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20120523135949047

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Downing, Karley - GOV

From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Attachments:
Hurlburt, Waylon - GOV
Wednesday, February 23, 20111:52 PM
Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Hogan, Pat- GOV
Employer Pays for part of Union Master Agreement Books
AFSCME State Pays for Part of Master Agreement Book.pdf
For the list of 'fiscal' cost to collective bargaining.
Waylon Hurlburt
Senior Policy Advisor
The Office of Governor Scott Walker
State of iisconsin
{608)266-9709
131
schedule with another employee capable of performing the work, the immediate
supervisor will make a reasonable effmt to approve the change of schedule between
the two (2) employees providing such a change does not result in overtime.
2/6/12 Where notice from the employee is required in 2/6/4, 216/8, 21619, 21619A,
and 2/6/10 above, Council 24 shaH also provide insofar as possible, at least seven
(7) calendar days in advance of the function, \vritten notice containing the names,
department and local union designation of the employees designated to attend such
functions. This written notice is to be sent to the Office of State Employment
Relations, Bureau of Labor Relations.
SECTION'l: Printing of Agreement
2/7/1 The Employer and the Union shall agree on the printer and the cost of
printing this agreement. The Employer shall allow the Union an opportunity to
·proof this Agreement prior to the printing and distribution. Any material put into
the Agreement that is not initialed and proofed by the Employer and the Union will
be considered invalid and not a patt of this Agreement. Prior !9 the printing of Uris
agreement, the Emplo.yer and the Union shall agree on the number of Agreements
to be printed. Each party will pay for the number of agreements they ordered. The
printer sltall provide a separate bill for the Union and the Employer.
21712 It shall not be the responsibility of the Employer to provide the employees
covered by this Agreement with a copy of the Agreement.
SECTION 8: Attendance at Local Union Meetings, Monthly Steward
Meetings, or Montltly Local Unio·n Executive Board Meetings
2/8/1 ·Local Union officers and stewards shall be granted tjme off without pay
and without loss of benefits to attend local Union meetings, monthly steward
meetings, and monthly local union executive board meetings, upon ten (1 0)
calendar days advance notice to his/her immediate supervisor. When the officer,
steward, and local executive board member is granted time off without pay and
without loss of benefits to attend the local union meeting, steward meeting, and
monthly local union executive board meeting, the employee will be allowed to work
up to four (4) hours to make up for such lost time for each local union meeting and
monthly local union executive board meeting, an<! eight (8) hours for a monthly
steward meeting. Makeup time for aU employees shall be at the regular rate of pay
and scheduled by the Employer. Makeup time shall normally occur during the same
week that the meeting occurred but may occur in the following week or pay period
if it does not generate overtime under the Agreement or the Fair Labor Standards
Act requirements.
2/8/lA Council 24 Executive Board Committee meetings may also be approved
for local· Union of/leers and stewards to attend, under the same conditions as in
2/8/l after confirmation of the meeting has been provided to the Employer.
28
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Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Hey man--
Murray, Mark A (NBCUniversal)
Wednesday, February 23, 201111:41
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Prank call
I know I'm late to this, but we just wanted to confirm that the call is authentic. Thanks ....
132
Downing, K<!rley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Schrimpf, Chris " GOV
Re: hey chris --
behalf of Peter Wallsten <wallstenp@washpost.com>
201110:50 AM
OK thanks .... .Is he actively encouraring the governors ofMI, OH and FL to take on the unions?
On Wed, Feb 23,2011 at 11:35 AM, Schrimpf, Chris- GOV <Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov> wrote:
February 23, 20 II
For Immediate Release
Contact: Cullen Werwie,
608-267-7303
Statement on Prank Call ·
Madison-Today Governor Walker's spokesman, Cullen Werwie, Released the following statement:
The Governor takes many calls everyday. Throughout this call the Governor maintained his appreciation for and
commitment to civil discourse. He continued to say that the budget repair bill is about the budget. The phone call shows
that the Governor says the same thing in private as he does in public and the lengths that others will go to disrupt the civil
debate Wisconsin is having.
###
From: Peter Wallsten [mailto--
Sent: Wednesday, February 2 ~
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: hey chris --
Chris,
Hope you're well. Is that Mother Jones "Koch" thing real? Is that the governor?
best,
Peter
Peter Wallsten
8
Peter Wallsten
9
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Chris,
on behalf of Peter Wallsten <wallstenp@washpost.com>
Wednesday, February 23, 201110:35 AM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
hey chris --
Hope you're well. Is that Mother Jones "Koch" thing real? Is that the governor?
best,
Peter
Peter Wallsten
11
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 201110:29 AM
To:
Subject:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Fw: Transit Issues ·
FYI- GB transit director says no need to break out transit workers to save fed dollars.
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
·To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Cc: Yahn, Nate - GOV
sent: Wed Feb 23 10:23:44 2011
Subject: Fw: Transit Issues
From: Turke, Jon
Sent: Wednesday, February 23,
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: FW: Transit Issues
Jonathon Turke
Office of State Representative Michelle Liljens
56th Assembly District
·Phone: 608-266-7500
Office: 221 North
From: Rep.Jacque.
Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 10:06 AM
To: *Legislative All Assembly
Subject: FW: Transit Issues
I was asked by Green Bay Metro Director Chris Phelps to pass this on to my colleagues. Thank you-
Rep. Jacque
From: Mary Haupt [mailto:MarvHa@ci.green-bay.wi.usl On Behalf Of Chris Phelps
. Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:27AM
To: Rep.Jacque
Subject: Transit Issues
Good morning Representative Jacque,
I am writing to give my recap on an article by Paul Srubas in last Sunday's Green Bay Press-Gazette, regarding the
proposed change to collective bargaining being tied to transportation funds for Green Bay Metro. While this change, if
approved, may threaten Federal aid to Green Bay Metro, there are many threats to our Federal Aid and it is much too
12
soon to panic. We do have options and if the budget bill passes, we will need to look at other alternatives. I believe
there is no rush in making a decision to exclude transit from the budget repair bill because the changes apply to current
Grant applications and we have no grant applications right now. We will be submitting our next Federal grant in July or
August. In other states transit services have become privatized and have basically the same people in the same
uniforms, but they are receiving their paycheck from a different source.
This is a very dynamic situation with a lot of hype about what may happen, but a lot of that may NOT happen.
Please share this information with fellow members of the Wisconsin State Legislature.
Regards,
Cltris Pltelps
Transit Director
Green Bay .Metro
90i University Avenue
WI 54302
13
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Wednesday, February 23, 201110:03 AM
Schmiedicke, David P - DOA; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Huebsch, Mike - DOA; Hayes, Brian - DOA
Subject: RE: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
So if we sent this out is it fair to say i't'd be accurate?
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email:
www:walker. wl.qov
.From: Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 10:02 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, .Mike - DOA; Hayes, Brian - DOA
Subject: RE: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
The savings figures used below exclude police and fire and other savings that may not be related to state aids and
propertytaxes. Overall savings to school districts and local governments will probably be higher than these amounts, but
those additional savings may not be as fungible. All of these estimates are based on 2009 Wisconsin Retirement System
and local government budget data.
Thanks.
Dave
from: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:43 AM
T().: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Cc:Werwie, Cullen J- GOV; Huebsch, Mike- DOA
Subject: RE: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
Importance: High
Updated. Need this back at the greatest speed possible
Governor Walker's Budget Repair Bill Would Save Local Governments Over $700
Million Every Year
Madison- Governor Scott Walker announced today that his budget repair bill would save local governments
and school districts at least $724 million dollars annually ($1.44 billion over the biennium).
16
"Our budget repair bill will save local governments and school distriCts hundreds of millions of dollars enabling
them to maintain services even as the state grapples with a $3.6 billion deficit," said Governor Scott
Walker. "These savings, in addition to the savings that local governments can realize through collective
bargaining reform, are a vital part of our budget repair bill. The Senate Democrats need to come do their jobs
so we can lock in savings at the local level and avoid thousands of layoffs."
Under the Governor's budget repair bill, school districts would save $488 million ($976 million over the
biennium). Municipalities would save $98 million ($196 million over the biennium). Counties would save $64
million ($128 million over the biennium). Technical colleges would save $58 million ($116 million over.the
biennium). Special districts would save $15.5 million ($31 million over the biennium).
On top of these savings reforming collective bargaining would allow governments to realize additional .
savings. For example, currently many school districts participate in WEA trust because WEAC collectively
bargains to get as many school districts· across the state to participate in this union run health insurance plan
as possible. Union leadership benefits from members participating in this plan. If school districts enrolled in
the state employee health plan, it would save school districts up to $68 million per year.
In Milwaukee County alone, because the union collectively bargained for paid time off, fourteen employees
receive salary and benefits for doing union business. Ofthe fourteen, three are on full-time release for union
business. Milwaukee County spent over $170,000 in salary alone for these employees to only participate in
union activities such as collective bargaining. The budget repair bill reforms would help counties, like
Milwaukee County, save on these costs.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpf@wisconsin.gov
From: Schrimpf, C h r i s ~ GOV
Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:35 AM
To: Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA
Subject: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
###
Governor Walker's Budget Repair Bill Would Save Local Governments Over $700
Million EveryYear
Madison- Governor Scott Walker announced today that his budget repair bill would save local governments
and school districts at least $724 million dollars annually.
"Our budget repair bill will save local governments and school districts hundreds of millions of dollars enabling
them to maintain services even as the state grapples with a $3.6 billion deficit," said Governor Scott
Walker. "These savings, in addition to the savings that local governments can realize through collective
17
bargaining reform, are a vital part of our budget repair bill. The Senate Democrats need to come do their jobs
so we can lock in savings at the local level and avoid thousands of layoffs."
Under the Governor's budget repair bill, school districts would save $488 million. Municipalities would save
$98 million. Counties would save $64 million. Technical colleges would save $58 million. Special districts
would save $15.5 million.
On top ofthese savings reforming collective bargaining would allow governments to realize additional
savings. For example, currently many school districts participate in WEA trust because WEAC collectively
bargains to get as many school districts across the state to participate in this union run health insurance plan
as possible. Union leadership benefits from members participating in this plan. If school districts enrolled in
the state employee health plan, it would save school districts up to $68 million per year.
In Milwaukee County alone, because the union collectively bargained for paid time off, fourteen employees
receive salary and benefits for doing union business. Of the fourteen, three are on full-time release for union
business. Milwaukee County spent over $170,000 in salary alone for these employees to only participate in
union activities such as collective bargaining. The budget repair bill reforms would help counties, like
Milwaukee County, save on these costs.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
###
18
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
. Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Wednesday, February 23, 201110:02 AM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Cc:
Subject:
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA; Hayes, Brian - DOA
RE: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
The savings figures used below exclude police and fire and other savings that may not be related to state aids and
property taxes. Overall savings to school districts and local governments will probably be higher than these amounts, but
· ihose additional savings may not be as fungible. All of these estimates are based on 2009 Wisconsin Retirement System
and local government budget data.
Thanks.
Dave
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:43 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA
Subject: RE: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
Importance: High
Updated. Need this back at the greatest speed possible
Governor Walker's Budget Repair Bill Would Save local Governments Over $700
Million Every Year
Madison- Governor Scott Walker announced today that his budget repair bill would save local governments
and school districts at least $724 million dollars annually ($1.44 billion over the biennium).
"Our budget repair bill will save local governments and school districts hundreds of millions of dollars enabling
them to maintain services even as the state grapples with a $3.6 billion deficit," said Governor Scott
Walker. "These savings, in addition to the savings that local governments can realize through collective
bargaining reform, are a vital part of our budget repair bill. The Senate Democrats need to come do their jobs
so we can lock in savings at the.locallevel and avoid thousands of layoffs."
Under the Governor's budget repair bill, school districts would save $488 million ($976 million over the
biennium). Municipalities would save $98 million ($196 million over the biennium). Counties would save $64
. million ($128 million over the biennium). Technical colleges would save $58 million ($116 million over the
·biennium). Special districts would save $15.5 million ($31 million over the biennium).
On top of these savings reforming collective bargaining would allow governments to realize additional
savings. For example, currently many school districts participate in WEA trust because WEAC collectively
bargains to get as many school districts across the state to participate in this union run health insurance plan
as possible. Union leadership benefits from members participating in this plan. If school districts enrolled in
the state employee health plan, it would save school districts up to $68 million per year.
19
In Milwaukee County alone, because the union collectively bargained for paid time off, fourteen employees
receive salary and benefits for doing union business. Of the fourteen, three are on full-time release for union
business. Milwaukee County spent over $170,000 in salary alone for these employees to only participate in
union activities such as collective bargaining. The budget repair bill reforms would help counties, like
Milwaukee County, save on these costs.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
·Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:35AM
To: Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA
Subject: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
###
Governor Walker's Budget Repair Bill Would Save local Governments Over $700
·Million Every Year
Madison- Governor Scott Walker announced today that his budget repair bill would save local governments
and school districts at least $724 million.dollars annually.
"Our budget repair bill will save local governments and school districts hundreds of millions of dollars enabling
them to maintain services even as the state grapples with a $3.6 billion deficit," said Governor Scott
Walker. "These savings, in addition to the savings that local governments can realize through collective
bargaining reform, are a vital part of our budget repair bill. The Senate Democrats need to come do their jobs
so we can lock in savings at the local level and avoid thousands of layoffs."
Under the Governor's budget repair bill, school districts would save $488 million. Municipalities would save
$98 million. Counties would save $64 million. Technical colleges would save $58 million. Special districts
would save $15.5 million.
On top of these savings reforming collective bargaining would allow governments to realize additional
savings. For example, currently many school districts participate in WEA trust because WEAC collectively
bargains to get as many school districts across the state to participate in this union run health insurance plan
as possible. Union leadership benefits from members participating in this plan. If school districts enrolled in
the state employee health plan, it would save school districts up to $68 million per year.
In Milwaukee County alone, because the union collectively bargained for paid time off, fourteen employees
receive salary and benefits for doing union business. Of the fourteen, three are on full-time release for union
business. Milwaukee County spent over $170,000 in salary alone for these employees to only participate in
union activities such as collective bargaining. The budget repair bill reforms would help counties, like
Milwaukee County, save on these costs.
20
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpf@wisconsin.gov
###
21
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:47AM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Statement on Prank Call
The Governor takes many calls everyday. Throughout this call the Governor maintained his appreciation for
. and commitment to civil discourse. He continued to say that the budget repair bill is about the budget. The
phone call shows that the Governor says the same thing in private as he does in public and the lengths that
others will go to disrupt the civil debate Wisconsin is having.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
·Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
22
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Importance:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:43 AM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA
RE: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
High.
Updated. Need this back at the greatest speed possible
Governor Walker's Budget Repair Bill Would Save Local Governments Over$700
Million Every Year
Madison- Governor Scott Walker announced today that his budget repair bill would save local governments
and school districts at least $724 million dollars annually ($1.44 billion over the biennium).
"Our budget repair bill will save local governments and school districts hundreds of millions of dollars enabling
them to maintain services even as the state grapples with a $3.6 billion deficit," said Governor Scott
Walker. "These savings, in addition to the savings that local governments can realize through collective
bargaining reform, are a vital part of our budget repair bill. The Senate Democrats need to come do their jobs
so we can lock in savings at the local level and avoid thousands of layoffs."
Under the Governor's budget repair bill, school districts would save $488 million ($976 million over the
biennium). Municipalities would save $98 mill_ion ($196 million over the biennium). Counties would save $64
million ($128 million over the biennium). Technical colleges would save $58 million ($116 million over the
biennium). Special districts would save $15.5 million ($31 million over the biennium).
On top of these savings reforming collective bargaining would allow governments to realize additional
savings. For example, currently many school districts participate in WEA trust because WEAC collectively
bargains to get as many school districts across the state to participate in this union run health insurance plan
as possible. Union leadership benefits-from members participating in this plan. If school districts enrolled in
the state employee h.ealth plan, it would save school districts up to $68 million per year.
In Milwaukee County alone, because the union collectively bargained for paid time off, fourteen employees
receive salary and benefits for doing union business. Ofthe fourteen, three are on full-time release for union
business. Milwaukee County spent over $170,000 in salary alone for these employees to only participate in
union activities such as collective bargaining. The budget repair bill reforms would help counties, like
Milwaukee County, save on these costs.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
###
2S
Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
. Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:35 AM
To: Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA
Subject: Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
Governor Walker's Budget Repair Bill Would Save Local Governments Over $700
Million Every Year
Madison- Governor Scott Walker announced today that his budget repair bill would save local governments
and school districts at least $724 million dollars annually.
"Our budget repair bill will save local governments and school districts hundreds of millions of dollars enabling
them to maintain services even as the state grapples with a $3.6 billion deficit," said Governor Scott
Walker. "These savings, in addition to the savings that local governments can realize through collective
bargaining reform, are a vital part of our budget repair bill. The Senate Democrats need to come do their jobs
so we can lock in savings at the local level and avoid thousands of layoffs."
Under the Governor's budget repair bill, school districts would save $488 million. Municipalities would save
$98 million. Counties would save $64 million. Technical colleges would save $58 million. Special districts
would save $15.5 million.
On top of these savings reforming collective bargaining would allow governments to realize additional
savings. For example, currently many school districts participate in WEA trust because WEAC collectively
bargains to get as many school districts across the state to participate in this union run health insurance plan
as possible. Union leadership benefits from members participating in this plan. If school districts enrolled in
the state employee health plan, it would save school districts up to $68 million per year.
In Milwaukee County alone, because the union collectively bargained for paid time off, fourteen employees
receive salary and benefits for doing union business. Of the fourteen, three are on full-time release for union
business. Milwaukee County spent over $170,000 in salary alone for these employees to only participate in
union activities such as collective bargaining. The budget repair bill reforms would help counties, like
Milwaukee County, save on these costs.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
###
26
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Attachments:
Ryan,
Hurlburt, Waylon - GOV
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:41AM
Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Hogan, Pat - GOV
Local Contracts Passed without the 5.8 and 12.6
Various Local Contracts that Don't Contain Contributions.doc
This is a collection of articles outlining how local unions and municipalities are not including
the increased contributions in their contracts which shows how disingenuous their offer is. I
think this would give anyone pause regarding the 'compromise' proposal being offered.
It simply would not work. Layoffs would occur and the biennial budget would be blamed
instead of the lavish benefits that union leadership refuses to give up.
I am also working on a memo with DOA regarding the cost of local benefits and how
collective bargaining is a fiscal issue.
Waylon Hurlburt
Senior Policy Advisor
The Office of Governor Scott Walker
State of iisconsin
(608)266-9709
27
Various Local Contracts that Don't Contain 5.8 and 12.6 Percent
These contracts were passed between introduction of the budget
adjustment bill and today that don 't contain the pension
and health care contributions asked for and even contain
wage increases and other sweeteners in some cases.
County approves worl{er contracts; unions OK one-year wage freeze
Feb. 22, 2011
La Crosse Tribune.
Excerpts:
Walker's bill, which would end collective bargaining rights for most state and local
government workers, provided some additional incentive for the unions to settle.
"It did fOrce us to re-evaluate and accept a one-year contract, "said Ken Dawson,
president of the jailers' union. Dawson said the union had already agreed to the wage
freeze but had wanted a two-year contract.
