Martin Heidegger ± The Basic Problems of Phenomenology ± Translated Albert Hofstadter

Translator¶s Intoduction

7/30/2008 3:41:00 A

and or that plan is successfully executed then the aim of the course will be discovered at its end. norms and mores of a taught course.Introduction ± Exposition and general division Of the theme Paragraph One 7/30/2008 3:41:00 AM 1. Grammar. and take notes. The text is drawn from a course that Heidegger taught so it references are to the structures. This course and the task. The text is presented is the absence of the students. though one of the students has contributed to the process.2. 2. as though a preset defined route as opposed to the destination. elaborating them. Phenomenology must develop its concept out of what it takes as its theme and how it investigates its object. The goal is to achieve a fundamental illumination of these problems. 2. 2. The course we set. Should the course be successfully planned. The route of the course is in fact the course. This course sets out for itself the task of posing the basic problems of phenomenology. 1. The course of the river as opposed to its telos? . and proceeding to some extant towards their solution.1. The teacher who conveys his words in the format of a lecture to those who listen. we take. Our considerations are aimed at the inherent and inner systematic relationships of the basic problems. for the aim of course lies in its ending.1.

2. but somehow all three could be valid.1. we can say that Heidegger see¶s phenomenology as an answer to a certain set of problems ± of basic problems.3. The basic. 5. Is each stage of the river its telos. This fits in with the idea that it function is related to its mission. Somehow we will see that the notion of phenomenology might lie in its problems. is that in fact any point that we pick on the way to its telos? Does the task of the course lie in every moment of the course. or can the task only be seen in the course as a whole? 3.1. The aim or telos of phenomenology is to provide a resolution for its problems. the problems and phenomenology. . Our understanding of phenomenology develops our of its subject and the way that it carries out its investigative function. At the end of the course. 5. or causes. Once these problems are resolved then Phenomenology will have reached the end of its existenz. assuming that it is possible to resolve them. 5. These problems might not indicate that the problems that phenomenology faces. we will want to know what Heidegger means by basic. which is the resolution of its basic problems. that what we will have is the closure of phenomenology. 4. 6. or is it the end of the river only that is its telos? Each stage of the river. Can we say that once these basic problems have been resolved. and at that its basic problems. Thus. 6. Phenomenology must develop its concept out of what it takes as its theme and how it investigates its object. by problems and perhaps by phenomenology. at the end of the introduction perhaps. This response is closer to that offered by Jacques Derrida in the limits of philosophy. [do these basic problems lead to a number of secondary or multiple layers of problems that also need to be examined. but the problems that its is meant to be an answer to.2.

7.1. Each of the problems have interior content.2. the goal. ± What is the connection between our aims. 7. that arises from our considerations are to achieve a fundamental illumination of these problems. 7. The goal is to achieve a fundamental illumination of these problems. The problems exist within systems of connective-ness between each other. The goal.3. Our considerations are aimed at the inherent and inner systematic relationships of the basic problems. or the course of Phenomenology. [This is the important consideration that will be answered at some time. 7.] .

1.2. instead. negative terms 1.1.Paragraph Two.1. we do not wish merely to take note of it so to be able to report then that phenomenology deals with this or that subject. and you yourself are supposed to deal with it. In negative terms this means that our purpose is not to acquire historical knowledge about the circumstances of the modern movement in philosophy called phenomenology.2. in the way that I talk about it. . A introduction to the basic problems could lead to that end.1. 1. To acquire historical knowledge 1. We shall be dealing not with phenomenology itself deals with. 7/30/2008 3:41:00 AM 1. A negative theology perhaps. the course deals with the subject itself. again. And. 1. or learn how to do so. as the course proceeds. The point is not to gain some knowledge about philosophy but to be able to philosophize.

And these basic problems themselves? Are we to take it on trust that the ones we discuss do in fact constitute the inventory of the basic problems? How shall we arrive at these basic problems? Not directly but by the round-about way of a discussion of certain individual problems. At the outset we may outline them as follows. . From these we shall sift out the basic problems and determine their systematic interconnection. The course accordingly divides into three parts. Such is an understanding of the basic problems should yield insight into the degree to which philosophy as a science is necessarily demanded by them.Paragraph three 7/30/2008 3:41:00 AM 1.

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