If you'il wfisser

my

k6shters, avali.

\

" Dick at
I)i(k at
Il.itchin

tlie
tlif^

siggabens, rya, dick
nlitti, avali,

al/mgus sar of a rikk,
ryor sa barveli.

lldtcliin' for

I

54

ENGLISH-GIPS Y SONGS.
" Trin koshters a li6rra shdn kavacui,

bdvol pudela, avali,

Kushto ta del

at the pivli6i

Kushto
"

for ryor sa barveli.

Yeck

nvittus besliella 'pr6 l6ster kosh,

Sdvvyin, salerin, avali

But kenna-sTg tute

vel k(5relen dusli,
dovali.

An' muller the monkeys,
"

Ryas chdvor,

pirri akdi,

Kenna
Lei
o'

si

o chAnsus, avali

mi

koshters, kushto rye

Si pydss for foki sa barveli."

O

rye las Cooper's kcjshter ad6i,

But adusta,

sa ryor barveli, at the pivlioi,

Te wussered adr6m
Te

lelldas a butus, avali.
o'

But vrhen pash

the pivli6i sos mored

An the rye had lulled akova-li, Yuv lAtched his boro chdkko was
Sa ydv
sas a-wusserin

chored,

avali.

A

boro chukko te twenty b4r

:

For the rye

sos yeck o' the bars^eli
te sar,

An' his pani wdsteni

Ndsho

te jlllo, avali.

EiWGLrSH-GlPSY SONGS.
Pukkerdas
"

rj'e

o Ii6mmani chal
si

Miro chukko

choredo, avali

An' tute a-hatchin just anerjal

-

Sa p^nnas

tiite o'

dovali

?

" If f6ki SOS lodderin miro ker,
Chorerii foki or bArveli,

"Fore I'd

mukk

'em be luredo I'd sigger mer,
ilvali

An'

tute's

a Romraani,
si

"
!

Frank Cooper

pordo

o'

kalo ratt,

As sane
To shun

as yeck kekava-li,
if

But willed as pano as
o' tlie

he were skat,

r/a, avali.

Frank Cooper's a mush k6

si

bunnak»,

Ydv'U kekker kdravit waver-li
An' the beng never (licked more hunnalo

Than

I^'raid'C

when

lu;

sliunavit, avali.

Yiiv hdtclied a slggus pukkenus,

Te shuned

o'

the ryas

l;lva-li

;

Then prdstercd
'Dr(i

avrl sims divius,

the sig

o'

the mushor, avali.
his kokcro,

Th(r rye never

dukkered
o'

For yuv sos y^ck

the bArveli,

An' patscred the Cooper tdcheno,

So

yiiv rakkcreil Ali.sa, avali.

156
Till the

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

R6mmani

chAl vias pala(i6i,

Yuv

bashed an' shuned lakis Idva-li
ap6pli to
It^ster plvli6i

When

Frank willed with the chukko,

avali.

Y6ck

o' l6stis

yakkor

s6s kalo aja,

An' the waver wasn't waver-li,

As

if

yuv'd dicked the btog te sa

Since yliv dicktav the r/a, avali.

" 'Kai's tiro w6ngur, mi rye," pens he, " 'Kai's the I6vvy sa barveli
'Kai shan
i

pani wasteni
tdcho, avali
0'

Dick

if it's

" Mdndy's tukno

hdtchin sa longadur,

Awer man
An'
I

nasti k^ravit waver-li,

For with kurom^scros a mush must kur,
had ta kur
for
it

— avali

"
!

rye lulled listers putsi avrl,

An' Idtched the w6ngur sa

barveli,

An' d6lled p4nj bdr to the R6mmani,

As a
An'

rye should k6ravit, avali.
the pivlioi

if tute'll jal to

At

the

Epsom

prdsterin, waver-li,

Tute can dick Frank Cooper ad6i

An' Alls

yCivs juva, avali.

ENGLISH-GJPS Y SONGS.
Si tute kamdss' mutterm^ngerl,

I

5

/

You
An'
if

can

lei it

fon Idns kekavi-li,
~

Alls the juva isn't avrl,

Y6i'll

dukker your raui

— avali
G.

Charles

Leland.

FRANK COOPER.

A A

LORD he went
Oh, lords are
little lord,

to the fair one day,

rich,

and

their ladies too

!

and

his

heart was gay,

Yes,

my

darling, I tell

you

true.

The

lord he

saw Frank Cooper there
you true
!

;

Yes,

my

darling, I tell

With

a lot of cocoa-nuts at the

fair.

All for lords and gentlemen too.

The
"

lord he heard

Frank Cooper shout

Come, noble

gents, here's the

game

for

you

;

You'll win back your money, you needn't doubt,
If

you throw these here
a chance,

sticks, I tell

you

true.

"

Look what
Look

my
be.

noblemen, see

!

at the nuts, don't I tell

you true \

All along in a

row they

Waiting

for

gentlemen just

like you.

ENGLISH-GIPS Y SONGS.
" Three sticks a penny,

1

59

my

lords, look here

!

And

the wind's a blowin' just right for you

:

You'll hit the cocoa-nuts, never fear,

And win
'

the lot

— don't I
its

tell

you true

I

Every cocoa-nut's on

stick
!

So pert
IJut

— why,

they might be laughin' at you
fall

take a throw, and they'll
you'll kill tlie

so quick,

And

monkeys,

I tell

you

true.

' Gentlemen's sons, won't

you step

this
;

way

^

Here

is

your chance,

I tell

you true

Come, take hold of the
This
is

sticks

and play

the

game

for swells like you."

The

lord took twenty or thereabouts
lot, as

Took a

gentlemen do,

And he fired away at the cocoa-nuts, And punished them well, I tell you
Jiiit

true.

when

lialf

the imts were tumbled

down
tlirew

With

so clever a

hand the gentlciuan

He

found that ids overcoat was gone,
h(! l<-ft

So

off

playing

— ay, that

is true.

A

beautiful coat

and twenty pouml
rich

The

lord

was

and the coat was new
thrown on
true.
tin- Lfiouiid.

And

his light kid gloves he'il

All of "em stolen

I tell

you

1

60

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
lord he said
coat

The

:

"

Why,
I tell

this is too

bad!

My

is stolen,

you true

;

And you

were near

it,

my

Gipsy lad
shall I

Where's the

thief,

and what

do

?

" If I had a guest," the lord he said,
" Eich like myself or poor like you,

'Fore I'd see

him robbed

I'd sooner
is

be dead,
"
!

And

you're a Gipsy

— ay, that
is

true

Frank Cooper's blood

as

dark as night,

As black

as the pot in

which Gipsies stew

But you'd think he was

shot, he

grew

so white

When

he heard the lord
as

yes, I tell

you
be,

true.

Frank Cooper's

proud as proud can

As proud

as the devil

and

all his

crew
than
lie

And never looked When he heard
He

devil

more

fierce

the gentleman

— ay, that's true.
;

said not a word, the Gi])sy

man.

But stopped and heard the gentleman through

And

then, as

if

he was mad, he ran
tell

Where
The

the crowd was thickest, I

you

true.

lord didn't trouble himself a bit

He was one of the rich, and they are few He trusted the liommani, as was fit. And talked to Alice, as gentlemen do.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

l6l

He sat him down by He let her chatter,
Till

her side, and then
as Gipsies do,

Frank came back

to the nuts again,

Bringing the great-coat as good as new.

One
As

of his eyes
its

was

as black as coal,
;

And
if

fellow

was much the same colour too
all

he'd seen the devil and
left

Since he

the lord

—yes,

I tell

you

true.

" Here's the money, " Here's your

my

lord," said he,
all safe for

money

you

;

And

the fine white gloves, why, here they be
if

Look

they're right

— have
man

I told

you true

1

" I'm sorry that you've been kept waiting so,

But

I

came

as fast as a

could do
fight,

For with fighting chaps one must

you know.

And
The

I

had

to fight for

it,

that

is

true."

lord he took his purse from the coat,
;

And found his money all right and true And he gave the Gipsy a five-pound note
Gave
it

so free, as a lord should
to the

<lo.

Now
With

if

you go

Epsom
I

race,

You'll see
all ilia

Frank Cooper,
cocoa-nuts

promise you,

in tlicir place,

And

Alice, his wife,

1 tell

you

true.

l62

ENGUSH-GIPSY SONGS.

And And

if

you wish

for a

cup of

tea,
it

They'll boil the kettle and give
if

you

;

Alice

is

there,

your

lady'll see
tell it true.

She'll tell her fortune,

and

Janet Tuckey.
Frank Cooper was told me, not by the Gipsy by a gentleman who was present at the occurAs the affair was very much rence described in the ballad.

The

story of

himself, but

to Frank's credit, I

have not hesitated

to give his
I

name.

It

may

be observed that, for the sake of the rhyme,

have taken
class, in ex-

a liberty not

uncommon

in ballads of a
Idvali,

humble

tending Jmv (a word) to
readers

waver (other) to waverli, and

kekdvi (kettle) to kekdvali.

For the information of those

who do

a cocoa-nut
sticks,

know what the game of cocoa-nuts, or cock-shy, may be, I would explain that stout
not
feet long, are

about four

stuck either into the ground

or into coarse baskets of matting filled with earth.

These are

placed in a row, about four feet apart, and behind them at a
little

distance there

is

a screen of canvas.

On

the end of each

stick a small cocoa-nut rests, not fastened, but

simply balanced. The player hires from the proprietor of the game a bundle of short sticks, about two feet in length, for which he pays
a halfj^enny each,

more

or less

according to the bargain

driven and the quantity taken.
to displace the cocoa-nuts,

He

then places himself about

twenty-five feet from the stakes, and throws, his object being

he can knock them
to prevent the sticks of the jday.
It
is,

off.

which become his property when The canvas screen is indispensable
inflicting injury

ous for

beyond the limits and very dangerthe Gipsy attendants, who, liowever, far from avoiding
of course, a rough game,

from

the sticks, often put themselves in the

way

of receiving serious

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
injuries,

l6'

hoping to get a present from the thrower.
I

Their

indifference to such hurts is very remarkable.

have seen

hastily

Frank Cooper with a long and deep cut. across his head, bound up, playing away in a few minutes, and crying

out the characteristic phrases embodied in the ballad, as if nothing had happened. I may add, with regard to cocoa-nuts,
the Gipsies believe, or pretend to believe, that one given by them as a present brings that hick which they are always

bestowing so freely on others, but of which they have so themselves, as Callot observed long ago.

little

D UKKERIN.

Chiv a

tani bit o s6naki lovo
o'

Adre the vdst
An'
I'll

de

Rommany

dye

;

pen yer a dukkeripen,

my
chi.

rani

The

kushtiest ever I panned a

There's a kushko pano rye as

kams you,

An' tute kamessa l6s tdcho aja An'
'd6is

a waver, a kalo geero,

Merin

for tiro

kam

kenna.
pirreno ydk, chi,

Te
Te

tute'll

rummer the
be dye

An' a t4chi r6mni'll tute k6r
tute'll
o'

dui ch4vyor,
till

Te

jiv adr6

kushkipen

you m6r.

An'

if

mdn'y

jins so the staror pukker,

To-divvus'll riggur you kdtteni.

D6rdi

!

akai's

a rye a wellin

That

jins

my

dukkcrin tdcho

si

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
Mtikk mengy dukker your k6k'ro, rya

1

65

So

?

mandy

can't

pen

lis

!

—mdndy
began
!

can.

Ma tute

sav' at

dukkerin pala

For d6vo

sos sar the tern

E. H.

Palmer.

FOR TUNE- TELLING.

Cross the poor old Gipsy's hand now

With a

little bit

of gold

:

You've the best of luck,

my

lady,

That the

stars

have

ever told.

There's a fair young

man

as loves you,
;

And you love him fond and true
There's a dark young fellow also,

Dyin'

all for

love of you.
love, miss,

And

you'll
you'll

marry him you

And And

make

a first-rate wife

You'll be mother of

two

children.

be happy
if I

all

your

life.

And
You
As
Look

can read the stars right.

will
!

meet him here to-day

here's

some one just a comin'

will bear out all 1 say.

ENGLISH-GIPSY, SONGS.
Shall I tell your fortune too,

1

67

sir

?

What

1

I can't

!

— Oh, yes

I can.
:

Don't you laugh

at fortune-telling
!

'Twas with that the world began
E. H.

Palmer.

Si miri

chumya shan kushti

to ha,
!

Tu

ndsti hatch b6ckalo, d6ari, aja

If kisses of mine were good to

eat,

You

shouldn't go hungry long,

my

sweet

THE GAVENGROES.

As mdndy was
I

pirryin 'pr^ the clr6m,

dicked the i^Atteran of a

R6m,

Of a Rommany

chdl as I did

know
Petulengr6.

And
And And

the ndv

o'

the

mush

'us

longo duro did

m4ndy
%

j^ss,
;

Till I willed to the

yag where yuv did besh

he pens

me

" Sarishdn

— " How do you do
he

"' 1

For a tdcho
"

Eum

was Petulengro.
1

What bak ta-diwus
It's

" I pens, an'

Pens " Wdfodo bak" aja to me.
"

wdfro bak wherever
aldngs
o'

I goes,

An'

all

them gavengroes.

" If I lells a k6shter fon a b4r,

There wells ta mdngy a h6ppercore.

And

it's

bak

if I ain't

starm^skero

Along

o'

adduvel gav^nger6.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" If

1

69

mindy's adr^ in

my

tan alay,

An' a balor wells an the dnim apr6

Yuv
For
" If

chivs
it

me

avrl, so
!

out I goes,

alters ja

with them giivengroes.
to a
k(^r,

my juva jals

you

jin,

A pdnnin
Aldng
o'

a bitto dukkerin,

Y6i's trisherdo mullo the fust she knows,

them b^ngalo gdvengr6es.

" I shuns a geero rakker to

me

:

As akovo's a
But
I

tern

o'

liberty,

pens the liberty

mdndy
k6k
o'

stows,

Is a tern

where

there's

them gdvengr6es.

" Oh, I've klled adusta o'k6vvo tem,

With
An'

its

ryes and rdshis an' sitch as

them

its

pirl the pdni 'fore

Ungs

I goes.

To

a tem where there isn't no gdvengr6es.

" Ad6vo'8 the

tem

for a dukkerin

;

Ad^vo's the tem for dudikabin

Kai you

jals as pirr' a« the bavol

blows

Hespesherly from them gdvengn'ies.

"The

'Merican<;skro tem,

my

p.'il

:

Adovo's the tem for a K(jmmaiiy

dial.

For fon sir

I

shun, an' fon sar

1

knows,

They

don't kiissur adoi for no gdvengroes."

ClIARLKS G. LeLAJ^D.

THE POLICE.

As
I

I

was going along the way,

saw the tracks where a Gipsy lay
fellow

Of a Gipsy

whom

I did

know,
Petulengro.

And

the
so I

name

of the

man was

And
Till I

went on the road a
to the fire

bit,

came

where

I
1

saw him
"

And he
For a
"

said to me, " Sarishan

— " How do you do
me

sit

%

real

Eom

was Petulengro.

What
It's

luck for the dayl" I asked, and he

Said, "

Wery bad
along

luck," again to

;

"

wery bad
all

luck, that never will cease.

And

o'

these here police.

" If I pulls a bit of a stick

from a hedge,
its

There's a

bobby a bobbin' along
if I ain't in o'

edge

An'
An'
"

it's

luck

prison a piece.

all

along

that 'ere police.
little

When

I'm sound asleep in our
an'

camp,
;

The Pigs come down

they make us tramp

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
They
For
" If roots

lyi

me
'

out,

and

I gets
!

no peace
'ere police.

it's

allers

Move on

'

with them

my

missus gets in a house, you know,
a bit of a fortin' or
so.

To

tell

They

scares her almost to her de-cease.
nat'ral devils, is

For they're

them

police.

" I heard a fellow preachin' to me.

As
An'

this is the land o' liberty
I tells

:

But

him my
none
o'

liberty

is

peace

there's

that there, where you has police.
o'

" Oh, I've

had enough

this land, I say,

With
An'

its

lords

and parsons
I

an' sitch as they

it's

over the water
there
tell

goes like geese,

To a land where
" There you can

isn't

no

j)olice.

a fortin' or so
;

There you can clear out the things, you know
There you are
free as the l^lowin' Ijrecze
jtolice.
:

Ilespesherly from thc-m vile

"The 'Mcncan
For from

land,

I

thinks,

mayhap,
;

Is just the spot for a
all I

lioramany chap

hears, there they lives at peace,
for

An' the people don't care

no

police.