Health and dental insurance premiums are held to 2010 levels for both employees and
the county, which 0 'Malley said is possible because the county, which is self-insured, has
managed costs through employee education, health risk assessments and other proactive
initiatives.
La Crosse County employees pay 10 percent of the premium cost, with the county
contributing the rest, and have a 20 percent co-payment for medical procedures.
For most employees, the county covers the fit!! pension payment -11 percent of wages
for nonlaw-enforcement; 20.1 percent for deputies. Walker's bill would require
employees to pay half of their pension contributions.
According to figures provided by the county administration, that translates to a pay
reduction of about $1,000 a year for a health care worker making $17,888 or a reduction
of$3,328for a nurse earning $57,387. ·
In total, the seven union contracts will cost the county $154,600 in additional
contributions to the state pension fund, a 0. 6 percent increase mandated by the Wisconsin
Retirement System. That money was approved in the 2011 budget.
O'Malley estimated the county will realize about $151,000 in levy savings by adopting
the union contracts. By comparison, it would see about $220,000 in levy savings If the
governor's bill were passed right away.
Janesville School Board could OK union contract
Feb. 21,2011
Janesville Gazette.
Excerpts:
The AFSCME workers would get 2 percent increases in each cell of their salary schedule
this year and the two years after that.
The contract runs through June 2013 and, like the teachers contract, would protect
workers fi·om the effects of Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill.
The agreement calls for the district to pay all oft he workers' pension contributions and
for workers to pay 8 percent of their health, drug and dental insurance premiums, but
that would be reduced to 3 percent ifthey participate in the district wellness program.
MATC fast-track contract raises instructor's objection
Feb. 20, 2011
Milwaukee Joumal Sentinel.
Excerpts:
"Within hours of learning Gov. Scott Walker had proposed a bill slashing collective
bargaining rights and benefits for public employees to help fix the state budget, leaders
of the union representing teachers at Milwaukee Area Technical College called an
emergency meeting to put a new three-year contract on the fast track.
Despite warnings fi'mn one union leader that they might be perceived as "arrogant
snobs" for winning the new contract while other public unions across the state were
facing major cuts, the union's executive board endorsed the agreement, reached earlier
that week after four months of bargaining.
Three business days later- on the same day the union membership approved the
contract- the college board ratified it, effective immediately, preserving a pension at no
cost to 1,933 workers and guaranteeing no layoffS (Or tiill time teachers whose average
total pay is more than $95.000. The union agreed to a two-year wage ji·eeze, not filling
19 open fitll-time teaching positions, and concessions in health insurance, projected to
save the college $11.6 million ove1' three years. "
Walker's legislation would require public workers to pay half of their pensions-
typically 5.8% of pay for state workers- and at least 12% of their health care costs. The
college board's attorney put the potential savings MATC left on the table at $7.1 million.
Health care is a big part of the $11. 6 million savings achieved through union
concessions: $1.1 million for increased health care payments by union employees, and
$6.6 million tied to health care plan design changes, including wellness testing and
increasing deductibles.
The remainder of the contract savings included $6 million for holding open 19 firll-time
.fcrculty positions. But the 2% wage increase in the contract 'sthird vear ~ w o u l d cost $2.28
million, according to college officials.
Though the union agreed to a wage fi·eeze the next two years, faculty still can get raises
under the class and step pay svstem for years of service, level of position and, in some
cases, education, MATC spokeswoman Kathleen Hohl confirmed Friday.
Madison city council extends collective bargaining agreements
Feb. 17, 2011
Wisconsin State Joumal.
Excerpts:
In a special meeting at the Overture Center, council members voted to ensure that
members of the city's labor unions can continue to receive current pension and health
benefits for the next two years. The measure delays the impact on city workers of a
proposed state bill that would strip public workers of most of their collective bargaining
rights.
Laptop City Hall: City Council approves all union contracts through
2012
Feb. 17, 2011
The Capital Times
Excerpts:
Most of the contracts include a 3-percent pay increase at the end o(2011 and a 2-percent
increase at the end o(2012 and include the citv continuing to pay (Or most or all of a
group's health insurance costs. Another resolution called for rescinding the city's co-pay
for non-represented employees, who will be paying 12-percent of their health insurance
premiums under Walker's proposal.
MATC OKs contract that preserves no-cost pensions
Feb. 16,2011
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
Excerpts:
According to the new Local 212 MATC contract, effective through Feb. 15, 2014:
• All Local 212 employee pension contributions remain at zero - meaning the •
school will continue to bear the firll cost of employee pensions.
• Nineteen fidl-time faculty positions will be held open in return for a no • layoff
guarantee forfidl-time faculty and professional staff through Feb. 15, 2014. The
positionfi'eeze could result in more part-time instructors being hired. A 32-hour
week constitutes titll-time status tor MATC (acultv.
• Health insurance premiums for fitll-timers for the first time will be based • on a
percentage of salary, and a wellness plan is added Those selecting family
coverage will contribute 1. 5% oftheir gross pay; those selecting single coverage
~ w i l l contribute 0. 8%. Those who choose not to participate in biometric testing
before open enrollment, or those whose health score declines fi'om one year to the
next, will pay higher premiums. The top-paid faculty ·would pay up to 9% of their
health insurance premium; those who earn less would pay a lower percentage.
• Wages are ji·ozen the first two years of the contract; the third year offers a 2%
increase.
Menasha School District teacher cuts may help plug deficit
Feb. 15, 2011
Appleton Post Crescent.
Excerpts:
Kobylski said he hopes to enact ''fiscally positive successor agreements with our
bargaining units" to assist with the budget crunch. For example, if teachers and other
employee groups agreed to a salary fi'eeze- instead of the 3.8 percent salary and
benefits increase due tor 2011-12- it would save the district about $634,000, or roughly
6. 5 fitlltime equivalent.
Sturgeon Bay teachers contracts OKd, pending state budget news
Feb 19,2011
Excerpts:
The Sturgeon Bay School Board approved individual teachers contracts for the coming
2011-12 school year during Wednesday nights meeting, but in light of the upcoming
announcement of the state budget, layoffs could be announced as early as next week.
Parl.s, DPW contracts approved
Feb. 16,2011
http://www.iournaltimes.com/news/local/article e41 bd5c2-3a5a-lle0-bbb2-
00 1 cc4c002eO.html
Excerpts:
" ... the city would pay nearly $600,000 in wage increases over the next four years for
the approximately 210 members of Local 67, representing public works and parks
employees, City Hall clerical and Police Department clerical employees. "
" ... the ratified two-year agreements with Local 67 included similar conditions as those
approved with police and fire, Letteney said: no wage increases in 2011, a 1 percent
increase in 2012 and 2013, and 2 percent in 2014, plus a condition o(no layoffs in 2011.
Wisneski added the city likely faces a 5 percent cut in shared revenue, an estimated $1.4
million less from the state.
While he doesn't agree with "the union-busting, " Wisneski said the state has given
municipalities like Racine a way to eliminate a big portion of their costs in light of the
coming cuts.
Having public employees pay higher contributions would save the citv hundreds of
thousands of dollars, Wisneski said, like the hundreds of thousands of dollars they were
"gnashing" their teeth to find just a few months ago during budget hearings.
Small victory for city unions, bigger challenges ahead
Feb. 21, 2011
http://joumaltimes.com/news/local/govt -and-politics/article 8f8603 7 a-3db6-11 eO-be 16-
001cc4c03286.html
Excerpts:
" ... the city will continue paying (Or all o(AFSCME Local 67 employees' pension
contributions, 11. 6 percent o[their payroll, as it has been. Currently the city covers the
employee's 5 percent contribution as well as the employer's remaining portion. For 2011,
that's $543,762, which was already budgeted"
County OKs contract with nurses
Feb. 16,2011
http://www.sheboyganpress.com/article/20 11 0216/SHEO 10111 02160480/County-OKs-
contract -with-nurses
Excerpts:
"The nurses' contract is essentially the same as six others already agreed to by
supervisors. It calls for workers to pay 12.5 percent of health premiums, but contribute
nothing towards their pensions. "
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
DWD MB Communications Office
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:39AM
Barroilhet, Dan - DWD; Bartol, Fred - DWD; Baumbach, Scott C - DWD; Beckett, Laura L -
DWD; Berge, Sharon - DWD; Bernstein, Howard I- DWD; Black-Radloff, Rita - DWD;
Bolles, John - DWD; Brockmiller, William - DWD; Crary, Cathy- DWD; Denis, Gary J -
DWD; Dipko, John A- DWD; Falk, Elizabeth C - DWD; Fosdick, Anna - DWD; Gerrits,
Karen - DWD; Grant, Ken G - DWD; Grosso, Eric - DWD; Hodek, Scott A- DWD; Holt,
Deb - DWD; Jones, Richard - DWD; Kikkert, Becky- GOV; Lied I, Kimberly- GOV; Lingard,
Sue - DWD; Maxwell, Georgia E - DWD; McDonald, Scott- DWD; Morgan, Karen P -
DWD; Natera, Ramon V - DWD; OBrien, Christopher D - DWD; O'Brien, Pamela - DWD;
Perez, Manuel - DWD; Phillips, Amelia - DWD; Preysz, Linda - DWD; Reid, Andrea -
DWD; Reynolds, Dianne - DWD; Richard, JoAnna - DWD; Rodgers-Rhyme, Anne M -
DWD; Sachse, Jeff A- DWD; Schmalle, Verlynn C- DWD; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Shutes,
David L- DWD; Solomon, Brian- DWD; Spurlin, Dennis A -DWD; Thompson, Heather-
DWD; Udalova, Victoria M - DWD; Vue, Mai Zong - DCF; Weber, Sue - DWD; Werwie,
Cullen J - GOV; Westfall, Grant - DWD; Williamson, Linda - DWD; Winters, Dennis K-
DWD; Wisnewski, Jerry- DWD; Wolfe, Brian M - DWD; Wurl, Mark W- DWD
Articles from CustomScoop Wednesday 02.23.11
htto: 1/www .json I i ne.com/business/1166 7 4359. html
M&l to eliminate 143 jobs nationwide
By Paul Gores of the Journal Sentinel Feb. 22, 2011 I (321 Comments
Marshall & !Isley Corp. said Tuesday it is eliminating 143 positions, including 15 in southeastern
Wisconsin. The cuts, which M&I said resulted from an internal evaluation and realignment of staffing and
weren't related to its pending acquisition by Canada's BMO Financial Group, amount to about 1.6% of
M&I's nationwide workforce of about 9,000.
http: I lwww.jsonline.com lbusi ness I 1167051 04.html
UW Hospital surprised to find its workers in budget-repair bill
By Guy Boulton of the Journal SentineiFeb. 22, 20111<131 Comments
· University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics -which doesn't receive state money directly- would be barred from
collectively bargaining with its roughly 5,000 union employees under Gov. Scott Walker's proposed budget-repair
bill. The provision surprised health system executives. "We did not anticipate and certainly did not request
elimination of the right to bargain, and we have communicated this to the Governor," Donna Katen-Bahensky,
president and chief executive of the health system, wrote in an e-mail to employees on Friday. UW Hospital and
Clinics, which includes American Family Children's Hospital, employs 7,500 people. About two-thirds of them are
represented by four unions, including 1,900 nurses and therapists represented by the Service Employees
International Union.
. . , ...........•
1
CustomScoop
Clip Report
I wanted to draw your attention to these articles that appeared In my CustomScoop online news result
report.
28
" · .. ·· . > . . .. . .-· .· . . . . . . . · .. ·.·• :·
..
.· .··.. ·
.. ·.:·._ . ·.·- ·-·
Slllall Rank Biggest Start UQ Mistakes ____
·.
_·.
-·--- .-. -.-
Source: Milwaukee Business Journal (WI) 10400 [Registration Required]
Indexed At: 02/23/2011 8:36 AM
Keywords: Worker's Compensation (4)
Abstract: ... liability insurance for small businesses. Hiscox also offers workers' compensation
insurance provided by EMPLOYERS®. To learn more about Hiscox Small Business Insurance,
visit httg:[lwww.hiscoxusa.comLsmall-business-insurancel or ...
Tal:go Qulling outofMihivaukee in 2012.
... ·.
:·-
·-. .·
_._·. ··.
. ...
··_ . · .. .··
Byline: Larry Sandier
Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (WI) 186433
Indexed At: 02/Z3/2011 7:44AM
!(eywords: Governor Scott Walker (11)
Abstract: ... in stimulus funding for the rail proJect, which Govefnor-elec;:t Scott Walker had vowed to
kill. Talgo had hoped to land contracts to build two trains for ...
Wis. Democrats filibuster to halt anti-unioll bill
. ·._·.·.
. __ -·. ···._-
.·.· -.. _
. .
·. . . -· ·_.
Source: Wisconsin State Journal and Madlson.com (WI) 91575
Indexed At: 02/23/2011 5:01AM
i -Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (9)
Abstract: ... filibuster to halt anti-union bill Opponents of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker's budget
bill sleep in the rotunda of the Wisconsin State Capitol Tuesday, Feb. 22, ...
.
E •• .. • " .. _ : -·-• --- _:. --.- ··: --
.. ·-· . . ... ··_··.
.. < ·_.
· .. ·-·
· xclusion of JObless exammed • -_
... · ... · ·. . .... - _.- .
Source: Appleton Post-Gazette & Post Crescent.com (WI) 52000
Indexed At: 02/23/2011 4:21AM
Keywords: Jobless (1)
Abstract: ... Exclusion of jobless examined ...
R'ft G .·- ' ·. A ---- - t M" . . Vlf k ·_-- ·-· .
. _·. ; .·_.·
··.·-···
..
.
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..
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... · .
Byline: Robert Miranda
Sourc!!: Spanish Journal (WI) N/ A
Indexed At: 02/23/20114:17 AM
Keywords: weatherization (1)
Allstract: ... but mostly Puerto Ricans working in the construction, -and other blue collar
type work are beginning to express some anger regarding employers hiring •..
__:_
·- ... ·-. ·. -.· . - ·.. .· . .· .
_-·-····-- ·. .. ··-
·. .· .. . · . . ...
Men get work faster Qost-recess10n
..
.
. .
Source: Appleton Post-Gazette & Post Crescent.com (WI) 52000
Indexed At: 02/23/2011 4:09AM
Keywords: Jobless (1)
Abstract: ... a new gender-specific meaning to the phrase "jobless recovery" and is further proof that the
I•
hiring rebound- isn't reachrng all groups. "The improvements ...
II
Walke[ of'dire conseguences' if Qlan fails; lawmakers Qush ahead
Source: Sauk Prairie Eagle (WI) 1700
Indexed At: 02/23/2011 1:11 AM
Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (5)
Abstract: ... consequences' if plan fails; lawmakers push ahead Gov. Scott Walker prepares for his
fireside speech at the state Capitol in Madison on Tuesday. Opponents to the governor's bill to
eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers are in ...
29
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A look atbudget battle outside Madison.
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Byline: Lysee Mitri - bio
Source: WKOW-TV 27 ABC (WI) N/A
Indexed At: 02/22/2011 6:41 PM
Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (6)
Abstract: ... working at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She says Governor Scott Walker doesn't
knOw how to listen. "The union ,has Offered to discuss things," Mish sa_id. "They ....
WiscorisiO R e c o r ~ s strong· Exuort Growth c (2[:22) ..•. c

c ••
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·'
:
Source: Department of Commerce (WI) (WI) N/ A
Indexed At: 02/22/2011 4:48 PM
Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (5)
Abstract: ... Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection, 608/224-5119 MADISON - Governor Scott
Walker announced today that Wisconsin's exports increased 18.28 to 19.78 billion in 2010.
Wisconsin now ranks ...
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Byline: Kristina Cooke
Source: WTAQ 97.5-FM & 1360-AM (WI) N/A
Indexed At: 02/22/2011 4:39PM .
Keywords: Jobless (1)
Abstract: ... sign for a labor market struggling with a Jobless rate of 9 percent. In the 17 months after
the 2001 recession -the same ...
·. ·. .. .· ·. ... . . . . ..··
. . :
..
. .··
::!tate Lal£offs Could Come Next Week
. .
· . •
Source:. WBFM-FM (WI) N/A
Indexed At: 02/22/201112: 11 PM
Keywords: Govenior Scott Walker (5)
Abstract: ... State Layoffs Could Come Next Week Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker (R) Madison, Wis.
(Learfield) - Governor Scott Walker confirmed this morning that state employees would get
layoff notices as early as •..
... J
30
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:35 AM
Schmiedicke, David P - DOA
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA
Please confirm the accuracy of this ASAP
Governor Walker's Budget Repair Bill Would Save Local Governments Over $700
Million Every Year
Madison -Governor Scott Walker announced today that his budget repair bill would save local governments
and school districts at least $724 million dollars annually.
"Our budget repair bill will save local governments and school districts hundreds of millions of dollars enabling
them to maintain services even as the state grapples with a $3.6 billion deficit," said Governor Scott
Walker. "These savings, in addition to the savings that local governments can realize through collective
bargaining reform, are a vital part of our budget repair bill. The Senate Democrats need to come do their jobs
so we can lock in savings at the local level and avoid thousands of layoffs."
Under the Governor's budget repair bill, school districts would save $488 million. Municipalities would save
$98 million. Counties would save $64 million. Technical colleges would save $58 million. Special districts
would save $15.5 million.
On top of these savings reforming cbllective bargaining would allow governments to realize additional
savings. For example, currently many school districts participate in WEA trust because WEAC collectively
bargains to get as many school districts across the state to participate in this union run health insurance plan
as possible. Union leadership benefits from members participating in this plan. If school districts enrolled in
the state employee health plan, it would save school districts up to $68 million per year.
In Milwaukee County alone, because the union collectively bargained for paid time off, fourteen employees
receive salary and benefits for doing union business. Of the fourteen, three are on full-time release for union
business. Milwaukee County spent over $170,000 in salary alone for these employees to only participate in
union activities such as collective bargaining. The budget repair bill reforms would help counties, like
Milwaukee County, save on these costs.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
###
31
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Janet Werner
Sent: Wednesday, February AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: Text of the Governor's Address
Chris,
I know you are all pretty swamped right now but things will get better.
Please pass on. Keep up the good work Governor Walker. It's time to get things straightened out and I
couldn't be prouder of what you stated you were going to do during your campaign and are now doing. And to
all the Republicans in the Senate and elsewhere in government. All these people protesting need to be self
employed and know what it is to pay all your own health insurance and put away money for your own
retirement. No one helped us out.
Proud to be a Republican!!!!
Serving the Jefferson Area since 1967
Janet M. Werner, Executive Director
Jefferson Chamber of Commerce
122 W. Garland Street
Jefferson, WI 53549
Telephone-
Fax····
Email:coc@iefuet.com
www.jeffersonchamberwi.com
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:45 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Text of the Governor's Address
Text of the Governor's Address
Madison-Below is the text of Governor Walker's conversation about our current fiscal year challenges, the
divisions which have arisen over the past week and his positive vision for moving Wisconsin forward.
Good evening.
Wisconsin is showing the rest of the country how to have a passionate, yet civil debate about our finances.
That's a very Midwestern trait and something we should be proud of. I pray, however, that this civility will
continue as people pour into our state from all across America.
First, let me be clear: I have great respect for those who have chosen a career in government. I really do.
