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CREATIVE PRAYER

SCHOLARLY ARTICLES BY PETER FRITZ WALTER

THE LAW OF EVIDENCE

THE RESTRICTION OF NATIONAL SOVEREIGNTY

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AND WELLNESS TECHNIQUES

CONSCIOUSNESS AND SHAMANISM

CREATIVE PRAYER
CREATIVE PRAYER
THE MIRACLE ROAD

by Peter Fritz Walter
Published by Sirius-C Media Galaxy LLC

113 Barksdale Professional Center, Newark, Delaware, USA

©2015 Peter Fritz Walter. Some rights reserved.

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About Dr. Peter Fritz Walter
http://peterfritzwalter.com

Pierre’s Blog
https://medium.com/@pierrefwalter/publications/
About the Author

Parallel to an international law career in Germany, Switzer-
land and the United States, Dr. Peter Fritz Walter (Pierre) fo-
cused upon fine art, cookery, astrology, musical perform-
ance, social sciences and humanities.

He started writing essays as an adolescent and received a
high school award for creative writing and editorial work for
the school magazine.

After finalizing his law diplomas, he graduated with an LL.M.
in European Integration at Saarland University, Germany, and
with a Doctor of Law title from University of Geneva, Switzer-
land, in 1987.

He then took courses in psychology at the University of Ge-
neva and interviewed a number of psychotherapists in Lau-
sanne and Geneva, Switzerland. His interest was intensified
through a hypnotherapy with an Ericksonian American hyp-
notherapist in Lausanne. This led him to the recovery and
healing of his inner child.

After a second career as a corporate trainer and personal
coach, Pierre retired as a full-time writer, philosopher, and
photographer.

Pierre is a German-French bilingual native speaker and
writes English as his 4th language after German, Latin and
French. He also reads source literature for his research works
in Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, and Dutch. In addition, Pierre
has notions of Thai, Khmer, Chinese and Japanese.

All of Pierre’s books are hand-crafted and self-published,
designed by the author. Pierre publishes via his Delaware
company, Sirius-C Media Galaxy LLC, and under the imprints
of IPUBLICA and SCM (Sirius-C Media).
IN MEMORY OF THE LATE DR. JOSEPH MURPHY (1898-1981)

The author’s profits from this book are being donated to charity.
Contents

Introduction 11

WHAT IS PRAYER? 21
No Belief, But Faith 21
Not Linear, but Cyclic Thinking 23
No God Concept 28
No Suggestion. No Hypnosis. 29

LEARN THE TECHNIQUE 31
Relax and Affirm 31
Build a Positive Attitude 33
Forgive and Choose 35
Keep It Short 38
Create Your Own Reality 40
Change Your Inner Program 43
Be More Creative 45
Relax Properly 47
Become Spontaneous 50

PRACTICE CREATIVE PRAYER 53
Learning Motivation 56
Teaching Motivation 56
CREATIVE PRAYER

Learning and Techniques 57
Self-Healing 58
Self-Acceptance 59
The Principle of Inner and Outer Harmony 60

ACTIVATE SELF-HEALING 63

BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE 67

CREATE INNER PEACE 81

POSTFACE 91

Glossary 103
Terms 103
Alpha, Alpha State 103
Brain and Mind Research 104
Cartesian Science and Worldview 106
Consciousness 108
Creative Visualization 109
Direct Perception 110
Emotional Intelligence 111
I Ching 112
Inner Selves 113
Intuition 118
Koan 118
Life Authoring 119
Quantum Physics 120
Self 126
Soul Power 127
Synchronicity 128

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CONTENTS

Taoism, Tao 129
Tarot 130
Yin-Yang 131
Zen 133
Personalities 135
Berne, Eric 135
Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama 136
Confucius 137
Descartes, René 138
Einstein, Albert 139
Freud, Sigmund 139
Heraclitus 141
Jesus of Nazareth 141
Jung, Carl Gustav 142
Krishnamurti, J. (K) 142
Lao-tzu 145
Murphy, Joseph 147
Picasso, Pablo 148

BIBLIOGRAPHY 153

Personal Notes 173

9
Introduction

The prayer method that I am going to pre-
sent here was first outlined in basically two es-
says by the spiritualist James Allen and, Abel
L. Allen. James Allen published As a Man
Thinketh in 1902, and Abel Allen wrote The
Message of New Thought in 1914.

Next in the development of the method
comes Ernest Holmes, founder of the ‘Science
of Mind’ and author of a book with the same
title, which was published in 1922.

The book is both a compendium of philo-
sophical wisdom and a practical manual that
teaches practitioners how to give treatments
using the unique prayer technique.
CREATIVE PRAYER

Eventually, it was in the 1960s and 70s that
the method really became popular through
the books of Dr. Joseph Murphy and Cather-
ine Ponder.

Joseph Murphy called it scientific prayer.

—See Peter Fritz Walter, Joseph Murphy and
the Power of Your Subconscious Mind (Great
Minds Series, Vol. 6), 2015.

Indeed, this kind of prayer is not founded
upon belief, but upon knowledge; it is based
upon insights in the functioning of the human
unconscious as, perhaps first in history, Sig-
mund Freud described it.

Well, I began reading Freud already upon
entering law school, so I was well aware that
the abuse and trauma I had suffered all
through my childhood had become imprinted,
in the form of thought patterns, on the mem-
ory surface of my subconscious mind.

12
INTRODUCTION

I discovered the prayer technique during
the time of my therapy and told my psychia-
trist about it, to see with him if that work was
compatible with the therapy. He replied that it
was not only compatible, but something like
an ideal add-on to it. With that reassurance,
then, from the side of my psychiatrist, I was
practicing affirmative prayer every day, consis-
tently, over a period of six months.

The results were more than convincing,
they were actually quite miraculous. My con-
stant anxiety and compulsive sweating gradu-
ally ceased, my feet were behaving in some-
what normal ways, instead of being frozen all
day long, and most importantly, my thoughts
were getting a note of self-affirmation that I
had never known before. I was developing a
new self-image. Observing my self-talk, I real-
ized that before that time I constantly wiped
myself out through disempowering self-talk.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

Eventually, I experienced moments of peace,
harmony and bliss that were novelty for me.

As a result, my creative expression ex-
ploded, and I could not stop the flow that was
set in place. I began to write and created in
virtually all literary genres, from essays to film
scripts; in addition I created hundreds of
spontaneous drawings, and many volumes of
spontaneously composed music.

Eventually I became also successful as a
coach, and my corporate seminars were found
to be creative, amusing and effective. It is for
that reason that I was going to name this
prayer technique Creative Prayer.