Chakles G. Leland,
Tlii.s b;illail

was partly written (me day while aasociating and waa drawn from
tlieir

with

f Jipsies,

own remarks.

ROMMANIS LEL

SAR.

O KRAL-RUKK
Y6i'll

kamela d6eyav

for lister pirryni,
Idv, yoi pells sa sTg avri.

k^kker dick nor shun a

O Rom

ker^la lester tAn adrd o rukkor lock
i

Lels pdnni fon

d6eyav, te koshters fon o shock.
romeli,

A

boro G6rgio kams a chi for
yoi'll

l($ster

Awer

k^kker shun o

rye, sa jala sig avri.

" Sa jinsa tu ad6vo,

mi puri

kali
i

dye ?"

Oh, mdndy dukkered saridui,
Av6llan y^ck ak6nyo,

rani te o rye.

i

rani te o rye,

Te

saridui d^s

m^ngy

sa buti s6nnakai.

boro rukk,
1 dlnneli

i

d6eyav, o

mush
lei

so kamela,

juva,— R6mmanis

kushto bak fon

sa.

Janet Tuckey.

ALL

IS

FISH TO THE GIPSY NET.

An

oak-tree loves a rivulet, but she will never stay
at

To look

him or hear a word, she runs

so fast away.

And there beneath the forest boughs the Rommanis are free
To take
the water from the brook and firewood from

the tree.
There's a lord that loves a lady, and she will never stay

To hear him when he speaks
away.
"

of love, but lightly trips

My

Gipsy mother, can you
"
%

tell

how

all

of this

was

known
I'lie

lord

and lady carno
to

to rac,

and each of them alone
crosscnl

;

They came
gold,

me

so secretly

and

my hand

witli

Tliey sat inside the Gipsy tent, and had tluir fortune told.

From
From

the lover and his lady, from rividet and tree,
all

of

them wo help

ourselves,

f(jr

we

are

Rommani.

Jankt Tuckkv.

CHARLIE O RASHIMENGRO.

I

ain't lelled kck religion,

An'

I'll

kek ankair kenna,
foki

But

if

waver

kams
aja.

lis,

Mukk

lenJy kair

Te m4ndy kek
0' sar ye

kairs pydss

waver ch4ls

If a chAvo jals to kangri,

Ma

sdvvy at

Idste, pals

!

But sAvo mdndy pukkers,

Adovo tacho
drom
si

si,

adr6 a geero

Yuv

sAsti Avell avrl.

D6i's Charlie o Rasliim6ngro-

Te
Ke,

'c6vo mdndy'll pen,

mukk

kangrdski cuvvar
sT

De mush

tdchipen.

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

1/5

Yuv

rakkela troosal de Scripturs,
si

Jinella sar

adre

:

Tu'd pdtser lendy

tdclio,

To shun
Adre

o' lis

del apre.

o heb,

yuv pukkers,

A
Te

ch6veno kinyo mush
apr^, te

Can hatch

muscros
lis

vel k(jkker kair

dush.

Awer
Te

i

chalor so h<)cker,

pi te sovahal,

Te

vel

k^kker raukkdo

adr(i

lis,

Sa mdn
Awer,

te vel kek'ra jal.

sig as

a weshni-juckal
ki'mi avri,
si

Te

vel

hukkcr a

Klin Charlie's ratt

tAtto

Av6lla o K6mmani.
Lis

dickdom awaver
lis

rati
be.sli,

Ghioin kcti
T(;

kdr to

giver pali a chfngari

Adre adovo wcsh.
I'cndas yuv
:

"Mi
lei

pukkiioni tukcy
dilkk.

Te 'dovo
()

to

you

weshni-kaiii-chiMiii

'Vel rig yer

men

to the rukk."

176

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

Te

h6tchi

:

" So sos tu kairin
!

?

Fordia wafropen

Te pdnderdas

i

hev6ngror

An' riggered de plopen.
"

Mi ghiom

a^TI,"

mi p^ndum

Tal6 the dud ad6i,

To dickav

a weshni kdni
for

Or rudder

yeck

sliosli6i.

" Te dickum wesh^ngror w^llin,

An' churied apr6 a rukk

;

"

Pens yuv, " Miduvel ford6 For a walin
o'

lis,

wrath

an'

dukk

!

" Yol r6dderd^ 'pr6 a bittus,

Te jallan
'

— avo,

sor

But yeck

:

"

pens puro Charlie,
!

" Yuv's trAshipen ba, to chore
""Sar the

dud

o'

the chone apre

lis.

Mi

dicks so

l6ste si

rdtfelo

w^sh^ngro

So man' kairdas sa waffodi.
"

Yuv

nAsti kaired a

warmiut

Kek
"

wdfrodiro, ba
!

The beng

"

pons puro Charlie,
aja."

Mas6vahal

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" I yagengri,

1

77

mi dicked
chiv,

lis

Tale

i

rukkor

Te hockered
It

sa sTg apre

lis,

trashered

him out

of his

jiv.

"

Mi

l(5ldom' is 'drd
it

mi wastor,
zl,

Te pet

atut his
'
:

Te pendom
Marava
"

Puk^ssa a lavus,

tut' slg avrl.'

Yuv hatchdas
Te kdkera

apre sar puk'no,

\&\\slb

kek

trAsh,

Sa yagengri

sos chido
pasli.

Atut his mui,
"

Penava mi

'
:

S'up mi Diivel,

Shan boro

slg o zl

Del idvus kek to slommor,

Mukkava

tut' jal avri.'

" Yi'iv pukkers

'
:

I'll

kair

my

*

hutsi,
!

Tho'

I

jins you've lelled mi, pal
pr.istcr,

Awcr
Te

mfikorav' tute
m/in'y'il
\v(;]I

palAl.'

" Sa dlom

lis

o yagungji,
siras divio
"
!

Te chindom
Te shorn akai
"

;

j)C'ns

Charlif,

M'ArAunyo parraco

178
"

ENGUSU-GIPSY SONGS.
Awer,
te
lis

sos a-mengy,

Lis k^kkera

mukdom ja,
his horror,

L^ldom mi

beng's yag^ngri,

Te poggered

ba

!

E. H.

Palmer.

PREACHING CHARLIE.

I

don't know much of

religion.
:

And
But
if

I ain't a goin' to learn
uj)

any one takes
is

with

it,

That there

his

own

concern.

I'm not the kind of party

As
If a

alius goes in for chaff

man does go to meetin', What call have you to laugh
do maintain
is,

?

IJut wliat 1

However much you
The ways
Must come out

try,

as you've once got in yer
])y

and

liy.

Now there's old Preachin' Charlie And this I'm bound to say,
There's no one, barrin' his prayin',

More honest than Charlie Gray.

l8o

E\'GUSH-GIPSY SONGS.
He's learnt to read, has Charlie,

And spelt the Scripture through And to hear him talk about it,
You'd half believe
it's

]

true.

And

he says as

how

in

heaven

The weary

are at peace,
troublin',

An' the wicked cease from
An' they don't keep no

police.

But he says

as

how
lie

to git there,
;

You mustn't

nor drink

And

as that's agin all natur',
see me, I think.

They wont
But a
fox'll

show

his breedin'

If there's ever a

hen about
old Charlie,

So whenever you
His

riles

Eommany

blood comes out.
I see

The other night
I

him

went
I'd

to his house to hide,
l>it

For

had a

of a shhidy
side.

On

yonder cover
I alius

Says he, "

warned you,

But

it ain't

a bit of use

Them

poachin' tricks you're

up

to

Will get your neck in a noose."

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
Says
he, "

l8l

What

icere

you arter
"
!

?

The Lord

forgive your sin

And he

fastened up the shutters,

And
Says
I,

fetched
"
I

me

out the gin.

was out by moonlight

A
Or a

lookin' about for a hare,

rabbit or two, or a pheasant,
to set a snare.

Or mebbe
" But
I

see the keepers comin',

And

clambered up a tree

"
;
'.

Says Charlie, "

May God
o'

forgive you
"
!

What
'•

a wessel

wrath you be

Well, they hunted about for a

little.

Then

all

went

off

but one,
:

Who
"
"

stopped behind
risks

"

Says Charlie,
!

What

them poachers run

Then the moonlight shone upon him.

And who do you
As
alius

think

1

see,

But the wcrry self-same ranger

was down on me.

" If I'd a been so

much

varmint,

He
The

couldn't ha' served
!

me

worse

;

"

" Can't you talk,"

.-^ays
?

Charlie.

" Without a hoatli or a curse

152

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
" Well, arter a bit he rested

His gun agin a stump,

And down

I

come upon him,
it

So sudden

made him jump.
up,

"And I took and snatched the gun And put it agin his head
Says
I,
'

You

shout or holloa,
!

And
"

you're as good as dead

He never moved a muscle. And I never see him flinch,
Within a half an inch

Tho' the muzzle touched his forehead
!

"

Says

I,

'

You

are a plucked

un

And no
If

mistake

—and so
follow,
let

you promise not to

Hang me
"

!

but

I'll

you

go.'

Says he,

'

I'll

Though
But

I

my duty, knows I am in your
do
if I

power

I don't

mind

give you

A

start of a half

an hour.'
his

" So I hands

him back
like

weapon,
;

And cuts away And here I am "
!

mad

Says Charlie,
you're safe,

"

Thank heaven

my

lad

!

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
'•

iS^

But

if

I had had the handhu'

That gun instead of you,
I'll

a taken the butt-end on
his legs in

it,

And smashed

two

!

E. H.

Palmer.

This story is told as it was related to a friend by a very well-known Gipsy or, I should say, as it was very naively He began the narrative in u told by the preacher himself. highly moral tone, but, becoming excited, ended in tlie words
;

of the last verse.

/

RANI TE O RYE.

Having
song,

read to an English Gipsy a

German Rommany
Leipzig, 18G3),
dialect.
is

given by R. Liebich {Die Zigeimer,
it

he promptly translated
original
is

into his

own

The
Fr.

as follows.

The Latin

version

by Dr

Miklosich {Uher die Mundarten und die
der Zigeuner Europas, Wien, 1873).

Wanderungen

Cakervela
Tegit
I

i

rani rajes peskere balensa
suis C7'inibiis.

domina dominum

gadze pal o wuder tarda
post januam stant.
te

Homines

Kamena
Vohmt

dikena me.

ut videant me.

Ho

gerena kettenc

Quid faciamus una

Me mukkava
Ego
dimitto
te

tute

nit.

nou

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
Kostela es
gleicli niiro

maropeuu

Etiamd

stet

mea

morte.

Te

hi tut' efta prdla
iihi

Si sunt

septem fratres.

Te

kellela

mlro dzi
vita,

Si saltat mea

Ap
Tu
Ta

o lengero charo.

In eorum gladio,
hal miri te atchalia miri.
es

mea,

et

manehis mea.

THE LADY AND THE LORD.

ENGLISH ROMMANY.
I

RANI shakerella o rye sar p6skri

bdllor,
wiidei-.

" I g6rgior shan tArderin poller the

Kamena

ta dlkk

mdndy.
%

Ko

kdiren

men

k^ttene
tute

" Mi'll net
If it kosts

mukkav

mengy miro miraben.
h6fta pralor,

Shan tukey

Te mlro
Apr6

zi k^llela,

l^ngeris harro,
te

Tu

shdn mlri

atcha mlris."

ENGLISH.

The

lady with her flowing hair
lover
o'er.

Has covered her
" There are

men who wish

to see

me

here

Are hiding behind the door.

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.

1

87

What What

cau

we do

together

?

canst thou do for

me

1

" I will not let thee go,

my

love,

Though

I lose

my

life

for thee.

Thou

hast seven brothers.

Though my

lieart

Should leap upon their sword,
Whilst thou art mine and
I

I

am

thine

ever will

keep

my

word."

Charles

CI.

Lelank.

O BORO

divv^isko dlvvus

Ko si adxiwel ? Kim tu sovd'ss' alAy
Keti bnro Duvvel.

M. V

Tell me what
wlion unto

is

The Judgment Day?
It is

Hod

Yi)ii

drcau) away.
('.

G. L

RdMMANESKRO KAAIMABEN.

Oh, luandy shorn choro

t6 kalo

;

Oh, mandy sh6m k6k pensa rye

:

Ma k^ssur clilchi pa aduUo Ma k^ssur, mi R6mmani
Oh, dikkav o bOro kekavi
Si wilfro te kalo,

clii

we

jin

Awer hdder
Shy^n
si

o hub, rairi chavi a kAiii
adriii.

Oh, dikkav adov' hotchewltchi,

Yuvs chukko

si

kalo aja,
:

Sim

spinyor, sa ruzno te nitchi

Les'

mas

si

but kushto to ha.

Te

vol tu si v^l tu

rummado mishto
rumessa sigdn,

Te
Te

Ldtch^ssa ke

mandy sh6m kushto
Tlummani shdn.

sar mdri

Janet Tuckey.

GIFSY WOOING.

My
But

face is as

brown

as a berry,

You'd never take
that will not

me

for a swell
less merr}-,

make me
girl loves

So long as

my

me

well.

That kettle
Outside

is

just like your lover
as ugly as sin
lift
;

:

'tis

Dut go now, and

up the cover

Perhaps there's a chicken within.

And
And

look at that hedgehog out yonder
;

He's ugly enough for a show
his bristles,

why, they are a wonder—

And
So
if

yet he's good eating, y<ni know.
will

you
if

nuury me early

So

you'll be gentle and true
I'll

You'll find that

love you as diaily
do.

As ever a Gipsy can

J.VNKT TUCKEV,

/ CHdVIHANI.

Men

ghiom

keti giv6scro k6r,

I rani sos pani, te

slm to m^r

Awer kdna
Te pandas,
" M6r6lla
"

y6i dlckdas

R6mmani,

Yoi rakkerdas in(5ngy kushteni,
pilli

o Sarishan

:

m^ngy
!

o chuvihan.

Dickadoi

— avella kenna,
!

O

wafro covva k^llin aja
!

Miduvel

Sikker

!

"—Men dlkkdom
adre,
;

alAy,

Ad6i pash o wuder, dikkin

Vds a boro j6mpa hockerin dn
Yoi shelldas
:

" Ad6vo's ml ch6vihan

!

" Sar-divvus, sa.r-6ra av6lla akai,

Te
St

hdtchel' apr6,

i

beng^skri dy6.

mdndy

chivava o c6vva avrl
;

T'vela hockerin 'popli dickinav mi
Sa-rati

shunava

lis

pali o tan,

An' sutto sarja o the ch6vihan."

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
T^nna rakkerdum ketnes
in

IQI

Rommani,

Te pendum akovo k^ manushi
" Chiv amc^ngy bOro katsas akai/

Te a

curro o lun, mi kusliti chi,
si

Te

sar o covva'll

sig sar^n,

Kana m^ndi
Simno
triisel

lelova o chovihan."
i

kdtsas
ja,

we

lei,

Te

jompa

nasti

pirri padel

Awer wdfro
'Driiia

gtidlo lis
si

shundom
:

kair,

Les jindas Gra

vel ta in6r

yag

sari kdtsas cliidom lis dii,

Te

yui wusserdas lun 'pr6 o ch6vihan.
i

Kon

rani das mcingy

moro

te mas,

L^vinor 'dusta

te bdllovds,
o'

Te a kushto pash-bdr

s6nnak^i
\(A les

:

Tiinna butsi-mush sasto

wye.

Te tacho

si

Rommanis
Icl

well to tan

Vdnka

foki

diish

dp o chovihan.

Charles G. Leland.

THE WITCH.

We

went one day

to a farmer's house

:

His wife was so Aveak she could scarce arouse

;

But when she saw we were Romnaany,
She spoke to us very
civilly,

And

said,

with

many
all

a gasp and twitch
of a wicked witch.
It is

:

" I'm dying

—and
!

"Look
The

there

look there
is

!

coming now
!

;

evil

thing
!

dancing, I

vow

,

My God
At

Oh, help

me

"
!

— and peeping

in

the open door, with a wicked grin,

Came

a great grey toad, with a hop and a hitch
cried the

"See there!"
witch
"
!

woman, "see

there s

my

Every day and hour
devilish creature

it is is

coming here

The
If I
It is

always near
first

throw

it

away, the

thing I

see,

jumping again and staring at me.
it

All night I hear

hiss

by the

ditch,

And

all

night long I dream of the witch."

ENGLISH-G/PSY SONGS.
Then we spoke together
in

193

Ilommany,

And
And And
The

told her at last

how

the thing

must be

:

" If you have shears, just bring them here,
-vvith

them a cup of

salt,

my

dear,
rich.
!

as sure as we're poor,

and you are

Gipsies will soon take care of the witch
like a cross,
it

So we tied the shears

you

see.