32
In 1985, when I was a high school junior in the small town of Delavan, I was inspired to pursue public service
after I attended the American Legion's Badger Boys State program. The military veterans and educators who
put on that week-long event showed the honor in serving others.
Tonight, I thank the state and local government employees who showed up for work today and
did their jobs well. We appreciate it. If you take only one message aWay tonight, it's that we all respect the
work that you do.
I also understand how concerned many government workers are about their futures. I've listened to their
comments and read their emails.
/listened to the educator from Milwaukee who wrote to me about her concerns about the legislation and what
it might mean for her classroom.
That's why last week we agreed to make changes to the bill to address many of those issues.
And /listened to others like the correctional officer in Chippewa Falls who emailed me arguing that bargaining
rights for public employee unions are the only way to ensure that workers get a fair say in their working
conditions.
I understand and respect those concerns. It's important to remember that many of the rights we're talking
about don't caine from collective bargaining. They come from the civil service system in Wisconsin. That law
was passed in 1905 (long before collective bargaining) and it will continue long after our plan-is approved.
You see, despite a lot of the rhetoric we've heard over the past 11 days the bill I put forward isn't aimed at
state workers, and it certainly isn't a battle with unions. If it was, we would have eliminated collective
bargaining entirely or we would have gone after the private-sector unions.
But, we did not because they are our partners in economic development. We need them to help us put 250,000
people to work in the private sector over the next four years.
The legislation I've put forward is about one thing. It's about balancing our budget now-- and in the future.
Wisconsin faces a 137 million dollar deficit for the remainder of this fiscal year and a 3.6 billion dollar deficit for
the upcoming budget.
Our bill is about protecting the hardworking taxpayer. It's about Wisconsin families trying to make ends meet
and help their children.
People like the woman from Wausau who wrote me saying "I'm a single parent of two children, one of whom is
autistic. I have been intimately involved in my school district, but I can no longer afford the taxes I pay. I am in
favor of everyone paying for benefits, as I have to."
It's also about the small business owner who told me about the challenges he faces just making payroll each
week. His employees pay much larger premiums than we are asking because that's how they keep the
company going and that's how they protect their jobs.
Or the substitute teacher here in Madison, who wrote to me last week about having to sit at home unable to
work because her union had closed the school down to protest.
33
She sent me an email that went on to say, "I was given no choice in joining the union and I am forced to pay
dues ... I am missing out on pay today ... I fee/like I have no voice."
I assure you that she does have a voice.
And so does the factory worker in Janesville who was laid off nearly two years ago. He's a union guy in a union
town who asks simply why everyone else has to sacrifice except those in government. ·
Last week, I traveled the state visiting manufacturing plants and talking to workers- just like the guy from
Janesville. Many of them are paying twenty-five to fifty percent of their health care premiums. Most, had
401k plans with limited or no match from the company.
My brother's in the same situation. He works as a banquet manager and occasional bartender at a hotel and
my sister-in-law works for a department store. They have two beautiful kids.
In every way, they are a typical middle-class family here in Wisconsin. David mentioned to me that he pays
nearly $800 a month for his health insurance and the little he can set aside for his 401k.
He -like so many other workers across Wisconsin- would love a deal/ike the benefits we are pushing in this
budget repair bill.
That's because what we are asking for is modest- at least to those outside of government.
Our measure asks for a 5.8% contribution to the pension and a 12.6% contribution for the health insurance
premium. Both are well below the national average.
And this is just one part of our comprehensive plan to balance the state's 3.6 billion dollar budget deficit.
Now, some have questioned why we have to reform collective bargaining to balance the budget. The answer is
simple the system is broken: it costs taxpayers serious money- particularly at the local/eve/. As a former
county official, I know that first hand.
For years, I tried to use modest changes in pension and health insurance contributions as a means of balancing
our budget without massive layoffs or furloughs. On nearly every occasion, the local unions (empowered by
collective bargaining agreements) told me to go ahead and layoff workers. That's not acceptable to me.
Here's another example: in Wisconsin, many local school districts are required to buy their health insurance
through the WEA Trust (which is the state teachers union's company). When our bill passes, these school
districts can opt to switch into the state plan and save $68 million per year. Those savings could be used to pay
for more teachers and put more money into the classroom to help our kids.
Some have also suggested that Wisconsin raise taxes on corporations and people with high-incomes. Well--
Governor Doyle and the Legislature did that: two years ago. In fact they passed a budget-repair bill (in just one
day, mind you) that included a billion-dollar tax increase.
Instead of raising taxes, we need to control government spending to balance our budget.
34
Two years ago, many of the same Senate Democrats who are hiding out in another state approved a biennial
budget that not only included higher taxes- it included more than two billion dollars in one-time federal
stimulus aid.
That money was supposed to be for one-time costs for things like roads and bridges. Instead, they used it as a
short-term fix to balance the last state budget. Not surprisingly, the state now faces a deficit for the remainder
of this fiscal year and a 3.6 billion dollar hole for the budget starting July 1st.
What we need now more than ever, is a commitment to the future.
As more and more protesters come in from Nevada, Chicago and elsewhere, I am not going to allow their
voices to overwhelm the voices of the millions of taxpayers from across the state who think we're doing the
fight thing. This is a decision that Wisconsin will make.
Fundamentally, that's what we were elected to do. Make tough decisions. Whether we like the outcome or
not, our democratic institutions call for us to participate. That is why I am asking the missing Senators to come
back to work.
Do the job you were elected to do. You don't have to like the outcome, or even vote yes, but as part of the
world's greatest democracy, you should be here, in Madison, at the Capitol.
The missing Senate Democrats must know that their failure to come to work will lead to dire consequences
very soon. Failure to act on this budget repair bill means (at least) 15 hundred state employees will be laid off
before the end of June. If there is no agreement by July 1st, another 5-6 thousand state workers --as well as 5-
6 thousand local government employees would be also laid off.
But, there is a way to avoid these layoffs and other cuts. The 14 State Senators who are staying outside of
Wisconsin as we speak can come home and do their job.
We are broke because time and time again politicians of both parties ran from the tough decisions and punted
them down the road for another day. We can no longer do that, because, you see, what we're really talking
about today is our future.
The future of my children, of your children; of the children of the single mother from Wausau that I mentioned
earlier.
Like you, I want my two sons to grow up in a state at least as great as the Wisconsin I grew up in.
More than 162 years ago, our ancestors approved Wisconsin's constitution. They believed in the power of hard
work andcdetermination and they envisioned a new state with limitless potential.
Our founders were pretty smart. They understood that it is through frugality and moderation in government
that we will see freedom and prosperity for our people.
Now is our time to once again seize that potential. We will do so at this turning point in our state's history by
restoring fiscal responsibility that fosters prosperity for today- and for future generations.
35
Thank you for joining me tonight. May God richly bless you and your family and may God continue to bless the
great State of Wisconsin.
###
36
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Kloiber, Bill - DOA
Wednesday, February 23, 2011 8:48AM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Wed. in Washington, DC: WI Solidarity Rally
AfL .. CIO Union Movement
When workers inWisconsin were faced with an
unprecedented attack, they responded with an
unprecedented show of solidarity. Now, Wisconsinites
need our help here in Washington, D.C.
WHAT: "We Are One" rally at the Wisconsin
Governor's Office in D.C. for teachers, firefighters,
nurses, construction workers and all who are under
attack by governors and state legislatures
WHEN: Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 12:30 p.m.
WHERE:
Wisconsin Governor's Office
444 N, Capitol St., N.W.
Washington, D.C.
Questions? Contact Chris Garlock at 202-230-1133.
Use Twitter? Please live-tweet with the hashtag
#StateS OS.
"WE ARE ONE"
WHAT: "We Are One" rally in
D.C. for teachers, firefighters,
nurses, construction workers
and all who are under attack by
governors and state legislatures
WHEN: Wednesday, Feb. 23, at
12:30 p.m.
WHERE:
Wisconsin Governor's Office
444 N. Capitol St., N.W.
Washington, D:C.
Questions? Contact Chris
Garlock at 202-230-1133.
Use Twitter? Please live-tweet
with the hashtag #StateSOS.
In Wisconsin, workers who are under attack-and the communities that know and respect
them--created such an outcry that all 14 Democratic members of the Wisconsin state Senate·
left the Senate chambers in protest, indefinitely delaying a vote on Gov. Scott Walker's anti-
worker bill.
This is the kind of strength it takes to win victories for workers. We need to make our
37
i All over the-country, Americans are standing up to politicians who arelaunching political
I attacks on firefighters, teachers, nurses, snowplow drivers, EMTs and other hardworking
l people who keep our communities safe. Our politicians should be creating jobs-not attacking
i nurses, teachers and firefighters.
I When we stand in solidarity with each other, we cannot be silenced. Please join our rally.
'
I In Solidarity,
J Manny Herrmann
j Online Mobilization Coordinator, AFL-CIO
I
i P.S. After giving tax cuts to businesses to create an artificial financial crisis in his state,
/ Wisconsin's Gov. Walker tried to ram through a sham "budget repair" bill that actually is a
j huge assault on Wisconsin's workers. It would undermine good, middle-class jobs and rob
J some 200,000 workers of their democratic right to collectively bargain for a better life.
l Wisconsin's public-sector union members are under direct attack today-but tomorrow it will
! be all of us, if we don't make our voices heard. Please join our rally and stand up for good,
l middle-class jobs across America.
I
To find out more about the AFL-CIO, please visit our website at www.aflcio.org.
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38
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
Subject:
Hegerfeld, Kathy - DOT
Wednesday, 23, 2011 7:05 AM
Today's Reader Review
Senate committee advances voter ID bill; phoned-in vote by Dem not counted
http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/govt-and-politics/article cfb18062-3ec6-11e0-8f75-001cc4c03286.html
http :lllacrossetribu ne.com/news/local/article ceba00d0-3f07 -11 eO-aedS-001 cc4c002eO.htm I
http://www.gazettextra.com/weblogs/latest-news/2011/feb/22/wis-senate-committee-passes-voter-id-reguirement/
Gannett papers
DEBORAH ZIFF
February 22 .• 2011
A Senate committee voted to advance a controversial voter ID bill Tuesday after the chairwoman angrily refused to allow
a Democratic member- one of 14 taking refuge out of state- to vote over the phone. The bill could go to the Senate
floor by Thursday.
The meeting got testy as Sen. Jon Erpenbach, D-Middleton, attempted to participate in the meeting by phone from an
undisclosed location. He and 13 other senators are refusing to return to the Capitol until Gov. Scott Walker gives
concessions on a plan to limit collective bargaining rights for public employees. Their absence has prevented the Senate
from reaching the 20-member quorum needed to act on fiscal bills.
"I'm not going to take your vote, Sen. Erpenbach," said Sen. Mary Lazich, R-New Berlin, chairwoman of the Senate
Transportation and Election Committee. "This is unethical."
Lazich said it's a courtesy to allow senators to participate from afar, but she wouldn't extend it to Erpenbach because he
"refuses to be here."
She proceeded to call roll and a vote, ignoring Erpenbach's voice piping in over the phone.
"I voted no. Did you get my vote?" Erpenbach yelled over the phone while Lazich ignored him. The bill passed 3-0, without
Erpenbach's vote. Committee member Spencer Coggs, D-Milwaukee, also was absent. ·
Because the bill is estimated to cost $2.1 million over the first two years to implement, at least one Democrat must be
present for the full Senate to take it up. Lazich said Republicans may introduce amendments to remove the cost of the bill
by delaying the implementation of the law to2012.
The costs involve modifying a statewide voter registration system, training local election officials, revising forms and
conducting public outreach, according to the Government Accountability Board.

Bill could wreck mass transit; millions in federal aid at stake
http://lacrossetribune.com/news/article c18d2c58-3f0b-11 e0-b031-001 cc4c03286 .html
By Chris Hubbuch
February 23, 2011
39
. Public transit could come to a halt in La Crosse if the deadlocked Legislature passes Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair
bill as written.
Federal funding accounts for about 35 percent of the Metropolitan Transit Utility's operating budget, and that $1.9 million
in aid requires a collective bargaining agreement with employees.
Walker's proposal, which prohibits collective bargaining for most state and local government workers, could jeopardize
that funding, according to analysis by the state's Legislative Fiscal Bureau.
"You take that kind of hit ... and what do you have left?" said Keith Carlson, La Crosse's transit manager. "That's just on
. the operating side."
The city could also lose as much as $1.2 million for three buses scheduled for replacement, Carlson said. The federal
government provides 80 percent matching grants for capital projects like the recently completed Grand River Station,
which was built with the help of $11 million in federal money.
"I can't replace any of that," Carlson said.
Cuts to the MTU would affect bus service to Onalaska as well, though funding to that city's shared-ride service would
likely be untouched.
"We have three routes that run extensively through the city or touch the city," said Mayor Mike Giese. "We depend on that
a g rea! deal."
The MTU has signed a contract for 2011 with the union that represents 31 full-time and six part-time drivers, but the
budget bill, if passed, could affect funding for 2012.
An amendment proposed by two Assembly Democrats seeks to add transit workers to the unions- currently police, fire
and state patrol- exempted from the proposed restrictions on collective bargaining, a move they say would save nearly
$47 million in federal aid.
Walker's office did not respond Tuesday to a request for comment on the concerns or the amendment.
One alternative solution could be privatizing the bus system.
Milwaukee County contracts with a private corporation, which in turn bargains with the bus drivers' union. That
arrangement means about $27 million in federal funds to the Milwaukee area would be unaffected by the changes in the
budget repair bill, according to the fiscal bureau report.
That's the case with Onalaska's shared ride program. Carlson said he has not studied options for contracting the MTU
service .
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Rock County road closes due to flooding
http:l/wclo.com/news/2011/feb/22/rock-county-road-closes-due-flooding/
by Stan Stricker
Feb.22,2011
The Rock County Highway Department has closed a section of Beloit Newark Road, in the Town of Avon, due to flooding.
40
Highway Commissioner Ben Coopman says water is about six inches deep, and safety concerns prompted the closing.
Coopman says it's not unusual for the Sugar River to flood the road later in the spring, but recent rains and a rapid snow
melt, accelerated the problem. The stretch of road closed is from Avon Stores Road to County Highway T.
Coopman predicts it will reopen in the next few days .
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Lane closures planned on US 41
http://www. postcrescent.com/article/2011 0223/APC01 01/1 02230670/Lane-closures-planned-US-
41 ?odyssey-modlnewswellltextJAPC-Newsls
Feb. 22, 20111
GRAND CHUTE- The state Department of Transportation says lane restrictions will be in place Thursday on U.S. 41
southbound where it crosses College Avenue (State 125).
The center and right southbound lanes will be closed from 7:30 to 9:30p.m. These lanes will reopen and the southbound
left lane will then be closed from 9:30 to 11 p.m. All lanes are expected to be open after 11 p.m.
These lanes are being closed for deck repairs and there is the potential for traffic backups .
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Editorial: Transit funding needs to be sustained
http://www. postcrescent. com/article/20 11 0223/ APC0602/1 022304 70/Ed ito rial-Transit-funding-needs-
sustained?odyssey-tabltopnewsltext1Views:%20Editorials,%200pinion%20%20&%20%20Letters
Feb.22,2011
Delaying passage of Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill has allowed legislators to uncover more of its ramifications.
We have our concerns about the bill, including the elimination of collective bargaining rights and giving a state agency
more power to change rules of medical
assistance programs.
But it also threatens mass transit systems throughout the state. The provision that takes away collective bargaining on
anything except salary would cost the state
$46.6 million in federal transportation funding.
That means the budget for Valley Transit, which runs the Fox Cities' public bus system, drops from $8.5 million to $6
million.
Lawmakers cannot let that happen. Walker cannot let this happen.
Bus systems connect workers to employers. They connect students to schools. They connect shoppers to retailers.
They're a vital part of the economy that Walker wants so desperately to stimulate.
We've said before the bill has problems, and this bolsters our argument. The state's budget is a mess and benefits should
41
be cut, but the elimination of collective
. bargaining must be debated in a bill separate from the financial issues.
Rep. Penny Bernard Schaber of Appleton and fellow Democrat Rep. Tamara Grigsby of Milwaukee have introduced an
amendment that would exempt transit
workers from the bill's bargaining restrictions.
The Federal Transit Act "requires the continuation of any collective bargaining rights that were in place when the employer
started receiving federal funds."
Since the budget repair bill is still alive, all legislators must understand the amendment's importance and approve it.
Riders, employers, agencies and families
. are counting on it.
Deborah Wetter, Valley Transit's general manager, speaks for those who are begging for a transit funding
solution."Whatever lawmakers come up (with) to fix
this, we are happy," she said. "Please just don't let us die."
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Metro transit manager fears possible loss of federal funding
http://www. htrnews. com/article/20 11 0223/MAN 01 01/1 02230850/Metro-transit-manager -fears-possible-loss-of-federal-
funding
Nearly half of annual revenue comes from Washington, D.C.
by charlie mathews
Herald Times Reporter
February 23, 2011
MANITOWOC- Maritime Metro Transit buses will be running their regular six routes in Manitowoc and .Two Rivers
·through the end of 2011, manager Derek
Muench said Tuesday. ·
But provisions in Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill may threaten operations in the future, Muench said.
"We fear federal dollars might be lost, but the true impact is not defined, yet," Muench said of the nearly 50 percent of the
annual $2.3 million in revenue needed to operate MMT.
"The local and state dollars which in place would be enough to keep us operating until year's end," Muench said.
Walker;s proposed budget fix calls for eliminating all collective bargaining powers of municipal workers- including the
local transit system's 19 bus drivers, 1.5 clerical staff members, and two mechanics- except wage negotiations.
A federal Department of Labor mandate requires approved labor agreements protecting transit workers be in place before
federal funds can be released to public transit systems. ·
Any changes in the agreements, such as altering collective bargaining rights, might jeopardize federal funds, according to
federal officials.
"We contract with the state Department of Transportation as a 'Tier C' system operating in an urbanized area of less than
50,000 people," Muench said of the relationship that flows federal money through Madison to Manitowoc.
42
Riders contributed $205,000 of the Maritime Metro Transit's annual budget, about 10 percent. In 2010, Muench said the
"operating deficit" was approximately $2.1 million.
Fifty percent of the deficit was covered by U.S. taxpayers in the form of the federal government, 21 percent from
Wisconsin and 29 percent from Manitowoc County, primarily the cities of Manitowoc and Two Rivers.
Riders
Last year, Muench said the system provided 310,000 rides of passengers taking one-way trips and transfers on the buses
that run from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.
Along with its fixed routes, part of Maritime Metro Transit's operating expenses is linked to its mandated paratransit
service under the Americans with Disabilities Act, some 9, 000 rides annually.
This is curb-to-curb van transportation for people with disabilities who have been certified as unable to use Maritime
Metro's accessible ramp-equipped bus service for some or all trips.
'Affordable, dependable'
An adult cash fare is $1.50, students pay $1, and senior and disabled citizens pay 75 cents to get on the bus, with a
monthly bus pass priced at $20 offering unlimited trips.
"The long-term philosophy of public transit is not to break even but be affordable and dependable and at Maritime Metro
Transit ... and we are."The communities of Manitowoc and Two Rivers have a high elderly and disabled population, often
dependent on fixed route or ADA services, and those are the ones that would be greatly impacted" by any loss of federal
funding, Muench said.