And it was only then that I realized that for
the first time in my life I began to manifest my
soul reality, expressing in my creations not my
ego, or conditioned self, but something from
a beyond-realm that I can’t express in verbal

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INTRODUCTION

language. And at the same time I became
acutely aware that such kind of spontaneous
intelligent self-expression is what primes in
life. In fact, emotionally intelligent children
create exactly in the same way, at every mo-
ment when they play; they share their soul
values through manifesting their soul power.

Not long ago, science and religion were
tightly separated, and some people even as-
serted that the two realms of human endeavor
needed to be split apart. And yet, we know
that in ancient civilizations science, philosophy
and religion were one body of knowledge. To
be true, the most ancient of religions were al-
ways both scientific and metaphysical because
they knew that knowledge is limited; the
myths and tales of old were expressing the
unknown realms of existence, showing exam-
ples of how hidden connections can manifest
once the circular movement of thought is dis-

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CREATIVE PRAYER

rupted by an unusual or sudden event. Tao-
ism, the oldest known religion, from ancient
China, was scientific in that it was based upon
the I Ching, the Book of Changes, and the
immutable cosmic laws that this wisdom book
embodies and describes. So it is with Huna,
the ancient science-religion of the Kahuna na-
tives in Hawaii.

Today, even popular science books men-
tion the I Ching as a unique example for a su-
premely intelligent view of life that explains
pattern, cosmic dependencies, and relation-
ships between things, events and people, as
well as the hidden connections we call syn-
chronistic correlations, and that we express
through binary-code mathematics.

The other element, that might be called
the deliberate uncertainty principle, in those
traditional religions, is divination, which is a

16
INTRODUCTION

form of exploration outside the realm of cer-
tainty, and that runs as it were on probability,
extrapolating the present content of con-
sciousness on a timeline into the future.

Ancient religious traditions were more wist-
ful than modern materialism in that they saw
that there is no contradiction between the
certainty of knowledge, and scientific exacti-
tude, on one hand, and uncertainty as the ter-
tium after thesis and antithesis, on the other;
in fact, they wistfully understood that the rela-
tionship between both realms of human per-
ception is one of complementarity.

When you explore religion with a scientific
mindset, you will find that much of what the
hyper-rationalists held to be superstition and
magic is actually a realm of knowledge that
belongs to perennial science.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

I believe affirmative prayer is not only sci-
entific, but that it is also a form of positive
self-empowerment; even assuming you are
empowered by a divine force or god, the em-
powerment comes from yourself, in the sense
of coming from your higher self; after all, you
are sitting down for it. In giving that effort,
while it’s kind of effortless to do this, you are
participating in the divine plan. Thus it can be
said that we are engaging in a form of partici-
patory consciousness when we pray.

It doesn’t matter if you believe in a divine
superpower or in your higher self, your guard-
ian angel, your heavenly parents, your ances-
tor spirits, or whatever you call that creator
force; fact is that you, by an act of will, sit
down to pray. By doing this, you create the
thought forms that are going to trigger a posi-
tive and creative response from the universe
provided that what you wish to happen for

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INTRODUCTION

yourself or others is non-harmful, constructive,
and ultimately in alignment with cosmic pur-
pose.

19
WHAT IS PRAYER?

No Belief, But Faith
Let me first explain what I mean when I use
the term prayer. What kind of prayer am I talk-
ing about, and why do I name it creative
prayer?

First, I am not talking about prayer as part
of a religious ritual, the prayer people do in
churches, mosques, temples or synagogues.

Furthermore, the prayer I am talking about
is not based upon belief. In creative prayer no
belief is involved, but faith. Faith and belief
are not the same. Belief is an intellectual con-
cept while faith is a quality of the heart.
CREATIVE PRAYER

Many of us believe that faith brings about
prayer, but it is equally true that prayer en-
hances faith. People tend to argue that with-
out faith prayer had no sense. When we eat
we believe that what we eat will be good for
our body; we also have faith that tomorrow
we’re still alive; otherwise nobody would ever
make plans. When we hurt our body we are
confident that the power of healing in our or-
ganism will quickly repair the damage. Faith is
something very basic, very natural, and some-
thing not reflected upon. People who say they
have no faith are wrong. I ask them one ques-
tion:

—Do you make any plans?

They of course affirm. And even if they
didn’t make plans, they still do have faith in
that tomorrow morning they are going to
wake up to a new day and not just die the

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WHAT IS PRAYER?

same night. Clearly, without this basic faith,
humanity would never have achieved anything
because people would just not have any re-
gard into the future. To conclude, we cannot
not have faith. It’s as simple as that.

Not Linear, but Cyclic
Thinking
Faith is not based upon linear thought but
upon cyclic thinking, and more precisely, upon
cyclic growth processes.

Our culture has created the line as a sym-
bol for evolution. However, the line is an artifi-
cial construct, inexistent in nature, a purely
mental achievement. Evolution is cyclic. It al-
lows the line only in combination with the cir-
cle, so as to say, resulting in the spiral.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary defines the
spiral as relating to the ‘advancement to

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CREATIVE PRAYER

higher levels through a series of cyclical
movements.’

The curving movement of the spiral is what
it has in common with the circle; the increase
or decrease in size of the spiral is a function of
its moving upward or downward.

The spiral is without a doubt the dominat-
ing form to be found in nature, and in all natu-
ral processes. It is a symbol for evolution in
general.

Life is coded in the spiraled double-helix of
the DNA molecule. The spiral is the expres-
sion of the periodic, systemic and cyclic de-
velopment that is in accordance with the laws
of life. The progression of the spiral shows
that it always carries its root, however trans-
porting it through every cycle onto a higher
level or dimension; whereas the line leaves its
root forever.

24
WHAT IS PRAYER?

All towers of Babel are manifestations of
the line: they are linear and are created by lin-
ear thought structures. True growth typically
manifests through a cyclic and spiraled ge-
stalt.

Liberated from linear thought structures,
man finds faith without effort. Or faith finds
man. There is no better means than creative
prayer for triggering this liberation from linear
thought.

Linear thought is purely causal and
founded upon mutuality, whereas the law of
love is neither causal nor based upon a condi-
tion. Neither is it teleological, but simply exist-
ing or existential. It is beyond causality and
synchronistic. Truth is beyond causality and
beyond time. Where all is synchronistic, time
ends.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

The creation principle, being beyond time,
beyond space, beyond causality, beyond ratio
and beyond thought categories cannot be
grasped mentally. However, we carry it with us
in every single cell, in the tiniest entity of the
hologram of life. All what we know of this
beyond-thought is that we do not know about
it. It therefore is the ideal soil for faith. That is
why the one who knows much and not one
who knows little has the greatest faith.

Ignorance is no fertilizer for religion, de-
spite the fact that the power mechanisms of
certain religions have exploited human igno-
rance for their profit.