And
For

held the toad

— and

couldn't get free
it

The charm was
it

so strong
its

—but
tin;

gave a

cr^'

knew
fire

that

hour had come to die
it

;

In the

with the shears we gave

a pitch,

And

she threw the salt on
us
all

])uruing witch.

Then the lady gave
Ale and bacon

a treat,

plenty to eat.

And

a

ten-sliilling piece as

we went away
get their pay
ricli.
;

Since people

who work must
all,

And

it's

gooil for

be they poor or

If Gipsies

come when

they're plagued with a witch. C. G. L.

One
Clipsy

fine

day in

Eppinj,' Forest I

met a very
it

jolly younj;

woman, ami 1k:M

witli lier a conversation

which was,
jiriiici-

Iiowevcr, liardly to be called cheerful, Bince

turned

pally on toads

and snakes, with their

relations to witchcraft.

In illustration of their evil nature, she told

me

the story

which

I

have repealed very accurately

in

the foregoing'

N

1

94
I

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
have no doubt of
its

ballad.

truth, but

would

state, in

explanation, that toads take unaccountable fancies to certain
places, and even to certain people, and that tlie Gi])sies, who were well aware of this, ingeniously worked on the morbid In fact, the Romfears and superstition of the sick woman. many chi, after telling the tale, mentioned incidentally that " people who live in the woods as we do, out of doors all the time, see and know a great deal about such creatures and

their ways."

Not wishing to be -outdone, I signified my cordial assent, and promptly narrated a story which I had found originally in a strange and striking little ballad by a well-known There was once an old American poet, R. H. Stoddard. Gipsy woman, a witch. One day a gentleman going along the road accidentally trod on a great toad and killed it. Hearing a scream at that instant some way off in the woods, and after that a terrible outcry, he followed up the sounds, and found that they came from a Gipsy camp, and were lamentations over the old witch's child, who had just died very suddenly. On looking at the little corpse, he was horrified to find that it presented every appearance of having been
trampled to death.

and awe expressed in the brown were as amusing as the puzzled look which succeeded them. She did not doubt the but inquired " how could it be 1 incident, not in the least, not being able to fathom the principle by which a soul could be in two places at once. I regret that I cannot report the discussion which probably ensued that night, around some fire, over this story, and the explanations given of it by It is not impossible that the wiser and older fortune-tellers. the next Rommany Rye or Gipsy-speaking gentleman who goes to Epping may, if he touch on the svibject with due care,
credulity

The simple

Gipsy face on hearing

this little tale

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
be told the

1

95

name

of the infant thus killed,

and learn many

interesting details of the subsequent effect of the bereavement

on

its

mother.
in this
;

The word chovihdn
lated wizard,

poem should be

correctly trans-

and not witch

chovihCml being the feminine.

Tu

shan

i

cliune adrd o hev.

Mi

d^ari,

kameli rani

;

Te waver

foki

shan o bdv,

Klin gdvla

tut' fon mAn'}-.

The moon,

soft-moving o'er the heaven,
;

My
And

darling, seems like thee
tlie

other folk are but
face

clouds

That hide thy

from me.

KAMMOBEN, TATTOPEN.

"

Mi shorn akouya," gllldas " Men buti ruzhior,
sar
i

yoi,

Te

chiriclor ad6i
gilior

Kair md,ndy
I

mdtchya
tern
SI

'dr6 o

p4nni suvv,

rinkeno
sosti

Awer i juva

ruvv

Leila kek pTrryno."
Giv6lla "

:

Wen

avdlP akdi

;

ShunAv k6k
I ruzhior

chir'clo gill

shan s6ved aldy
si shill

d6eyav

Awer Mi deari

tu shdn pa miro rikk,

pirryno

kalo heb, o nango teni,

Kenna shdn

rinkeno."

Janet Tuckey.

LOVE- TIME IS SUMMER-TIME.

" I

WANDERED
birds

forth alone," sang she,
floAvers

"

When summer

were young,
for me.

And

made merry songs

The summer woods among

And gaily, gaily danced the And balmy was the air
:

rill,

Rut there was something

failed
fair.

me

still,

Though
"

all

the land was

The blossoms
"

all

are dead," she sings,

That graced the summer-time
birds have spread their wings.

And summer
To

seek a softer clime.
is

The wintry sky

dark al)Ovc
:

The

silent

woods are bare

But thou

art near me, oh,

my

love,

And

all

the land

is fair."

Janet Tuckey.

O

SHAH.

"

AVALI

rya, I clicked the Shah,"

Panned ye puri Petul^ngerl.
"

An

I

pens
I jin

my

chAvo,

'

Ma

rakker

aja,

For
"

yuv's a

bitt' o'

a Rommanl.'

Mindy jins

sar sortis

o'

E6mmanis,

M6rnis te waver-t^mmeny
I jins lens

yakkor

an'

javomus,

I

pens you ad6vvo's a Eommanl.

" Gorgiki

yakkor shAn kushti

aja,

Ne penava

shan kek rlnkenl
the yakk the
o'

Awer mandy penava
Bitcher the dtid
o'

the Shah

Eommanl."

An' as m^ndy shuned lakis rakkerben,

Yeck

lav adr6 trin sos Ft4rsanT

It sims y6i piikkerdas tdchopen,

And

the Shah sos a

bitt' o'

a Eommani.
G. Leland.

Charles

THE SHAH.
" Yes,

my

master, I've seen the Shah,"

Said old
"

Dame

Petulengro to me.
son,
'

And
For

I says to
I

my

You

needn't talk.

know
all

he's a bit of a

Eommany.'
folk,

" I've seen

sorts of

Gipsy

Our own and them from beyond the sea
I

knows the
I tell

eye,
he's

and

I

knows the walk
a liommany.

:

you

somehow

" Other folks' eyes
I

may

be worry good eyes,
thai

won't say never

how

may be

But

this I say, that that Persian rye's

Have got

the shine of the

Kommany."

And
It

as she talked in her Gii)sy tongue,

With

just one Persian
if

word

in three,

seemed as

she rouldn't be wrong,

And
The

the Shah were a bit of a
described
true,

Kommany.

iiiciilent liere

is

every expression having
has been

Ifccn accurately retained.

No

cfFdrt

made

to intro-

200

ENGLISH- GIPS Y SONGS.
and

duce Persian words in these
portion of

lines,

it

chances that the pro-

them

is

rather less here than usually occurs.
:

The

following, however, belong to that language
halt;
rye, Pers.

Avali, Persian

ray; rakker, Pers. rakidan; kush-ti, Pers.
^;^r,•

Ichush; shuned, Pers. shun-klan; puri, Pers.
hibitative), Pers.

Ma

(pro-

ma;

Gorgiko (from Gorgio), Pers.

Jch'dja,

pronounced

Jchorja.

G ILL

I.

Of a Rbmmany
Tc a Goryio

chi

rye.

Si

mAndy

sos tiro chdvo,

Si tute SOS mlri dye,

Kam^ssa

d6l

mAndy
nil

a chumer 1"
!

" K(jkker,

ruzno rye

Awer mi sh6m Awer

k(ik tiro chAvo,

tute slian kcik miri dye
;

" Aduva's a waver covva

Avo, ml kushto rye

"
!

SONG.

If I were your
If

little

baby,
old,

you were

my mother
me

You

Avould give
sir,

a kiss,

my

darling

?-

" Oh,

you are

far too bold!

But

as

you are not
as I

my

mother,
1

But

am
is

not your son

" Ah, that

another matter.
I'll

So maybe

give you one

!

O PATTERAN.

"

Trin mla

ilriro

pAnni,

Trin mia duro gav,

Mi Utchdom

pAtterAni,
:

A
Man

cuttor lullo tuv

dickiUmi

.sig

ye covva

Sos Ucho Ilommani

A

rAkli lakis

shuba

Lis chliigerdas avn.

" Sos

pAndo pre

3<^

rukkor

;

Te

rudcriii adoi,

Mi

liltchdoin 'pr6

ye puvor

A

Ii(')mmani
dfii

])at6i.

SigAn yo

pirried,

mush
AmC'n a

te plrr^nT

sliul o'

Gorgios

JinAs len Koininaiii.

204
"

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
B^shdom Te
sar

aJoi ak6nya,
dsti

mdn

dikk

Sos kalo, mullo wongur,

Te pano, mullo
KAi shAn
I
i

chikk.-

dui

tarii.

Eomni

te o

Eom ?

Anduro

pari o

chumbor

Shdri ndsherdo adr6m,"

Ma

dusher, kameli, awer,

K6

yul

a-jlllo

shdn

:

Yiil hAtcli kdratti waver,

An' Litch a waver

tan.

I 'kavi'il bailor kuslito,

yag hatch

pali An,

Te

nikli'll

chinger pall

A
Ma

waver pdtteran.
'

pdtser k^kker dusher
fokis dush.

Fon waver
Sar rdkli

lela rdklo,

Sar mdnushi a mush.
Si kekker

yag

hotchcilla

'Pr6 'c6vo tern kenna,

Awer

adrd a waver

Si kushtidir aja.

Charles

G. Leland.

THE GIPSY SIGN.

"

Three

miles beyond the hamlet,

Three miles beyond the mere,
There hangs a shred of
scarlet
!

The Rommanis were here
Right well
I

know

the token
:

They

leave where'er they stray

Some Gipsy from
Mas torn

her kirtle

this strip

away.

"

It's fluttering in

the thicket,

And, as
I

I searcli

around,

find the

Gipsy

f()ot-i)rints

Upon

the mossy ground.

'Twas here the Gipsy lovers
Passed underneath the trees
;

Among
I'd

a

hundred Gorgios'
such steps as these.

know

206
"I
sit

EiVGUSH-G/PSY SONGS.
alone, sad-musinsr,

For yonder on the sward
1 see

a few white ashes.

And firebrands black and charred. And whither have they wandered.
The Gipsy and
Perhaps
his love
1

o'er far-oflF

mountains

With weary

feet they rove."

Oh, sorrow not,

my

darling

!

Oh, grieve not for the twain

!

To-night they'll rest them gladly,

And

pitch their tent again.
kettle's singing.

Again the

Again the

coals will shine,

And from

her skirt the damsel

Will tear another sign.

Then never weep,
So long as love

my
is

darling

!

true,

Each maid

shall find a lover, to

Each man a maid

woo.

And though no
Are blazing

kindly embers

close at hand.

Be

sure the

fire

glows cheerly

In some more favoured land.

Janet Tuckey.

/

RATTESKRI PlRENGRI.

Avo,

rya,

si

a puro cuvva,

Te

keniii'i

shan huti-dusta beslior

K6 man
'Pr6
i

sliundom puro dadas pukker

h(ifta Kiitteskri Pirengri.

Sa, }'(xv

p6ndas te sa

man

lis

shundoiu

;

8T tu lassa sc'jvahal apr6 lea,

Te aduvo SiWahal
H6fta Hdfta
ratti

si
i

poggered,
pirengri
;

wcUdn

ratti w(ill te

junger tutc
i

Ilufta ratti dikAsa

licfti.

Awer, rya

'i)re

i

hefta ratti,
;

Y^ck

o' len te

well t^ssAla tute

Wastor

pali tiro

men

diivclla
;

Ti' niun6lla sigan tiro gurlo

Te

adui luUena 'vrl aratti.
(•'

AAver, kai shundssa tut'

Idndy

/

(.'llARLKS

(j.

LkLAMi

THE SE VEN NIGHT- WALKERS.

Yes,

my
it's

master,

it's

a queer old story,
it

And

many

a year since last I heard

Since I heard the good old father telling
All about the Seven Night- Walking Spirits.

Thus he told the story
If

— thus
to

I

heard

it

you took an oath upon those
the oath upon
will

spirits,

And

them should be broken,
you the walkers
;

Seven nights Seven nights
Seven nights

come

they'll

come, each night to wake you

you'll

always see the seven
night,

:

But upon the seventh

my

master,

By the seventh spirit you'll be strangled. Round your neck the ghost will twine his
Then upon your throat
Then they pass away
But,
you'll feel

fingers,
:

them pressing

into the midnight.
it ?

my

master, where could you have heard

Charles

G. Leland.

An old Gipsy once assured me that he had heard of the Seven Walkers, as described by Sir W. Scott in the oath

ENGUSH-G/PSY SOXGS.
sworn by
tlie

2O9
Whether
is

Romraany Hayraddin Maugrabin.

my

informant was mistaken or not

—and

I

do not think he

would deceive me in
served

Eommany

matters

—nothing

more

likely than that such a superstition should

have been pre-

among

Gipsies.

LEL TIRO KAMI

Si o

Rommani mush

si

kiulo,

Si a gry adr6 o stanya

Te

o

Eommani

chd,vo's b6ckalo,

Si a k4ni adr6 o

grdnya
trushilo,

Shan Ilummani chalor
Si levinor 'drd o

kitchema

L6la

E6mauo

chichi 'dr6 l^skro fern,

Shan

bdrveli G6rgior 'dre sar o tern.

Janet Tuckey.

HELP YOURSELF!

If the Gipsy

man

is

weary,
stall
:

There's a horse in the farmer's
If the

Gipsy child

is

hungry,

There's a hen near the granary wall
If the

Gipsy lads are

thirsty,
all

There's beer enough for them

And

if there's

nought

in the Gipsy's hand,

Tiiere are wealthy Gurgios in all the land.

Janet Tuckey,

O

D ELAB EN.

Sa miindy ghiom

adr^ the gAv,

Vas a boro rashai

A boro
Tu

rye

:

jin^ssa o mushis nAv

Te kairdas rakkerben, Te putchdas d^laben
For
o nAflopen ker,
:

A bunnerin there
Te penava
So
:

"

Yeck divvus

te vel
!

mAn

ta ni6r,

Sos kushto adrd a boro k6r
I

pakkers mi wdst 'dre miri putsi

:

Lelov' a ruppeny kalor avri,

An' pels

it alay.

Eye

dickella mc;
!"

Te

'•'

pArraco tute, Rye

pens he

;

An

rikkerdas stardy Anerjal,
kalo

To ak6vo
St tacho.

Rommani

chal.

Yuv

b6ngerdas kokero,
do.

Sims ryas to waver ryas

Charles G. Leland.

THE

GIFT.

As

I

was going along the town,

Came

a clergyman,

A

very great man,
I'll

You know him by name,

bet a crown

;

And
lie

preached like honey,

Askin' for

money

:

wanted some

For a Hospital

Home

;

And

I

said:

"If death ever should come

to

me,
I'd like to die there

respectaljly."

So into

my

pocket

my

hand

I

poke,

And And And
To

out a silver
dro])ped

shillin' I took,

it in,

— " Thank
he.

The gent looked
sir,

at me,

you,

for

your

gift,"

says

this lierc black-faced

Kommany

!

2 14

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
It's

a

fact.

He bowed

himself, d'ye

know,

As gentlemen always

to gentlemen do.

Charles G. Leland.
This was the account wliich a Gipsy gave me of an honour which he had received. lu narrating the event, he acted it to life, with great spirit and intense satisfaction, ending witli a profound bow, in imitation of the one bestowed on him l)y the clergyman. It may be worth recalling on Hospital Sunday that Old Windsor Cooper, the Gipsy, once gave his only shilling to the good cause.

O

WAFROPEN

O'

THE BESHOM^NGROS.

S(5sKi adre de bitclierin k(5rs

Kai 'dovvo bdshomdugros besh
Butider wdfropens they kairs

%

K6
Te

divio juckals 'drd o wcsli.

'd6sta

chovany R6mmani
'pr(j

cli.il

St lino

for kairin kek,
sdsti jfd

Te

pari

de pdnni

Te mdndy peskro
Jin(5ssa

jiiiav ycck.

Matthew Kumlo, Rye,
his

So ndshe'd
Sos
lOllefl for

juva wfiver wen

\

chorinav a grai,

Te
Rut

Intciiered triu bush .stdripen.

—bang's the busliom^ngros
miro puro inullo
as
d;id,
;;rai

zl

!-

'Prci

The mush
Si

hukk

d

il<-

avii
•'.'id.

kek

adr(!;

Mat

Kfimlo's

2^^

ENGL/SH-GIPSY SONGS.
" Soski did
Si

mdndy kdkker pen mdndy jinned lis ? " Slmn
trdsh o' tachipen,

acdi

Mi shomas

For miro roin chored 'd6vo
"

grai.

Yuv

sasti slkk'rav

halihi—
grai sos ch6red
"
!

Penned kek adui kun

Sos trdslier Idster k6kero, Eye, 0' ndsherin for a mush he'd
E.

mured

!