He fears a "domino effect" if possible lost federal funding hinders Maritime Metro's operations.
'We provide transportation to Holiday House for many of its clients," Muench said. "If those individuals can't get there it
would put a burden on that treasured organization to get them there or function without them."
Muench said that for adults that don't or can't drive and for many students, any diminishment of Maritime Metro Transit's
services "jeopardizes the welfare of those individuals."
Muench said he and other transit system managers would like any future state legislation to exempt municipal transit
systems from the proposed collective bargaining changes .
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Highway 51 ramp in Brokaw closed
http://www. wausaudailyherald.com/article/2011 0223/WDH01 01/1 0223081 0/Highway-51-ramp-in-Brokaw-closed
February 23, 2011
BROKAW-- The Highway 51 northbound ramp at Highway WW in Brokaw is closed indefinitely after the roadway buckled
late Monday.
A 12-foot-wide bubble a foot high in the middle formed in the ramp when water between the old concrete roadway and the
asphalt surface froze and pushed the asphalt upward, said Mike Wendt, a Department of Transportation maintenance
43
engineer. The DOT and Marathon County Highway Department officials met Tuesday and will meet again today to
determine how to fix the damage, Wendt said.
Motorists planning to use the northbound ramp now must exit at Highway Kin Wausau and follow Highway K north to
HighwayWW .
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Kathy Hegerfeld
WisDOT
Office of Public Affairs
Rm. 1038 Hill Farms
Madison, WI
44
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:50 PM
WeeklyStandard-National, Stephen Hayes
Re: question ...
Those are you to best choices for now, I haven't had time to dig deeper.
Did you get a copy of his remarks tonight?
-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Hayes [mailto:4····
Sent: Tuesday, February 22,
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: question ...
Hey Chris,
Sent this earlier but I'm guessing it got lost in the flurry of emails you're getting by the minute.
I'm writing another piece tonight, this one on what said during the campaign. In this article, Ryan Murray told the JS that
Scott wanted to take the choice out of collective bargaining. (That was mentioned in the AFT flyer.) Also, you'll find this
quote from a union spokesman: "Our members oppose taking away their rights to collective bargaining, so they would
definitely raise their voices against it," Christina Brey, speaking for the Wisconsin Education Association Council, said of
Walker's plan.
My question: Do you have a list of other times that Scott-- or anyone from the campaign-- mentioned changes to
collective bargaining?
Thanks for any help you can give me.
Steve
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Wisconsin)
August 30, 2010 Monday
Final Edition
Saving millions on insurance I ELECTION 2010 Barrett, Walker plans would add workers to health pool I
BYLINE: JASON STEIN, jstein@journalsentinel.com Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (WI)
SECTION: News; Pg. NaN
LENGTH: 1244 words
45
Madison- Two leading candidates for governor say they could save taxpayers up to hundreds of millions of dollars a year
by revamping the way schools and local governments buy health insurance for more than 200, 000 public employees
around Wisconsin.
The plans are the centerpiece of proposals to cut government spending by Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker,
Enhanced Coverage LinkingCounty Executive Scott Walker, -Search using:
News, Most Recent 60 Days
Biographies Plus News
a Republican, and Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, a Democrat.
The changes could save taxpayers substantial sums, though the saving could still fall short of what the candidates
suggest.
What neither candidate highlights, however, is that their plans also will mean taking away unions' right to negotiate with
their employers for their insurance carrier- a potentially explosive political fight.
Walker's plan would give school boards, city councils and village boards the ability to join the state health insurance pool
even if unions object. The Barrett plan would require local governments to insure their workers through the state pool
but not schools.
The state's powerful teachers union opposes Walker's plan and is signaling a fight over it if Walker is elected and moves
the idea forward.
"Our members oppose taking away their rights to coll.ective bargaining, so they would definitely raise their voices
against it," Christina Brey, speaking for the Wisconsin Education Association Council, said of Walker's plan.
·Walker is running in the Republican primary against former U.S .. Rep. Mark Neumann, who has said he would hold state
spending increases to 1 percentage point below the inflation rate but has not given details about how he would do that.
Already in pool Walker has said he wants to allow schools and local governments with higher health costs to buy into the
insurance pool for state employees- a step he says could save schools up to $68 million a year and local governments up
to $224 million. But schools and local governments already are allowed to buy into a state pool, according to the state
Department of Employee Trust Funds.
About 380 local employers, such as cities, villages and counties, are part of the pool, said Lisa Ellinger, deputy
administrator of the agency's Division of Insurance Services.
But only a handful of schools participate.
That's in part because ofthe close relationship between WEAC and a separate major insurer for school employees, WEA
Trust, that the union created, said Ryan Murray, campaign policy adviser for Walker. He said school districts often have
some of the most expensive health benefits in Wisconsin and could receive cheaper insurance through the state if they
didn't have to negotiate with unions about who would insure their members.
"The way the proposal would work is we would take the choice out of the collective bargaining process," Murray said.
Brey said that WEAC members have sought to keep their overall pay and benefits to reasonable levels in contract
negotiations. "Through the years, during the give and take that occurs at the bargaining table, teachers have looked at
good benefits for themselves and their families and foregone salary benefits for that," Brey said.
Murray said Walker would let schools and local governments keep any saving they get and would not seek to recover it
to help close a $2.7 billion projected budget deficit for the state 2011-'13 budget.
School boards back plan The Wisconsin Association of School Boards, which has studied the possible saving from such a
step, backs the proposal and believes that Walker's cost saving estimates are reasonable, said Sheri Krause, a lobbyist
for the group.
A similar proposal was passed as part of the 2003-'05 budget by the Republicancontrolled Legislature but was vetoed by
Gov. Jim Doyle, a Democrat. He said in his veto statement he objected to "forcing this plan onto employees." Because
there aren't good estimates for local government health insurance costs, the Walker campaign relied on the average
estimated saving for teachers to calculate the "up to $224 million" in lower costs his plan might produce for local
governments.
Todd Berry, president of the Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance, said that likely would exaggerate the local government
saving, because schools in Wisconsin typically have higher health insurance costs.
Murray acknowledged that was possible and said that was why the Walker campaign was careful to say "up to $224
million" in saving.
For his part, Neumann said as governor he would look at the "big picture" and seek to hold down costs that the state
and local governments are paying for their employees overall, not just their health insurance or their salaries.
46
" (Voters) should expect me to be very tough on a bottom line total compensation package for the public employees,"
Neumann said.
'Win-win' situation Barrett's plan would require local governments to buy insurance through the state system, a step
that his campaign estimates would save $339 million a year. Barrett wants to include school districts in the state pool in
the future but feels that doing so right away would be politically difficult, campaign policy adviser Paul Vornholt said. He
noted that local employee unions are more familiar with the state insurance system because more local governments
use it.
"There wouldn't be much convincing to do. It would reduce state employee costs and local government costs and be a
win-win," Vornholt said.
Vornholt said Barrett's plan would give state and local government more buying power in Wisconsin's insurance market.
Now, the state receives lower health insurance prices in Dane County- the seat of state government where the state has'
its biggest concentration of workers and its greatest purchasing power.
Vornholt said Barrett's plan would give the state similar leverage and similar saving in other parts of the state. He said
that, unlike Walker's proposal, Barrett's plan would allow the state to keep the difference.
John Torinus, chairman of Serigraph Inc. in West Bend and a commentator on the issue of health care costs, said pooling
government employees together might not produce huge saving because large employers such as the state typically see
diminishing returns when they get even bigger.
David Riemer, a former state budget director under Doyle who has given advice to Barrett, said it also might be
challenging to achieve reductions with the plan in very rural areas with little competition among healthcare providers
now. But Riemer, now the director of the Community Advocates Public Policy Institute, said Barrett's plan should lower
costs and improve competition in urban health care markets such as Milwaukee as providers compete to serve the
larger bloc of public employees.
"I think it's quite reasonable," Riemer said of Barrett's saving estimate. Murray said Barrett's plan protected the teachers
union, a key Democratic ally, by not including schools.
"That had a lot to do with who's supporting (Barrett) in the election," Murray said.
Vornholt countered that Walker's plan ran a risk by allowing school districts and local governments to choose not to
enter the state plan if they wanted. That leaves open the possibility that only school districts with the highest costs
might choose the state plan, which could drive up costs in the state pool, he said.
Copyright 2010, Journal Sentinel Inc. All rights reserved. (Note: This notice does not apply to those news items already
copyrighted and received through wire services or other media.) Copyright, 2010, Journal Sentinel, All Rights Reserved.
LOAD-DATE: August 30, 2010
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper
47
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Get it done. He is right.
----- Original Message -----
Erin Roth (Wisconsin) <••
Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:47 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Re: Text of the Governor's Address
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV <Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov>
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV <Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov>
Sent: Tue Feb 22 19:44:59 2011
Subject: Text of the Governor's Address
Text ofthe Governor's Address
Madison-Below is the text of Governor Walker's conversation about our current fiscal year challenges, the divisions which have
arisen over the past week and his positive vision for moving Wisconsin forward.
Good evening.
Wisconsin is showing the rest ofthe country how to have a passionate, yet civil debate about our fmances. That's a very Midwestern
trait and something we should be proud of. I pray, however, that this civility will continue as people pour into our state from all across
America.
First, let me be clear: I have great respect for those who have chosen a career in government. I really do.
In 1985, when I was a high school junior in the small town of Delavan, I was inspired to pursue public service after I attended the
American Legioll's Badger Boys State program. The military veterans and educators who put on that week-long event showed the
honor in serving others.
Tonight, I thank the 300,000-plus state and local government employees who showed up for work today and did their jobs well. We
appreciate it. If you take only one message away tonight, it's that we all respect the work that you do.
I also understand how concerned many government workers are about their futures. I've listened to their comments and read their
emails.
I listened to the educator from Milwaukee who wrote to me about her concerns about the legislation and what it might mean for her
classroom.
48
That's why last week we agreed to make changes to the bill to address many of those issues.
And I listened to others like the conectional officer in Chippewa Falls who emailed me arguing that bargaining rights for public
employee unions are the only way to ensure that workers get a fuir say in their working conditions.
I understand and respect those concerns. It's important to remember that many of the rights we're talking about don't come from
collective bargaining. They come from the civil service system in Wisconsin. That law was passed in 1905 (long before collective
bargaining) and it wiJI continue long after our plan is approved.
You see, despite a Jot of the rhetoric we've heard over the past 11 days the bill I put forward isn't aimed at state workers, and it
certainly isn't a battle with unions. If it was, we would have eliminated collective bargaining entirely or we would have gone after the
private-sector unions.
But, we did not because they are our partners in economic development We need them to help us put 250,000 people to work in the
private sector over the next four years.
The legislation I've put forward is about one thing. It's about balancing our budget now-- and in the future. Wisconsin faces a 137
million dollar deficit for the remainder of this fiscal year and a 3.6 billion dollar deficit for the upcoming budget.
Our bill is about protecting the hardworking taxpayer. It's about Wisconsin families trying to make ends meet and help their children.
People like the woman from Wausau who wrote me saying "I'm a single parent of two children, one of whom is autistic. I have been
intimately involved in my school district, but I can no longer afford the taxes I pay. I am in favor of everyone paying for benefits, as I
have to."
. It's also about the small business owner who told me about the challenges he faces just making payroll each week. His employees pay
. much.Jarger premiums than we are asking because that's how they keep the company going and that's how they protect their jobs.
Or the substitute teacher here in Madison, who wrote to me last week about having to sit at home unable to work because her union
had closed the school down to protest.
She sent me an email that went on to say, "I was given no choice in joining the union and I am forced to pay dues ... I am missing out
on pay today ... I feel like I have no voice."
I assure you that.she does have a voice.
49
And so does the factory worker in Janesville who was laid off nearly two years ago. He's a union guy in a union town who asks
. simply why everyone else has to sacrifice except those in government.
Last week, I traveled the state visiting manufacturing plants and talking to workers- just like the guy from Janesville. Many of them
are paying twenty-five to fifty percent of their health care premiums. Most, had 40 lk plans with limited or no match from the
company.
My brother's in the same situation. He works as a banquet manager and occasional bartender at a hotel and my sister-in-law works for
a department store. They have two beautiful kids.
In every way, they are a typical middle-class family here in Wisconsin. David mentioned to me that he pays nearly $800 a month for
his health insurance and the little he can set aside for his 40 I k.
He- like so many other workers across Wisconsin- would love a deal like the benefits we are pushing in this budget repair bill.
That's because what we are asking for is modest - at least to those outside of government.
Our measure asks for a 5.8% contribution to the pension and a 12.6% contribution for the health insurance premium. Both are well
below the national average.
And this is just one part of our comprehensive. plan to balance the state's 3.6 billion dollar budget deficit.
Now, some have questioned why we have to reform collective bargaining to balance the budget. The answer is simple the system is
broken: it costs taxpayers serious money- particularly at the local level. As a former county. official, I know that frrst hand.
For years, I tried to use modest changes in pension and hmilth insurance contributions as a means of balancing our budget without
massive layoffs or furloughs. On nearly every occasion, the local unions (empowered by collective bargaining agreements) told me to
go ahead and layoff workers. That's not acceptable to me.
Here's another example: in Wisconsin, many local school districts are required to buy their health insurance through the WEA Trust
(which is the state teachers union's company). When our bill passes, these school districts can opt to switch into the state plan and
save $68 million per year. Those savings could be used to pay for more teachers and put more money into the classroom to help our
kids.
Some have also suggested that Wisconsin raise taxes on corporations and people with high-incomes. Well-- Governor Doyle and the
Legislature did that: two years ago. In fact they passed a budget-repair bill (in just one day, mind you) that included a billion-dollar
tax increase.
so
Instead of raising taxes, we need to control government spending to balance our budget.
Two years ago, many of the same Senate Democrats who are hiding out in another state approved a biennial budget that not only
included higher taxes- it included more than two billion dollars in one-time federal stimulus aid.
That money was supposed to be for one-time costs for things like roads and bridges. Instead, they used it as a short-tenn fix to
balance the last state budget. Not surprisingly, the state now faces a deficit for the remainder of this fiscal year and a 3.6 billion dollar
hole for the budget starting July I st.
What we need now more than ever, is a commitment to the future.
As more and more protesters come in from Nevada, Chicago and elsewhere, I am not going to allow their voices to overwhelm the
voices of the millions of taxpayers from across the state who think we're doing the right thing. This is a decision that Wisconsin will
make.
Fundamentally, that's what we were elected to do. Make tough decisions. Whether we like the outcome or not, our democratic
institutions call for us to participate. That is why I am asking the missing Senators to come back to work.
Do the job you were elected to do. You don't have to like the outcome, or even vote yes, but as part ofthe world's greatest
democracy, you should be here, in Madison, at the Capitol.
The missing Senate Democrats must know that their failure to come to work will lead to dire consequences very soon. Failure to act
on this budget repair bill means (at least) 15 hundred state employees will be laid off before the end of June. If there is l)O. agreement
by July 1st, another 5-6 thousand state workers-- as well as 5-6 thousand local government employees would be also laid off.
But, there is a way to avoid these layoffs and other cuts. The 14 State Senators who are staying outside of Wisconsin as we speak can
come home and do their job.
We are broke because time and time again politicians of both parties ran from the tough decisions and punted them down the road for
another day. We can no longer do that, because, you see, what we're really talking about today is our future.
The future of my children, of your children, of the children of the single mother from Wausau that I mentioned earlier.
Like you, I want my two sons to grow up in a state at least as great as the Wisconsin I grew up in.
51
More than 162 years ago, our ancestors approved Wisconsin's constitution. They believed in the power of hard work and
detennination and they envisioned a new state with limitless potential.
Our founders were pretty smart. They understood that it is through frugality and moderation in government that we will see freedom
and prosperity for our people.
Now is our time to once again seize that potential. We will do so at this turning point in our state's history by restoring fiscal
responsibility that fosters prosperity for today- and for future generations.
Thank you for joining me tonight. May God richly bless you and your family and may God continue to bless the great State of
Wisconsin.
###
52
bill and testified to lawmakers for hours about the impact on middle-class families; hundreds still waited to
speak as the clock ticked toward midnight.
Madison school district officials canceled Wednesday classes because teachers planned stay away to protest the
bill. As oflate Tuesday, 40 percent of the district's 2,600-member teacher bargaining unit had called in sick and
the number was expected to increase.
Opponents of proposal essentially were mounting a "citizen filibuster" in hopes of delaying a committee vote on
the bill, said Rep. Robin Vos, R-Rochester. But legislative leaders said earlier that Walker has enough support
in both chambers to approve the measure, which he said is necessary to address a projected $3.6 billion
budget deficit.
"We're broke and we don't want to layoff almost 20,000 people," said Senate President Mike Ellis, a
Republican, who added, "They've got the votes to pass it."
Union representatives were attempting to sway key moderates for a compromise but Democrats said the bill
would be tough to stop.
"The Legislature has pushed these employees off the cliff but the Republicans have decided to jump with them,"
said Sen. Bob Jauch, one of 14 Democrats in the 33 member chamber.
New Republican governors and legislatures in other states have proposed cutting back on public employee costs
to reduce budget shortfalls, but Wisconsin's move appears to be the earliest and most extensive.
Wisconsin was the first state to enact a comprehensive collective bargaining law in 1959 and also is the
birthplace of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the national union
representing all non-federal public employees, which was founded in 1936 in Madison.
But the election of Walker, an outspoken conservative, last November and the GOP's seizing of control of both
legislative chambers set the stage for a dramatic reversal of Wisconsin's strong labor history.
Joharma Larmer-Cusin, 29, a history teacher who came to the University of Wisconsin-Madison to pursue a
graduate degree, told lawmakers Tuesday that Walker's proposal would hurt the school's ability to recruit
quality instructors and graduate students.
"It's hard to go into a classroom and teach people about a society that's moving backwards," she said. "I'd rather
not do that.
Walker's plan would make workers pay half the costs of their pensions and at least 12.6 percent of their health
care premiums. State employees' costs would go up by an average of 8 percent. The changes would save the
state $30 million by June 30 and $300 million over the next two years.
Unions could still represent workers, but could not seek pay increases above the Consumer Price Index unless
approved by a public referendum. ·
Unions also could not force employees to pay dues and would have to hold armual votes to stay organized.
Local police, firefighters and state troopers would retain their collective bargaining rights.
In exchange for bearing more costs and losing leverage, public employees were promised no furloughs or
layoffs. Walker has threatened to order layoffs of up to 6,000 state workers if the measure did not pass.
135
Wisconsin is one of about 30 states with collective bargaining laws covering state and local workers.
Walker has argued that the public employee concessions are modest considering what private sector workers
have suffered during the recession.
But Democratic opponents and union leaders said Walker's real motive was to strike back at political opponents
who have supported Democrats over the years.
Protesting workers arrived in buses from across the state and poured into the Capitol, where they rallied under
the watch of a large security force. Protesters chanted, waved signs and occasionally applauded testimony
broadcast from the legislative hearing on monitors set up in the Rotunda.
"We're focusing on being heard as a people, as one, all the unions," said Michael Hyde, a sergeant at the prison
in Waupun. "Government is supposed to be our representative."