When we pray creatively we hold the exis-
tence of all-that-is for more likely than its non-
existence, and thus we do not run around like
a blind hen who finds a corn here and there.

26
WHAT IS PRAYER?

We then are ‘seeing with other eyes and hear-
ing with other ears.’

Regarding this basic fact of our mental limi-
tation towards the unknowable, we really can
be like children and have the grace which is
promised and which is based on something
like ‘une heureuse insouciance.’

The Heraclitean ‘All Flows’ is perhaps the
greatest expression of faith in history although
it has to my knowledge never been consid-
ered as such.

Prayer brings all our inner parts into a state
of harmony, a balance of yin and yang. It cre-
ates a balance between rational mind and
emotion, between knowledge and belief, be-
tween male-giving (yang) and female-
receiving (yin), between high and low, good
and bad, positive and negative, white and
black, going forward, standing still or going

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CREATIVE PRAYER

backward, and so forth. Prayer establishes
complete mental, emotional and physical
health and wellbeing.

No God Concept
The next important point is that creative
prayer is not based upon a god concept. It is
based upon the existence of a universe that is
the result of all-that-is, infinite wisdom, si-
lence, love and energy—the creator principle,
the word, the logos.

What is beyond thought cannot be put in
words; the non-manifest cannot be imagined
as something manifest.

Let us say, therefore, that creative prayer is
based upon the existence of potentiality or
universal creative potential.

Prayer addresses the quantum field, the
nonlinear continuum that is mostly, but not

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WHAT IS PRAYER?

exclusively, located in the invisible realms of
existence. Furthermore, creative prayer is not
a wish or a demand, but an affirmation. We
simply affirm a state of affairs we wish to real-
ize and that is not yet manifest, and we affirm
it as if it was already manifest and realized.

No Suggestion. No Hypnosis.
Last not least, I would like to clarify why I
consciously use the word prayer and not the
term auto-suggestion.

The question was once asked by my father
who wondered why I talked at all about a
prayer technique instead of using the term
auto-suggestion. In Germany, there notably
exists a technique called ‘Autosuggestion’
and people use that quite successfully for
dealing with timidity or for fighting alcoholism
or drug addiction. While indeed both tech-
niques do the same, there is a difference.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

When I say ‘prayer,’ I mean that I address
my words to a force that is beyond the mere
rational mind, thought or the tangible, physi-
cal world. I namely implicitly recognize an in-
visible realm of existence, and a supreme en-
ergy that is the creator force. However, when I
use the word ‘suggestion,’ I implicitly make a
reference to modern reductionist science and
psychology that affirm there is nothing be-
yond our five senses and that all the rest is
fantasy, imagination, psychosis or charlatan-
ism.

Because I simply know that there is an all-
encompassing quantum field of which the
physical world is only a tiny part, I will stick to
the word prayer and call it creative prayer be-
cause it is a form of creative writing and
gradually brings about a new reality through
conscious and subconscious mind working
together in sync.

30
LEARN THE
TECHNIQUE

Relax and Affirm
How to work with the prayers? Best prac-
tice is to calmly recite them at least two times
a day, in the morning after waking up, and in
the evening before going to sleep, so as to
profit from the natural relaxation that takes
place in your mindbody during these special
moments of the day. Creative prayer helps
imprint your subconscious mind with positive
images, images that heal and help you to be
successful and happy in all areas of life. In or-
der to access this part of your consciousness
you must get into what is called a light trance.
CREATIVE PRAYER

Typically, this light trance is brought about
when your brain is in the so-called alpha state.
Before explaining you the details, let me
shortly point out why we need relaxation at all.

When we are relaxed, we more easily focus
inside. We become still and listen to our-
selves. When we feel connected to the source
of peace in us, there is nothing that cannot
be, and we will be radiant, joyful, powerful,
wonderfully successful and blessed with all life
can offer. In order to work on the fulfillment of
our desires, we need to connect with the su-
preme power that we bear inside of us!

When we relax and let go, we let life offer
its gifts freely to us instead of chasing life for
receiving those gifts.

What creative prayer does in fact is to
gradually change your mindset which is now
perhaps a mindset of limitation, to a mindset

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LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

of infinite possibilities. Our destiny as human
beings is to be happy, powerful, joyful and
blessed. The only limitations there are, really
are the limitations we set for ourselves.

Therefore, it is essential that you find out
about the black magic of negative thinking. It
is negative thinking, and, resulting from it,
wrong action that created all the illnesses, all
the hurts or deprivations you are suffering
from right now.

Build a Positive Attitude
It is not esoteric to have a positive mental
attitude. It is directly related to, and con-
nected with, our daily life experiences and re-
lationships. We do not need philosophical
speculations and concepts in order to adopt a
positive attitude. To have more success and
achieve more happiness is not a function of
effort alone, nor even of intelligence. All our

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CREATIVE PRAYER

outward experiences are the result of our in-
ner attitude projected onto the interface of
real life: the world. Our thought today is our
reality tomorrow, it’s as simple as that.

Creative prayer helps to create positive re-
ality in transforming our thought structures.

Many of us are driven by negative inner
scripts written in early childhood. Some of
these inner programs, or some elements of
them, may even have been imprinted on our
mind during former existences.

These inner programs drive us uncon-
sciously and if they are negative, they bring
about frustration and unsatisfying or even
hurting life experiences. This is because inner
programs are composed of thought patterns
and emotional patterns which, since they are
repetitive, hold us within a vicious circle of

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LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

frustrating life experiences that in turn seem
to justify or to confirm our negative worldview.

Positive reality and success, happiness and
fulfillment are not a chance; they are pro-
grammed! However, the will and intention
alone to change our inner program are not
enough. They are necessary for the start, and
even the primary condition for it, but they
cannot do all the work needed to erase dec-
ades or even centuries of negative self-
programming.

This is so because much of our inner pro-
gram is unconscious. We are not aware of it
and have the impression that all comes upon
us from outside.

Forgive and Choose
Therefore the first thing to do, once we
really want to change, is to accept that we are
not driven by outside forces or other people,

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CREATIVE PRAYER

but uniquely by ourselves. It means to admit
that we are the only cooks of our destiny
soup; which in turn means that we have to
forgive others and ourselves, and this regu-
larly, just like something we do naturally, like
breathing.

After forgiving we are open to access our
inner program using relaxation and medita-
tion or some form of spontaneous art to get
connected to our subconscious mind.

In the relaxed state then, we calmly recite
our prayer, which deeply penetrates into our
subconscious mind, especially if we repeat
this procedure several times per day, and over
a certain period of time.

The problem for many of us is our lack of
persistence. We tend to give up after a short
while, assuming the method did not work be-
cause we did not see immediate results. Skep-

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LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

ticism really is an impediment to personal
growth. It leads to nowhere, or, yes, it leads to
more skepticism. High achievement is easily
brought about by an attitude that is humble,
and somewhat childlike.