H. Palmeil

THE INJUSTICE OF JUDGES.

The judges come and
In yonder court

hold assize
?

— but what's the use
sir,

They do more harm,

with their
loose.

lies

Than any mad dog broken

And many Ilommany

lads there be,

Who
And

ne'er a bit of harm. have done,
to jail, or over the sea

Are sent
I

my.sclf w«'ll

knows
sir,

of one.

You knows Mat

Lovell,

of course,
?

Who
lie's

lost his wife

some years ago
a horse,
so.

took for

stealin' of

And
liut

got three years for doin'
I

— hang them magistrates,
father this
I

say

!

By my dead
The chap
Ain'l
ill

swears

as took that horse

away

the

siiirt tliat

Matthew wears

2l8
"

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

Why
If I

didn't I give evidence,

knew

that

?

"—Ah,

there's the rub

!

I couldn't speak for the defence

'Cos

my

old

man had

done the job.
Jialibi,

"

He

oughter proved a

Said where he'd been arid what about

"
!

Poor

fellow,

ah

!

he durstn't try

:

They'd hanrj him if they found that

out.

E. H.

Palmer.
it

The
little

incident in this

poem

is

given almost exactly as

was
In
is

narrated by an elderly Gipsy
alehouse, in

woman

of the better class, in a

Cobham, Surrey, on the

fair-day 1873.

justice to the Gipsy, it should be stated that the last verse

added

to

her story from an entirely different source.

A NASHERIN COVVABEN.

T.iLE the shelni patrinya
Apiish o the kltchema,

MAndy rakkerdom
Tc
y<')i

puri Eosa,
asa.

rakkerdas sig

KAna-sTg yui pukkedas shukAro
"

Ma

rakdssa Romraanis

;

Ad6i avcUa o mCiscro,

Te
"

vcl beiiKUS shrnKil' Up."

Tc

vcl sliun^lla aniongy.

Si chiclii o Icstcr

pcm

"
:

"

Ma jin'sa
'Sis

tutc

mi rya
tlic

chinger yc sig of

tcm

?

" Mdn'y sliundom

mi dddas pen
or chin
;

lis

Tutc mrui

jtcnni.s
sli.-in

Te

buti foki

iiiishcrcd

Ajafcra rakkerin.

220

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.
" Si chlndo adre the lilyor,

Te

si

kekena

lino 'vri
tute,

Len pdnderdnna
Pel

rakkerdv Rommani,

Pa

lakkeren, ara cliinnen
lil

A
"

adrd R6mmani.
a boro rya,
tal

Tu

si

Awer

kenna

tiro chib

;

Si a buti nAsherin

c6wa,
jib.

Muro kalo E6mmany

Charles

G. Leland.

A HANGING MATTER.

One morning

in

Epping Forest,

Beside the alehouse door,
I

talked with the Gipsy Rosa,

As

I often

had done

before.

JVhen she whispered quick and
" Don't speak in

softly

Rommany,

For there

is

a policeman,

Who
"

can hear as well as sec."

Hut

if

he hears us talking.
:

'•

He will not understand " Why, don't you know, my
It's

master,
/

against

tii(^

law of the land

"

I

have heard
It

it

from

my

father,

may

not bo spoken or writ
liave

And many

swung on

the gallow;
it.

For nothing but talking

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

And it's still down in the law-book, And was never struck out, d'ye see % They may swing you off the cross-beam
"

For a

talkin',

much more

for a writin'

A
"

book

in the

Kommany.

And

thougli you're a gentleman truly,

Don't go in the way to be hung

For I say

it's

a hangin' matter,

This talkin' the

Eommany

tongue."

Charles G. Leland.
know whether
making
it

I

do not

the laws passed in

many European
also

countries

death to speak
if so,

Eommany were
tlie

extended to England, or
pealed.

wlu'ther they liave been re-

That the Gipsies themselves entertain
is

opinion
itself,

that their language

forbidden, invariably manifests
ladies,

even

if

talking

it

with gentlemen or

when

a policeman

approaches.

Many
:

whispered warning

a time have I heard the rapidly spoken " Ma rakka Rommanis, r^^a 'd6i vella

comes a policeman " More than once during my researches I have received such a kindly-meant warning.
muscro
! I

Don't talk Ronuuany,

sir

!

—there

TAN-ROMANESKRI

GILIOR.

TENT-GIPSY SONGS.

TRIX BITTI r6mMANI CHALS.
DV

Yeck

bitto Eupi'ni dial chiiryiu fip a riilck
t'

Clmry'd ap

truppo an' bcisned aprd a shock.
chury'd up
t'

Dui

bitti

R6mmanis
t'

rukk
apr(i
t'

Vdck sloinmenn
Trin

waver as bashed
churyin
till

shock.

bitti R/jm'ni chals

ap'.-ft

rukk
'vri

Slommerin
Trin
bitti

yijck a -waver

they po^e?ed
'lay

the shock.

Kom'ni chalspd-Ued mOllo

the puv

Lt-ntcr

dye willed aldngiis ankaired to nlv.
.si;;

Welled
.\..s

anpuli a boro cliovihan
.in.

kiiircd .sar the ch/ivvos apojili jivv(;ii

liUDtcrs

dye hatched a

nlvviii, lunter.s

dye

lulled a ko.sh

\x\ del 'em all a kfirin for a kairin such a

bosh (dush).

ChornK.

Yijck bitto Koininani,

Dui
Trin

bitti iWinmajii,
bitti

Ilommani

chals.

THREE LITTLE

GIPSIES.

One little Gipsy climbed a tree, and how He climbed up the branches and sat upon
Chorus.

%

a bough.
little

One

little

— two

little

—three
!

— oh

!

Three

little

Gipsy boys

Two

little

Gipsies climbed a tree, and
'tother one

how

?

One followed
Three
little

who

sat

upon the bough.

Gipsies climbed a tree, and
till

how

1

They followed one another
bough.

they broke away the

The

three

little

Gipsies

all

corpses did

lie

Tlu'ir

mother came along and began

for to cry.

There

came

a

great

conjuror

who saw them, ami
and
'em

then,

He

brought 'em
acrain.

all

to

life,

boys,

set

up

TEXT-GIPSY SONGS.
Their mother stopped a crying
stick,

22/
mother got
a

their

And

gave 'em

all

a whipping for a playing such a

trick.

This song was repeated to
blood), as

composed by a Lee.

me hy one of the James's (lialfHe gave it in a very imperfect

form

it did not differ materially from what is here Since writing the foregoing verses, I have received another version of the ballad, which will be found on the
;

but

printed.

following pages.

DESH TANI CHAVIS DURIKEN.

Desh What

tani ch4vis, all adr(^ a

row

welled

o'

lender tute shall know.

Y^ck tano chdvo was chivved up a rukk,
Polled to the puv an yuvs neck 'us broke.

Dui tano chAvo hatched apr6

his head,

Wery

sig anpall yiiv

was Idtchered dead.

Trin tano chdvo his levinor drank,

An" wery

sig anpall

was tdssered

in a tank.

Yeck tano chavo

— dui tani chavis
!

Trin tani chavis they are gone

Shtor tano chavo killed himself lame,
Polled alay a coal-h6v an'
-w-as

never dicked again.
rain,

Pdnj tano chavo was dickin at the

An' wery

sTg anpall

mered

o'

thought upon the

hrain.

TENT-GIPSY SONGS.
Shov tano
clidvo

22g

tumbled

'pr6 a log,

Adui yuv was hotcliered
Shtor tano

to sindor 'dre the yog.

clu'ivis

— pduj

tiini

chavis

Shov

tani chdvis

we must mourn.

Afta tano chivo prdstered from a dog,

An' wery

sig anpali

was ndshered

'dr^

a

fog.

Oitoo tani chavi was always at war,
Y«ick

dCwus

yoi

was ndshered

'diu the tav of lier guitar.

Enneah tano chavo was
An' wery
slg unpall
ch;ivo,

kellin'

with a match,

was mullered by a witch.
tall,
call.

Desh tano
IMayin'

yuv was booti

Punch and Judy was
Afta tano chavo
Enneali te desh

tdssered with his

— oitoo tano chdvo
all

are dead.
wife,
life.

Then the Drab6ngro

kureil

hi.s

An' shook the tani chdvis

till

sar willi-d to
ail

Desh, enneah, oitoo, Afta chAvis

glad

;

Shov and pdnj
Shtor trin
I)rii,

cliAvis,

dancing

like

mad.
;

cliAvia,

standing on their heatis
lik<i

ycck chdvis, growing
tani chdviH, all in a

weeds.

Dcah

row

;

What

Welled

o'

lendy, kciina you know.

TEN LITTLE

GIPSIES' FA TE.

Ten

little

Gipsies

all in

a row

\

What happened
One
Fell
little

to

them

I shall let

you know.

Gipsy climbed up a
his

tree,
!

down, broke
little

neck

— there lay he

The second

Gipsy stood upon

his head,

And
The

very soon after he was found dead.
thinl
little

Gipsy drank up

his ale,

And

very soon after

was drowned
little

in a pail.

One

little

— two

— three

little

Gipsies-

Three

little

Gipsies they are gone.

Tlie fourth little

Gipsy danced himself lame,

Fell

down

a coal-pit, and up never came.

The

fifth little

Gipsy was looking

at the rain,

And

died soon after of thought upon the brain.

TENT-GIPSY SONGS.
The
sixth tumbled over a log into the mire,

23

And

afterwards was burnt up to cinders in the

fire.

Four
Six

little

five little

— six

little

Gipsies

little

Gipsies

we must mourn.

The seventh

little

Gipsy ran from a dog,
fog.

And
The

very soon after was lost in a
eightli little

Gipsy was always at war.
one day in the strings of her guitai\

And she was hanged
The ninth
little

Gipsy was playing with a match,
l)y

And

very soon after was killed

a witch.

Tlie tenth little Gipsy,

who was

very, very

tall, call.

Playing Punch and Judy was choked with his

Seven

little

— eight

little
all

— nine

little

Gipsies

Nine

little

Gipsies

arc drnad.

Then

the doctor whipped his wife,
sliook the little Gipsies
till

And

they

ail

came

to

lil'i'.

Ten, nine, eight, seven Gijjsics
Six, five Gipsies

all

glad

;

dancing

like

mad.

Pour, tlirce Gipsies standing on their hcad.s;

Two, one Gipsies growing

like weeds.

232

TENT-GIPSY SONGS.
Ten
little

Gipsies

all

in a

row

;

What became

of them,

now you know.

ballad originally

These songs are simply variations of an old American known as " John Brown's Ten Little Indian Boys," and which has heen changed in England to " Ten
Little

Nigger Boys."

THE RAUNEY ON THE TO BEE.

There's a rauney

jessin

on the tober,
;

There's rye jessin after her

He would
Would

del all
if

the louver

In his putsey

the rauney
liiiu.

beshtolay with
:

He
If

pens

"

My

dear rauney,

You
For

sliall

have plenty of vonggar
jfs.s

you w

ill

with

mandy
will

:

in the

sarlow

wo

;,'et

Rumoured,

for that will be tatchey.'

THE LADY ON THE ROAD.

There's a lady going on the road,
There's a gentleman going after her

He would
In

give

all

the

money
with

his pocket if the lady

Would

" settle
:

down

"

hiin.

He says " My dear lady, You shall have plenty of money If you will go with me
;

For

in the

morning we

will get
(nice)."

Married, for that will be right
Tliese songs, one of "

which has already been published in

The English Gipsies and their Language," were repeated for me by a Gipsy woman, whose husband, a Gorgio, wrote them
out at her dictation.
the spelling.

This will explain the pecuUarities in

GILLI OF A

ROMMANY JUVA.

Die

at tlie Gargets,
!

The Gargers round mamly
Trying
to lei

my

nieripon,

My
I

meripon (meriben) away.

will care (kair) uj» to iny cliuugs (cliongs),

Up

to

All for

my chungs my liap})y

in rat,

racier (raklo).

•My mush is lellcd to .stunibon To sturriboii, to sturribon,

(staripcii).

My mush
To

is

lelled to sturribon,

the tan where

mandy

gins (jins).

A GIFSY WOMAN'S SONG.

Look

at the Gorgios,

The Gorgios around me,
Trying
to take

my

life,

My
Up
All

life

away.

I will

to my knees, my knees in blood, for my happy boy.

wade up

to

My
To

liusbaud's ta'en to prison,
prison, to prison
;

My husband's
To

ta'en to prison.

the place of which I know.

PRONUNCIATION.

PRONUNCIATION.
Rommanj^

In reading or pronouncing English
in this

as given
:

book, the following rulos should be observed
is

A

or a

pronounced either

like aiv in such English

words as law, raw, and saw, or with a modification of
the same sound as heard in father.

Such words

as rdtfi

(night) and pdnni (water) are frequently but incorrectly

])ronounced

I'arty, parnj',

on the same principle which

induces the uneducated man, whether English or American, to extend

the a to ar.
(7

In

nrali

(yes),

and

its

abbreviati<m dvo, the
characteristic manner.

is

strongly accented, in a very
it is

In julsh (half, near, itc),
like " in

commonly pronounced
is

wash.

In

most cases a

sounded as
Aiiiii'r (to
Ai/'iiiirv't

in An/i, mh/, ulr, n/ar, tVc, thus

bring),

pronounced as
(tlial),

in

Aim.

or ndiluimi

as in adijit.
first

Aldi/ (down).
in nlUy, iho

In this
in

word the
A///.
liai'c.

a

is

sounded as

second as

Avrl, a as in aloe, or in
.(

in

rhdm (boy)

ia

sounded as

iji

liave,

aud

is sliort.

240

PRONUNCIATION.
hard, or like
before all letters except
e

C

is is

Ic,

and L

Ch

the same as in church.
is

Chal

often pronounced like chuL
;

E is generally pronounced as in inen, hen
French
;

and

e as in

ie like

au in

lay.

G

is

almost invariably hard,
it

but in a few words,

such as sig (quickly, Sec),
sound, as in South

has sometimes a very soft
after
r.

German

It

then

is

between

g and

y.
e.g..,

Ch. In a few words

plochta, a

cloak

;

hacht,

luck;

chnshto
;

{i.e.,

kushto),

good; hochaben

{liockahen),

falsehood

hochter (hokker), to
e.g.,

jump

ch has the

same
sound

sound as in German

Buch.

But

for this
h.

most Gipsies are rapidly substituting the hard

J

is

pronounced as in English or in Hindustani.

In

the middle or at the end of a
Enf^lish dg
Avith
V.

word

it is

sounded

like the

e.g.,

laj

(ashamed), which exactly rhymes

Madge.

Not
is

to be confounded (as Gipsies often do) with

u or w;

here pronounced as in English.
;

W, as in English

should not be confounded with
to

v.

Most Gipsies, however, treat v and
if,

as the same.

u.

Like 00 short, or the Italian u
^i'oo-de^


TJ

e.g.,

wilder (door),

pronounced

(not wood-er).

unaccented gene-

rally follows the English pronunciation.
0.

In the word " Rommany," o has a peculiar sound,

PRONUNCIA TION.
between
in

24

Roman and u

iu rum.

The same

is

the

case in dovo, adOvo, ado eel,

and
(as

alconyo,

which are pro-

nounced much hke duvvo
adduvvel.

in

dove), 'adduvvo,

and

This rule

is

far

from being generally followed,

but

it

appears to be correct and ancient.

Some

confusion

prevails

among

different tribes in the pronunciation of

rov (to weep), sou (sleep), but they are generally given

as ruv

and

suv.

Covva

is

like cover
lovey,
is

without the r

final.

Lovva (money), often called
/,

has the same sound.
in

or

I,

is

like ec in
/,
^,

see,

or

pronounced as

French

or Italian.
in

without the lowj accent takes the Sdund
it, ill,

most cases of the same vowel in
is

jnn

;

but

it

never

like

y

in hy, or the

same

letter in hi<jh,

except

in chi (a

woman).
serve as a guide in reading liomis

The following may
many,
it

being Ijorne in mind that the 00

not so

much

I)rolonged as the juxtaposition of

two

letters in
full

English

generally indicates, nor
Oil tute
loot y
jin.s
1718

i.s

the air fpiiie so
krdco,

as in saiv:

miro

rye
rye.

j

meero kawko,
l(i.ster

O

tut(t

jins

nav.

tooty Jitis IcKlcr into {av as in have).

Y(5ck divvus yiiv pirried sir

le.ster

gry.

Yek div-vu8 yuv

pen-' yd saivr tester gry.

Fon

y«ick'eti

waver gdv.

Foil ycl^etly wdivver gdv.

