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A publication of the Ohio University Society of Professional Journalists

Meeting
Tuesday, 5:00 SCRIPPS 111

Celebrity Journalism

The Field of Photojournalism
Professional Dave LaBelle shared photo insights with journalism students at a guest lecture event.

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According to Eiler, searching for accuracy and candidness, creating a sense of being, and interpreting an observation are several of the fundamentals of photojournalism, which can easily serve as tenants for print. “It’s the same elements of journalism…the difference is the tool. You are using images rather than text,” Eiler said. He describes photo and print as collaborative mediums that “form a bond that is stronger than either one of them would be on their own.” However, a fine line is drawn when text does not connect with image. “What we don’t need with pictures are words to tell me what’s in the photograph, and so many captions do no more than state the obvious,” he said, “I need to know why this picture is being put in front of me.” An image may stand alone from print if it is on the cover of a magazine, but, according to Eiler, the photo must be a “very dynamic image, and the person observing it would have to be very insightful.” Dustin Lennert, a first-year photojournalism student in the School of Visual Communication, attended Labelle’s presentation and said that his interest for photojournalism developed last year. “I liked art and writing, but I didn’t want to go in those two directions. Photojournalism was kind of like the middle ground there, because pictures are kind of like art, and I’m still telling stories,” he said when asked how his interest began. Katharine Egli, also a first-year photojournalism student in the School of Visual Communication, finds that the most rewarding side of photojournalism is “the adventurous aspect of it.” Egli is continuously learning new areas of photojournalism taking on jobs beyond capturing photos that fit within her comfort zone. She is quickly acclimating to experiencing interviewing for the first time and taking pictures of people rather than objects. While photo and print journalism continue to utilize two different media, the two combined create a work even better suited for the rapidly changing industry. Each in its own right can be magnificently used, but together they form something even more powerful. n

From world traveling reporter Nellie Bly to the ground breaking, industrial photography of Margaret Bourke-White, photojournalists have left astounding impacts on the field of journalism. For many photojournalism professionals, the connection between images and print may be quite obvious, but the true nature of each is deeply intertwined. The job of a photojournalist is to convey a story using images and captions, a task that Dave LaBelle summed up as storytelling, when he said that, “at the core, we are all storytellers.” On Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. in Ohio University’s Walter Hall, LaBelle presented “Photojournalism: It’s always been more about the people than the photography.” He discovered his passion for photography early on. As a young boy from a family of modest means, photography served as his outlet to success while other studies somehow escaped his interest. As he progressed behind the lens, Labelle utilized his talents in broader fields to make money. “When they started paying me to take pictures, I thought this was the greatest thing to ever happen to me,” LaBelle reflected. He was offered one well-paying career in particular but turned it down because he felt compelled to tell stories, not to merely snap meaningless pictures. “I will not go down in history as a great photographer. I don’t photograph wars. You know what I do? I photograph people doing good things,” he said. LaBelle regards himself as more than a photographer; he is both an artist and a poet. Influenced by artists such as Rembrandt, Steinbeck and Rockwell who “all were master storytellers,” he was particularly inspired by Rembrandt as someone that “taught [him] to see and to feel light.” He said he feels his soul purpose as a photojournalist is to share his work and understand the subjects behind his pictures. “If I can’t share, it’s like eating tacos for three weeks and not being able to go to the restroom…I’m ready to explode,” he said. Likewise, Terry Eiler, interim director and associate Internship News professor for the School of Visual Sequence Updates Communication at OU, supports sharing images Religious Reporting through the process of From the President meshing both print and photo.

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SCRIPPS NEWS
options when it comes to sequences and advisers,” Stewart said. How to know if your choice is a good fit: Upon choosing a sequence, students begin taking classes specific to that sequence; the very first class will indicate if the right choice was made. “You’ll know if the sequence you’ve chosen is right for you when you take the first class in that sequence,” Stewart said. “If you enjoy it – if you’re saying, ‘I want to read the textbook, and everything else I can get my hands on’ – then that sequence is a good fit. If you’re dreading going to class each day, then it’s not.” Stewart wants students to be passionate about what they’re learning. “If you love a specific area in journalism, even if it’s more difficult to find a job in that area, I would still encourage you to pursue that area,” he said. “My goal is that students find a sequence that excites them, because then they’ll do better.” If students find their chosen sequence isn’t for them, switching to a new one is easy, Stewart said. All it requires is a simple form, and the process can be repeated as many times as necessary. What to do if you want something more unique: Students who are interested in more than one sequence or something completely different have options as well. Some of Scripps’s sequences have a lot of flexibility; for instance, the magazine sequence requires students to take four magazine classes and four electives in other areas. This provides the variety that some students are looking for. For those seeking something truly unique, there is another option. They can take advantage of the Carr Van Anda opportunity, which is an individualized, student-constructed sequence. It may be a combination of two or more of Scripps’s six sequences, or it may be a completely separate area in journalism that a student would like to study. This sequence is declared during junior year, allowing journalism majors plenty of time to make a decision. “The Carr Van Anda is the ultimate flexible model for journalism sequences,” Stewart said. Although the Carr Van Anda isn’t for everyone, it’s an important option to consider, Stewart said. This specialized sequence allows students with a very specific, unique vision to create a degree that will fulfill that vision. The JSchool’s six areas of study, paired with the Carr Van Anda, provide a way for all journalism students to find a sequence that works for them. n