I know that most people belittle this kind of
attitude but not only does the Gospel call it
the direct way to heaven, but it is in my obser-
vation also the attitude that most highly gifted
people maintain.

To enhance creativity and to boost our tal-
ents, there is nothing more productive than
play. Our creativity is at its peak level when we
play, just like children do. This is so because in
this state of mind, the natural balance within
our inner selves is restored because our inner
parent and our inner adult are put at rest. It
means that the inner criticizer, the naughty
observer is not any more part of the game.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

This is of course a temporary condition, but
a very important one, as every artist knows.
We have to give our inner child this freedom
of expression once in a while, and these are
the moments of bliss every creator knows to
tell a story about.

Positive thinking leads to faith, a strong
conviction that you will always attract the very
best to you. Faith is not a mysterious grace
fallen from heaven for select beings; it is avail-
able for everyone. It comes about not by
chance, but by the constant intention to bene-
fit others that is sustained and nourished by
positive and empowering prayer.

Keep It Short
Creative prayer works with mantra-like for-
mulas that we repeat to ourselves in a relaxed
state so that they become part of our uncon-
scious thought pattern. Our overall mental at-

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LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

titude reflects the program that we run in our
subconscious mind. This program is com-
posed of rational and irrational elements, and
it seems that emotional content and generally
what is related to pictorial thinking finds eas-
ier access to this part of our mind. Publicity
exploits this fact very profitably.

Creative prayer uses the greatly enhanced
receptivity of the brain during the alpha
state— a state where our brain runs on longer
brain waves than usual—in order to trigger
significant changes deep down in our subcon-
scious mind.

Humans are special in that they can re-
create creation. They do it with their mind, us-
ing imagination as a tool. All our great artists,
scientists and business people have shown
that it is possible, long before we were talking
about virtual reality, to create worlds within a

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CREATIVE PRAYER

world. And if we go through the biographies
of very imaginative people, we can see that
they have created their own world, a world
that is usually quite different from the world of
the common man who takes reality for
granted.

Create Your Own Reality
We have already asked the question ‘What
is Reality?’

Now let us inquire further. Is reality a fixed
concept that we can define and that is the
same for all of us? My observation is rather
that there are seven billion realities on this
world, in every head one—or even more than
one. If we take multiple personalities, we can
see that their brain creates different worlds,
one for every split self. Different personalities
live in different worlds since they perceive re-
ality in a different way.

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LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

Quantum physics with its puzzling insight
that the outcome of every experiment de-
pends on the observer perspective corrobo-
rates this observation.

There is a relativity theory which goes far
beyond the one Einstein is credited with, or
perhaps we have conceived Einstein’s obser-
vations in a much too limited fashion.

What if this relativity theory was actually a
universal concept in the cosmos, more than a
mere science theory but a philosophical con-
cept? You only need to remember how you
see the world when you are angry, and how
different it seems to you when you are content
and happy. The inside and the outside are
one! When we are black inside we encounter
black outside. It is very strange but when we
are filled with negative emotions, we encoun-
ter negative people, unlucky, unfortunate

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CREATIVE PRAYER

people, those who are mutilated, either physi-
cally or mentally. Yet when we are positive and
happy, the world seems populated with an-
gels. This is not a trick of our imagination. It is
because we project our inside world toward
the outside and thus re-create creation.

We use to distinguish our emotional life
from our mental life or mental attitude. In fact,
the two are not separated. Or, to put it more
precisely, the mental encompasses the emo-
tional. The mental is the broader concept. It is
directly linked to the universal or cosmic spirit.

If we accept that our mental reality encom-
passes all our feelings and emotions, and also
our irrationality, we can easily comprehend the
idea that the inner reality is at the basis of all
our shortcomings, like a seed which produces
a monster or a wonderful landscape, a demon
or an angel.

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LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

Yet we have to go farther and see that the
dualistic concept which distinguishes good
and bad, white and black, yang and yin, male
and female, is a concept as well, a product of
our mind—and not the mind itself.

The mind at its origin is pure and un-
touched, and it is the source of a multitude of
virtual realities; it bears a potentiality full of
beauty yet a beauty that we cannot grasp nor
evaluate. However, we can program the mind
to recreate its original creation—and thus
achieve to change our mindset.

Change Your Inner Program
All of us are driven by an inner program.
This program is a mixture of heritage, up-
bringing and self-programming.

Unfortunately for many of us, this program
is more or less negative, thus blocking the re-
alization of our evolutionary potential.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

Creative prayer erases or neutralizes the
negative content of this program bit by bit,
replacing it by a new and positive one.

Our inner program is reflected by our self-
talk. If we want to find out about it, we only
have to watch our self-talk or self-thought-talk
during one day.

Many of us are not conscious of their self-
talk. Perhaps you will be surprised, once you
observe it, how negative it is, how cynical, dis-
empowering, or how colored by guilt and fear.

We can transform our self-talk, so that it
serves to bring us forward instead of blocking
us; we can change our inner black magician
into a white magician. If we wait for others to
empower us, we may wait a lifetime!

We are at the root of our success or our
failure, we are the carpenters of our house of

44
LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

life, and it will look outwardly exactly how we
inwardly built it.

Be More Creative
Many of us feel they need more creativity
or spontaneity. They perform well within es-
tablished ways and routines, but when it
comes to invent, to create new forms, to
change established routines, to open up new
pathways of realization, they have difficulties
and feel blocked or inhibited.

This is predominantly the result of a mind-
set that is too much left-brain oriented, disre-
garding the wide range of creation potential
situated in our right brain hemisphere.

Our two brain hemispheres carry out dif-
ferent tasks and are organized in different
ways. We reach our full creative potential only
if we imply the right brain hemisphere in our

45
CREATIVE PRAYER

thought processes and thus think with both
sides of the brain simultaneously engaged.

This means that our thought processes
have to be coordinated so that they work as
one whole integrated thought process that is
based upon the harmonious functioning of
the full brain. Learning and creativity are
greatly enhanced from the moment we use
the full brain.

With our brain hemispheres it’s a bit like
with the potentialities of two persons. We
cannot say that one plus one equals two when
we talk of two people brainstorming for new
solutions. We all know that in this case we
have a multiplication factor or potentiality fac-
tor built in the cooperation of these two peo-
ple. In terms of human potential, one plus one
can go up to thousands. Left hemisphere plus

46
LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

right hemisphere is not two, but perhaps mil-
lions.

Relax Properly
Relaxation induces in our brain the so-
called alpha state, a condition of higher re-
ceptivity, which brings about a higher level of
coordination between our two brain hemi-
spheres. This following overview over all our
possible brain waves reveals that alpha waves
are among the longer brain waves.