242
Aprd kaliko

PROI^UNCIATION.
ratti sa's

mAndy

sos jallin adr^ o wesh,

muskro dui bori rukkor, man'y shunedom a boro wafodo
giidli
;

te
te

chommany
dias avri

pelled alay apr6 o

puv pash o

mandy
c6vva.

a boro sliellaben, sims a b^ngalo
:

Penava m4iidy

" Sa's d6vadoi

1

"

Mdndy
lis

sos

buti trdsheno.

Awer
;

o covva aiikaired to liakker and

kell sims dlvius

te

mdndy viom
(a

an' Idtched

sos a

tano ratti-chiriclo that had

p(^lled avri

fon listers tan.

Pronunciation.
{eeko like ico

— K-pray

as father)

hawAt^o

m

calico)

rawty, saws ?«a?idy sus (us as in

fuss) jawlin (aw short as in falling) adrai/ o wesh, muskro
(as in

musk) doo-ee bovee rookov, man'y s/ioo«edum a hovo
;

z^^afodo ffud-\ee

te

chwnmany

pelled alay a^ray o poov

posh o ma7idy te dee-ass avree a boro shel-laben, sims a
beng-a\o cuvva.

Penawva mandy

:

"

Saws duv-ya-doy

"
]

Aive-wer o cuvva on-cared to hocker and kell sims div'ms
te

;

mandy vee-ome and
(Broken

latched

lis

(as

in this) sus a

taivno ra2vty-chirry-\do that
tdn.
dialect.)

had

2)elled

awree fon lesievs

The reader

will find the following outlines of a

Eom-

many Rhyming
of

Dictionary, compiled by Miss Tuckey,

much

use in acquiring the pronunciation and accents
It

of the

language.

embraces both the perfect and

" allowable" rhymes.

Charles G. Leland.

D C 1' O N A R Y
I

I

B
Aja, thus, wjain,

Heb,
Jib,

the sky.

Asa, aho.
BSl,

Club, the tongue.

friend, companion.
f/ivc.

a

lanr/uai/c.

Da,

Ha,

cat,

D
DQ(1,
lii/ht.

.la, fjo.

Kamasa, thou lovcst. Kenna, now. Krallissa, a queen.
Mollasa, never mind.
Piiramlsa, a fable
JSa, all, so.

Tud, milk.

Adre,
-A

in, inside.

pre, up, above.

Slioro apre, to praise

Uora, an hour, a watch. Ora, a penny,
KaniOra, a room.

A lay,
Tulu,

down.
hclou:

Tuley,

Yora, an eyy.
Atlovva, that, Ihoae.
Atri'isli,

U
afraid.
HiiHh,

Covva, a

thinr/.

a fiddle.

Ixivva, money.

KokIi, a stick.
I'&hIi, half,

mar.

Ddnya, a

root, teeth.
YUitih, to tit, rflinaiii.

Ordnya, a yranarii. Kuoya, a snrk, ha;/.
Ildnyn, a rred, rod.
Stdiiya, a slahle.

DckIi, ten.
1'chIi, to

shine. icood, forest.

Wtnh, a

K&na, -when. M&nnn, to forbid.

IKitch, to stay, remain.

Latch, to find.

244

DICTIONARY.
Kani, a hen.
Panni,
neater.

Dush, (lush, trouble. Mush, a man or mouse. Rush, clean.
Trush,
thirst.

Rani, a lady.
Sani, soft, silken.

Tani, young, small.

Akai, here.
Avail, yes.
Bai, a bough.
of.

Avrl, away, out

Chi, a

firi?"'-

Bar veil,

rich.

Dilleri, clever.

Dye, a mother. Gry, grai, a horse.
Kai, where.

Ketteui, together.
Kri,

an

ant.

Nai, a finger-nail.
Parakai, <Ais wa?/,
/icre.

Mee, mi, a mile. Manushi, « woman.
PI, to drink.
Plrr^-ni,

Rashai, a clergyman.

Rye, a
(femi-

lord,

gentleman.
to /e? 2/o?<r icye,

siceetheart

Soniiakai, gold.

nine).

AVye, due
to get

;

Rinkeni,
Asti
sT,

prettii, beautiful.

your due.

it is to be.

Tacho

si,

all right.

Chichi, nothing.

Sumeli, fragrant.
Suneli, handsome.

Hotchewltchi, a hedgehog.
Nitchi, peevish, cross.
Bitti, little.

Sunari, golden.
SI, is.

Zi, the sold,

mind, heart.

Chltti,

little.

Buti, much, very.
Dili, hearty, cordial.
Gilli,

Nutti, nuts.
Tute, you.
Dori, thread, rope.

a song.

Killi, to dance.

LuUi, red.
Mili, pleasant, kind.
Milli, together, mixed.
Nlli, blue.

Kori, a thorn.

Shukori, sixpence.
Akoi,

ShiUi, cold.

/icre.

Dui, two.

Adoi, there. Covakoi, this here.
Dovadoi, that
Fergoi, a
fig.

Mui, the face, mouth. Rooy, or roy, a spoon.

there.

DICTIONARY.
Goi, a sausage, pudding.
Patoi,

245

Ajal, quick.

a Gipsy

sign.

Anerjal, opposite.

Yoi, she.

Chal, a

/a(/,

felluvx

Dral, through.
Ferri, to please, entice.

Hal,
Pal,

<o ea<.
gro.

Kerri, at home.
PIrri, free, to walk.

Jal, <o

a

brother, friend.

Pashajal, neighbouring.

Chavi, a

girl.
kettle.

Shimal, the north.
Sovahal, an oath, to swear.
Trushdl, a cross.

Kekavi, a

lAvi, words.

Nevvi, new.

S&wi,

to

laugh.

Del, to give.
Ferdel, to forgive.

Kingri, a church.
Viingri,

Kel,

to

dance.

a waistcoat.

Lei, to get.

K
liak, luck.

Padcl, across.
V{:\,tofall.

Shell, to call, whistle.

Lock, sluulow.

Well,

vel, to come.

Nak,

the none.
liongh.

Shock,
Ti'ilak,

Dil,

a im/(.

behind.
eye.

Dill, i/uick.
Jil, to go.

Yak, an
Chlkk,
Dikk,

dirt, earth.

Kill, butter, cheese.
Lil,
6(>oA-,

a

Icier.

tol'Mjk, sec.

Flick, clevci; adroit.

Nill,

a

brook.

Shill, cold.

Ki'k, not,

ii'i.

Kikk,

jrid,.

D(Jll,

a

declivity.

VY-ck, one.

Lull,

rf<i, ^/t« yo/A'
ifi'nf.

«/

fin egg.

Mukk,
Iliikk,

to let, allow, leave.
(t

Mol,

tree.

Tuk, tad.

M
L

ChAm, the chcrk. Ja kiini, f/M slowly.
K&in,
love, the sun.

Aglal,

1

Agdl.

\'^^"''-

^ ^

ShCttn, the evening.

246
Fern, the hand.

DICTIONARY,
T6n,
to say.

Pem, a thing. Tem, country. Kim, n
side-tent.

Shillopen, the cold.

Wen,

the ivinter.

Adrin, in, inside, within.
Bin, to
sell.

tSim, like, resembling.

Chin,

to cut.

Adrom, away. Drom, a road, a way.
PIshom, honey, a bee. Kom, a Gipsy, a husband. Shorn, / am, we are. Viom, / came.

Chin, a blade.
Jin, to knoio.

Kin,

to buy.

Kin, the edge.
Sidderin, drowsy.

Trm,

three.

N
Blan, wind.

Chovihan, a witch. Drovan, quickly.
Glan, in front
of.

Budero, aged.
Barvelo, rich.

Bockalo, hungry.

Gran, a granary. Kan, the ear. Del kan, to listen (give ear). Patteran, a Gipsy sign.
San,
silk.

Chavescro, a
Dinnelo,

little

boy.

Chiriclo, a bird.
silly, foolish.

Dov

Safriln, yellow.

what is that. Dukkero, sad. Kanavo, half-blood.
e lo,

Saran, done, finished.
Sarishan,

Kinelo, tired.
do.

how do you
are.

Morriclo, a cake.

Shan,

is,

Niishedo, hung,
Piikeno, quiet.

lost.

Sigan, quickly.

PIrryno, sweetheart.

Shyan, perhaps.
Delaben, a
gift.

Sapeno, wicked,
like,

i.e.,

snake-

from

sap, snake.

Kalopen, darkness, blackness.

Suvalo, infirm.

Kammoben,

love, pleasure.

Kellapen, dancing.

Trash eno, frightened. Vaccasho, a lamb.

Len, them, to them. Miraben, life.

Waffedo, bad, vHcked.
Avella, he, she,
Brishinella,
it

Mullopen, death.
I'un,

it

comes.

a

sister.

rains.

DICTIONARY.
Pello, fallen.

247

PIrdo, half-breed.

ShiHlo, a rope.
Jillo, gone.
Sliillo, cold.

Pordo, full.

Wardo,

caj-t,

carriage.
well, ripe.

Kushto, good,
Mishto, glad.

GuUo,

the throat.

WIsbto,

lijj.

Lullo, red.

MuUo, dead.
Tullo, fat.

Matto, drunk.
Tatto, hot, clever:

Balo, pig.

Avo,
lazi/.

yes.

Kalo, black, dark,
Jfppo, a patch.
Trfippo, the body.

Ch^vo, boy, youth.
Savo, who.

R
Bar, a stone. Bur, a garden. Edr, a

Ch6vihano, a wizard.
Pano, while. Sano, soft. Tano, young, small.
.lafro(ra), such, as.

pound

(20s.)

Char,

gra-ss.

Gogemiir, a swamp.

Kar, company
kdr, do
Katilr,
rail.'!,

;

kair

lis

in

it

in company.

Wufro, bad.
IJcTO,

fence.

a ship.

Pukar, aloud.
Sar, all.

Kcrro, done, finished.
Ocero, a person.
Miro, my.

Sanusar, always, forever.
Sliukar, easy, slow.
Soliviir,

a bridle.

Pino, free, afoot.
Tiro, thy.

Sovar, sleepy.

TuHHar,

to

cmforl.
wcjit.

Hhirro, sour.

Utur, the

Vzar, by chance.
COiTO, « nip.

Wnfudur, bad.
IVirodf-r, larger.
I'.uiider,

Duro, far.
I'uro, old.

more.

Ki'rdo, dtine, completed.

Kiiir, to inake, do.

MOnlo, dead.
I'urdo, hiildcn.

Ker, a house. Mtr, to kill, strike.

246
Kekker, no, never. Nikker, to swallow.
Rikker,
to keep, hold.

DICTIONARY.
Anner,
to bring. to bite.

Dan'er (dander), Puder, to blow.

Sikker, to show, help, secure. Sikker, sure, certain.

Ruder,

to clothe.

Wuder, a
Kcssur,

door.

Chokker,
Hockcr,

to shoe.

to care. to

to

jump.

Kusser,

adorn.

Hokker, Nakker, Makker,
Pogger,

to carry.
to stray.

Nisser, to swallow.

Pessur, to pay.
Tasser, to droivn, choke.
"WQsser, to throiv, fling.
Laster, to find.

to defile. to break. to speak, talk. to yell.
to

Rakker,
Shokker,
Stakker,

climb into.

Praster, to run.

Waster,

to

hold, handle.

Dukker,
Lucker,

to tell fortunes. to hide. to nevjh.
to tell, ask.

Kister, to ride.
Lester, his, to him.

Nucker, Pukker,

Shukker,

to shake.

Bor, a hedge.

Suker, to xcarm.

Chore,

to steal.

Cor, the edge.

Duter,
Luter,

to rise {the sun).
to steal.

Levinor, beer, ale.

Mor,

to kill,

murder.
tail.

Jotcr, together.
Giller, to sing.

For, a feather,

Shtor, four.

Huller,

to carry.

DQr, far.
Giir, the thunder.

Luller, to yell at.
Miller, to mix, adulterate.

MuUer,

Kiir, to fight.
to kill.

Kfir, outside.

Shiller, to shiver.
Tiller, to hold.

Lur,

to steal.

ShQr, the beginning.

Bosher,

to

play the fiddle.

Bosher,

to bark.

S
Jas, he, she,
it

Dfisher, to vex, grieve.

went.

Kosher, Nasher,

to beat.

Ja

palass, go behind.

to spoil, lose.

Kass, hay.
Las, he, she,
it

Trasher, to frighten.

got, took.

DICTIONARY.
Leilas, he, she,
it

249

took.

Mas, meat.
Nakelas, was
silent ; t/Hv

Av, come.
Doe'ydv, river, sea.

ndkelas, he never spoke.

Pendas,

/tc,

she, it said.

Pyass, fun, a game. Syass, shade, shadow.
Tas, a cup.

Gav, a town, village. Kur'hav, a proverb. Lav, a word. Nav, a name.
Si'iv, to

laugh.

Vas,
Lis,

he, she,

it

came.

Tuv, thread.

it.

Chiv,

to

put.

Rommanis, Gipsy; rakkrr R6mmanis, to talk Gipsy.
Kettenus, together.

Hev, a

hole,

window.
'

Giv, wheat.
Jiv, alive.

Riv, to put on (clothes), to
dress.

Kurimus, a fight.
P^tsei-us, possible, credible

Siv, to sew.

from
trust.

falser, to

believe,

Tiv, to knit.

Yiv, the snow.

Pus, straw.
Fuvius, afield.
Sob, 8U8, was, wtre.

Puv, afield, the ground. SQvv, <o swim.

Tuv,

<o

smoke.
to wcf/>.

K(iw,
lUtt, blwjd.

Y(iv, Ac.

Tit, total.

Pit {cant ^),

foot.

Shove,
Sovc,

six.
»/<:(•;>.

Tom-i'iit, foot.

(o
to

Skat, k4t, cut.

Tove,

wash.

GLOSSARY.

a lay,
|

acdi, here.

alay,
a\h,

V doion.

acoi, here.

)

acovo, this.

Alisa, Alice (a propa' name).

adduvel, that.

amdudi, we,

us.

adenna, then.
adoi,
tliere.

amdn, aviong.

amdndi
&o, on.

dui, we two.

addvo,
adr«5,

tliat.
\
.

anUva, / bring.
anerjal, over against.

adr<?e,

^

adrin, in, intidr.

Anglaterra, England.
Qakair, to begin ^

adruin, avtay.
addllo, adai, that.

dnner, to bring.
anncrela,
finpiili,
it

aduata, enoutjh.
dfta,

bnngs.

»nen.
in front

back again.

agal, before,
agal).
(
"J**'
J'
'

of

(jessed

anviaH,
fip, lip,

came on
upon.

(iitrf.)

»o (often pleonfiilir, a»
kiiHLti
nji'i,

a|((5pli,

buck again.

.'

" ijood

aruti,

by night.
thug, ahn, at.

(

tnouijh").

ana, 10 alto.
aitllrla, »o,
tutti,

a-jiUo, gone.

nkdi, here,

woulil hare,

had

to.

"''""y*!

lUlid,

can, pot^ible.
it

nlone.
dati 81,

akunjro,

)

ran

bt.

252
atcb, to remain, stay.
atrdsh, afraid.

GLOSSARY.
bar, hedge.

bar,

a garden.

atukno, sorry.
atut, across.
;lv,

bar, a

pound.
stone.

bar,
here.

a

come ; avakdi, come
come.

bari, baris,

a snail.

avali, yes.

baro, great.
b.irvelo,
i,

avava,

loill

rich {fem.

avava, / come.
avdlla (vela), he,
she,

bau,
(

bra ther.

or

it

is

baw,
b^v,
'

coming.
avdllin, they are cominrj.

\
J

loind, breath. air, vn

bavel, oavel,

av^nna, they come.
aver,

bavelo, windy.
'

a comer, one who comes.

\
)

wind, air.

avessa, thou contest.

bdvol,

avo, yes.
avri,

bavol, dust.
of.

away, out

baz, back, behind, open.

awali, yes.

beeno, born. beng, the devil, flame; o pure

awer, but.

bang, the old

devil.

B
ba, brother, friend.

^'^"g^^'''
!

devilish.

beng^skro,

S

bai (by), sleeve, bough.

bdngis, the devil.

babalo-dye, grandmother.

bengis his

zi,

the devil in his heart.

babus, grandfather.
bak, luck. bakelo, hungry.

berk, breast.
h6ro, ship, boat.

b^ah, to

sit.

bakeugro, shepherd.
bakro, lamb, sheep.
baktalo, lucky.

besh, a year.

beshava, /

sit ;

beshela, he

sits.

beshdas, he sat.

hiWor, hair;
hairy.

ha,l,

a hair; balno,

beshduii!,

I sat.
he, she, or it sat
sits, to sit.
sit.

bashed aldy,
beahdlla, he

down.

bdllovas, bacon.
balo, a pig ; balor, pigs.
balo,

beshallan, they

a pig, a hog.

beshermdngro, one who

sits,

a

baulo,
balor, pigs {policemen).

judge or magistrate.
beehin', sitting.

