P. 1
MHRA Style Guide 2008

MHRA Style Guide 2008

|Views: 18|Likes:
Published by Fuzzy_Wood_Person
CONDITIONS OF USE
As a service to the scholarly community, the MHRA is making the latest edition of the Style Guide (2) available for download free of charge as an Adobe® Acrobat® PDF file. Please note that the text of the Style Guide is ©Modern Humanities Research Association, 2008. You may download and make copies for personal use, but you may not re-publish the content, either digitally or in print. For licensing reasons it has not been possible to include here the BSI proof correction marks
CONDITIONS OF USE
As a service to the scholarly community, the MHRA is making the latest edition of the Style Guide (2) available for download free of charge as an Adobe® Acrobat® PDF file. Please note that the text of the Style Guide is ©Modern Humanities Research Association, 2008. You may download and make copies for personal use, but you may not re-publish the content, either digitally or in print. For licensing reasons it has not been possible to include here the BSI proof correction marks

More info:

Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Fuzzy_Wood_Person on Jun 23, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/26/2013

pdf

text

original

Single words or short phrases in foreign languages not used as direct

quotations should be in italics. Direct, acknowledged, or more substantial
quotations should be in roman type (in small print or within single quotation
marks). For the setting of quotations, see Chapter 9.
Foreign words and phrases which have passed into regular English usage

should not be italicized, though the decision between italic and roman

type may sometimes be a fne one. In doubtful instances it is usually best
to use roman. The following are examples of words which are no longer
italicized:

avant-garde

dilettante

milieu

role

cliché

ennui

par excellence

salon

debris

genre

per cent

status quo

denouement

leitmotif

résumé

vice versa

See also 2.2 and the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors.
Certain Latin words and abbreviations which are in common English
usage are also no longer italicized. For example:

cf., e.g., et al., etc., ibid., i.e., passim, viz.

Exceptions are made of the Latin sic, frequently used within quotations (see
5.3) and therefore conveniently diferentiated by the use of italic, and of circa
(abbreviated as c., see 8.1). See also 11.3 on the use of such abbreviations.

© MHRA, 2008. www.style.mhra.org.uk

36

MHRA STYLE GUIDE

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->