The longest brain waves, predominant
when we are in deep slumber and not dream-
ing are delta waves. They are 0.5 to 3 Hz per
cycle. Second among long brain waves are
theta waves, predominant when we are
drowsy and drifting into sleep and dreams;
they are 4 to 7 Hz per cycle. Now, we got the
alpha waves which manifest when we are in a
state of relaxation or meditation, and in the

47
CREATIVE PRAYER

short interlude between wake and sleep; they
are 8 to 12 Hz. Finally, among the short brain
waves, we got the beta waves which are char-
acteristic for our thinking activity, for our wake
state, and for conversation; they are 13 to 30
Hz per cycle. Last not least, there are ultra
short brain waves, called gamma waves, which
are manifesting when our brain is in overdrive;
they are 31 to 120 Hz.

• Delta waves 0.5 – 3 Hz

Deeply asleep and not dreaming

• Theta waves 4 – 7 Hz

Drowsy and drifting down into sleep and dreams

• Alpha waves 8 – 12 Hz

State of relaxation or meditation

• Beta waves 13 – 30 Hz

Busily engaged in activity or conversation

• Gamma Waves 31 – 120 Hz

Hyper brain activity

In the state in which alpha waves are pre-
dominant in our brain, the two brain hemi-

48
LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

spheres have shown to be most coordinated.
This means that our thought processes while
we are in alpha are more integrated.

When are we in alpha? Typically, in the in-
terval between wake and sleep or, artificially
induced, while we do relaxation.

In alpha, typically our brain functions in a
way that left and right brain hemispheres work
together in synergistic cooperation.

Creative prayer over time reorients the
brain toward a more integrated functioning by
dissolving the habit to function only on the
left hemisphere, a habit we have been condi-
tioned to by our left-brain oriented education
and culture.

The second element that favors whole-
brain thinking is creative visualization, which
actively involves our spatial and pictorial
thought capabilities and helps our prayers to

49
CREATIVE PRAYER

be accompanied by pictorial content. This
makes for an integrated functioning of the
two hemispheres during visualization because
imagination is a right-brain quality while recit-
ing the prayers, as it involves language, is per
se a left-brain activity. Visualization therefore
enhances imagination and stimulates the
right-brain hemisphere to participate in the
creative prayer process.

Become Spontaneous
Creative prayer, last not least, enhances
spontaneity. Spontaneity seems for many
people something childish, something they
think they can do without. Yet spontaneity is
not only important in social life and on sur-
prise parties, but it is a major factor in the
process of creation. Without spontaneity, we
always turn around in the same circles, we al-

50
LEARN THE TECHNIQUE

ways stick to the same procedures, we always
trod the same old paths.

Spontaneity typically means doing before
thinking! Action without involving thought is
more integrated and generally more holistic
than thought-based action.

I do not suggest that we can entirely live
without thought and base our whole life on
spontaneous action. To state this would be
silly. What I am saying is that we need a crea-
tive balance between routine, on one hand,
and spontaneous creation, on the other.

Zen considers spontaneity as an essential
part of a creative and happy life. The tech-
niques Zen uses for spiritual growth and self-
development are designed to block thought
processes in order to free our potential for
spontaneous creation and action.

51
CREATIVE PRAYER

One of these techniques is the koan, a
riddle-like tricky way of expressing truth, a way
which is non-logical, non-rational or even im-
possible to grasp with thought. The koan
tricks our mind to block thought or to go
around the trap thought represents for true
creativity.

For someone who has never done Zen
meditation, it seems at the beginning almost
impossible to grasp the idea of the koan
technique or to resolve even a simple riddle.

This is not a question of intelligence! It is
the way we use our brain and how we organ-
ize thought. Only if we get used to imply intui-
tion in our thought processes, we can pro-
gress in Zen—and in life in general.

52
PRACTICE CREA-
TIVE PRAYER

Having practiced creative prayer for now
about twenty years, I can say with conviction
that, if pursued seriously and over a certain
period of time, at least about three months,
even deeply ingrained thought habits will be-
gin to change.

In addition, our thought process as a whole
will be restructured, and creativity and spon-
taneous expression will be greatly enhanced
so that inventive original thought can come
up freely and lets us find new solutions to old
problems.
CREATIVE PRAYER

These solutions are often so simple and
seem so evident that we may ask how we
could not find them before?

Relaxation can be done either progres-
sively with physical exercises, or with music. I
myself prefer relaxation with music because it
has the special advantage to work easily for
brain coordination.

This can be done with physical exercises,
too, but with a little more effort from the side
of the participant. Musical relaxation insures
that changes will be brought about effort-
lessly.

Observing the lives of geniuses shows that
they usually dislike hard and ineffective learn-
ing, which is perhaps why many of them drop
out of school. And yet they typically learn ten
times faster than average people.

54
PRACTICE CREATIVE PRAYER

This is so because they develop their own
learning techniques that bring learning and
pleasure together; they derive pleasure from
learning.

That is one of several reasons why they are
motivated for learning.

We are always motivated to engage in do-
ing what brings us pleasure. But there is more
to motivation. Even if learning as such gives us
pleasure, this pleasure will evaporate if the
matter we want to learn is felt as boring or off-
track.

How does creative prayer help to build
learning motivation? When we practice crea-
tive prayer, we receive directly or after a while
flashes of insight or we take spontaneous ini-
tiatives that show us what we are really inter-
ested in. It happens that people remember
early interests or childhood interests they had

55
CREATIVE PRAYER

completely forgotten about. Intuitively we
know everything about ourselves, yet often we
do not regard intuitions as a serious source of
insight and knowledge. Our culture and edu-
cational systems do not favor this knowledge
and even more or less destroy it.

Learning Motivation
A very simple but powerful prayer for build-
ing learning motivation and ability is:

Learning is easy and enjoyable for me.

Teaching Motivation
For teachers, the corresponding prayer
would be:

Teaching is easy and enjoyable for me.

The enthusiastic teacher, the one who
teaches with joy and derives pleasure from

56
PRACTICE CREATIVE PRAYER

teaching, conveys implicitly that the learning
process is an exciting adventure, even without
directly teaching learning skills. Anyway, what
are learning skills for? No learning skill can re-
late the pleasure the learning process itself
can provide, and no learning technique can
build the motivation for learning. A technique
is a technique, nothing more and nothing less.
It is a tool for realizing something on a practi-
cal level.

Learning and Techniques
Yet techniques do not generally affect our
inner attitudes, our motivation, or our mental
disposition. I do not talk now about mind-
techniques, of course. I talk about techniques
like a piano technique, a type-writing tech-
nique, a carving technique, a mathematical
technique, and so on.