A Change In Sequence Policy
New class prepares for a new J-school policy: the deadline for choosing a sequence has been extended. story Rebecca McKinsey
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Journalism is a broad term at Ohio University. Every student in the journalism school must declare a sequence – that is, an area of specialization within the journalism spectrum. There are six concrete sequences within the Scripps College of Communication: Advertising, Broadcast News, Magazine Journalism, News Writing and Editing, Online Journalism and Public Relations. There are many options and quite a bit of flexibility when it comes to choosing a sequence best suited for the individual student. Normally, journalism majors at OU start their freshman year already having declared a sequence. The class of 2013 is the first to see a change in this policy. “Starting with this incoming freshman class, we’ve decided to allow students more time in choosing their sequence,” said Robert Stewart, Associate Director of the School of Journalism. The new deadline for declaring a sequence is at the end of the winter quarter, when students are beginning advising sessions for spring quarter. Why it is important to have a sequence: “The idea behind sequences is that the way the journalism industry works, you need specialized knowledge that’s specific to various areas in the industry,” Stewart said. “Having a sequence prepares students for the area of journalism they want to go into.” Although recent changes in journalism have caused a need for more flexibility in journalists’ knowledge, it’s still important for a student going into this field to have an area of expertise. This is what a sequence provides.

The best way to choose a sequence: Introductory journalism classes give students some background in the various sequences they can choose. However, on-campus student media organizations are a tremendously helpful resource as well. “If you’re not taking advantage of the hands-on opportunities available to you here, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to make the best decision possible,” Stewart said. “Anything you think you’re interested in, go out there and try it.” OU has various print, online, radio and television media outlets with which students can become involved, and the hands-on experience that comes along with these goes a long way toward affirming a student’s interest in a particular area. “Student organizations are also a great way to network and meet upperclassmen who can tell you about your various

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The idea behind sequences is that the way that the journalism industry works, you need specialized knowledge that’s specific to various areas in the industry.

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NEWS
or a respected church leader has done something wrong... it brings down the church. But at DisciplesWorld Magazine, our philosophy is it’s healthier for the church if we discuss these issues and bring them out in the open. Also, it helps us fix the issues themselves. KM: What about non-religious issues? What are your thoughts on religion journalists reporting on politics? RW: That’s a pretty tough question. Some Christians believe faith and politics should be completely separate. They don’t want to read it, hear it, or have their church leaders speak about it on any medium. I do think things like endorsing candidates from the pulpit is a very bad idea. But... I think it’s hard to read the Bible and not apply its teachings to public life. Still, among other Christians, people don’t agree on scriptural interpretations. We need to understand diversity of thought and allow healthy, diverse discussions. KM: How do secular journalists react to your work? Is there any sort of division between the religion and secular journalists in Cincinnati’s chapter of SPJ, for example? RW: There is something like a disconnect between “us” and “them.” I’ve never really heard anything said, but there may be some questions and raised eyebrows at us. And some of them have distanced themselves from me; maybe they’re afraid that I might think their work is wrong or sinful? People need to get to know others better and remember that my approach to journalism is the same as theirs. n

PROFESSIONAL

Religious Reporting with Rebecca Woods
Reverend Rebecca Woods is the news and Web site editor for DisciplesWorld Magazine. interview Kaitrin McCoy shoutout Rebecca McKinsey
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KM:. What drew you to religious journalism? RW: Well, I majored in Public Relations at Miami University. Yes, I know that’s the wrong school to mention around here. I worked the technology side of newspapers in the Detroit and St. Louis areas. I later worked for a technology subsidiary of Gannett Co. But when I read the religion section in these newspapers, I saw that their focus was more community-oriented, like a church celebrating its 75th anniversary or a banquet being held in honor of a pastor. I realized that it takes specialized training in religion to really write it properly. So, I left the company in 2001, became a freelance journalist and attended the United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio, where I received my masters of divinity. KM: Do you have any suggestions or advice for journalism students who wish to pursue religion journalism? RW: It’s important to be informed, so I’d recommend taking a religion class or two. If possible, you should try to specialize in religious studies. As for the actual writing, you need to respect the person being interviewed and remember how deep their beliefs go. Also, and this is something journalists forget, you should remember that much of the audience reading mainstream or secular journalism hold religious beliefs or are interested in religion. KM: Did you find the transition to a religious publication difficult? RW: Well, it’s a different environment. There’s always the pressure not to write any “bad news.” You know, how giving in the church is down,

