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H ome Work Solutions: 1. 200.1.1.0, break into 40 networks 40 networks = 00101000 (6 bits) Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.

.252 Increment = 4 Ranges: 200.1.1.0 200.1.1.3 200.1.1.4 200.1.1.7 200.1.1.8 200.1.1.11 200.1.1.12 200.1.1.15 so on 2. 199.9.10.0, break into 14 networks 14 networks = 00001110 (4 bits) Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.240 Increment = 16 Ranges: 199.9.10.0 199.9.10.15 199.9.10.16 199.9.10.31 199.9.10.32 199.9.10.47 199.9.10.48 199.9.10.63 so on 3. 170.50.0.0, break into 1000 networks 1000 networks = 1111101000 (10 bits) Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.192 Increment = 64 Ranges: 170.50.0.0 170.50.0.63 170.50.0.64 170.50.0.127 170.50.0.128 170.50.0.191 170.50.0.192 170.50.0.255 170.50.1.0 170.50.1.63 so on 4. 12.0.0.0, break into 25 networks 25 networks = 00011001 (5 bits) Subnet Mask = 255.248.0.0 Increment = 8 Ranges: 12.0.0.0 12.7.255.255 12.8.0.0 12.15.255.255 12.16.0.0 12.23.255.255 12.24.0.0 12.31.255.255 so on

Some Subnet Hints:


192.168.1.66 The first octet is between 192 and 223: Class C Default mask for Class C: 255.255.255.0 188.21.21.3 The first octet is between 128 and 191: Class B Default mask for Class B: 255.255.0.0 24.64.208.5 The first octet is between 1 and 126: Class A Default mask for Class A: 255.0.0.0

The first valid IP address is defined as NetID + 1 The last valid host is defined as BroadcastID 1 Here are some handy tips to help you keep track of the NetID, first and last hosts, and Broadcast ID: NetID: First Host: Last Host: Always Even Always Odd Always Even

Broadcast ID: Always Odd

Question) a company was assigned the class C network 199.166.131.0 from the ISP. If the administrator were to subnet this network using the 255.255.255.224 subnet mask, how many hosts will they be able to support on each subnet?
Answer:

The subnet mask 255.255.255.224 is a 27 bit mask (11111111.11111111.11111111.11100000) it uses 3 bits from the last octet for the network ID, leaving 5 bits for the host address. We can calculate the number of the hosts supported by this subnet by using the 2n 2 formula where n represents the number of host bits, in that case will be 5 , 25 2 = 30

Q) How many subnets can be gained by subnetting 172.17.32.0/23 into a /27 mask, and how many usable host addresses will there be per subnet?
it asks how many subnets and how many hosts have per subnet not how many host have totally! So here is the most logical and easy understanding of sub-netting without need to convert to binary we all know to make binary no. from the regular number. 23 subnet mask =255.255.254.0 27 subnet mask =255.255.255.224 it ask for 27 how many subnets will have and how many hosts so we start we all should know that totally in subnet mask have 32-bits here first 27 are taken for the subnet mask so we left 5 bits for host 32-27=5 number of the host we get from formula 2^n-2=No of host per subnet so we get 2^5-2=32-2=30 we take 2 address for the broadcast and subnet thats why is 2^n-2 We finish with the hosts no lets get the no. of subnets first given was /23 bits and the second was /27-bits we just do this 27-23=4 no. of subnet is 2^n we don`t have here -2!!! someone make mistake in the answers so remember you don`t take minus 2 when you solve no. of subnets thats for hosts!! so 27-23=4 2^4=16 ANSWER OF THE QUESTION IS: Subnets 16 HOST 30 per subnet address range like this 172.17.32.0 first subnet 172.17.32.32 172.17.32.64 172.17.32.96 172.17.32.128 172.17.32.160 172.17.32.192 172.17.32.224 172.17.33.0 172.17.33.32 172.17.33.64 172.17.33.96 172.17.33.128 172.17.33.160 172.17.33.192 172.17.33.224 last one

Question) An organization is granted the block 16.0.0.0/8. The administrator wants to create 500 fixed-length subnets. a. Find the subnet mask. b. Find the number of addresses in each subnet. c. Find the first and last addresses in subnet 1. d. Find the first and last addresses in subnet 500.

Solution:
a. log2500 = 8.95 Extra 1s = 9 Possible subnets: 512 Mask: /17 (8+9) b. 23217 = 215 = 32,768 Addresses per subnet c. Subnet 1: The first address in this address is the beginning address of the block or 16.0.0.0. To find the last address, we need to write 32,767 (one less than the number of addresses in each subnet) in base 256 (0.0.127.255) and add it to the first address (in base 256).
First address in subnet 1: 16 . 0 . 0 . 0 Number of addresses: 0 . 0 . 127 . 255 Last address in subnet 1: 16 . 0 . 127 . 255

d. Subnet 500: Note that the subnet 500 is not the last possible subnet; it is the last subnet used by the organization. To find the first address in subnet 500, we need to add 16,351,232 (499 32678) in base 256 (0. 249.128.0) to the first address in subnet 1. We have 16.0.0.0 + 0.249.128.0 = 16.249.128.0. Now we can calculate the last address in subnet 500.
First address in subnet 500: 16 . 249 . 128 . 0 Number of addresses: 0 . 0 . 127 . 255 Last address in subnet 500: 16 . 249 . 255 . 255

Question) An organization is granted the block 211.17.180.0/24. The administrator wants to create 32 subnets. a. Find the subnet mask. b. Find the number of addresses in each subnet. c. Find the first and last addresses in subnet 1. d. Find the first and last addresses in subnet 32.

Solution :
a. log232 = 5 Extra 1s = 5 Possible subnets: 32 Mask: /29 (24 + 5) b. 232 29 = 8 Addresses per subnet
c. Subnet 1:

The first address is the beginning address of the block or 211.17.180.0. To find the last address, we need to write 7 (one less than the number of addresses in each subnet) in base 256 (0.0.0.7) and add it to the first address (in base 256).
First address in subnet 1: 211 . 17 . 180 . 0 Number of addresses: 0 . 0 . 0 . 7 Last address in subnet 1: 211 . 17 . 180 . 7

d. Subnet 32: To find the first address in subnet 32, we need to add 248 (31 8) in base 256 (0.0.0.248) to the first address in subnet 1. We have 211.17.180.0 + 0.0.0.248 or 211.17.180.248. Now we can calculate the last address in subnet 32 as we did for the first address.
First address in subnet 32: 211 . 17 . 180 . 248 Number of addresses: 0 . 0 . 0 . 7 Last address in subnet 32: 211 . 17 . 180 . 255