GLOSSARY.
b&hor
(besbya), years.
sit

253

bosh, a fiddle, to bark, noise.

besbtolay, to
bibi, aunt.

down.

boshom^ngro, a fiddler, a fiddle.
boshto, a saddle.
brishin, '
)

bikin, to

sell.
sell.

\
)

rain.

bikinava, / do or will
bisa, poison

brisbiudo,

made from

beans.

briino, brown.

bisser, to forget.

bud, after.
buddika, a shop.
assize

bitcher, to send, to cmil.

bitcberin-kdrs, police
courts.

or

budeskro, a successor.

bukko,

liver.

bitcherin-mushor, mayislrates.
bitcher paddl, to transport.
bitti,

buller, to boil.

bullerin, boiling.

a

bit,

a

little,

small (fern.)
lower
{voice).

buuner,

to shape, build.

bittider,
le-'^s,

fainter, smaller.

biinnerin, building.
biino, boino, proud.

bitti-muUya,
liitto,

tjoblins.

but, very, much, often.
buti, very,

a

bit,

a

Utile, small.

many.

bivdn, raw, uncooked.
blan, wind.
b<jckali>,

butider, more. butidosta,
plenty.

hungry.

butadusta,

boiiger, to duck, bend, bow,

dodgr

Ijutiengro,

a workman.

b(5ngo, bent, bowed, crooked,

butsi, buti, work.

bongo, unwilling.
booti, very.

C
'cai,

bor, a licdgc.
H(irga\',

har,

i.e.,

acai.
(

Walton

{proper name),

Cuinlo, Lovcll
c.1in8,

proper name).

literally llrdyi or Wall-town.

he loves.

boried,

it

wciglud.

caulo, unwilling.
cdvacai,
.' )

Iniro, great.

.,

.

,

}
)

this, here.

bOrodir, greater.
boro'in, growing.

ciivncoi,

chai, chi, girl.

boro-pdnni

tcin, the

south

(lit.

chairuM (ciiyruB), ^
'

"

)
'

,.
I

line.

orran-liiu<l).

chiriiH,
h'ltil.

)

Bori kiU-heina, grand
l>uri
pfirii,

rlial, lad,

a

(tipsy.

the ocean,

the great

cbalava, / touch.
cb;llor, liuls, Gipsies.

UHiier.

254
chain, cheek, leather, tin.

GLOSSARY.
chinnin peggor, cutting
chiricli,
skave>-s.

chdmor, cherries.

a bird (fem.)

chamyor, cheeks.
char,

chiriclo,
to

or

chorl,

pour

out,

vomit.
char, grass.


chirus

a bird (masc.) ; Rommauy chiriclo, the Gipsy bird
i.e.,
)

the ivatcr-wagtail.
^'"-^'}

chiriclor,

charava,
2orap.

/

touch,

vex,

cover.

cbiriklya,

[also

chyrus),

heaven.

charo, a dish, plate.
chavali, boys, mates.

time.
chitti, nothing, trifling, little.

chdvey, child, girl.

chiv, to put, place, fix, throw ('vri

chdvo

(in.), boy, child.

the chiv).
chiv aprd,
to

chdvl (fem.)
chiiv'or, children

put up, throw up.

i.e.,

chav-o.

chiv avri, to put out or away.
chivava, / do, or will, put,
<i:c.

chav-I, chdv'or).

chavorli, here, children

!

mates.

chivdlla, he, she, or

it

puts,

d-r.

cbdvori, chicken.
cheirus, time.
cheirnsses, times.

cbivved,
chido,

)

]P^t> placed.
boots, shoes.

chdkka,

chorus, time.
chi, girl (pron. chj^).

chommany,
;

something.

cbone, the moon.

chib, chiv, tongue

boro apre the

chong, a knee-joint,
cbor, grass.

hill.

chib, boastful {great on the
tongue).

chore, a thief.
fie.

chichi, nothing,

chori,

^oor {fem.)
,

cbikk, ashes, dirt, sand.

chorin, thieving.
sti tck,

chidom,
laid.

/

put,

placed,

choro, poor {masc.

chorredo, not of pure Gipjsy blood,
stolen.

chidom, me, I put.
chin, to cut, to write.

chovahaui, a witch.

china mangri, a
chingdri,

letter.

choveno, poor.
chovihan(i), a wizard.

a row, a
to

quarrel.

cbinger, through. chinger,
tear,
to

chovveny,
scold.
to

pt^^'''

(

pron.

chuv-

veny).
chufa, petticoat, skirt.

quarrel, tear.

chingaror, sptarks.

chukker,

to hit together.

GLOSSARY.
chukkered, shod, hooted,
cbukko(a), coat (chaho).
cutteieugeris,
cuttor,
bit.

255
bits, pieces.

chuma, to kiss. chumbo, chumba, a hill. chumbor, hills. chumer, to kiss. chumor, kisses. chumya, l\ churameny, somethimj.
chunger,
to spit.

B
dad,
-J

diidas, \ a father.

dado,

)

dad&ko, or daddskro, dai, a mother.
das, gave.

fatherly.

cburelo, heardtd.

de, the.
deari, dear.
de'as,

chureno, poor.
churi, a knife.

given, gave.
(English), pure,
accurate,

churya, knives.
churider, poorer.

deep

correct (language).

churdo,
chdrredo,

^
(

a quadroon, not of pure Gipsy blood,
alsoa poor person
stolen.
;

deep-diru8, deeper, purer.
deepodiridest, deepest, purest.
del, to give.

(chur'do), (

chdrredo,

)

ddlaben, a gift.
del-aprd, to give up, to read.
dell, to kick.

chury,

to climb.

chdrried, climbed.

chdrro, a ball,

i.e.,

a round

object.

dulled, done, draum.
ddllln, hitting
di^'llin

chuvveno, poor.

or kicking. of him.'

ch6vveny,
cbdvvani,

} )

lescro, ^'agivin'

"

ddll o[nb, to give up, to read.

cooDJerncHa, sccrtl.
coor, lofijkl, beat, strike
;

d6tme, then.

onra-

dc«, gave.

ben, a blow, nft'jht.

donb,
bl'tnkcU,

tr»» ;

deKblOri, lS/(fHfr.

cuppoa,

ihinffs,

clothe-^,

dick, to

see.
li>iiking-gl<i.is.
;

iih/i.

dickauxSngro, u
dickavit,
avit,

*coTo, thin {/or iicovo).
c<}vvii,

to

see

tii

MUfti dick-

a

thiu'j (ciivva).

yon should harr
saw.

seen.

covvabeii, nn incident.
cnifni,
ciirro,

d'.ckdii, si'rn.

a button, a turnip, n nnH. a cup, n tankard.
bit,

(lickdiitn, /

lick kfilo, to look

bl'ukor glum.

c6ttcr, a

drop, rwj.

dlcklo, a handkerchief.

256
dicktum, /
saiv.

GLOSSARY.
dud,
light.

dick pali, remember (look hdck).
dikk, to wait, to
dil,
dili,
see.

dud, a shooting dud, moonlight

star.
;

taley tbe dud,
;

a

ivish ; dill, quick.

hy moonlight
daylight.

div'sko dud,

hearty, cordial.

dilleri, hold, clever.

dud-bar, diamond.

dinnelo, a fool, stupid.
diplus,

dudikabin,

inahing

a

clean

a dimple.
")
.

sweep of everything in the
house, under pretence ofjjro-

dipplor, dimples.
divio,
,.
.

pitiating
species

the

planets

;

a

divius,

f-

mad, insane.
'

of

fraud

often

divvus,

divvus, the

a day ; o boro divvusko day of judgment.
river.

practised hy Gipsy women.
dui,
tioo.
{i.e.,

doeyav, a stream,
Vloi's, there is.

dui-dash

dui-tas),

a cup and

saucer.

dood (dud),

light.

duiyav, a stream, river.

dood (dud), a month.
ddrdi, see there
!

dukk, pain.
dukk,
spirit.
to tell

dori, rope or twine.

dukker,

fortunes.

dori, string, cord.

dukker,

to

pain, grieve, chide.
grief, trouble.

dovalay,

down
what

there.
is that 1

dukkerben,

dov' e

lo,

dukkerin, telling fortunes.
dukkeriu', tempting.

d(5vo (diivYo), that.

drdb, -poison, a drug.

dukkeripen, fortune-telling, an
augury.

drabbed, poisoned.
drdbber,
to poison.

dukkero, sorroivful.
dull, a declivity.

drabdngro, a doctor, druggist.
'drd,

in {for adr^).

drfe his

drom, in his own way.

drom, way, road. drom, dromus,
,
)

dum, back. dumbo, a hill. dumo, hack.
dur, far,
lo7ig, deep.

}
)

way, road. •"

durmi, among.
durodirus, longer, farther.
dtish, ^

dromya, roads.
droppi, a drop.

harm,

hard treatment.
injure, grieve.

drtimos,
driim,

dush,

)

sorrow.

a roadway.
diisher, to

harm,

GLOSSARY.
d\ia\ierir\, dificult

257
oxit of.

:

ma

dusher,

ion,

from, away,

dont harm,
dusberi, hard.

don't grieve.

fotografeugro, a p)hotograiiher.

Duvel-nasherdo, God-forsaken.
duvels-pdnni, rainhow.
gdd, a shirt.

,

G

dya, oh, viothcr
dye, o mother.

I

garadom, / hid.
gargera

e.g.,

Gorgios,

wh ite

dyeskri dye, grandmother.

people, not Gipsies.

gdv, a town, village.

E
engri,

gavdDgero, ro,

)

when added to a qualifying word signifies a thing,
is

gavdngro,

^

a policeman.

gilver, to hide.

while engro
rally to

applied gene-

gavior, villages, towns.

an

giiv-mush, a policeman.
active agent.
giivors, villages, towns.

cnneah, nine.
(is,

gdvver,
it.

garava,

/

do

or

will

hide.
esti,

for sa esti

(s'asti).

gdvvered, hidden.
geero, a

man, a person
a Gipsy).
loent.

(especi-

F
FuPhini, Persian.
fiUhni, /a/«c, countcrfiit.
fern,

ally not
ghinfl,

he went.

ghi(jm, / went, we

a hand.

gbidn, they went

;

ghilo, gone.

fergoi, fig.
ferri, to entice, allure, to please.

°

'

i

to sinn.

gill. S

ferridiro, better.
flliMin,

glllaben, a song, a singing.
gill.iH,

a mansion.

he sang.
it

tirHtuH, first.
flick, clever, r/uick, ndi/'t.

gillola, he, she, or

sings.

gillur, to ling.
gilli,

flickuor, clfvcitr, quicker,
f'jrdd,
}

a song.

forgivt

;

Miduvel fordu
forgive him
!
,

gillied,

he sung.

fordel, i

\'w,(io(l

gillior, songs.
I

fordia, he forglrin.

giiiiior ajirfi (g

bard), to count (oho

fordia wufropun,
forgiven.
foki, pfoplCffulk.

may

his sin he

koiiiUT

and
;

kemb'r).

Oinny

in'iiii

Virginia

Water

{proper name).

R

258
giv, wheat, oats.
givi^scro,
givili,

GLOSSARY.
hafta, seven.

a farmer, farming.
song.

halaben,

a meal.

a

hdmil,

to attack.

giv-puvior, oat-lands.
glal, before, in

bamlin, kneading.
hdnik, a well.
d-c.

front

of.

gdi,

^:)tV,

pudding, sausage,

hanser, to ridicule.
haro, halono, copper.

gorgiki, English, not Gipsy (fern.)

gorgiko, English, not Gipsy {mas.)
gorgio,
ft

hatch, to stand, stay, bring

;

to

white man, not a Gipsy.

hatch a tan,
to hatch
to

to

pitch a tent;
it

gorgiones, in English.
graior, horses.

it, to
it.

stand

i.e.,

endure

grdnya, a
grilsni,

ham, a mare.
buU.

hatched apic, stood up.
hatch^Ila, he, she, or
it

stands.

gruv,

a

hatchdrdo, stood, stayed.
hdtchin, standing.

gruvni, a cow.
gry,

a

horse.

hatch oprd,
angry.
hav, come
/

to

stand up.
cross,

gddli, noise.
gudli, sweetly.

haurini (hyno, hdnnalo),

gudlo, a trick [masc.)

gudlo, sweet, a
(masc.)

siceel thing,

sugar

hav
hav

acai,

come here

!

avri,

come away

I

gujer, to

make a deep
noise.

noise.

haw,

to eat.

gunno, a bag, sack.
guri, to

heb, heaven.
hdfta, seven {masc.)
hdfti, seven {fern,

make a

gtirlo, throat.

and pi.)
J

gtirni,

a cow.

hekka, hekki, hokki, haste
hdrro, herri,
leg,

gurnidver, a cucumber (b.d.)
gusveri, wise, discreet.

wheel.

hev, a hole; coal-hev, a coal-hole. hev, a dimpile, heaven.

guzno, proud.

hevdngries, shutters.

H
ha, hal, to eat;

hdvyor, valleys.
ate.

hadom, I

hevyor, windows.
hikker, to confess.

Labben, food.
li

elder, to lift.

hockabeu, a

lie,

a fraud.
de-

lidddered, lifted.

hdckeni, false, fraudulent,
ceptive ; deceit,

hadem,

v;e ate.

a

lie.

GLOSSARY.
hdcker, to jump.
hdckerin, sprirKjimj,

259
to look

byver,

into, to

pry

into.

jump 'ng.

"peek" (American).

hockerpen, a

lie,

fraud.
I

bono (hyno), angry.
hopper, to carry away.
hoppercore, policeman.
bora,
xcatch, hour.
i,

she, they.

iudi, firewood.
is, if.

borra, a penny.
botch<511a,
it

burns.

iv,

snow.

hcjtcher, to burn.

hdtcbered, burnt.

J
3A,9o.
jafra, ajafro, as such.
jal, to go.
jal, to

hotchewitchi, a ludyeJioy.
hotchni, whiskey.
hovalos,
f/aitera, stockiiujs.

hub,
hufa,

lid, cover.

make to go

;

jul the graias.

cap.
to take aioay.

run
jala,

off the horaea.

hukker,

he goes.

bukkered, cheered.
bukki, already.
huler, to shelter.

jilMn, go

on I mote on ! (pron

joll-

dnn).
jfiUan, they go.

bunkeri, dry

;

hriiikeri-rukk,

a

jails, goes.

dry
lifinnalo,

tree.

jfimpa, yVo// or toad.

bored,

awjry,

bud,

jan,/o»' ja

iiii,

go on

!

rotten.
]iunnal(), obstimite.

jasKcd, gone, went.
jilssin, gain'. jilva,

bunnel,

to vex.

/ go, J will go.
170.

lifinter, to arise.

jilw,

bnnti,

r/rt

uf)/

jaw
jt-HH,

vii,

go awoy

!

bdiibti, to rite.
liuiibti aprd, yrt up.

jellod, ictn<.

go.

buitki,

what fur
/"

f

why?
mour
t.

joiwcd, gone.
jt.'MHin,

bnUT,

hany
apr<?,

up, to

going.

bntennl

yot up (on horse-

ji,

to like.

back).
bfitlo, ihalloui.

jinn, they went.
jib,

language,
jib, in

tpeech

;

dn>
>

»av<i

butt'j,

hung up, mounted.

what Inn gunge

26o
jido,
liv'inrj,

GLOSS AR Y.
alive.

kairen,

they

make,

or

do

;

so

jiller, to sing.

kairen men, what are

tve to

jillo,

gone.

do?
kairdngei'i,
;
^

jin, to
jin, to

know.
knoiu
jiuava,

a

house-dweller
(/e"*-)

/ know

kairdngii,

(

jindoni, I knew.

kair^ngro, a house-dtveller (masc.)
kairengror, house-dwellers.
kairin sig, pretending.
kdj (kasb), silk.

inaben, knowledge.
inavit, to

know.

ins, knou's.

ippo, a patch, 'patched.
iv, to

kako, an uncle.
kai, cheese.
kali.
live.

live; jivava,

I

live.

ivaben,
iivvas,

life, existence.

Mack

(fern.)

thou

livest,

didst

kaliko, to-morrow, yesterday.
kalleri, vain.

iwiu', living.
ouger, to wake.
oter, jota, together.

kalo, black [mas.