Kathy Lusiak, 59, a computer lab aide at Prairie Lane Elementary School in Kenosha, said the bill would cost
her about a third of her $21,000-per-year salary. "I'm totally shocked. I never thought it would be this drastic,"
said Lusiak, who joined the protest. "It's very much a nightmare scenario."
The public employee bill is the latest that Walker has pushed through the GOP-controlled Legislature in rapid
order since taking office in January. He's also signed into law tax cuts for businesses that relocate to Wisconsin
and those that create jobs and sweeping lawsuit reform. To achieve additional budget savings, he is seeking
authority to make changes in the Medicaid program, sell state power plants and restructure existing debt to save
about $165 million.
Democrats, who lost the governor's office and control ofthe Legislature in the November midterm elections,
have been powerless to stop to the juggernaut. Republicans hold a five vote margin in the Senate and a 57-38-1
edge in the Assembly.
The threat of layoffs helped many lawmakers reluctant to compromise.
"Anybody who promises you that there's an easier way to close this gap is trying to seli you something," Senate
Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald said in an open letter to Wisconsin workers.
Governors in a number of other states, including Ohio, Indiana, Nevada and Tennessee, have called for forcing
concessions from public employee unions but no similar measures have moved to final action.
© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or
redistributed.
136
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Chris:
Thompson, Ben (NBCUniversal)
Wednesday, February 16, 2011 1:01 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
CNBC "Kudlow Report" Inquiry
Ben Thompson here again with CNBC's "Kudlow Report," with Larry Kudlow. I know my colleague, Andrew Conti, had
been in touch earlier this week, but I wanted to reach out again to see if Gov. Walker might ever be willing and available to
join us on the program tonight, either live at 7:30pm ET or taped between 6-6:30pm ET? Larry would love to talk about
this plans for collective bargaining rights. If not tonight, perhaps another night this week?
All the best,
Ben Thompson
CNBC Segment Producer
Wisconsin Seeks to Gut Unions to Rein In Costs
POLITICS, GOVERNMENT, WISCONSIN, WISCONSIN GOVERNOR, GOVERNOR WALKER,
GOVERNOR SCOTT WALKER, REPUBLICANS, LABOR, LABOR UNIONS, REPUBLICANS,
REPUBLICAN GOVERNORS
The Associated Press
116 Feb 2011110:44 AM ET
Wisconsin is poised to strip collective bargaining rights from most of the state's 175,000 public employees in
the boldest step by a new Republican governor and Legislature to solve budget problems by confronting
organized labor.
The state Senate and Assembly are expected to vote as soon as Thursday on Gov. Scott Walker's plan to end
collective bargaining for all state, county and local workers except for police, firefighters and the state patrol.
More than 10,000 public employees staged demonstrations at the state Capitol Tuesday to protest the measure,
banging on drums and screaming "Save our state!" and "Kill the bill!" A parade of witnesses railed against the
bill and testified to lawmakers for hours about the impact on middle-class families; hundreds still waited to
speak as the clock ticked toward midnight.
Madison school district officials canceled Wednesday classes because teachers planned stay away to protest the
bill. As oflate Tuesday, 40 percent of the district's 2,600-member teacher bargaining unit had called in sick and
the number was expected to increase.
Opponents of proposal essentially were mounting a "citizen filibuster" in hopes of delaying a committee vote on
the bill, said Rep. Robin Vos, R-Rochester. But legislative leaders said earlier that Walker has enough support
137
in both chambers to approve the measure, which he said is necessary to address a projected $3.6 billion
budget deficit.
"We're broke and we don't want to lay off almost 20,000 people," said Senate President Mike Ellis, a
Republican, who added, "They've got the votes to pass it."
Union representatives were attempting to sway key moderates for a compromise but Democrats said the bill
would be tough to stop.
"The Legislature has pushed these employees off the cliff but the Republicans have decided to jump with them,"
said Sen. Bob Jauch, one of 14 Democrats in the 33 member chamber.
New Republican governors and legislatures in other states have proposed cutting back on public employee costs
to reduce budget shortfalls, but Wisconsin's move appears to be the earliest and most extensive.
Wisconsin was the first state to enact a comprehensive collective bargaining law in 1959 and also is the
birthplace of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the national union
representing all non-federal public employees, which was founded in 1936 in Madison.
But the election of Walker, an outspoken conservative, last November and the GOP's seizing of control of both
legislative chambers set the stage for a dramatic reversal of Wisconsin's strong labor history.
Joharma Larmer-Cusin, 29, a history teacher who came to the University of Wisconsin-Madison to pursue a
graduate degree, told lawmakers Tuesday that Walker's proposal would hurt the school's ability to recruit
quality instructors and graduate students.
"It's hard to go into a classroom and teach people about a society that's moving backwards," she said. "I'd rather
not do that.
Walker's plan would make workers pay half the costs of their pensions and at least 12.6 percent of their health
care premiums. State employees' costs would go up by an average of 8 percent. The changes would save the
state $30 million by June 30 and $300 million over the next two years.
Unions could still represent workers, but could not seek pay increases above the Consumer Price Index unless
approved by a public referendum.
Unions also could not force employees to pay dues and would have to hold armual votes to stay organized.
Local police, firefighters and state troopers would retain their collective bargaining rights.
In exchange for bearing more costs and losing leverage, public employees were promised no furloughs or
layoffs. Walker has threatened to order layoffs of up to 6,000 state workers if the measure did not pass.
Wisconsin is one of about 30 states with collective bargaining laws covering state and local workers.
Walker has argued that the public employee concessions are modest considering what private sector workers
have suffered during the recession.
But Democratic opponents and union leaders said Walker's real motive was to strike back at political opponents
who have supported Democrats over the years.
138
Protesting workers arrived in buses from across the state and poured into the Capitol, where they rallied under
the watch of a large security force. Protesters chanted, waved signs and occasionally applauded testimony
broadcast from the legislative hearing on monitors set up in the Rotunda.
"We're focusing on being heard as a people, as one, all the unions," said Michael Hyde, a sergeant at the prison
in Waupun. "Government is supposed to be our representative."
Kathy Lusiak, 59, a computer lab aide at Prairie Lane Elementary School in Kenosha, said the bill would cost
her about a third of her $21,000-per-year salary. "I'm totally shocked. I never thought it would be this drastic,"
said Lusiak, who joined the protest. "It's very much a nightmare scenario."
The public employee bill is the latest that Walker has pushed through the GOP-controlled Legislature in rapid
order since taking office in January. He's also signed into law tax cuts for businesses that relocate to Wisconsin
and those that create jobs and sweeping lawsuit reform. To achieve additional budget savings, he is seeking
authority to make changes in the Medicaid program, sell state power plants and restructure existing debt to save
about $165 million.
Democrats, who lost the governor's office and control of the Legislature in the November midterm elections,
have been powerless to stop to the juggernaut. Republicans hold a five vote margin in the Senate and a 57-38-1
edge in the Assembly.
The threat of layoffs helped many lawmakers reluctant to compromise.
"Anybody who promises you that there's an easier way to close this gap is trying to sell you something," Senate
Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald said in an open letter to Wisconsin workers.
Governors in a number of other states, including Ohio, Indiana, Nevada and Tennessee, have called for forcing
concessions from public employee unions but no similar measures have moved to final action.
© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or
redistributed.
139
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Day, Stacy - GOV
Wednesday, February 16, 201112:35 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Mark Niquette, Bloomberg News
Mark Niquette is doing a story for Bloomberg News about the collective bargaining measures of the budget repair bill and
asked to speak to you.
--Stacy
140
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Evenson, Tom - GOV
Wednesday, February 16, 201110:08 AM
GOV DL All Staff
Morning News Update 02.16.11
Office of Governor Scott Walker- Morning News Update for Februacy 16. 2011
News Summary:
• Washington Post columnist calls tbe Governor a "pharaoh."
• Union protests spark media frenzy over Governor Walker's budget repair bill.
• Madison school district closes for Wednesday as teachers have a unified "sick out."
• JFC is meeting to discuss possible amendments to the Governor's budget repair bill, they will vote at 12pm.
• Some outstate editorial boards express dislike for the budget repair bill, want process to slow down.
Governor Walker- Television Clips for Tuesday. Februarv 15. 2011
Wisconsin's Front Pages:
Appleton Post-Crescent
Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
Green Bay Press Gazette
La Crosse Tribune
Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Oshkosh Northwestern
Racine Journal Times
Sheboygan Press
Stevens Point Journal
Wisconsin State Journal
Nation/World
State Plans Anger Unions
Wall Street Journal
MADISON, Wis.-Union leaders say overhauls of rules for public- and private-sector unions being considered in
Wisconsin, Ohio and about a dozen other states threaten to accelerate tbe decline in membership nationwide and hurt
organized labor's finances and political clout.
Workers toppled a dictator in Egypt. but might be silenced in Wisconsin
Op-Ed- Washington Post
But even as workers were helping topple the regime in Cairo, one state government in particular was moving to topple
workers' organizations here in the United States.
Wisconsin Governor Threatens To Replace Union Workers With National Guard
Huffing ton Post
In the case of a walkout, Walker has put the National Guard on alert. Last week, he told reporters that the guard is
"prepared" for "whatever the governor, their commander-in-chief, might call for," such as staffing prisons if guards go on
strike.
Related Story: Wisconsin Governor Launches Attack on Public Sector Employees and Unions <VIDEO)
Thousands of Wisconsin union workers protest budget plan
Reuters
More than 10,ooo union public employees and supporters packed the Capitol Square and the inside of the statehouse on
Tuesday to protest Gov. Scott Walker's budget plan to strip many bargaining rights from state and local government
workers.
141
Wisconsin's Cheesy Tax Cuts
Forbes
Is it possible to cut taxes while addressing a state budget deficit-leaving aside misguided folk belief in supply·side
economics?
Memo: Legislature must meet in Capitol
Associated Press
After that memo was released, Walker's spokesman Cullen Werwie said Walker's address at Vita Plus would be a speech
and not a joint session of the Legislature. Walker will officially release his budget when the Legislature is in session in the
Capitol.
Milwaukee
GOP leaders predict budget bill will pass
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Top GOP lawmakers said Tuesday that Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair plan will pass,the Legislature even as thousands
of workers converged on the Capitol to protest the proposal's cuts in employee benefits and union bargaining rights.
Crowds decry budget bill's handling of workers
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Thousands of state union workers and their supporters blanketed the Capitol on Tuesday for a daylong demonstration to
protest Gov. Scott Walker's plans to wipe away most of their bargaining rights and reduce fringe benefits.
Jeff Stone, Chris Abele advance to county executive runoff
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Voters on Tuesday picked state Rep. Jeff Stone (R-Greendale) and philanthropist Chris Abele to advance to the Aprils
election for Milwaukee County executive.
Prosser, Kloppenburg to face off for Supreme Court seat
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
State Supreme Court Justice David Prosser will face Assistant Attorney General JoAnne Kloppenburg on the Aprils
ballot, voters decided Tuesday.
Racine voices opinions of Walker's union proposal
Racine Journal Times
Wearing a red T-shirt with an apple on back, Laurie Bauer, 51, who used to teach in Burlington, stood before the state
Joint Committee on Finance Tuesday in opposition to Gov.· Scott Walker's budget bill.
Unified subs on alert to work for protesting teachers
Racine Journal Times
The Racine Unified School District is keeping substitute and fill-in staff on alert that their services may be needed this
week if district workers call in sick or take personal days to protest Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill.
Public, private workers need equal footing
Editorial - Racine Journal Times
Despite the chants and protests, as soon as Thursday a bill may be on the floor of the Legislature to limit public employee
unions. It is a bill that we think holds much good but also some bad.
Madison
Lawmakers to meet this morning on possible amendments before JFC begins voting on repair bill after
noon
WisPolitics.com
JFC Co-chair Robin Vos said lawmakers would gather this morning to begin discussing possible amendments to the guv's
budget repair bill before the committee meets around noon to begin voting on the legislation.
Hearing on Wis. union plan finally ends
Associated Press
Wisconsin Republicans have called a halt to a marathon public hearing on their plan to strip almost all public workers of
their collective bargaining rights.
142
Madison schools closed Wednesday due to district-wide teacher sickout
Wisconsin State Journal
Madison schools will be closed Wednesday as teachers planned a district-wide absence to attend protests against Gov.
Scott Walker's proposal to limit union bargaining.
Thousands gather at Capitol to protest Walker budget bill
Wisconsin State Journal
In one of the largest protests in recent memory, thousands of angry union supporters gathered at the state Capitol on
Tuesday to oppose a bill by Gov. Scott Walker that would greatly weaken organized labor in Wisconsin.
Walker gins up 'crisis' to reward cronies
Editorial - The Capitol Times
But Gov. Scott Walker is not making tough choices. He is making political choices, and they are designed not to balance
budgets but to improve his political position and that of his party.
Governors wise-to secure prisons
·Editorial- Wisconsin State Journal
Can you believe the governor of Wisconsin threatened to sic the National Guard on state workers because they didn't like
what he's doing?
Labor activists strategize for 'class war' ignited by Walker budget bill
The Capitol Times
What's happening now in Wisconsin, with thousands of workers flooding the Capitol to protest Gov. Scott Walker's move
to snuff the collective bargaining power of public employees, is much more than backlash against a union-busting
maneuver, labor activists and their supporters said Tuesday evening at a forum at the Orpheum Theatre in downtown
Madison.
Wisconsin workers get creative to attend budget bill protest
Wisconsin Reporter
·Some used personal vacation days. Others used their free time. But they came for the same reason.
Lawmaker tensions set stage over budget repair battle
Wisconsin Reporter
The biggest obstacle to Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair package may have been cleared.
Locals join union protests
Beloit Daily News
City of Beloit union leaders are heading to Madison today and Wednesday to participate in the Capitol lobbying and
protests.
Green Bay/Appleton
Republicans poised to cut Wisconsin worker rights in budget riX
Associated Press- Appleton Post-Crescent
MADISON- Wisco:tisin is poised to strip collective bargaining rights from most ofthe state's 175,000 public employees in
the boldest step by a new Republican governor and Legislature to solve budget problems by confronting organized labor.
Appleton East High School students join in rally against Wisconsin budget bill affecting unions, teachers
Appleton Post-Crescent
Incensed by Gov. Scott Walker's plan to end most collective bargaining rights from teachers and other public employees,
about 200 Appleton East High School students filed out of class at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday chanting, "Save our teachers, save
our school."
Take policy items out of budget bill
Editorial- Appleton Post-Crescent
One of Scott Walker's pledges in his campaign for governor was to "strip policy and pork projects from the state budget."
Wisconsin budget protests draw thousands
Green Bay Press-Gazette
The Republican governor has put the legislation at the center of a budget repair bill that aims to save the state $30 million
in the current budget and an additional $300 million over the next two years.
Action by state may eliminate need for city layoffs. Manitowoc mayor says
143
Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter
Mayor Justin Nickels sent a memo to City Council members Tuesday, saying his potential vetoes of their votes authorizing
layoffs and furloughs will be influenced by discussions under way in the state Legislature.
Oshkosh legislators exemplifY range of responses to Walker's budget bill
Oshkosh Northwestern
The Oshkosh area's state representatives' reaction to Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill represents a microcosm of
statewide opinions on his proposal to increase public sector employees' benefits contributions, refinance debt and sweep
non-budgetary policy changes into law.
Budget bill anything but repair for Wisconsin
Editorial - Oshkosh Northwestern
The problem with Gov. Scott Walker's state budget repair bill isn't what it ends, but what it begins. If it ended at simply
requiring public employees in Wisconsin to pay a higher share of health insurance and pension costs, it would be a tough,
but reasonable and appropriate response to a projected $3.6 billion budget deficit.
La CrossejEau Claire
Walker defends plan to strip state worker bargaining rights
La Crosse Tribune
Gov. Scott Walker defended as "modest" his plan to strip collective bargaining rights from most of the state's 175,000
workers during a visit Tuesday to a La Crosse steel manufacturing company. Hundreds of protesters lining the street
disagreed.-
Union rallv draws hundreds to Riverside Park
La Crosse Tribune
Woody Guthrie's "This Land isYour Land" played in the background as more than 1,500 people gathered Tuesday in
Riverside Park to protest Gov. Scott Walker's proposed budget repair plan.
Walker defends bill in Chippewa County stop
Chippewa Herald
Calling his proposed budget repair bill a request for "modest" changes, Gov. Scott Walker defended the measure in a stop
in Chippewa County Tuesday, while hundreds of protesters rallied outside against it.
Wausau/Rhinelander
Workers rally against Walker's contract bill
Wisconsin Rapids Tribune
STEVENS POINT-" Public workers and their supporters matched the fervor in Madison with their own rally Tuesday in
Stevens Point, protesting and discussing the impacts of Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill.
Don't rush Walker's plan into law
Editorial -Stevens Point Journal
Last November, precisely 1,128,941 voters marked Walker's name on the ballot. Voters selected a Republican candidate--
and by a majority in both houses, a Republican Legislature-- because they wanted less spendingJower taxes, fewer
regulations and above all, more jobs.
Walker defends anti-union proposal
Marshfield News Herald
Walker traveled to manufacturers throughout the state, including Wilson-Hurd Manufacturing in Wausau, to again
outline his plan to limit unions' negotiating powers.
Wausau union workers gather to rally against Walker's budget plan
Wausau Daily Herald
The opening chant Tuesday night at a union rally in Wausau intensified like an approaching freight train: "Stand up! Fight
back! Stand up! Fight back!"
Superior/Duluth
Governor Walker's war on working families
by Rep. Milroy -Superior Telegram
Governor Scott Walker's proposed "budget repair" bill has sparked a fire in our community and across Wisconsin unlike
anything I have ever witnessed.
144
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
DWD MB Communications Office
Wednesday, February 16, 2011 9:06 AM
Barroilhet, Dan - DWD; Bartol, Fred - DWD; Baumbach, Scott C - DWD; Beckett, Laura L-
DWD; Berge, Sharon - DWD; Bernstein, Howard I - DWD; Black-Radloff, Rita - DWD;
Bolles, John - DWD; Brockmiller, William - DWD; Crary, Cathy- DWD; Denis, Gary J -
DWD; Dipko, John A - DWD; Falk, Elizabeth C - DWD; Fosdick, Anna - DWD; Gerrits,
Karen - DWD; Grant, Ken G - DWD; Grosso, Eric - DWD; Hodek, Scott A- DWD; Holt,
Deb - DWD; Jones, Richard - DWD; Kikkert, Becky - GOV; Liedl, Kimberly- GOV; Lingard,
Sue - DWD; Maxwell, Georgia E - DWD; McDonald, Scott- DWD; Morgan, Karen P -
DWD; Natera, Ramon V - ,DWD; OBrien, Christopher D - DWD; O'Brien, Pamela - DWD;
Perez, Manuel - DWD; Phillips, Amelia - DWD; Preysz, Linda - DWD; Reid, Andrea -
DWD; Reynolds, Dianne - DWD; Richard, JoAnna - DWD; Rodgers-Rhyme, Anne M -
DWD; Sachse, Jeff A- DWD; Schmalle, Verlynn C- DWD; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Shutes,
David L- DWD; Solomon, Brian - DWD; Spurlin, Dennis A - DWD; Thompson, Heather-
DWD; Udalova, Victoria M - DWD; Vue, Mai Zong - DCF; Weber, Sue - DWD; Werwie,
Cullen J - GOV; Westfall, Grant- DWD; Williamson, Linda - DWD; Winters, Dennis K-
DWD;Wisnewski, Jerry- DWD; Wolfe, Brian M- DWD; Wurl, Mark W- DWD
Articles from CustomScoop for Wednesday, 02,16,11
http://www, jsonline,com/blogs/business/116240414. htm I
Home Depot has 500 seasonal jobs open in area
By Doris Hajewski of the Journal Sentinel Feb. 15, 2011 [C23) Comments
Home Depot is looking for people to fill 500 part-time seasonal jobs in the Milwaukee area to work weekends during the
home improvement store version of the holiday season. The company adds temporary staff during March and April, the
busiest time of year for home improvement stores. Training starts in February. ,
http://www .jsonline.com/news/education/116284229. html
MATC contract offers few cuts
Union considers new pact to replace contract that ends July
By Karen Herzog of the Journal Sentinel Feb. 16, 2011 [C35) Comments
At a time when public employee unions across the state are revolting against the prospect of slashed benefits and
bargaining rights, Milwaukee Are.a Technical College teachers and paraprofessionals are voting on a three-year contract
that would shelter full-timers from layoffs ahd preserve their generous pension while requiring them to pay more for health
insurance - on average 9% of the premium.