Mac or PC? OU J-school students sound off about their computers of choice.
“Macs don’t get sick. They don’t crash. They’re shinier than PCs. And I like the noise they make when they power up – it lets you know they’re okay.” -Caitlin Whitehurst, Sophomore, News Writing and Editing/ Magazine “Honestly, with this technological revolution we’re experiencing, this shouldn’t even be a debate anymore. Macs seem to be the smarter option because I don’t have to fear getting a virus and wiping out the memory on my computer; they’re more versatile; they have many more useful features; and in my opinion, they’re much more reliable. And to top it all off, they’re even environmentally friendly. Sure, they’re a bit costly, but they more than pay for themselves in the long run. I love my MacBook Pro and I wouldn’t trade it for even the best PC out there.” -Tanya Parker, Freshman, Broadcast “With a Mac, you can call the service center and get your computer fixed in 10 minutes. With a PC, you make a call and they transfer you to India, and then to Bangladesh. Then you’re transferred to the moon, and then finally back to the person you started with – and your computer still doesn’t get fixed.” -Kyle Grantham, Senior, Photojournalism “I’m a PC, mostly because they’re less expensive and I’ve worked with PCs my whole life. Macs are so confusing to me.” -Kellie Asmus, Freshman, Public Relations “I don’t like the Mac at all. I love PCs. Macs have a really weird and confusing setup. I know a lot of people with Macs who still don’t know how to use them. I’ve always had a PC and I love them because they’re easy to use and more convenient.” -Katie Fetheroff, Freshman, Magazine “I like PCs better because you have Vista, and because Internet Explorer works better on them. And because every time you move the cursor, all your windows don’t disappear. Also, I think the guy in the PC commercial is really cute.” -Natalie McGee, Junior, News Writing and Editing “When it comes to visual media, whether it’s design or animation, I simply prefer Mac. On the other hand, there are several programs unavailable to Macs that I require on PC for music production. Not to say that Macs lack audio programs. I’m simply accustomed to the resources I already have on my PC.” -Josh Adams, Freshman, Magazine

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NEWS
The program’s Web site provides two big names of possible returning participants to act as guest lecturers, including reporters Paul Glader from the Wall Street Journal and John Fritze from USA Today. The Indianapolis Star is not the only publication where the Pulliam Journalism Fellowship Program offers positions for eager student journalists. The Arizona Republic, another Gannet Co. newspaper, has the same internship program available in Phoenix. Interested students should contact Aric Johnson at Aric.johnson@azcentral.com or at 602444-4368 for more information. The internship is a 10-week position where students can earn $650 per week. If accepted, he or she will also receive a cash grant of $6,500. While the application deadline is Nov. 1, the Web site does indicated that late applications have a chance of being reviewed. The application process includes completing a five-page form, writing samples, a copy of college transcripts, a recent mug shot and three letters of recommendation. The program start date is June 7, but Pulliam said the rest of that week can be negotiated. More can be found about the program and application process at Indystar.com/pjf or by contacting Pulliam at Russell.pulliam@indystar. com or 317-444-6001. n

INTERNSHIP

Big Rewards Offered at Star Summer Program
Gain experience and training with the Pulliam Journalism Fellowship Program. story and listings Cameron Glover
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When journalism students search for the perfect summer job, many consider what they can contribute to a certain media company or publication or how they can impress an employer. But does anyone think about how that job can benefit his or her journalistic career, beyond earning a salary? The Pulliam Journalism Fellowship Program is an internship opportunity to spend a summer with the Indianapolis Star, a Gannett Co. newspaper. It is open to all junior and senior journalism students as well as recent graduates interested in writing, design or photography. It focuses on teaching young journalists through various writing workshops with a professional writing coach, setting this position apart from the typical summer job. Program Director Russell B. Pulliam said that this is one of the highlights of summer. “The workshop’s held partly because the coach is one of the best, Sherry Ricchiardi, and is cited by previous fellows as the best part of the program,” Pulliam said. Ricchiardi is a journalism professor for the School of Journalism at Indiana University. According to her biography on the school’s Web site, she started as an international reporter for The Des Moines Register in 1971, and she began teaching at the collegiate level in 1986.

