NEWSLETTER

THE HIGH SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC SERVICE YOUTH FARM

Farmer Column
Our  summer  youth  program  is  going  along     swimingly!  You  may  have  seen  youth     working  hard  on  the  farm  during  your     CSA  pickup  or  selling  at  the  farmers  market.     Thanks  to  our  summer  youth  leaders     program,  we  have  12  youth  who  are     employed  on  the  farm  during  July  and     August.  W e  are  currently  in  our  sixth  week     of  the  program  and  the  students  have   really  mastered  the  art  of  bed  preparation,     irrigation,  compost  and  weeding  at  this     point.  They  are  also  learning  about  food     justice,  botany  and  pest  management.  Two     of  our  returning  students,  Tyasia  and   Shineka  have  taken  on  leadership  roles  at     the  farmers  market.  Be  on  the  lookout  for     them  and  say  hello!  Also  keep  an  eye  out   for  an  unveiling  of  a  secret  youth  created     value  added  product  at  the  market  in  the     next  two  weeks.  We  also  have  youth     cooking  demonstrations  with  ingredients     from  the  farm  during  each  farmers  market.     It  is  a  great  way  to  meet  the  students,  taste  our  produce  and  learn  new  recipes  to  prepare  summer  vegetables.  Just  this  past   Saturday  our  youth  led  our  volunteer  day  with  adult  volunteers  from  the  community  and  the  CSA.  It  was  fun  to  see  the   interactions  between  the  two  age  groups  as  they  worked  together  to  learn  new  skills.    It  is  definitely  hard  work  working  on   the  farm  as  our  summer  youth  leader  Myranda  admits.  She  says  it  was  harder  than  she  anticipated  but  is  really  enjoying   working  as  a  team  and  seeing  her  work  pay  off.  Stop  by  the  farm  anytime  Wednesday,  Friday  or  Saturday  and  our  youth   would  love  to  give  you  a  tour  and  get  you  dirty!   -­‐  Anita  Singh,  S ummer  Youth  Coordinator    

Farm News and Notes
 

New  at  the  market:  Red  Jacket  juices!  We  are  excited  to  offer  fresh  fruit  juice  from  upstate  New  York  at  our  market,  again   this  week.  
 

Community  Volunteer  Day   Saturday  August  18th,  10am-­‐2pm   Join  us  at  the  Farm  and  get  your  hands  Dirty!   Please  bring  a  healthy  lunch,  a  water  bottle,  and  work  clothes.  No  open  toed  shoes  or  sandals.  Youth  under  the  age  of  13  must   be  supervised  by  an  adult.  
 

Free  Community  Workshop:  Creative  Salads  (YOUTH-­‐LED)     Saturday  August  18th,  2pm-­‐3:30pm   Salads  are  easy  to  make,  easy  to  pack  for  lunch,  and  chock  full  of  nutrients.  These  are  no  wimpy  salads:  they  are  big  on  flavor   and  will  give  you  lots  of  energy.  Summer  Youth  Farmers  will  lead  workshop.     Remember:  You  can  always  come  join  us  for  volunteer  work  during  our  farmers  market  -­‐  Wednesdays  from  2:30  to  6:30.  
Week  1  ·  June  20,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com   Week  8  ·  August  6,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com  

 

Featured Vegetable: The Tomato!

Flower of the week  
    The  majestic  euphorbia,  a  genus  of  plants  that  consists  of  approximately     2,100  species,  can  be  found  on  five  of  the  earth's  seven  continents.  The     "Mountain  Snow"  variety,  an  annual  plant  that  has  smooth,  oval-­‐shaped     leaves  and  white  flower  clusters  and  can  grow  to  three  feet  when  mature,     can  be  found  at  the  youth  farm.  Euphorbia  plants  produce  a  milky  sap  that     contains  toxic  chemical  compounds,  but  the  sap  has  been  and  continues  to     be  a  positive  agent  in  folk  medicine.  Before  Euphorbia  is  added  to  your     bouquet,  the  stems  are  drained  of  the  majority  of  the  white  sap.   It  is  known  to  help  heal  wounds,  and  is  used  in  Africa  to  stun  fish.  The   euphorbia  sap  can  also  be  used  as  a  laxative.  The  name  "euphorbia,"  given   to  the  genus  by  the  botanist  Carolus  Linnaeus,  means  "well-­‐fed"  in  Greek.   The  plant  is  said  to  have  originated  in  what  is  now  Morocco.                            

Ingredients   2  cups  balsamic  vinegar       2  large  ripe  tomatoes       1/4  medium  watermelon       2  tablespoons  olive  oil       Salt       1/8  teaspoon  sugar       1/2  cup  toasted  pine  nuts       1/2  cup  crumbled  feta  cheese       1/4  cup  shredded  mint     Method   Heat  the  balsamic  vinegar  in  a  small   saucepan  over  low  heat  until  the  volume   is  reduced  by  half,  20  to  30  minutes.   Remove  from  heat  and  let  cool  to  room   temperature.      Core  tomatoes  and  cut   each  one  into  four  1/4-­‐inch  thick  slices.   You  need  eight  slices  total.  Cut  eight  1/4-­‐ inch  thick  slices  of  watermelon.  Trim  the   rind  and  cut  slices  into  rectangles  of   equal  sizes,  about  2-­‐inches  wide  and  3-­‐ inches  long.         Spread  watermelon  and  tomato  slices   out  on  a  plate.  Drizzle  with  olive  oil  and   sprinkle  with  salt  and  sugar.         Layer  watermelon  and  tomato  slices  on   4  plates  to  form  a  stack  on  each  plate.   Sprinkle  pine  nuts  and  feta  over  the   watermelon  and  tomato  stacks,  then   drizzle  with  the  balsamic  reduction,   zigzagging  back  and  forth  across  the   plate.  Sprinkle  each  stack  with  a  pinch  of   salt  and  garnish  with  mint.  

Shineka  helping  out  at  our  market!  

A  view  of  the  farm  from  above.    

Week  1  ·  June  20,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com  

 

Week  8  ·  August  6,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com