),

dark, lazy.

kalodirus, blacker.

ove, oats.

kalo drom, a black road, dark.
kalo pani, the ocean, the dark or
black water.

ukals, dogs.

ukalo-Rommanis, dog-Gipsy.
a wife,
va,
)

woman.

kalopen, darkness, blackness.
kalor,

a

shilling.

kalo-rattescro,

appertaining

to

K
kai, where.
'kai, ^'.g., acai, here.

the

dark

night.

kdm, kam, kam,

the sun. business, affair, want.
to love, like.

kair,

a house.
lis in

kamakunycr, a mouse.
kiimava, /
love, like.

kair, to do.

kair

kar,

do

it

in

company

kambri, kamli, enceinte.
kamela, he or she loves or
likes.

ivith

some one.

kairava, / do, or will do.
kairavit, to do.

kameli, loving, lovely, enceinte.
kameli, darling.

kainlum, J did.
kair duro, to sink.

kamdscri, loving, a sweetheart.

kamescro,

lover.
loveliest.

kaired kin, tired, sharpened.
kairedo, done.

kamlidlrest,

kamlo, loving, darling.

GLOSSAR Y.
kammoben, anything agreeable; tukey kammoben, for thy
take.

261

k^das

(i.e.,

kordas), thou didst,

ye did.

ke-diwus, to-day,
kek, no,
(a.

kamni, enceinte.

not,'

none.
kettle.

kamora, kamOrus, room

kekavi, a pot,

kams, he

loves, likes.

kan, the ear {pi. kanawor).
kuna, kan, when.
drorayii, church-going

kek covva, nothing. kek-kek kumi, "not no more," "never no morc.^'
kekkeno, none, nothing.
kekker, no.

kaugr&ki

xcays, piety.

kaugri, church.

kekkumi, no more.

kangri-pov,

kek
}
)

nai, not, there is not.

,/^„^,/,^,,„;

kangry-puv,
kani, a hen.

kekumi, any more.
kel, to dance.

kdnu<% now, when.
kanner, to utink.
kilnnls, hens, fouls.

kdlled, danced.
kdllela, it dances.

kdllin,

dancing.

kiinya,

a sack.

kdlloben, a dance, a bull.

kap, to take.

kenaw,
,

kap, to

get.

kennii, )

.

) f

now.

kap-buti mufh, a prosperous man.

kenna, ago.
kennadoi, now and then.

kappa, clothes, a
kiir, to

bl'iidrt.
to.

cry out, roar, shout, call

kenna
\ii'.\m\

sig,

by and by, soon.

kari,

a thorn, neck,
hay.

kepsi, kipsi,

a basket,

karm (kam) « gleam,
kiiua,

kosh, viillow.

k(5r,

a house.

kaAw'ngro, a hay-stack.
katMOH, scissors, shears.
kaiiliko,

keratti, to-night.
k(?ravit, to do.

tomorrow, yrsterdoy.
love, like.

kerdo, done, rndrd.
kdrela, he, she, or
k(5relo, / do.
it

kaulor, a shilling.

does.

kniim, to

kiivakai, this here.
'kavi,

kdrimiifl, doing, deed.
k(5rin,

a

pot, keltic (for kekftvi).

doing,

kavod'ji, that there,

kerin, a

worm.

ke,

to,

that, as.

kcrri, at Jiomr.

kttli, to Jiirk.

kerro, done, fmithnl.

262
kessur, to care,
test,

GLOSSARY.
try
;

maiuly

korauna, a croivn ;
half-a-crnwn.

pilsli-korauiKi,

kessava, / care.
k^ti, to, toioards, staiyht to.

koredo (kurredo),
koosi, kusi, few.

blind.

kettena,
ketteui,

"v

\
)

together.

kosh,
kosliter,

kettenus,

a

stick.

ki {pron. kye), wherever, %ohere.
ki'
kil,

kosbter-stogg, a rick of faggots.
kosser, kusser, to clean.
krallisa, the queen.

and
)

'doi,

here

and

there.

kill
kil,

\

^^ ^^"2/> ^^
;

dance.

Krallisas gav, Windsor.

butter

kil-curro, buttercup.

Krallis'wesh, Windsor Forest.
kri-kria, kiri,
krili,

killer, to bloom.
killin, playing.
kill, to

an

ant.

funny.

buy.

kuder, to open.
kukalus, doll, fairy, dwarf, goblin.

kin, the edge. kinlo,
1
.

)

(

tired.
;

kulla (kolla), things.

kissi,

much

sar kissi,

how much

?

kumbo, a
kumi,

hill.

I

kister, to ride.

quiet.

kitchema, an inn

;

boro kitoh-

kun, who, when.
kuneri, old.

ema, grand
klisin, lock-up.

hotel.

kunjerni, secretly.
.spirally,

klisin, Uj

wind around
a
lock.

kunji (koonjee), narrow,
kunsus, corner, end.
kunter,
(o adulterate.

close.

to twist about.

klisin,

a

key,

ko, v)hat.

kur, to strike, beat, fight, to grieve,
^

kOkeri {/em.),

vex.
^'

kokero
kOk'ro

{7nasc.),
i.e.,

^

kuraben, n blow, a fight.
kuramt^ngro, fighting man, warrior.

i

kokero.

kom, to lore, like. kommeni. some, somebody, any. kon (kun), who, then, ivhen, therefore, what.
kor, eyebrow.

kured, beaten.
kfirhav,
kuri,

a proverb.
vessel.

a cup,

kuricus, a week.

koraben, noixe.
kor'ben,

kdrri (kulli
noise.

?),

tin.

making a

kiirran,

an

oath.

GLOSSARY.
kurredo, beaten.
kurried, beaten.
kursas, kurshni, dexterom^.

263
a
linguist, professor.

lavdngro,

orator.
Idvus,
14,

a word.
liave, hold, take, to

kuaher apr6,
kushko,
fjood.

to flatter.

they.

lei, to

kushkipen, goodness.
kushtier, better.
kushtiest,
best.

yuv
way.

lulled a drotn, he

own ; had a

Idldom, J took.
Idllas,

kushti-rudered, wdl -dressed.

thou didst take.

kushto, good.

lulled, taken, held,

owned.

kushto-bak, goo<l luck.
kushtodirus,
better.

lulled opr(5, taken up, arrested. Idlled adusta,
Idlliu, taking.

had enough.

kusDO, a basket.

UUo, taken.
lei rdk,

.

take care

!

L
la, she,

Idle,

he takes.
take care!

her.

lei vin',

lab, lav, lip, edge, profit.
laj,

len, tluy.

ashamed.
of or to her.

Idnder, them,

of,

from, or by (hem.

Idjipen, shame, viodcuty.
laki. her,

Idndy, them.
IdngeriB, their,
lens, their.
les, his.

of them.

lakis, }

lak'B.;'"^'IdngH, along.
lasa, her, with her.
Idiiflcd,

IdHcro,
Idakri,

of him. of him {before a feminine

he, she, or

it

took.
leaai

noun).
(

IfuitUB, at last.

pron. leH-aee),

it is.

latcha, to find,

knp.

Idstcr,

him, of or by nivi.

iatcLed,
latchd...

Icsti, to
}

him.

^^"""'^-

IcHtiH kiikoro, himself.

latchedorn,

vc

met

;

lit.,

xrc

leviiia,

}

beer

(German

Ciip>y,

found.
latcbcr, to find.
lati, to her,

Icviiior,

^

loviiiu).

n,

it.

her.

lian,
lion,

ye or you took, got. he or they look.
/
to'ik.

lav,

a word.

lava, /

do or

will take.

lioiii,

264
lil,

GLOSSARY.
lutfi
lily,

a book.
lilei,

chdvo, adopted son.

lilai,

summer, maid-

lutter, to

wallow (lutterin adrd

hood.
Lilengreski
gav,

chik).

Cambridge

luva,

money

(lovey).

(book-learners' town).
lino, taken.
lis,
it,

M
ma,
don't.

him.

livindugris, hops.

Livindugri-tem, Keiit
livvena, beer (livena

mai (my), /. maila, a donkey.
or levina.

i

ma

rakker, don't speak.

probably more correct than
levinor).
lo, he, it, that.

mal, mdlor, malya, companions.

maluna, lightning or thunder.

lock,

a shadow.
(pron. also ladder),
to

man, /. man, musn't, don't!
man,
the heart, soul.

l<5dder

lodge, abide.

mander, from me.

loko, heavy or light.

lolo-pabo, tomato.

mandy, /, to me, me. mang, to beg, ask; mi raangav
tute, I beg you.

lougo-duro, farther.
louver,
lovva,
^

f

mangermdngro, a beggar. mano, silly.

man
lovvy,
'

pen, mustn't say.
tu, cheer

mdnsha

up

1

luchipen, sensuality.

mansy, with me.
manrxsh, a

Mdderin, shaking.
lullan,

man.

they vanish

;

len

lullan

mdnusbi, a woman.
man'y,
e.g.,

'vri,

they vanish away.

mandy.

1611er, to vanish, disappear.

mariklo, cake.

luUi, farthing.
lullo, red.

marc, bread.
maro's
'ker,

an

oven.

lullo 0' the yora, yolk.

martadas, he wailed.

lullopen, redness, ruddiness.

martava, L wail.

lun, salt.

mas, meat ; Mas-diwus, Sunday.
mdsker, in the midst
of.

Ltindra, London.

Lundramtjskro
lur, to rob.

jiv,

London

life.

mdtcha, a

fish. cat.

matcbka,

GLOSSARY.
mdtchyor,
mol^ngrls, grapes.
mol^ngri-tan, vineyard.

265

fishes.

nidtto, drunk.

mavi, rabbit.

mor, do

not.
killed."

mee, mi, a

mile.
miles.

mored,

meeyor, mior,

mdriclo, a cake.

men, among. men, to me.

morno, our own.
mornis, our own.

men, the mendui,
m^r,

neck.
tee

moro,

i,

our.

two.
to

moro, bread.
mortclii, leather.

mengy, me,
to die.

me.
yoi'd a-m<^red, she

'mout, without.
;

m^red, died

mui, face.
mui-engro,
)
)

would have died.
merdla, he, she, or
it

a Ukcncss.apirture.

dies.

muiengri,

mdriben, death,
m£, my.

life.

mujer,
"^^^'
\

'Merican^skro, American.

to let,to leave, to be

worth

mi,

I,

mukk,

)

midiri,

my

dear.

mukk

alay, to let
let go.

down.

Middvel, God.

mukkdv,
j

mi

duvvel-B tem,
tern,
)

uiukk mengy
/,,,„.^„

jal, let

me go!

Miduvelus
miller, to

mukker,

to fly.

mill, sweetly.

add

up, to usHCViblf, to

niukkeran duro, flying far. niukkered avri, flown away,
out.

let

mix, to adulterate.

minner,
miiino,

to

make a fuss.
my, mine.

nnikkert'd avrl his dfikk, he delivered himself {liberavit ani-

iiiinriil,

iiilraben, life, diuth.

mam.
mull
(inol), worth.

mini, my.
mirlH, mine.
miHali,

mTilIiT, In die, to kill.
mnll<;ri"<l, killed,

a

table.

dead.

miHlito, svect, nice, fflad.

mnlicrin, dying.

minhto pen, twret vorda.
niiito,
e.f/.,

mnllo, dead.
n-.nil",
rf'r.

mi»hto.

a bubble, shadow.

mol,miil,tfinf,krilornul,por<,

mnllo, a spirit, ghost.

mol, wine
port.

;

lollo inol, red wine,

mQllo haulor, dead
mQlIo

pig.

cLiriclo, raven.

266
mumeli,
light, candle.

GLOSSARY.
ndwo, named.
net, not.

mun,

the forehead.
she, or it squeezes.

munella, he,

nevvi, neto.

munjer,

to pinch,

a pig

that has

nidderi (nudderi), ignorant.
nik-but, no good.
nlli, blue.

died a natural death.

muscro, a policeman.

mush, a man, a mouse. mushero, vuisculine.
musbi, arm.
mtitchimengro, a tanner.

nisser, to swallow.

nisser the
to

beng and sar
the

jivin,

svjallow

devil

and

every living thing.
nisser,
to

mutterimengri,
rnyla,

tea,

remove,

miss,

avoid,

a

donlcey.

keep away, pour out, empty,
extinguish, to vex.
nisseri cdvva,

mylas, donkeys.

a strange

thing.

nitehi, peevish.

N
ndflo,
ill,

nok, the nose.

sick.

noko, one's own,
nutti, nuts.

ndflopen,

an

illness.

ndflopen-kair,

a

hospital.

uak, end.

nak
nai,

o'

ye divvus, the end of
is

the

o, the

[masc.)

day.

oitoo, eight.
not,

a finger-nail, there

okki, okai, there.

nan

est.

oprd, on, up.
ora, or, {broken dialect).

nango, naked, bare.
narkeri (nakkeri), spiteful.
nisher, to
lose,

ovavo, the other, the next.

to

hang, forget,

spoil, run.

ndshered, ' ndsherdo,
nass,

)
J.

7 j hanged,

lost.

7

^

pa, ybr, on. pa, /or
;

)

Latch pa

leste, wait for

away
'\

!

him.
pa, by, near, on.

nasser, to lean on.
nasti,
,

pdbos, apples.
not
"°^to, '

.

nastis,
n'asti,

f it is

unable, can'

>

P

'

'

(
)

s-port, jollity.

)

paias,

nav, a name.

paiascro, jolly.

GLOSSA/?V
pdkker, to defend,
pal,
to clean.

267

pasher a pash bar, nearly half-a-

a
of

brother.

pound.
accent
(i.e.,

pal

a lav,

its

pash-korauna, half-a-crown.
paah-iuli, (jrcy\half-bl>ie).
patoi,

brother, M.C.)
pala, oh, brother!
paldll,
pali,
)

a sign.

piltriii,

a

leaf.

patser, credit, trust, believe.

palass,
pale,
'

again, behind.

patserdo, trusting.
patsered, promised.
pdtserus, possible.
p;itteran,
. ,

paller, to follow ; to nourish, to

rear.

)
?•

paller an, follow after.
palor, brethren.

patterani,

_

.

a

track, a si'/n.
'

)

'

pauli, behind, after.

pander, to

tie,

to suspend.

pauDO, white {masc.)
pauni, white (fern.)

pandered,

tied,

bound,

close.

panderpen, the pound.
paudngri, a
this
bell

pauvero, poor.
peerdos, travellers.

(corrupted into

fomi by an Englinh who had at first learned it from a German
Gipsy,

peggor, skewers.
I>ekker, to roast or bake.
pelled, fallen.

Gipsy as gani'pana.)
pSni, water.

pelled

a,\Ti,

fallen

off.
it.

'pels it alay, ilrvps

panj,

Jive.

pelt alay, fallen
;

off.

pdnni,

water

pari the

iiuiini,

pein, « thing.

over the water.

pen, to say, to think.

pdnser, to approve.
papiro, paper.
para, pari, to fxchavge.

pen,

sister.
(rt

pen

termination used in form;

ing nouns, us kuslito, good
kuHliti|>en, goodness).

par-akdi, before now.
paravit, split, shntlir.
pari, over, across.

peniiva, / say.

pendaH, thou didst say, he said.
pendiotn, / said.

parraco, thank yon.

poHh, by, near, beside
pfiah-divvuB, afternoon.

a half

]i(.iid(iH,

he said.

penelian, they say.

pSahcr, nearly.
piiah-njul, ncighbonriny.

pennaH, thou sayest.
pi'Iinin, saying.

268
peniiis,

GLOSSARY.
a saying.
as.

poller, to feed, nourish.

pensa, pensi, like,
per, to Jail.

pooro, poor.

poov, the earth, ground
pordo, full.
; peski, self.

;

a

field.

pesh, to shine.
peskri, her

own

por^Dgripen, tvriting.
pOri, a feather, pen, or tail.

pessur, to pay.

Petul^ngro,

Smith

{a

proper

porno, bacon.
posserben, burial.
pov, earth,

name).
philissin,
pi,

a mansion.
pi
to

ground

;

a field.

to

drink; to

moben,
health.

your kamdrink your

praio-tem, heaven (query, praller-

tem).
praler
i.e.,

paler.

pinder, to attack.

praller sherro, overhead.
prasser, to abuse. praster, to run.

pingoro, an associate.
jiiopen, drink, somethinij to drink.

piredor, travellers, tvalkers.
pirella, he walks.

prasterin
races.

o'

ye

gryor,

Jiorse-

pirengri,

a

traveller (fern.)