CustomS coop Clip Report
I wanted to draw your attention to these articles that appeared in my CustomScoop online news result
report.
Leqislativeworl<group to study prevailing wage laws
Source: Milwaukee News Buzz (WI) N/A
Indexed At: 02/16/2011 8:37 AM
Keywords: workforce development (1),John Dipko (1)
hn\1 C::rntt rlirprtinn thP \Afic::rnndn fl.on:=u·tmpnt nf 0""\/Pinnn"'""n't ic::
145
'---- ---" '" -- "'"' .. ······. "'. ---------- '"" ----------- "" "'
.
--- ----
.. . .... .... ..
;I
organizing a workgroup of legislators, state officials and union representatives to study changes
to ...
I t' h h . •.· . b . . t• 'd . NWT . 't .
.. .
.·· .
.
K ee 1sc . ears JO crea 10n 1 eas m C v1s1; ·.·
.. ·
.
.··.
Source: Green Bay Press-Gazette (WI) 56300
Indexed At: 02/16/2011 7:35AM
Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (6)
Abstract: ... mayor, Brown County executive(4) Wisconsin unions fight Gov. Scott Walker's collective
bargaining proposal(?) Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker to strip most union rights to help.fix
budget deficit(631) Wisconsin Gov. Scott ...
Budget reeair hearing runs tJVernight
.. ···

>'
·.
· .. ·
..
_:_
Byline: Andrew Beckett
Source: Wisconsin Radio Network (WI) N/ A
, Indexed At: 02/16/2011 3:41 AM ·
' Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (5)
' Abstract: ... WRN) Testimony before the Joint Finance Committee on Governor Scott Walker's budget
repoir bill stretched into the early hours of Wednesday morning, with many protestors ...
bong-term i ~ b l e s s face stigmas .•. · .. · .. ·.
. .·
. . · .. ·· .
.·;
.. · ..
. .
Source: Oshkosh Northwestern (WI) 21400
Indexed At: 02/16/2011 3:27AM
i ·'Keywords: Jobless (1)
Abstract: ... Long-term jobless face stigmas ...
. ···.·. . -.. -- ··. .. ·. . . - .
· ..
..... · .· ,.· .. ·.'
Some fear a new, eermanent jobless class . ..
· .
Source: Oshkosh Northwestern (WI) 21400
Indexed At: 02/16/2011 3:27AM
Keywords: Jobless (1)
Abstract: ... Some fear a new, permanent jobless class ...
' . OP . . ·. d t . . . k . ht . . b d . . f'
W)sconsm. G eo1se o cut wor er ng s m u get IX
· .... ·
· ...
Source: Green Bay Press-Gazette (WI) 56300
Indexed At: 02/16/2011 3:20AM
Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (9)
Abstract: ... "We didn't set this menu,U Ellis said. "The governor did." MADISON Wisconsin Gov. Scott
Wal,ker's plan to have the Legislature meet outside of the Capitol may not be legal ....
Jllb fair highlights recoverl£ effort ·.
. .
··•·.
. ...
. ·.
· ... · ...
. ·.
. .
Byline: Kyle Weaver
Source: Osceola Sun (WI) N/ A
Indexed At: 02/16/2011 2:59AM
Keywords: Job Center (3),workforce development (1)
Abstract: ... _workers organized by WorkForce Resources, Wisconsin's Department of Workforce
Development and the federal Trade Adjustment Act agency. '*It's going very well. n Polaris has
been ... .
.
Walker Visits McDonough Manufacturing; Protestors Rally: Outside · ...
.. ;
Source: WAXX-FM (WI) N/A
I
Indexed At: 02/15/2011 9:38PM
Keywords: Jobless (1)
146
-------------- '-- ----- ·--- . --- ------· ..... ··.
Abstract: ... his bill provides an alternative to being being jobless. He says it'd keep 5-6,000 people from
being laid off. Walker says worker rights ...
The changing face of American jobs ·. · .. ·.'·. ·, .•.. . ...... .
Source: Oshkosh Northwestern (WI) 21400
Indexed At: 02/15/2011 2:25PM
Keywords: Jobless (4)
·. · .. ·
.
.· · ...
Abstract: ... the vast middle.- After a mostly '*jobless" economic recovery, the nation eventually might
accept a basic level of unemployment much higher ...
Valle\fjob market improves. but still slow ..... ··.·•·· ... ··.
Source: Oshkosh Northwestern (WI) 21400
Indexed At: 02/15/2011 2:25PM
Keywords: Jobless (l),workforce development (2),Jeff Sachse (1)
.

Abstract: ... unemployment rates, according to the state Department of Workforce
Development:StatewldeBeloit: 13.4Racine: 13.4Kenosha: 11.3Wausau: 10.4Milwaukee:
10.3Janesville: 10.3Sheboygan: 10.1Mount Pleasant: lOWest Bend: 9.5Fox ValleyGreen Bay:
9.9Neenah: ...
! L _ ~ ~ ~ = = ~ - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~
f'e1NE!st requests for unemployment aid since :Zoos
Source: Oshkosh Northwestern (WI) 21400
i Indexed At: 02/15/2011 2:25 PM
Keywords: Unemployment Insurance OR unemployment benefits (1)
. . .. . .· ·.
..
Abstract: ... pm WASHINGTON The number of people applying for unemployment benefits plunged
last week to the loWest level ih nearly three years, continuing a-downward trend ...
1
City and countv workers could see smaller paychecks under Walker's budget
bill Video included · ·.·.. ····• · ·. . •. · ..· ·• • · .. ,.··•• · ·. .·.·
Source: WQOW-TV ABC 18 Eau Claire (WI) N/A
Indexed At: 02/15/201112:01 PM
' Keywords: Governor Scott Walker (9)
, Abstract: ... budget bill Eau Claire (WQOW) -According to Governor Scott Walker, as many as 1,500
i employees could lose their jobs In the next four months, if ...
Biz Be<it: Walker pl<m would hit private sector in pocketbook
Source: Madison Capital Times (WI) 19500
Indexed At: 02/15/2011 9:46AM
Keywords: workforce development (1)
·.·.
•••••
Abstract: ... based on data from the Wisconsin Department of_ Workforce Development. Using
traditional economic calculations
1
the report estimates aloss of some 600 million a year in ...
Congress. Administration Cuts to Career Technical Education Misguided,
Harmful. According to ACTE and NASDCTEq ·. · .. •.·.. . •-. .. ·< . ·
Source: Milwaukee Business Journal (WI) 10400 [Registration Required]
Indexed At: 02/15/2011 9:45AM
Keywords: technical education (?),career and technical education (4)
Abstract: ... Congress
1
Administration Cuts to Career Technical Education Misguided
1
Harmful,
According to ACTE and NASDCTEc ALEXANDRIA, Va., Feb. 15, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/
-Today, ...
... - --- " ---- .. .------- -- "" - ---- . -
147
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 8:18 PM
Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Huebsch, Mike - DOA; Schutt, Eric - GOV; Archer, Cynthia - DOA;
Jensen, Jodi - DOA
Hagedorn, Brian K- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Polzin, Cindy
M - GOV; Lied I, Kimberly- GOV; Culotta, Jason - DOA; Hurlburt, Waylon - GOV;
Matejov, Scott - GOV; Eberle, Ed - L TGOV
Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
Legislative Affairs Team
Legislative Contacts
• Talked with Representative Jacque who had questions with regard to how the BAB will affect local contracts that
have been recently signed
• Representative Kooyenga is trying to help Milwaukee Electric Tool create 80 jobs in Wisconsin. Currently working
with both Economic Development Team and Commerce to facilitate ·
• Representative Bies and Representative Steineke have both reached out to our office regarding BAB. May need
further attention
• Contacted supporters of SS AB 5- 2/3rds vote needed for tax increase- to inform them of postponement of bill
signing
SS AB/SB 11- BAB update
• The Joint Committee on Finance had a public hearing on SS AB/SB 11- BAB that will continue into the night. JFC
plans to vote on the bill tomorrow.
• Retirement system changes included in SS AB/SB 11 were ok'd by the Joint Survey Committee on Retirement
Systems
Economic Development and Regulatory Reform Team
Commerce
• Spoke to Dave Volz about contacting Milwaukee Electric Tool Corporation
DOT
o VP/CFO of company contacted Brookfield's Economic Development coordinator, who then contacted
Rep. Kooyenga
o Would like to speak to Commerce about state assistance that would aid in the expansion of jobs currently
in-and-out of the state
• Met with Scott Tyre, Mick Foti, and American Transit Solutions
o They would like to introduce a JFC amendment allowing cameras to be used at intersections and in
construction zones to fine speed violators
o This could be used to help supplement local governments' finances
o Would be a civil forfeiture; law enforcement would issue the citation, but a vendor would monitor for
offenses.
o They are talking to Sec. Gottlieb and Tom Howells at the Motor Carriers Assn about this; AAA and the
League of Municipalities support this.
• Discussed course of action to resolve the NHTSA Section 164 issue with Reggie Newson and DOT
attorney
o DOT has the following recommendations:
• Appeal to NHTSA and illustrate why WisDOT is in compliance with Section 164.
• Set up a conference call with NHTSA and FHWA to get guidance to how WisDOT could become
compliant with Section 164.
148
• Request congressional assistance to ask NHTSHA to reevaluate their interpretation of Wisconsin
state statue.
• DOT Recertification of 23 CFR Section 164 and,
• Short-term, continue to be non-compliant and administratively transfer highway dollars that have
been redirected to highway safety program. (Status quo)
o Until told otherwise, WisDOT will not be requesting administrative rule or statutory changes to
reconcile the difference in state vs. federal interpretation of Section 164 (reserves right to
introduce language sometime in future)
o Currently, nothing has been done with Section 164 sanction transferred funds (WisDOT cannot do
anything until official sanction notification letter is received from FHWA)
o Note: Feds have already moved $7.3M from the $15M allocated for highway programs into the safety
program fund, which is contradictory the process that the Fed's established, as a result of no official
ruling/decision on this issue has been made yet
• Budget Repair Bill - potential issue
o Dan Kannien, former Doyle legislative director and current White House policy staff, contacted Fiscal
Bureau
o Has opinion that it is illegal for the state to eliminate collective bargaining rights for county transit workers,
based on current federal code
o If illegal, could affect state's ability to receive federal transit dollars ($60-SOM)
• NGA Economic Development and Commerce Committee Conference Call
o Discussed President's new budget and highlights of surface transportation funding
DNR
• Spoke to Town of Hubbard Chairman in Rusk County about issue they are having with flood plain mapping done
by DNRand used by FEMA.
• They are hoping to resolve the issue before the risk of flooding is at spring-time high.
• Will work with DNR on possible resolution.
WHEDA
• Spoke with the Curt Witynski of the League of Municipalities on Director Winston's WHEDA TIF proposal.
• They have signed off on the concept and we will share the concept with interested legislators
Human Services and Education Team
Legislative Meeting
Met with Rep. Kapenga on K-12 issues:
* Repeal2009 Act 134 (funding Planned Parenthood/sex education)
* Wants teacher accountability and tenure reform
* Wants funding based on graduation rather than enrollment
Education Meetings
Met with DPI to discuss creation of a Wisconsin Student Information System (WSIS). DPI is very excited to he
moving forward with this project and would like to put as many pieces in place as possible before the budget passes. To
make that happen, we will have to consider the following issues, among others:
o How much time do we allow districts to get on board?
o How can we encourage DOA to move this process along?
o Many districts are currently signed with a Wisconsin vendor; will this cause backlash if a non-Wisconsin
vendor is ultimately selected for the statewide system?
Met with members of the Midwestern Higher Education Compact. They wondered why Wisconsin state agencies aren't
participating in the IT procurement consortium with the other 11 member states. They believe that it could provide a
significant cost savings to the state. Another option for potential cost savings is with property insurance benefits with
universities if their insurance wasn't pooled with the other state properties.
Justice and Local Governments Team
Legal Reform:
149
• Met with Andy Cook of the Wisconsin Civil Justice Council and Brian Hagedorn to taik about another legal reform
package. This would include loser pays, punitive damage changes, etc ...
Corrections:
• Met with Pete Christianson, Forbes Mcintosh, Mental Health Management and Secretary Hamblin regarding
contracting out mental health services at corrections to save cost. Secretary Hamblin and his staff are reviewing
the idea to determine if it is worth pursuing. MHM offered to consult at no cost to the state.
• Secretary Hamblin is planning on announcing the closure of Ethan Allen and SOGS on Tuesday of next week
because the staff will know when the budget language is released.
Military Affairs:
• Dept. of Military Affairs. Wisconsin National Guard always ready, always there
Local Government:
• Mayor Bauer from the City of Durand stopped by to talk about the budget adjustment. He supports it and feels
the teachers union has destroyed the Durand school. He also brought up an issue with WHEDA over the
approval of a loan guarantee to build a radio tower. I contacted Deputy Winston and McCoshen to check on it.
• Mayor Bauer would also like the Governor to be at Volk Field when his son returns from Iraq. I contacted General
Dunbar to see if he has the time they are to return so I can get it to Dorothy if it works on the Governor's
schedule.
• Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. GMC proposes downsizing for county government. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
(Editorial).
"Milwaukee County government would get downsized under a plan announced Monday by the Greater Milwaukee
Committee, with parks, transit and the airport spun off to two new special districts and unspecified human services turned
over to the state."
150
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
State Plans Anger Unions
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 7:16 PM
J- GOV
wall street journal article
Proposed Curbs on Bargaining Rights Threaten Membership, Labor Leaders Say
By KRIS MAHER And DOUG BELKIN
MADISON, Wis.-Union leaders say overhauls of rules for public- and private-sector unions being considered
in Wisconsin, Ohio and about 12 other states threaten to accelerate the decline in membership nationwide and
hurt organized labor's finances and political clout.
The moves prompted presidents of more than a dozen of the nation's biggest unions to meet on Monday and
pledge to spend more than $25 million to counter efforts to scale back bargaining rights that in many cases
would give employees the option of not belonging to a union or paying dues, according to a union official
familiar with the matter.
The proposals in Wisconsin and other states have "great ramifications" beyond the damage to union coffers and
membership, said Gerald McEntee, president of AFSCME, the nation's biggest public-sector union.
Unions have told the Obama administration that the state fights could affect the 2012 presidential election by
draining unions' political resources, especially in states like Wisconsin and Ohio. "I think it can put him in some
[political] danger," Mr. McEntee said of the president.
The states' moves come as sentiment toward public-sector unions sours, fueled by cuts in state services and a
sense that generous wages and benefits have contributed to the states' fiscal crisis. Voters are reluctant to accept
tax increases and would prefer to see government workers' benefits cut.
But some labor experts say the economic hardships facing .states are also providing an opportunity for governors
and lawmakers to weaken public-sector unions that have exerted growing political influence in recent years as
they made up a bigger share of organized labor. A much higher percentage of government workers are
unionized compared with the much larger private sector.
Union representation fell to 11.9% ofU.S. workers last year, nearly half the 20.1% level the early 1980sm and
Labor leaders fear that proposals in states like Wisconsin and Ohio could quickly erode union membership in
the public sector, now 36.2% of workers nationally.
In Wisconsin, lawmakers could vote as early as Thursday to take away most of the union's bargaining rights for
about 170,000 public-sector workers. The proposal from Republican Gov. Scott Walker would limit collective
bargaining for most state and local government employees to issues of wages, and exclude costly provisions
such as pensions and health care. It would also require government workers, who currently contribute little or
nothing to their pensions, to contribute 5.8% of their pay to pensions, and pay at least 12.6% of health care
premiums, up from an average of 6%.
151
Mr. Walker said in an interview Tuesday that eliminating most bargaining rights would give local governments
more flexibility to maintain jobs and services while finding ways to cut spending. "We're giving these people
the tools to balance budgets without laying people off," he said.
He said 5,500 state jobs and 5,000 local jobs would be saved under his plan, which would save $30 million in
the current budget and $300 million in the two-year budget that begins July I. Wisconsin faces a $137 million
shortfall in the current budget that ends June 30.
Labor experts say the labor movement is facing a historic challenge that could lead to a downward spiral of
nnion membership and political influence, particularly in key states such as Ohio and Wisconsin.
"It could cripple the Democratic Pmty in 2012," said Nelson Lichtenstein, director of the Center for the Study of
Work, Labor and Democracy at the University of California at Santa Barbara.
In Ohio, lawmakers are holding hearings this week to limit bargaining rights for about 400,000 public
employees nnder Republican Gov. John Kasich's plan.
More than a dozen other states are considering so-called right-to-work proposals that would give private-sector
workers the option of not belonging to a nnion or paying dues even if the nnion bargains with an employer on
their behalf. Virginia is already a right-to-work state, but there is an effort to put that provision in the state
constitution. In Michigan, an initiative has been filed that would eliminate state employee collective bargaining.
Roughly 5,000 union members from aronnd the state converged on Madison, Wisconsin's capital, on Tuesday,
carrying signs and chanting "Kill the Bill."
Ed Lawlor, a 52-year-old elementary-school teacher from Kenosha, grew red-faced with anger as he spoke
about what he called Gov. Walker's "power grab."
"If this goes through you're going to see this played out across the country. This needs to stop right here," he
said.
Republican state senator Pmn Galloway, who defeated a 20-year incumbent Democrat in November, said union
supporters protested outside her home on Snnday, shouting "Galloway, Vote Our Way." But she said she still
plarmed to vote for the governor's proposals.
"We were elected to help the taxpayer, and that is what we will accomplish by voting for this bill," she said.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
152
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 5:42 PM
To:
Subject:
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
Fw:
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 04:32 PM
To: Brickman, Michael- GOV; Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Sorry. All states have public sector union membership but I guess not necessarily collective bargaining rights. Info here:
http:/ /www.gao.gov /new .items/d02835.pdf
Twelve states do not have collective bargaining laws for public employees. They are Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas,
Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. In
addition, Texas prohibits collective bargaining for most groups of public employees. However, firefighters and police
may bargain in jurisdictions with approval from a majority of voters.