INTERNSHIPS

Who
Ohio Watchdog American Society of Magazine Editors RMD Advertising

What
Investigative Internship

When
Winter 2009

Where
Columbus, Ohio

Why
Uncover corrupted public officials. A summer of editing magazines. Be part of advertising and PR solutions. Chance to average 30 professional clips.

How
Visit www.ohio. watchdog.org. Contact Cary Frith at frith@ ohio.edu. Visit www. rmdadvertising. com. Visit www.theihs. org/journalism.

10-week internship for juniors 12-week internship program Eight-week investigative reporting internships

June 2- Aug 6, 2010

NYC or Washington D.C. Columbus, Ohio

Winter 2009

Insititute for Humane Studies

Spring or Summer 2010

Multiple locations around the United States

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NEWS

COMMENTARY

What I Learned On My Summer Vacation
Columnist and SPJ President Ian Bowman-Henderson talks about the lessons learned at a summer internship. column Ian Bowman-Henderson
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I’ve never been one to espouse the virtues of Clear Channel’s near turn family over to the police. Never mind that my story was often paired monopoly on commercial radio (though the argument probably goes with rants about crime going unpunished in Cincinnati. The irony of something like this: “Sure they only play six songs, but that means you following stories about how hard it is to be a cop with a fable-presentedcan travel to the other side of the country and still be able to sing along as-fact about why you should never ever be a snitch didn’t come up in – Clear Channel is the glue holding America together!”). However, in the writer’s meetings. the holy name of resume building, I took a summer internship in the I believe it was E.W. Scripps himself who famously said, “Screw ethics, promotions department of their Cincinnati branch. I shook the adolescent the best way to be a journalist is to lie to people (especially about crimes self-righteous chip off my shoulder, told myself that even media empires against women) until you’re filthy rich.” My only criticism is that I had are made up of regular Joes and Janets and psyched myself up for the to wait through almost three weeks of my internship before I got the real most soul crushing experience of my life. world experience to drive home this important lesson. The way I was taught to give constructive criticism is to start with a Compliment: compliment, then let loose the disparaging remark and end with another I think I may have been too harsh with my criticism. I did get some compliment. This is commonly called a “shit sandwich.” I’ve never real journalism experience. For instance, I was sent downtown to the worked at a deli before, but I courthouse in search of a homeknow how to slap a turd on a less person for Eddie and Tracy to bun, and I have been waiting all interview on air. The question of I shook the adolescent self-righteous chip summer to call “order up” on the day was ‘why do the homeoff my shouder, told myself that even media the internship program at Clear less insist on sleeping in front of Channel Radio. the courthouse?’ Eddie and Tracy empires are made up of regular Joes and Compliment: even helped out by giving me my Janets and psyched myself up for the most If I have one great flaw it is a first tip as a real journalist – I was tendency to obsess about the told it would be best if I found soul crushing experience of my life. difference between right and them a woman or a minority. wrong. Well, Clear Channel graWorking for Clear Channel was ciously attempted to cure me of a great networking opportunity my ethics hang-ups, and all it took was a little harmless coercion. Need too. I got to meet one of the company’s most storied and celebrated somebody to call into your morning-zoo radio show on the day after Minewsmen, Mr. Sean Hannity, at his very own Freedom Concert. Hanchael Jackson’s death and call the deceased a hell-bound child molester? nity wasn’t the only famous person I got to meet; Oliver North (of The intern with no experience, no connections within the company, and a Iran-Contra fame) was there too. ‘Ollie’ was the perfect person to drive grade riding on his performance review is probably home Eddie and Tracy’s point about how awful your man. snitching is. Criticism: … I wish I had listened to them, because now That was my on the job training. Or rather, it was I’m in the awkward position of asking the the audition for my on the job training, because I administrators and professors of the J-school to apparently did well enough to earn the privilege of permanently censure Clear Channel Radio of helping Eddie Fingers and Tracy Jones defile the Cincinnati by refusing to send any more of our historic airwaves of WLW in their afternoon-drive talented students to be twisted and manipulated slot. I was recruited for a recurring role as “Joey,” at the hands of their do-anything-for-a-buck crew a boy whose father had secretly taped thousands of shock jock hacks. I would like to say I learned of women naked in his hotel – a la Erin Andrews. nothing during my time at Clear Channel, but I was the platform that they used to tell the entire that would be a lie. I learned the wrong – that tri-state area that it didn’t matter how many feloniis the morally and ethically wrong – way to do ous sex crimes your father committed, you never everything. n

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