'pr^

i.e.,

oprfe, aprd.

pirengro, a walker, a traveller.
piri,

puders,

it

blows.

afoot.
) t
)

pukk,

to say, to speak, to tell, to

pirriben,
i_ pirraben,

sing.

a walk.

pukdr, aloud.
pukeni, quiet (fern.)

pirried, walked.

pirro,

beginning

;

tacho pirro,

pukeno,
pukker,

quiet (masc.
tell,

well begun.
]pirro,

pukkelan, they
;

they say.

dear, free

afoot.

to tell.

pirros, feet.

pukkeras,

thoii tellest.

pirryin, walking. pirryni, dear, sueetheart (fcm.)

pukkerin,

telling.

pur, to change, to turn.

pirryno,

dear,

a

sweetheart

(masc.)
plashta,

puraben, a turn, the action of turning, exchange.
pureni, old age.
puri, old,

a red
zi,

cloak, mantle.

poggado, broken.

aged (fern.)

pdggado
pogger,

broken heart.

puripen, old age.
pure, old (masc.)

to break.
it

pogger^lla, he, she,

breaks.

p<irr, belly.

GLOSSARY.
purub, purus, west (Hindustani,
the east).
pufl,

269

ratteskri nightly, [ftm.], in the
night.

straw.

ratt^skro (masc.) nightly.

pusheno, buried.
pusimegrid, spurred, pricked.
pusta, a spur.

rdtfuUy, Moody.
rati,

night.
ratti,

putcb, >utcb,

)

rani,
to ask.

putcbt )utchei-,

,

,

,

>
)

rawuey,
J-

a lady.

putcbin, a-skiufj. bin, askiufj.

rawni,
religionus, religion.

putsey, ey,
putdi,

)

>

a pocket.
; (t

rig (rikk), side.
field.

puv, earth, (/round

riggur, to take, carry.
rikk, side.

puva,
puvor,

}

r
\

plural o/puv. ^ ' '

rikk,

to keep.

puv-vardo, plough.
pyass, sport, jollity, fun.

rikker,
rikker, to carry, keep, retain.

rikkered,

kejit.

R
rackli,

rikkers, he keeps, he carries.

a

girl.

rikkorus, beside, aside; theside of

niffer, to descend.

anything.
!

rdk, lei rak, take cure

rinkeni, jn-ctty (fern.)

rilkker, to speak, to lulk.
rakli,

rinkeno, pretty (masc.)
ri.sher, to bribe.

a

yirl.

r&klo, a boij.

risHcr, to turn,

<(«('."<,

<tr.

ran,

an

osier.

risser, to Ircmhlc, shake, stir.
riv, to

rinkni, prctiy (Ilindii, rangiiii,

wear (lidder, ruder),

gaily coloured).

rodder, to seek, search.
roi, rooy,

Tim, a lady.
ranjer,r6njer, to take oJf,undrcss.

a spoon (Hindu,

doi).

rokkcr, to npcak.

ranya, osier twigs.
raabdi,

rokkerapen,
rokkerpeii,

)

,

a clergyman.
'

)

'

clergymen.

Hum, a hutband, a Gipsy Himln,
(

riisliera,

)

pom).
Uoinani,
lioincli,
/

riabimongr'i, n prcucher.
rut, blood.

u-if>: (//.,

D(.niiii).

ratfulo, bloody.

Kouimanebkiifl, Gipsy fashion.

270

GLOSSARY.
ruzli o' the sala,

Romiuaiii chal, a Gipsy lad.

dawn.

Roinmani joter,
ing cry.

tlie

Gipsy (lather-

ruzha, a flower.
ruzhior, flowers.
ruzlo, strong, bold, harsh,
stiff.

Rdmiuanipen, Gipsydom.

R6mmauis, Gipsy lanyuaye.
R(5mmani,
Gipsy.

ruzno, strong, bold.
rya, oh, sir J
rye,

Rommano,
romni, a wife.
rov, to cry, to weep.

a gentleman.

ryeskro, gentlemanly.

rovades, he wept.
rovel, rov^Ila,

S
sa,

he or she weeps.
dress.

such, so, like, as.

sa buti, as

much

as.

rudaben,

safrdn, yellow.
siiko, all this.

rudderin, seeking.
riidela,

he or she seeks.

sakunii, as ever.
sala, the

ruder,, to search, feel the person,
seek.

morning.

Sillamauka, a table.
salivilrdo, saliviiris, bridle.
liter-

ruderpen, dress.

rukestamengro, a squirrel,
ally,
trees.
'

sani, soft [fern.)

having

to

do

with

sano, soft, thin, slender (masc.)
sap,

a drop.

[

a

tree, the galloivs.

sar, all.
sar, with, as, like, hoiv.

rukk,

)

rukker,
trees.

sarapre, all over.
sarasar, altogether, always.

rukkor,

rummer, to marry. rummered, , > married. rummoed,
)
.

sar but,

how much

?

saridui, both.

'

)

sarishau,

how do you do

?

(fur sar

runjer, to distress.

shan).
sarja, everywhere, all.
sarlo,

ruppeni, ambitious.

ruppeuo,

silver.

morning.

rush, clean.
rdsher, lo attack.
rushni, bright.

saro, all.
sarrati, all night.

sar'sban, see sarishan.

ruvv, to weep, cry.
ruz, day.

sa saf, all right.
sastis, can, able.

GLOSSARY.
Basti,

271

perhaps,
<i:c.

may

he,

must,

shilleri, cool, chilly.

should,

sbiUo, cold.
shillopen, cold.
shimill, the north.

satcho, true, truly,
s&v, to smile, laugh.
8i[veri, cruel.

sLindo, wet.
that
;

edvo,

which,

siivo

mush,

sblr avri, to

pour

out.

that

man.

sbirki, star (cbiriki).

sav' pen'ia,

who

says.

shirro, sour.

eiwer,

to

lawjh.

shock, a bough.
shorn,
)

fidvyins, smiles.
88, is.

J

am ;
I

shomas, / was,

mi

shorn,

)

we were.

Bee, heart.

shorn

shillo,

am

cold.

selno, green.

shore, to praise (shar).
shorin, praising, boasting.
shosh(5i,

sensus, since (b.d.)

Bbab, night, dew.

a hare or rabbit.

shab

o'

the

ratti, to

go by night.

shov, six.
sbtor, four.

sbaian, perhaps.
Bb3,k, body, bough, cabbage.

shuba, a woman's gown.
shukar, quietly, gently, dry.
shiiker, to wither, fade,

ebakerella, she covers.

sbam, evening.
Bbilm, /

dry up.

am.

shuker,

to begin.

Bban, you are, they are.

shul, to whistle (sholl, shell).

Bban, bad.
th&T-aprii, to boast, cry up.

shun,

listen.

shuuaben, obedience.
shunabcn, a noise, hearing; the

ahel,

shell, to cry or

a hundred. scream

out.

shdllaben, a cry.
BbellH, he cries out.

sound of the voice; pardon; judgment.
Mhunalo,
tshinlo,

had, ill-tempered.

Bbellcd, cried out.

Hhuiiela, she hears.

Bherongro,

\

BhQned, heard.

Bherr<5rigro, \

head man, captain.

HJiunelo, / hear.
HhriiiH,

eherrcJacro,

)

sounds.

sherro, head.
8h($rro-i ar, head-stone.
shill, cold.

Hhrnuini, I heard (ib

^

lu.iii

Kn

Hhunum).
HhQveni, heaullful,

sbilla

>eii,

a

cold.

bhydn, perhaps.

ZJZ
si,

GLOSSARY.
skiluuiiin, chair.

as.

si, tlit

soul, heart.

skunya, a
slom,

boot.

81, he, is.

to follow, track.

siddi, nmiqlity.

slommado, followed, tracked.
slommer,
so,
to follow,

sidus (zldo), alive.
sig,

track (cant).

quicldy, straight, right.

what, who.

sig,

way, manner,
sign,

indication,

soiiaki, golden.

disguise, liJceness, col-

sdunakai, gold.
800V, to sleep.
sore,
sor,
) i, ) all.

our
sig,

;

kek
o'

sig,

no

right.

or sik

the tern, the law.
fur, to pity.

''

sIg, to be ; sig,

)

sigaben, a chance.
sigdn, 'Straight on.
siggadiro, quicker.
sig o*
si

sorno, pork.
SOS, is, was.

so

si lis,

what
)
,

is it ?
,
.

my

zi,

anxious.

soskey's,
,
.

>
)

what
is it ?

IS,

why

,

what.

kam^lo,

it is likely.

soski,
sossi,
sosti,

sikker (sigger), to shew, to teach,
able.

what
has

to,

must, ought.

sikker, sure.

sov, to sleep, to lie
tLc.

down.

sikkerava,
sikkeras,

/ teach, shew, you teach.

sovadura, /

slept.

sovahall, to sivear ;

an

oath.

sikkerdlla, he teaches.

sove, to sleep, lie down.
Bovar, sleepy.

sikkered, taught.
sikkerin, teaching.
sikkeriii

splnya,
stadi,

a pin (Med. Greek).
hat.

mQsh, a
to,

teacher, school-

a

master.
siklo,

stani, buck, stag.

used

accustomed.
like,

Stans Chumber, St Anne's Hill.
stanj'a, stable.
star, to

sim, the same,
related.

to

resemble,

imprison.

sim^nsa, relations, kin.
siins, resembles.

stardi,

a

hat.

staripen, prison, imprisonment.
(ziiidi, alive).

sindor, cinders
Bl

starmdskero, imprisoned.
staror, the stars.

pash

sig, p£j7ta/?s.

slrdn, faster.

starribened, imprisoned.
starya, stars.

siro puv,

a reaped field.
a needle.

siv, to sew,

stekka, a stack.

GLOSSARY.
stigga,

27:

a

gate.

tanopen, childhood, youth.
tdnya, tents, camp.
?

slider apre, huivj up. suji (saji) dovo, wha-t is that

tarderin, hiding.
tas,

suker, to burn.
sukni, hot.

a cup.
morning.
strangle,
suffocate
to

tasala, this

sum,

to taste, smell.

tasser,

sumeli, sweet-smelling.
suneli, handsome.

droicn.

tassered,
left behind.

suffocated,
;

strangled.

sunered, suuado,
sur, deep.

drowned
devil

beng tasser tute strangle you !

sumi, bright

red.

tdtchi, true.
tdtter, to heat, fry.
tdtti, hot (fern.)

aurrelo, strong., hard.

surriko-musb, an actor.
BUB, was.

tatto, hot (masc.)
sleep,

sutto,

a

a dream.

tdtto,

handy, expert.

8UV

(suvi),

a needle. down.

tiltto-kairabeu, sharp practice.

suvali, infirm.

tdttopen, heat, summer.
lie

Buvo, to sleep,
8UV0,
to

tav, string, strip, rag.

swim.

Bwiabi, ugly.

'''^'^^''^'{to tav apr(>,
tavvni, little,

lift

up.

young.

T
te, to.

te,
tel,

and.
thread.

tdcbeni, true (fan.)
tiichipen,
j

tern, country.

tdnna, then.
^^.,^^/^
)

tdchopeii,

te

v($l,

to

come

;

vsed^ to e.c]ircsK

tacho, true, rial, right.
tichodiro, trurr.

the future.

to v6], shall or will.
ticktii,

tachonuH, true.
tdder, to draw.
tale,

tickno,
lei

a child, a baby {fcm.) a little child, a baby ; U
a tickii", to be confined.

under.

tamlo, dark-.

tikker, to abide in.

tamlopcn, darkness.
tan,

tikno, a baby.
tlr,

a

place,

tdner, to

a tent. drown (a as

near.

in Ann).

tiro, thine.
titla,

tani [fern, andplu.), small, young.

a

butterfly.

274
tiv, to knit.

GLOSSARY.
tulak, behind, back.
tul^,
^

tivdas, she knitted.

tivved, knitted.

tuir,
taller,

/
p"^^*"'"
)

tober, a road (a slang ivord.)

toob, grief.
tool, to hold, to keep, vuinage.

tuUno,

tulker, bitter.
tiillo,

tooled, held.
toolin',

fat.

dnving

{a cart.)

tuneri, fierce.
tute, thou, you.

toov, grief.
tove, to wash.
tover,

tuv, smoke.

an

axe.

tuv, gnef.

tovin-divvus,
day).

Monday

{washing-

U
!

trad, care ; lei trad, take care
trash, /ear y trashava,

-U3,

a termination
disguise them.

often

added

to

I fear.
i

English or Gipsy nouns
ji

to

trjtsheno (mas.)
^
'

) \
)

^ r awj id, fearful.

trdsheni (fern.)

utiir, ^oest.

trdsherdo, afraid, frightened.
tiaslierdo

uzar,

by chance.

mullo, frightened to

death.

trashipen, terror, a fearful thing.
trin, three.

vaccasbo, lamb.

vanka, when.
vas, he went, she loent.
vasi,

trindesh, thirteen.
trtippesko, bodily.

he or she went.

truppo, the body.
tnisharo, a pannier.
trushilo, thirsty.

vdssavo, bad.
^^'*''

vast,

I a hand.
)

trushni, a basket.

vava, will
vlas,

(affix).

trushul, a cross.
tufer, to

he came.
vin), take care.
T / came, we came.

mend.
thee.
;

vin

(lei
)

tukey, to or for

viom,
'

>
)

tukno
tul,

(tuk), sad, woe

tuknu&,

vIom,

sorroio.

vonggar, money, coal.
to drive,

to

hold,

squeeze,

v6ri80, vtiriso, nothing, anything.

lead; tul your cbiv, hold

voro, flour, meal.

your tongue.

voudress, a bed.

GLOSS A J? Y.
^y
wadress, bed.
wafli, thin, scanty.

275
come; used
to

wel, to wel, to

express the future.

wen, winter.
wendsto, wintry.

^^^"'
]

bad, evil.

waffodi,

)

wesh, a forest, a wood.

waffodi jivvin, bad or

hard

life.

weshengrdski,

ajypertaining

to

waffodipen,
wilfodi, bad.

evil.

forest rangers.

weshengrdski chorin, poaching.
weshdugro, a
.,

wafodipen,

evil.
,

forester,

a game-

wafodo,
'

)

(
)

baa,

,

keeper.

evil.

wafro,

weshni, forest, woody, wild.

wriiTO-dickeno,bad-looiinff(ugly).

weshni drom,
a forest.

the

road towards

wiifropen, evil.

walin, a

bottle,

a

vessel.

weshni-jukal, a fox.

walin

dukh, a

vessel

of wrath.

weshni kani, a pheasant.
wishto,
lip.

wardo, a cart, van.
warter, to watch, wait.

witchaben, hatred.
witcher, to hate.

wartni mush, watchman.
wast, a hand.

wdngish, a

little,

a short time.

wasta-pord, a handful.

wdngur, money,
day).

coal.

wastermdugris, handcuffs.
^•^^''''

wdngur-divvus, Saturday (payworrisso, anything.
wilder, a door.

\hands.
\

waators,

waver, another, the other.

wriver-temmeny. forci'/n,

belonrj-

ing to another country.
wfivero,
) t
\

^^^' wuBser,

I
)

to throw.

.„
differently, otlunmse. •" •"

wye, due.

wavencro,

Y
yack, an eye.
yug,
fire.

wiivior, others.

welgora, a fair.
wellan, they come.
wellatt, tlion romtst.

yagdngro, an inspector.
yagdskro, fen/.

welled ta dukh, " come to yrief."

yugdskro

chil),

a tongue of firr,

/*
wellgoro,
welliii,

'

{ )

a fair.

fume.
yrign\,fcry.

coming.

yak, an rye.

2^6
yakitn,
certain,
i.

GLOSSARY.
c,

mai ked,
dell
the

yek

pal' a waver,

one after an-

observed.

other.

yakk, an

eye,

a wink; to
" to
give

yiv, snoio, ice.

the

yakk,

yog, firey6\, she.

office," to vnn1c.

yakkas,

\ yakkor,
'

)

eyes.
)

^')\they.
yui,

yakkerpen,
ye, the.

eyesight.

yoras, eggs.

yuv,
one.

he.

yuv yuzhered
off,

avri,

he cleared

yek,

y^^^'i )

vanished.

yeck

cdvvEi,

one thing.

yuzher, to clean.

yeck'eti waver, one to another.
y^ckli, only.

Z
zl,

ydckno, one, single.
yeckora,
)

heart,

mind,

soul.

zi-hush, sensible, shreivd (Persian,
once.

>

yekorus,

J

hush,

sense, shrewdness).

THE END.

PRINTED BY BALLANTVNE AND COMl'ANY

KDINBUKGH AND LONDON

.AL

LIBRARY FACILITY

AA

000 192 587

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