12 states have laws that provide bargaining rights to specific groups of workers (e.g. state workers, teachers, or
firefighters) but not to all state and local government workers.
These states are Georgia, Indiana, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma,
Tennessee, and Wyoming. Three of these states, Indiana, Kentucky and Missouri, extend collective bargaining rights to
cert.ain public employees through an executive order from the governor. Many public employees may be covered by
local laws, for example, in Maryland they do not have a comprehensive law covering all public employees. All state
employees are covered under state labor laws, but state statutes cover local employees only in certain counties. Local
governments in Maryland may have their own ordinances giving local public employees collective bargaining rights, but
these ordinances do not exist in every county.
Michael Brickman
Education policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 20114:22 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
153
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
I believe all states allow collective bargaining for public workers in some form. Some good info in this report from CATO:
http://www.cato.org/pubs/tbb/tbb_61.pdf
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:54 PM
To: Brickman, Michael- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Re:
Michael- please look at it for all public employees.
-----Original Message -----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:53:31 2011
Subject: RE:
Here it is for teachers: http:/ /mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx?id=173
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Brickman, Michael- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
154
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:41 2011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
155
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Thanks
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 5:22 PM
Brickman, Michael - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Re:
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 04:32 PM
To: Brickman, Michael- GOV; Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Sorry. All states have public sector union membership but I guess not necessarily collective bargaining rights. Info here:
http:/ /www.gao.gov /new.items/d02835.pdf
Twelve states do not have collective bargaining laws for public employees. They are Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas,
Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. In
addition, Texas prohibits collective bargaining for most groups of public employees. However, firefighters and police
may bargain in jurisdictions with approval from a majority of voters.
12 states have laws that provide bargaining rights to specific groups of workers (e.g. state workers, teachers, or
firefighters) but not to all state and local government workers.
These states are Georgia, Indiana, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma,
Tennessee, and Wyoming. Three of these states, Indiana, Kentucky and Missouri, extend collective bargaining rights to
certain public employees through an executive order from the governor. Many public employees may be covered by
local laws, for example, in Maryland they do not have a comprehensive law covering all public employees. All state
employees are covered under state labor laws, but state statutes cover local employees only in certain counties. Local
governments in Maryland may have their own ordinances giving local public employees collective bargaining rights, but
these ordinances do not exist in every county.
Michael Brickman
Education Pqlicy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 4:22 PM
!56
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: RE:
I believe all states allow collective bargaining for public workers in some form. Some good info in this report from CATO:
http://www .cato.org/pu bs/tbb/tbb_ 61.pdf
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
· Office ofGovernor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:54 PM
To: Brickman, Michael- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Re:
Michael- please look at it for all public employees.
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:53:31 2011
Subject: RE:
Here it is for teachers: http:/ /mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx?id=173
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Brickman, Michael- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
157
Subject: Re:
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message -----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:41 2011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
158
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Brickman, Michael - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 20114:32 PM
Brickman, Michael - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Schutt, Eric -
GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
RE:
Sorry. All states have public sector union membership but I guess not necessarily collective bargaining rights. Info here:
http:/ /www.gao.gov /new.items/d02835.pdf
Twelve states do not have collective bargaining Jaws for public employees. They are Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas,
Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. In
addition, Texas prohibits collective bargaining for most groups of public employees. However, firefighters and police
may bargain in jurisdictions with approval from a majority of voters.
12 states have laws that provide bargaining rights to specific groups of workers (e.g. state workers, teachers, or
firefighters) but not to all state and local government workers.
These states are Georgia, Indiana, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma,
Tennessee, and Wyoming. Three of these states, Indiana, Kentucky and Missouri, extend collective bargaining rights to
certain public employees through an executive order from the governor. Many public employees may be covered by
local laws, for example, in Maryland they do not have a comprehensive Jaw covering all public employees. All state
employees are covered under state labor Jaws, but state statutes cover local employees only in certain counties. Local
governments in Maryland may have their own ordinances giving local public employees collective bargaining rights, but
these ordinances do not exist in every county.
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 20114:22 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: RE:
I believe all states allow collective bargaining for public workers in some form. Some good info in this report from CATO:
http:/ /www.cato.org/pubs/tbb/tbb _ 61.pdf
Michael BriCkman
159
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 20113:54 PM
To: Brickman, Michael- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Michael- please look at it for all public employees.
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael - GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:53:31 2011
Subject: RE:
Here it is for teachers: http:/ /mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx?id=173
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From; Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Brickman, Michael- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
160
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:41 2011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
161
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Doesn't that report say 12 don't?
----'Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 4:25 PM
Brickman, Michael - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Re:
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 04:22 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
I believe all states allow collective bargaining for public workers in some form. Some good info in this report from CATO:
http:/ /www.cato.org/pubs/tbb/tbb_ 61.pdf
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:54 PM
To: Brickman, Michael- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Re:
Michael- please look at it for all public employees.
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael - GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:53:31 2011
Subject: RE:
Here it is for teachers: http://mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx?id=173
162
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Brickman, Michael- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:41 2011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
163
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Brickman, Michael - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 4:22 PM
Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
RE:
I believe all states allow collective bargaining for public workers in some form. Some good info in this report from CATO:
http:/ /www.cato.org/pubs/tbb/tbb _61.pdf
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Michaei.Brickman@wisconsin.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:54PM
To: Brickman, Michael- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Michael- please look at it for all public employees.
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:53:31 2011
Subject: RE:
Here it is for teachers: http:/ /mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx?id=173
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
164
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Brickman, Michael- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:41 2011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
165
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:57 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE:
Will do. I'm going to tell them that it's not unprecedented to give exclusives, and. then throw it back in Patrick's face that
he wanted to spend a week with the Guv, as an exclusive.
You always like it when you're the one getting the exclusive, and you don't like it when you aren't.
We're over it
1
we've moved on.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:55 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Re:
Try and keep it short let them know that we're moving on and hope they do too.
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:52 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
We provide information to news organizations we feel will give us a fair shake. The decisions was made on that bill we
were going to give it to ·state Journal and AP, I just executed the plan.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
166
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:51 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you know what you're going to say
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: Re:
The fact we never got back to them on it
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To:Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:46:25 2011
Subject: Re:
What about it
-----Original Message -----
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 201103:45 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
Marley and Lee Berquist are coming into the office this afternoon to talk about the wetlands bill signing.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
167
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:55 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Try and keep it short let them know that we're moving on and hope they do too.
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:52PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
We provide information to news organizations we feel will give us a fair shake. The decisions was made on that bill we
were. going to give it to State Journal and AP, I just executed the plan.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press
Email
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:51 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you know what you're going to say
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:48PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: Re:
The fact we never got back to them on it
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:46:25 2011
Subject: Re:
168
What about it
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:45PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
Marley and Lee Berquist are coming into the office this afternoon to talk about the wetlands bill signing.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email:
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
169
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:54 PM
To:
Cc:
Brickman, Michael - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Michael- please look at it for all public employees.
-----Original Message-----
From: Brickman, Michael- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:53:31 2011
Subject: RE: ·
Here it is for teachers: http://mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx?id=173
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Brickman, Michael- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:41 2011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
170
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Brickman, Michael - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:54 PM
Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
RE:
Here it is for teachers: http://mb2.ecs.org/reports/Report.aspx?id=173
Michael Brickman
Education Policy Assistant
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Brickman, Michael- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie;cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:41 2011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
171
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:53 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE:
We provide information to news organizations we feel will give us a fair shake. The decisions was made on that bill we
were going to give it to State Journal and AP, I just executed the plan.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen.Werwie@WI.Gov
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:51 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you know what you're going to say
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:48PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: Re: ·
The fact we never got back to them on it
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:46:25 2011
Subject: Re:
What about it
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:45 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
172
Marley and Lee Berquist are coming into the office this afternoon to talk about the wetlands bill signing.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen.Werwie@WI.Gov
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
173
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:51 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Do you know what you're going to say
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:48PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: Re:
The fact we never got back to them on it
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:46:25 2011
Subject: Re:
What about it
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:45 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
Marley and Lee Berquist are coming into the office this afternoon to talk about the wetlands bill signing.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press OffiCe: {608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen.Werwie@WI.Gov
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
1
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:49 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Re:
The fact we never got back to them on it
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:46:25 2011
Subject: Re:
What about it
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:45PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
Marley and Lee Berquist are coming into the office this afternoon to talk about the wetlands bill signing.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen.Werwie@WI.Gov
www.walker.wi.gov
-"---Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
2
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Do you have this Michael?
-----Original Message -----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:48 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV; Brickman, Michael - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Re:
To:. Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tue Feb 15 15:44:412011
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
3
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:46 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
What about it
-----Original Message-----
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Re:
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 03:45 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE:
Marley and Lee Berquist are coming into the office this afternoon to talk about the wetlands bill signing.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen.Werwie@WI.Gov
www.walker.wi.gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
4
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: . Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE:
Marley and Lee Berquist are coming into the office this afternoon to talk about the wetlands bill signing.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen.Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi .gov
-----Original Message-----
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
5
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 3:45 PM
Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Can we get an official count of states that don't have collective bargaining for the public sector
6
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:55 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
FW: Reference material
There is going to be a great story out of WBAY tonight. #1 rated news org in GB.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Byrne, Kristin
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:52 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE: Reference material
IT DOES!II THANK YOU!
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:51 PM
To: Byrne, Kristin
Subject: RE: Reference material
Certainly. Lay man terms:
Wisconsin's Civil Service System provides a fair way for hiring, retaining and promoting employees based on objective
assessments of their qualification and ability to work. Civil service laws include things like sick leave, vacation time,
ensuring hiring is based on merit and experience, contains a process that employees can file grievances against their
employers, and states that employees can only 'be fired for just cause.
One thing to think of is that there are the all sorts of state employees that are currently not unionized (take me for
example, I am unrepresented), yet I get sick leave, vacation time, and have basic worker rights under Wisconsin law
(totally separate from collective bargaining), all of those are provided to me under the Civil Service System.
Hope that makes sense.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
17
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Byrne, Kristin [mcliltc>:t
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE: Reference material
Thanks cullen I Hey I have another question for you. What exactly is civil service system? Or the civil service protection
walker keeps talking about and says public employees have a lot of protection under? In layman's terms, what is it?
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 20111:43 PM
To: Byrne, Kristin
Subject: Reference material
"State workers and other public workers aren't about to sacrifice their benefits for some political future of a tyrant," said
Marty Beil, executive director of AFSCME, the largest state employee union. "This is all about Scott Walker kind of
bringing back, instead of public service, it is public servitude. He's the master of the plantation and we're supposed to be
his slaves; that's his philosophy here. So I think he'd be real happy if we were paid minimum wage and had no pension at
all.u
http://www. channel3 000 .com/politics/26049415/ detail.html
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi. qov
18
Downing, Karley - GOV
,From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:19 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
Can you confirm with the Gov that he's good to go on the Jason Lewis show call-in, and he'll meet me tonight at WISC?
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608}267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:19PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: from the New York Times
Great.
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 02:18PM
To:. Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
It's set for tomorrow at 11:00am. They're bring a photog.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV .
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 20111:12 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: from the New York Times
Gov is good with giving her a few minutes
19
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 201111:14 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
Thoughts?
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www:wa/ker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica [mailto
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 201111:11 AM
. To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: from the New York Times
Cullen:
I just wanted to let you all know that I am going to be coming to Madison tonight to do more reporting there on Wednesday
about.Gov. Walker's proposal and how it is being received. We are planning a follow-up piece, particularly given that there
are likely to be similar proposals (albeit in a range of shades) in states around the country in the coming months.
I wondered if there is any chance I might come and meet the governor (we have talked repeatedly when he was a
candidate, but never got to meet face to face) and get a few minutes with him?
I could be available at any time.
Thanks for any assistance.
Best,
Monica
Monica Davey
The New York Times
Chicago Bureau Chief
111. E. Wacker Drive; Suite 2912
r.hi'"""'n Illinois 60601
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Sunday, February 13, 2011 8:36AM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE: Re:
Got it-I'm going to add you to our national media list. From time to time (not too often) we send an email to national
contacts regarding stuff we think would garner national media attention.
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
20
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Monica Davey rm:,ilt,,j
Sent: Sunday, February 13, 2011 8:35
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Cullen,
I appreciate your note. Thanks for your help on Friday and I look forward to working together again. Don't ever
hesitate to email or call if there's something you think national readers may be interested in.
Best,
Monica
From: "Werwie, Cullen J- GOV" <Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov>
Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 08:15:15 -0600
To: Davey, Mcmh:a1
Subject: RE:
Monica-
I just wanted to say I thought your story was fair.
If you need anything in the future email is probably the easiest way to get a hold of me. But just so you have all my
contact info, in addition to the phone number in my signature line {which rings to our entire comms shop), my direct line
is
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica [mailto
Sent: Friday, February 11, 201
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
quick question in follow up ....
-a in?
(i'm getting a weird voice mail-- not yours-- on your phone)
21
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:57PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Governor Walker campaigned 18 months on providing local governments with the tools necessary to control their own
budgets. Today he is following through on what he had been discussing over the last two years, on the campaign trail,
while in transition, and throughout the first month of being in office.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica rm;•iltr'''
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Hmm, I think we may be misunderstanding one another.
I mean just the plan to make some cuts to bargaining and to benefits-- was that developed by Governor Walker internally.
Or were outside groups involved?
· From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:41 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Neither. These are not some new big plans that were produced in response to anything.
Governor Walker simply reviewed the state's emergency management plans that have been in place for years and
worked with officials to update them as he came into office.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica fm;,iltc>:d
Sent: Friday, February 11,
22
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
One followup from my editor: If you know, was this plan developed internally by the Governor's staff there or was there
outside help from leaders elsewhere-- i.e. National Chamber of Commerce or something else? -
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:00 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: FW:
Monica-
I understand you got to talk to my boss.
Just wanted to make sure that happened.
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi. gov
From: Davey, Monica
Sent: Friday, February 11, 20111:00
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Perfect -- I appreciate it very much.
Even if the governor can't speak to me, I need to run through a couple items on the press release to make sure I
understand them.
Might you or someone else be willing to do that?
Best,
Monica
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 201112:57 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Monica-
Below is the email that was sent, I'm trying to see if I can work out to have the Governor call you this afternoon. If he
can't I'll give you a ring.
Thanks,
23
GOVERNORSCOTTVVALKER
STATE OF VVISCONSIN
Thank you for your service to your state and your fellow citizens. I know that you have worked hard during this
economic downturn to ensure that our citizens continue to receive great service, despite our state having fewer
and fewer resources. I, like all Wisconsinites, am grateful for your professionalism and commitment to public
service.
Like almost every state across the nation, our state faces some very serious and undeniable financial
challenges. Over the last three months, I have worked diligently to review the status of our state finances and to
put forward a plan that balances our budget now and will create stability in future budgets.
Many of you are aware of the immediate challenges facing our state. In the current fiscal year which ends on
June 30, 2011, we face a budget deficit of $136.7 million. We also owe more than $200 million to the Injured
Patients and Families Compensation Fund. Failure to immediately address this shortfall could result in the state
being unable to pay for health services to thousands of children and families in Wisconsin's BadgerCare
program.
Looking to the future, our challenges are even greater. Over the next two years, the State of Wisconsin faces a
biennial budget deficit of$3.6 billion.
While some of these financial challenges may be attributed to the slowing of our economy, the reality is that
these problems were exacerbated by poor budgeting decisions approved and promoted by past elected leaders,
Republicans and Democrats alike. By relying on the use of one-time money, segregated fund raids, and
increases in taxes and fees, past leaders have focused on short term solutions without looking toward the future.
While these decisions may have appeared to be the easiest solution, or the path of least resistance, the bills for
these decisions have come due and the path to long term financial solvency for our state requires shared
sacrifices from everyone.
Today, I am introducing a Budget Repair Bill to address our current fiscal year deficit of$136.7 million. Later
this month, I will introduce my 2011-2013 Biennial Budget proposal to address the pending $3.6 billion deficit.
The Budget Repair Bill will include a number of reform measures focused on bringing government employee
benefits closer to the private sector, including: ·
• Pension Contributions- Currently, state, school district and municipal employees who are members of the
Wisconsin Retirement System contribute very little toward their pensions. The bill requires that WRS
employees; including myself and my cabinet officers, as well as employees of the City and County of
Milwaukee, contribute 50 percent of their monthly pension contributions. This amount is estimated to be
5.8 percent of salary for 2011, which is about the national average for private sector employees.
• Health Insurance Contributions- Currently, state employees pay approximately 6 percent of annual health
insurance premiums. This bill requires that state employees, again including myself and my cabinet officers,
pay at least 12 percent of monthly premiums, which is still less than half of what the private sector pays. In
addition, the bill directs the Group Insurance Board to implement changes to health insurance plan designs
to further reduce premiums by 5 percent and will implement health risk assessments for all state employees
beginning on January 1, 2012. Local employers participating .in the Public Employers Group Health
insurance program operated by the state will be prohibited from paying more than 8 8 percent of the lowest
cost plan.
24
• Collective Bargaining- Given the above changes, the bill also makes various changes to limit collective
bargaining to the base pay rate. Total increases cannot exceed the Consumer Price Index (CPI) unless
approved by a referendum. Contracts will be limited to one year and wages will be frozen until the new
contTact is settled. Collective bargaining units will have to take annual votes to maintain certification as a
union. Employers will be prohibited from collecting union dues and members of collective bargaining units
will not be required to pay dues. These changes take effect upon the expiration of existing contracts. Local
police and fire employees and State Patrol Troopers and Inspectors are exempted from these changes.
Collectively, these changes will result in savings of approximately $30 million in the remaining few months of
the current fiscal year.
In the days ahead, some may attempt to misrepresent these reform measures, spreading inaccurate or misleading
information. To ensure that you know the facts, I would like to proactively address these issues.
Furloughs - Over the last several years, state employees have been required to take furloughs resulting in an
across the board pay cut of approximately 3 percent. The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-2013 Biennial
Budget proposal will not include additional furlough days for state employees.
Layoffs- Without the pension and health care reforms described above, saving $30 million over the last three
months of the current fiscal year would require laying-offmore than 1,500 state govermnent employees. By
implementing these reforms, the provisions contained in both my Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-13 Biennial
Budget proposal are focused on avoiding layoffs for state employees. ·
Wisconsin's Civil Service System -The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-2013 Biennial Budget proposal will
not include any provisions to alter or modify the main tenets of Wisconsin's Civil Service System, one of the
strongest in the nation. The grievance and dispute resolution systems cutTently in place, as well as all employee
protections, will remain.
Vacation and Sick Leave Policy- Recent news stories have suggested that I am considering altering the state's
vacation or sick leave policy. The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-13 Biennial Budget proposal will not
include any provisions to alter or modify state employees' vacation or sick leave policy. In addition, benefits
currently accrued by any state employees will not be altered in any way.
Last week in my State of the State Address, I shared my belief that govermnent employees are among some of
the most honest, hard working, dedicated, professional workers in this state. I sincerely believe that.
We all recognize that these are historic times that require us to rethink how govermnent operates. I ask that we
continue to work together to do what is necessary to bring the state's spending in line with our taxpayers' ability
to pay.