57
CREATIVE PRAYER

For most of us learning was and is an expe-
rience directly related to techniques, to the
learning of techniques. Yet learning at its ori-
gin is not something linked to a technique.
And there are many forms of knowledge other
than techniques. I think that learning motiva-
tion even evaporates if we concentrate exclu-
sively on learning techniques.

Practicing creative prayer, we develop
natural confidence in our inner wisdom and its
guidance, and we avoid over-stretching our-
selves.

Self-Healing
There are basic affirmations that open our
inner potential. Once we are in deep relaxa-
tion and our mind is open and receptive, we
can begin affirming:

58
PRACTICE CREATIVE PRAYER

Every day and in every way, I am feeling
better and better.

This simple suggestion, developed by Dr.
Émile Coué, effects miracles; he was one of
the first pioneers of suggestive healing. In his
hospital in Nancy, France, he let his patients
repeat this powerful mantra while they were
relaxed, and doing some repetitive activity
such as sewing or embroidery.

Self-Acceptance
This mantra can be varied. Here is a prayer
for self-acceptance:

Every day, in all respects, I approve more of
myself.

In fact, many people are at pains with ac-
cepting themselves. What happens if we do
not entirely approve of ourselves? Well, in that

59
CREATIVE PRAYER

case we continuously try to mold ourselves
into others’ expectations or what we believe
they expect from us. As a result, we are out of
our center and cannot realize our full poten-
tial. In addition, we feel stressed and unhappy.
The stress to comply with others’ needs can
affect one’s health and even cause heart dis-
ease. A prayer for counteracting to this would
be:

I realize my full potential from inside out.

The Principle of Inner and
Outer Harmony
When I first got involved with scientific
prayer, twenty years ago, reading Joseph
Murphy’s The Power of Your Subconscious
Mind (1962/1982), I was especially moved by
Dr. Murphy’s stressing the necessity to formu-
late our needs in a way to bring good not only
to ourselves, but also to others.

60
PRACTICE CREATIVE PRAYER

And I took this principle of harmony as my
point of departure. In fact, I had encountered
situations before that time that everybody ex-
cept me would have considered as very unfor-
tunate. All my friends asked me where I took
my optimism from?

But my faith in a good delivery seemed to
win over their skepticism; after having done
creative prayer for a few months, I heard from
a growing number of persons, including my
psychiatrist that I had ‘completely changed.’ I
myself was not much aware of it, besides the
simple fact that I felt better about myself.

I namely had stopped to constantly judge
and criticize myself as well as feeling guilty for
some of my habits. Well-meaning friends also
revealed to me that before this fundamental
change, I had tried to justify myself to a point
to apologize for my very existence. One said:

61
CREATIVE PRAYER

‘It was up to a point that you tried to apolo-
gize for your mother having put you in the
world.’

62
ACTIVATE SELF-
HEALING

Healing and self-healing are important is-
sues in our times of turmoil, transformation
and global change. Healing has a more uni-
versal connotation than mere curing a sick-
ness. Whereas people, when their body is af-
fected, may consult a physician and when they
have a mental health problem go to a psycho-
therapist, they may hesitate to see anybody
when they feel empty, depressed and bored
with life.

Depression is more complex and perhaps
more dangerous than any physical ailment,
and therefore it cannot be healed by palliative
CREATIVE PRAYER

medicine. Some will see a spiritual healer,
minister or counselor, but most will stay within
their shell of mistrust that is in most cases the
reason why they cannot get help. And this
mistrust in turn is not a fancy but has well
founded reasons in the past of these people.

There may have been some form of abuse
or a heavy loss of trust in life, and in people.
There are wounds that need to heal but that
often have never been identified since these
wounds are invisible.

The solution, then, can only come from our
own inner source and not from outside sense-
givers. But this source has to be found before
this can happen; its existence must be ac-
knowledged so that its healing powers can be
activated. This means we have to connect to
it, and by doing so get embedded in our

64
ACTIVATE SELF-HEALING

original continuum. Thus healing is first of all
self-healing.

How to activate this self-healing process?
How to trigger the process of linking back to
our primary source of being, to the I-AM force
in us?

There are several ways. One of the easiest
and certainly the most practical one is creative
prayer. The fantastic thing about this tech-
nique is that it is similar to Lao-tzu’s famous
wuwei or action through non-action.

On the outside level, we really do nothing
else but reciting some affirmations. But inside
a lot is going to change. And this form of
medicine, unlike most other medicine, has
really no side effects. The most marvelous is
perhaps that our inner wisdom is triggered
and activated which means that—

‣ We attract every possible help we may need;

65
CREATIVE PRAYER

‣ We are freed from resistance to accepting
this help;

‣ We are protected from becoming a victim of
charlatans;

‣ We are peacefully freed from negative rela-
tionships;

‣ We are gradually building a new self-image.

66
BUILD SELF-
CONFIDENCE

In the old myths and fairy tales the hero is a
person who, through the patient mastering of
all kinds of obstacles, got to gain the princess
and the kingdom. He is rewarded because he
achieved inner unity, symbolized by the prin-
cess, as well as outer standing, symbolized by
the kingdom.

All heroes are driven by an idea, be it mar-
riage with the king’s daughter, be it the reali-
zation of some skill or mastership. The mar-
riage, love and sexual fulfillment and the chil-
dren as the fruit of this union symbolize the
élan vital, the life force that animates the hero,
CREATIVE PRAYER

his personal power or charisma, as we would
say today, his self-confidence, his inner
strength. It is the force that builds courage
which in turn conquers fear and leads us to
new horizons and achievements; it is our in-
herent power of renewal.

Optimism mixed with a good portion of
pride and unfettered self-confidence charac-
terizes for example the Virtuous Tailor in the
old German fairy tale.

What in fact is self-confidence? Is it faith,
and can it be enhanced through creative
prayer?

The etymology of the word is interesting.
Self-confidence means confidence in the self.
The self, as teaches Ramana Maharshi, is our
guide, our true I-AM force.

Self-confidence, it seems, is not pride let
alone vanity, but simply faith. What myths and

68
BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

fairy tales convey us is nothing different from
the wisdom that the religions teach: the best
way is to found one’s life upon the direction
that we receive through our higher self.

Creative prayer is the easiest and most
natural way to feed this faith constantly. Be-
hold, faith does not negate our human emo-
tions; it accepts and affirms them. It also ac-
cepts our weaknesses, our fears and doubts,
knowing that our greatest weakness will be
our greatest strength.

The faithful person knows that negating
the human nature is a defense, and is pro-
duced by fear. We could say that faith means
to believe that we will win despite our fears
and doubts, despite all that seems to be oth-
erwise an obstacle on our way to victory. Faith
helps to bring about this alchemical process in
us. What is life other than a magic circle, a cir-

69
CREATIVE PRAYER

cle that serves to fulfill certain tasks in order
for us to progress on our evolutionary spiral?