Wisconsin's state employees are second to none in our nation. Our citizens expect great service, and you have
delivered. I know you will continue to deliver top-notch programs for Wisconsin's taxpayers. Thank you again
for your service to our state.
Sincerely,
Governor Scott Walker
25
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 12:
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
Cullen:
I'm trying to reach you for a story for tomorrow paper regarding this budget cut plan.
I just want to clarify a few things from the release.
Also, wondering: may I have a copy of the email to state workers.
And is there audio or video of the governor's presser this morning?
Or, better yet, might the governor be willing to talk for five minutes to me on the broad issue-- his thinking about why
these benefit cuts must be made to unions now?
Can you give me a call?
Thanks.
Best,
Monica
Monica Davey
The New York Times
Chicago Bureau Chief
111 E. Wacker Drive; Suite 2912
Chicago, Illinois 60601
26
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:20 PM
Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Re: from the New York Times
He said okay to both those
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 02:19PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
Can you confirm with the Gov that he's good to go on the Jason Lewis show call-in, and he'll meet me tonight ?t WISC?
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@ WI. Gov
www. walker. wl. qov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:19 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: from the New York Times
Great.
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 02:18 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
it's set for tomorrow at ll:OOam. They're bring a photog.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi.qov
27
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 20111:12 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: from the New York Times
Gov is good with giving her a few minutes
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 201111:14 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
Thoughts?
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Davey, Monica [mailto=---
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2 ~
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: from the New York Times
Cullen:
I just wanted to let you all know that I am going to be coming to Madison tonight to do more reporting there on Wednesday
about Gov. Walker's proposal and how it is being received. We are planning a follow-up piece, particularly given that there
are likely to be similar proposals (albeit in a range of shades) in states around the country in the coming months.
I wondered if there is any chance I might come and meet the governor (we have talked repeatedly when he was a
candidate, but never got to meet face to. face) and get a few minutes with him?
I could be available at any time.
Thanks for any assistance.
Best,
Monica
Monica Davey
The New York Times
Chicago Bureau Chief
111 E. Wacker Drive; Suite 2912
Chicaao. Illinois 1
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Sunday, February 13, 2011 8:36 AM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE: Re:
28
Got it-l'm going to add you to our national media .list. From time to time (not too often) we send an email to national
contacts regarding stuff we think would garner national media attention.
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Monica Davey [mailto.
Sent: Sunday, February 13, 20
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Cullen,
I appreciate your note. Thanks for your help on Friday and I look forward to working together again. Don't ever
hesitate to email or call if there's something you think national readers may be interested in.
Best,
Monica
From: "Werwie, Cullen J- GOV" <Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov>
Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 08:15:15 -0600
To: Davey,
Subject: RE:
Monica-
I just wanted to say I thought your story was fair.
If you need anything in the future email is probably the easiest way to get a hold of me. But just so you have all my
in addition to the phone number in my signature line (which rings to our entire comms shop), my direct line
is
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica [mailto:__,
Sent: Friday, February 11,
29
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
quick question in follow up ....
may i call you again?
voice mail -- not yours-- on your phone)
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:57 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Governor Walker campaigned 18 months on providing local governments with the tools necessary to control their own
budgets. Today he is following through on what he had been discussing over the last two years, on the campaign trail,
while in transition, and throughout the first month of being in office.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Davey, Monica
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Hmm, I think we may be misunderstanding one another.
I mean just the plan to make some cuts to bargaining and to benefits-- was that developed by Governor Walker internally.
Or were outside groups involved? ·
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:41 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Neither. These are not some new big plans that were produced in response to anything.
Governor Walker simply reviewed the state's emergency management plans that have been in place for years and
worked with officials to update them as he came into office.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
· Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
30
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Davey, Monica
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
One followup from my editor: If you know, was this plan developed internally by the Governor's staff there or was there
outside help from leaders elsewhere-- i.e. National Chamber of Commerce or something else?
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:00 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: FW:
·Monica-
I understand you got to talk to my boss.
Just wanted to make sure that happened.
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Davey, Monica [mailto:--
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Perfect-- I appreciate it very much.
Even if the governor can't speak to me, I need to run through a couple items on the press release to make sure I
understand them.
Might you or someone else be willing to do that?
Best,
Monica
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 12:57 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Monica-
31
Below is the email that was sent, I'm trying to see if I can work out to have the Governor call you this afternoon. If he
can't I'll give you a ring.
Thanks,
GOVERNORSCOTTVVALKER
STATE OF VVISCONSIN
Thank you for your service to your state and your fellow citizens. I know that you have worked hard during this
economic downturn to ensure that our citizens continue to receive great service, despite our state having fewer
and fewer resources. I, like all Wisconsinites, am grateful for your professionalism and commitment to public
service.
Like almost every state across the nation, our state faces some very serious and undeniable financial
challenges. Over the last three months, I have worked diligently to review the status of our state finances and to
put forward a plan that balances our budget now and will create stability in future budgets.
Many of you are aware of the immediate challenges facing our state. In the current fiscal year which ends on
June 30, 2011, we face a budget deficit of$136.7 million. We also owe more than $200 million to the Injured
Patients and Families Compensation Fund. Failure to immediately address this shortfall could result in the state
being unable to pay for health services to thousands of children and families in Wisconsin's BadgerCare
program.
Looking to the future, our challenges are even greater. Over the next two years, the State of Wisconsin faces a
biennial budget deficit of $3.6 billion.
While some of these financial challenges may be attributed to the slowing of our economy, the reality is that
these problems were exacerbated by poor budgeting decisions approved and promoted by past elected leaders,
Republicans and Democrats alike. By relying on the use of one-time money, segregated fund raids, and
increases in taxes and fees, past leaders have focused on short tetm solutions without looking toward the future.
While these decisions may have appeared to be the easiest solution, or the path of least resistance, the bills for
these decisions have come due and the path to long term financial solvency for our state requires shared
sacrifices from everyone.
Today, I am introducing a Budget Repair Bill to address our current fiscal year deficit of$136.7 million. Later
this month, I will introduce my 2011-2013 Biennial Budget proposal to address the pending $3.6 billion deficit.
The Budget Repair Bill will include a number of reform measures focused on bringing government employee
benefits closer to the private sector, including:
• Pension Contributions- Currently, state, school district and municipal employees who are members of the
Wisconsin Retirement System contribute very little toward their pensions. The bill requires that WRS
employees, including myself and my cabinet officers, as well as employees of the City and County of
Milwaukee, contribute 50 percent of their monthly pension contributions. This amount is estimated to be
5.8 percent of salary for 2011, which is about the national average for private sector employees.
• Health Insurance Contributions- Cunently, state employees pay approximately 6 percent of atmual health
Insurance premiums. This bill requires that state employees, again including myself and my cabinet officers,
32
pay at least 12 percent of monthly premiums, which is still less than half of what the private sector pays. In
addition, the bill directs the Group Insurance Board to implement changes to health insurance plan designs
to further reduce premiums by 5 percent and will implement health risk assessments for all state employees
beginning on January I, 2012. Local employers participating in the Public Employers Group Health
insurance program operated by the state will be prohibited from paying more than 88 percent of the lowest
cost plan. ·
• Collective Bargaining- Given the above changes, the bill also makes various changes to limit collective
bargaining to the base pay rate. Total increases cannot exceed the Consumer Price Index (CPI) unless
approved by a referendum. Contracts will be limited to one year and wages will be frozen nntil the new
contract is settled. Collective bargaining units will have to take annual votes to maintain certification as a
union. Employers will be prohibited from collecting union dues and members of collective bargaining units
will not be required to pay dues. These changes take effect upon the expiration of existing contracts. Local
police and fire employees and State Patrol Troopers and Inspectors are exempted from these changes.
Collectively, these changes will result in savings of approximately $30 million in the remaining few months of
the current fiscal year.
In the days ahead, some may attempt to misrepresent these reform measures, spreading inaccurate or misleading
information. To ensure that you know the facts, I would like to proactively address these issues.
Furloughs - Over the last several years, state employees have been required to take furloughs resulting in an
across the board pay cut of approximately 3 percent. The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-2013 Biennial
Budget proposal will not include additional furlough days for state employees.
Layoffs- Without the pension and health care reforms described above, saving $30 million over the last three
months of the current fiscal year would require laying-offmore than 1,500 state government employees. By
implementing these reforms, the provisions contained in both my Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-13 Biennial
Budget proposal are focused on avoiding layoffs for state employees.
Wisconsin's Civil Service System-The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-2013 Biennial Budget proposal will
not include any provisions to alter or modify the main tenets of Wisconsin's Civil Service System, one of the
strongest in the nation. The grievance and dispute resolution systems currently in place, as well as all employee
protections, will remain.
Vacation and Sick Leave Policy- Recent news stories have suggested that I am considering altering the state's
vacation or sick leave policy. The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-13 Biennial Budget proposal will not
include any provisions to alter or modify state employees' vacation or sick leave policy. In addition, benefits
currently accrued by any state employees will not be altered in any way.
Last week in my State of the State Address, I shared my belief that government employees are among some of
the most honest, hard working, dedicated, professional workers in this state. I sincerely believe that.
We all recognize that these are historic times that require us to rethink how government operates. I ask that we
continue to work together to do what is necessary to bring the state's spending in line with our taxpayers' ability
to pay.
Wisconsin's state employees are second to none in our nation. Our citizens expect great service, and you have
delivered. I know you will continue to deliver top-notch programs for Wisconsin's taxpayers. Thank you again
for your service to our state.
33
Sincerely,
Governor Scott Walker
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Davey, Monica rm;•ilt,,.
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cu.llen J - GOV
Subject:
Cullen:
I'm trying to reach you for a story for tomorrow paper regarding this budget cut plan.
I just want to clarify a few things from the release.
Also, wondering: may I have a copy of the email to state workers.
And is there audio or video of the governor's presser this morning?
Or, better yet, might the governor be willing to talk for five minutes to me on the broad issue -- his thinking about why
these benefit cuts must be made to unions now?
Can you give me a call?
Thanks.
Best,
Monica
Monica Davey
The New York Times
Chicago Bureau Chief
111 E. Wacker Drive; Suite 2912
' - ' " ' ~ " · u u . Illinois 60601
34
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 2:19 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: from the New York Times
Great.
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 02:18 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
It's set for tomorrow at 11:00am. They're bring a photog.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 1:12PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: from the New York Times
Gov is good with giving her a few minutes
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 201111:14 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: from the New York Times
Thoughts?
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi.qov
35
From: Davey, Monica [m;3ilt<J:I!II
Sent: Tuesday, February 15,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: from the New York Times
Cullen:
I just wanted to let you all know that I am going to be coming to Madison tonight to do more reporting there on Wednesday
about Gov. Walker's proposal and how it is being received. We are planning a follow-up piece, particularly given that there
are likely to be similar proposals (albeit in a range of shades) in states around the country in the coming months.
I wondered if there is any chance I might come and meet the governor (we have talked repeatedly when he was a
candidate, but never got to meet face to face) and get a few minutes with him?
I could be available at any time.
Thanks for any assistance.
Best,
Monica
Monica Davey
The New York Times
Chicago Bureau Chief
111 E. Wacker Drive; Suite 2912
Chicago, Illinois 60601
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Sunday, February 13, 2011 8:36 AM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE: Re:
Got it-l'm going to add you to our national media list. From time to time (not too often) we send an email to national
contacts regarding stuff we think would garner national media attention.
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
From: Monica Davey ~ ~ ~ b ~ ~ i i i i l
Sent: Sunday, February 13,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re:
Cullen,
I appreciate your note. Thanks for your help on Friday and I look forward to working together again. Don't ever
hesitate to email or call if there's something you think national readers may be interested in.
36
Best,
Monica
From: "Werwie, Cullen J- GOY" <Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov>
Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 08:15:15 -0600
To: Davey,
Subject: RE:
Monica-
I just wanted to say I thought your story was fair.
If you need anything in the future email is probably the easiest way to get a hold of me. But just so you have all my
contact info, in addition to the phone number in my signature line (which rings to our entire comms shop), my direct line
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Davey, Monica [mailto:--
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
quick question in follow up ....
may i call you again?
(i'm getting a weird voice mail -- not yours -- on your phone)
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:57 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Governor Walker campaigned 18 months on providing local governments with the tools necessary to control their own
budgets. Today he is following through on what he had been discussing over the last two years, on the campaign trail,
while in transition, and throughout the first month of being in office.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
37
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica [mailto:--
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Hmm, I think we may be misunderstanding one another.
I mean just the plan to make some cuts to bargaining and to benefits-- was that developed by Governor Walker internally.
Or were outside groups involved?
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:41PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Neither. These are not some new big plans that were produced in response to anything.
Governor Walker simply reviewed the state's emergency management plans that have been in place for years and
worked with officials to update them as he came into office.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
One followup from my editor: If you know, was this plan developed internally by the Governor's staff there or was there
outside help from leaders elsewhere-- i.e. National Chamber of Commerce or something else?
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 2:00 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: FW:
Monica-
I understand you got to talk to my boss.
Just wanted to make sure that happened.
38
Thanks,
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office af Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@W/.Gov
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, ·Monica [mi3illto:•
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE:
Perfect-- I appreciate it very much.
Even if the governor can't speak to me, I need tb run through a couple items on the press release to make sure I
understand them.
Might you or someone else be willing to do that?
Best,
Monica
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV [mailto:Cullen.Werwie@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 201112:57 PM
To: Davey, Monica
Subject: RE:
Monica-
Below is the email that was sent, I'm trying to see if I can work out to have the Governor call you this afternoon. If he
can't I'll give you a ring.
Thanks,
GOVERNOR SCOTT WALKER
STATE OF WISCONSIN
Thank you for your service to your state and your fellow citizens. I know that you have worked hard during this
economic downturn to ensure that our citizens continue to receive great service, despite our state having fewer
and fewer resources. I, like all Wisconsinites, am grateful for your professionalism and commitment to public
serv1ce.
Like almost every state across the nation, our state faces some very serious and undeniable financial
challenges. Over the last three months, I have worked diligently to review the status of our state finances and to
put forward a plan that balances our budget now and will create stability in future budgets.
Many of you are aware of the immediate challenges facing our state. In the current fiscal year which ends on
June 30,2011, we face a budget deficit of$136.7 million. We also owe more than $200 million to the Injured
Patients and Families Compensation Fund. Failure to immediately address this shortfall could result in the state
39
being unable to pay for health services to thousands of children and families in Wisconsin's BadgerCare
program.
Looking to the future, our challenges are even greater. .Over the next two years, the State of Wisconsin faces a
biennial budget deficit of $3.6 billion.
While some of these financial challenges may be attributed to the slowing of our economy, the reality is that
these problems were exacerbated by poor budgeting decisions approved and promoted by past elected leaders,
Republicans and Democrats alike. By relying on the use of one-time money, segregated fund raids, and
increases in taxes and fees, past leaders have focused on short term solutions without looking toward the future.
While these decisions may have appeared to be the easiest solution, or the path of least resistance, the bills for
these decisions have come due and the path to long term financial solvency for our state requires shared
sacrifices from everyone.
Today, I am introducing a Budget Repair Bill to address our current fiscal year deficit of $136.7 million. Later
this month, I will introduce my 2011-2013 Biennial Budget proposal to address the pending $3.6 billion deficit.
The Budget Repair Bill will include a number of reform measures focused on bringing government employee
benefits closer to the private sector, including:
• Pension Contributions- Currently, state, school district and municipal employees who are members of the
Wisconsin Retirement System contribute very little toward their pensions. The bill requires that WRS
employees, including myself and my cabinet officers, as well as employees of the City and County of
Milwaukee, contribute 50 percent of their monthly pension contributions. This amount is estimated to be
5.8 percent of salary for 2011, which is about the national average for private sector employees.
• Health Insurance Contributions- Currently, state employees pay approximately 6 percent of annual health
insurance premiums. This bill requires that state employees, again including myself and my cabinet officers,
pay at least 12 percent of monthly premiums, which is still less than half of what the private sector pays. In
addition, the bill directs the Group Insurance Board to implement changes to health insurance plan designs
to further reduce premiums by 5 percent and will implement health risk assessments for all state employees
beginning on January 1, 2012. Local employers participating in the Public Employers Group Health
insurance program operated by the state will be prohibited from paying more than 88 percent of the lowest
cost plan.
• Collective Bargaining- Given the above changes, the bill also makes various changes to limit collective
bargaining to the base pay rate. Total increases cannot exceed the Consumer Price Index (CPI) unless
approved by a referendum. Contracts will be limited to one year and wages will be frozen until the new
contract is settled. Collective bargaining units will have to take annual votes to maintain certification as a
union. Employers will be prohibited from collecting union dues and members of collective bargaining units
will not be required to pay dues. These changes take effect upon the expiration of existing contracts. Local
police and fire employees and State Patrol Troopers and Inspectors are exempted from these changes.
Collectively, these changes will result in savings of approximately $30 million in the remaining few months of
the current fiscal year.
In the days ahead, some may attempt to misrepresent these reform measures, spreading inaccurate or misleading
information. To ensure that you know the facts, I would like to proactively address these issues.
40
Furloughs - Over the last several years, state employees have been required to take furloughs resulting in an
across the board pay cut of approximately 3 percent. The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-2013 Biennial
Budget proposal will not include additional furlough days for state employees.
Layoffs- Without the pension and health care ref01ms described above, saving $30 million over the last three
months of the current fiscal year would require laying-offmore than 1,500 state govetmnent employees. By
implementing these reforms, the provisions contained in both my Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-13 Biennial
Budget proposal are focused on avoiding layoffs for state employees.
Wisconsin's Civil Service System-The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-2013 Biennial Budget proposal will
not include any provisions to alter or modify the main tenets of Wisconsin's Civil Service System, one of the
strongest in the nation. The grievance and dispute resolution systems currently in place, as well as all employee
protections, will remain. ·
Vacation and Sick Leave Policy- Recent news stories have suggested that I am considering altering the state's
vacation or sick leave policy. The Budget Repair Bill and my 2011-13 Biennial Budget proposal will not
include any provisions to alter or modify state employees' vacation or sick leave policy. In addition, benefits
currently accrued by any state employees will not be altered in any way.
Last week in my State of the State Address, I shared my belief that government employees are among some of
the most honest, hard working, dedicated, professional workers in this state. I sincerely believe that.
We all recognize that these are historic times that require us to rethink how government operates. I ask that we
continue to work together to do what is necessary to bring the state's spending in line with our taxpayers' ability
to pay.
Wisconsin's state employees are second to none in our nation. Our citizens expect great service, and you have
delivered. I know you will continue to deliver top-notch programs for Wisconsin's taxpayers. Thank you again
for your service to our state.
Sincerely,
Governor Scott Walker
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Davey, Monica
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
41
Cullen:
I'm trying to reach you for a story for tomorrow paper regarding this budget cut plan.
I just want to clarify a few things from the release.
Also, wondering: may I have a copy of the email to state workers.
And is there audio or video of the governor's presser this morning?
Or, better yet, might the governor be willing to talk for five minutes to me on the broad issue-- his thinking about why
these benefit cuts must be made to unions now?
Can you give me a call?
Thanks.
Best,
Monica
Monica Davey
The New York Times
Chicago Bureau Chief
111 E. Wacker Drive; Suite 2912
Chiocaao. Illinois 60601
42

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