Reading fairy tales is revealing. They are
highly initiatory and express eternal truths and
wisdom in a beautiful picturesque language, a
language that also children understand be-
cause it is non-intellectual and poetic.

Fairy tales teach us that all masochistic
worldviews and fundamentalist religious opin-
ions are deeply wrong and that we are right,
right from the beginning, in pursuing the de-
sires of our heart. Fairy tales encourage us to
work on ourselves to increase our strength,
self-confidence and courage since these
qualities are highly important to succeed in
whatever we want to do.

This is the reason why fairy tales are so im-
portant for children and adolescents. And
they reach the deeper mind of our children

70
BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

much more directly than our ordinary lan-
guage does because they are written in the
language of poetry which is the language of
the unconscious mind, the language of hyp-
nosis, and the language of children. And it is
the language of creative prayer. It is the lan-
guage in which our various religious scriptures
originally were drafted, be it the Torah, the
Bible, the Koran, the Vedas or others.

This language is rich in symbols, simple in
semantics and grammar, yet colorful and sug-
gestive. It is the language of the old myths
and sagas. When we listen to this language, it
sounds organic, simple and powerful. But eve-
ryone who has tried to write it knows how dif-
ficult it is to convey the world of dream and
occult mythology with ordinary words.

Folk wisdom says one had to be born a
poet. Yet people who either have successfully

71
CREATIVE PRAYER

followed psychotherapy or found inner peace
through prayer or meditation unanimously
testify that the language of poetry once of a
sudden begins to flow like water from a well.

Gabrielle Carmi, an inspirational author
from Switzerland, reports that she wrote her
texts for the most part after long meditations
and that these texts were, to her own surprise,
written in a poetical imaginative language that
she could barely identify as being her own, so
different was it from her ordinary writing style.

I do not say that we need a therapy to get
there; whatever we use to become centered
and find inner peace will produce amazing re-
sults, if only, as I pointed out in the beginning,
we believe that this event is a probability and
accept it as such. This means that we do not
shut any door or exclude any potential out-
come when we start with the prayers.

72
BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

If, for example, we prefer using relaxing
music to get into a different state of con-
sciousness, or we use colors, or we make
spontaneous drawings, or else engage in
automatic writing, it makes no difference.

We all have preferences and should re-
spect them, because all these different ways
lead to the same source.

A good way also is to paint or print a sym-
bol on top of a page and then write a one-
page impression about this symbol, a sponta-
neous text that simply expresses what the
symbol triggered in our emotions and in our
intuition.

The themes and contents of such tales can
reveal surprising inner truths; they in fact de-
liver messages from our subconscious mind.
They often give hints to our present life situa-

73
CREATIVE PRAYER

tion and can show new ways and solutions to
problems that burden us.

When we assume the power of our imagi-
nation, we will use it when we do creative
prayer. However, since our capacity of imagi-
nation and visualization is individually very dif-
ferent, creative visualization is not a must. In
fact, we can do without. While this may
slightly retard the outcome of our prayers, the
absence of visual images does not render
creative prayer ineffective.

The most important, to repeat it, is not
visualization but relaxation before starting our
daily prayer sessions. This is so because our
brain is something like a bioelectric organism;
it runs on frequencies, as we have seen al-
ready. Depending on the state of mind in
which we are, the length of our bioelectric
brain waves is different. For example, when

74
BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

we are fully awake, our brain works predomi-
nantly on beta waves. When we sleep, we are
in theta or even delta.

Particular attention merits the alpha state
because when our brain works predominantly
on alpha waves, it has certain very valuable
characteristics: it is highly coordinated and ex-
tremely receptive. As the alpha state is the
state in which we are between wake and
sleep, we actually do not need to learn any
sophisticated relaxation technique to get into
alpha, except we want to induce the light
trance at other times of the day. For this pur-
pose, for example for creating art, doing
brainstorming, or for finding new ideas, we
may resort to any relaxation technique, such
as progressive relaxation or relaxation with
music.

75
CREATIVE PRAYER

Progressive relaxation has been created in
1926 by Professor Jacobsen from Harvard Uni-
versity, USA. It is a technique that relaxes the
mind through relaxing the body. It progresses
step-by-step, hence the term, typically by re-
laxing an arm, then a leg, then the neck, the
eye muscles, and so on. The secret behind
this simple technique is what we today call
biofeedback. When I want to relax, my mere
will to relax is by far not enough to really get
me into deep relaxation. I need my body to
help me. The body helps by giving a feed-
back. So I simply tell my body what to do. I
say:

—When I relax my arm, I get a slightly hot
sensation in the arm muscles.

And the body responds by creating a warm
sensation in your arm. Thus, the body feed-
back reinforces your intention to relax. When

76
BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

you feel hotter every time, you go on doing
this with another limb of your body; this feed-
back greatly helps your mind to really relax,
and focus. It’s a fantastic technique because
it’s so simple and so effective. Its effectiveness
comes from the fact that our body is intelli-
gent.

I myself prefer and practice relaxation with
music simply because I have more experience
with music than with psychosomatic tech-
niques. This is so because I am a musician,
first of all, before being a lawyer, writer or
coach. This does not mean that I belittle Dr.
Jacobsen’s technique, but I think it’s better to
stick to what you really know.

By simply playing some relaxing tunes on
the piano, I was able once to hypnotize a
classroom with more than fifty orphan chil-
dren, during my working as a volunteer with

77
CREATIVE PRAYER

orphans in Jamaica in 1988. After about fif-
teen minutes, all children had their heads on
their arms and were found to be in deep
slumber. And this was the case even with
highly disturbed and insomniac children. As
the German orphanage director could not be-
lieve what the teacher told her, she ran out of
her office to see with her own eyes what she
called ‘a miracle’.

Highly self-managed persons who are free
of bodily tensions and negative emotions are
able to switch consciously their state of mind
from beta to alpha, thereby opening their in-
ner space for the reception of creative intui-
tion, inspiration and a higher form of energy
which is involved in creation.

When we are relaxed, we can use one of
the following prayers in order to build more

78
BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

self-confidence. Every prayer has to be re-
peated over and over again in the alpha state:

PRAYER ONE

I am naturally, comfortably, and more and
more sure of myself.

PRAYER TWO

I feel more and more myself and self-
secured in every situation.

PRAYER THREE

I trust my innate wisdom to realize all my
gifts and talents.

79
CREATE INNER
PEACE

Here I would like to unfold a regard on how
to realize inner peace.

Many religions have tried to force peace
upon man by dogma, prohibitions and pun-
ishment. Clerical and worldly forces have im-
prisoned the human animal in a set of tight
rules, laws and prescriptions that resulted in
rendering man a violent creature, full of con-
tempt, rebellion, strife and turmoil.

To get out of this net of obligations and the
feeling of oppression that goes along with it,
man is caught in an endless pursuit of pleas-
ure. To make it worse, through the split in
CREATIVE PRAYER

man’s mental and emotional setup as a result
of the schizoid dualism that judging our emo-
tions in good and bad ones brings about,
man’s psyche is divided in a conscious or offi-
cial part and an unconscious or unofficial one.

Through the process of so-called civiliza-
tion and primarily the school system with mass
indoctrination and the disregard of the indi-
vidual as a unique soul-being, humanity has in
fact devoluted since the end of the great Mi-
noan and other pre-patriarchal cultures of An-
tiquity, and evolution has made it only in the
tiny range of technological advancement
while in all other areas of life, we are today
more barbarous than eight or twelve thousand
years ago.

The solution for world peace is entirely dif-
ferent from what clerical and worldly powers
have ever taught us. In fact, only those who

82
CREATE INNER PEACE

were considered as heretics, saints or proph-
ets have told the truth. Buddha, when he was
alive, found truth by human struggle and suf-
fering, but after his death his teachings were
perverted into their exact contrary. Through
levitating the man Buddha into a god-like
tower of virtue, the applicability of his teach-
ings for us was eroded. And the same hap-
pened with the teaching of J. Krishnamurti
who, in accordance with the Buddha, taught
total freedom as the only viable modus
vivendi at the root of man’s quest for sense
and soul.

To establish inner peace and peace in the
outside world, we must first of all embrace all
that is in us. This will enable us to embrace the
world, and all-that-is.

What happens when we repress certain de-
sires or emotions and discard them from our

83
CREATIVE PRAYER

awareness? We will lose sight over them and
at the end they will take over control and
dominate us. Inner peace can only be estab-
lished if we make an end to our inner fight
and overcome our fragmentation.

Why should we make peace? What is the
value of being in peace with oneself or oth-
ers?

I think that for many people peace is but a
concept or a nice word or some kind of ideal
but nothing they really give a priority in their
lives. However, if you do not put energy in
what you want to achieve, nothing will hap-
pen. It means we have to put energy into this
wish, this very desire to be in peace with all-
that-is.

This simply means that, if we want some-
thing to grow, we have to care for the seed.
We have to water the plant, put it in the sun or

84
CREATE INNER PEACE

give some fertilizer. The same applies for our
inner life. If we want to let something grow in-
side of us, we have to take care of the seed,
water it and put it in the sun, the sun of our
inner energy! Put some energy into peace
also means to take some energy out of war,
the war within ourselves, our inner struggles,
and the war with others or what we call ‘cir-
cumstances.’

Circumstances are but reflections of our in-
ner life, projected upon the interface of out-
ward reality. From our inner state, the screen
of our thought and our conscious and uncon-
scious beliefs, energy irradiates into the uni-
verse that brings about changes; it drives us
and others to various kinds of actions.

Depending on the level of integration and
harmony of our inner actors, the resulting ac-
tions are effective or ineffective, constructive

85
CREATIVE PRAYER

or destructive, harmonious or disruptive. All
those beliefs form a coherent projection sys-
tem, something like a slide projector we carry
inside of us. On this screen we project images,
memories, fantasies and visions. We can con-
trol the outcome, the projection, by control-
ling our thought and our emotions.

It is through this form of inner control that
we handle intelligently our outer world and
lives.

I would like to recall the old Chinese gen-
eral Sun-tzu who wrote the legendary book
The Art of War. Sun-tzu who was a teacher not
only of war but also of life said that in order to
maintain peace we must prepare for war. This
sounds like a paradox and seemingly is one.
Sun-tzu knew that peace is not a static situa-
tion and that for establishing peace we need
to constantly maintain a dynamic balance be-

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CREATE INNER PEACE

tween inner and outer forces. As such, peace
can only be maintained through balancing
those forces or energies. And this is again not
something we do once forever, but which
needs to be done at every moment, con-
stantly, at every moment of our life, as a never-
ending task.

This also means that we have to deal with
everything in us and around us that is disturb-
ing peace, by first of all taking it serious, and
second, work on its integration. Taking inner
struggles serious means to stop the struggle,
the inner war, by giving a higher priority to in-
ner peace.

How, then, to stop the inner war? We stop
the inner war by giving up moralistic concepts
because those concepts make for inner war.

Second, we do it by meditating about
peace instead of staying with should’s and

87
CREATIVE PRAYER

ought-to’s that moralistic upbringing has in-
stilled in us. Meditating on peace does not
necessarily mean to sit cross-legged for hours
every day. It does not mean either to declare
peace an ideal to strive after. Ideals are in
practice as destructive as moralistic concepts
and get us into inner conflicts instead of help-
ing us to integrate conflicting opposites.

Meditation means first of all acceptance of
all our inner drives and conflicts and second,
passive awareness. When we are truly atten-
tive at every moment to the whole of our inner
and outer life experience, new integrated so-
lutions will come up that show us the way to
peace.

These solutions will come up spontane-
ously and intuitively. Intellectual constructs or
mere reasoning will not lead us out of our in-
ner chaos and fight. Nor will the big words of

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CREATE INNER PEACE

famous gurus, be they from a spiritual or a
business background.

The only guru that can truly help you is
your inner guide, your true self. It is thus your
task to find and connect to your self and to
develop and allow its involvement in your
daily thought and work.

89
POSTFACE

In this article we have seen that the ‘spiri-
tual track’ is not necessarily the honest track,
nor is it the track that leads to a transpersonal
understanding of reality.

Stan Grof, the founder of transpersonal
psychology, has stressed that for developing
an authentic spiritual understanding of life, it
is paramount to get beyond social and cul-
tural conditioning.

This was the reason why Grof experi-
mented several years with LSD and psychoac-
tive drugs, because he saw that when humans
get to strip off their conditioning, by whatever
means, they are suddenly connected, totally
CREATIVE PRAYER

and forever, with their inner being, their
unique spiritual identity.

And by being connected to their own at-
man, their own spirit guide, they are also con-
nected with brahman, the universal spirit, the
cosmic intention that is the creator force for
the whole of the universe.

The late Albert Hofmann, of Sandoz Labo-
ratories in Switzerland, discoverer of LSD, was
a naturally religious person, whose intention
was to help us discover our own unique spiri-
tual connectivity, without being sidetracked by
organized religion and ideology.

Terence McKenna, an explorer of reality,
and parallel realities, came to exactly the
same conclusions, as he asserted that looking
beyond the fence of our cultural conditioning
is a key element in true spiritual growth and
evolution. When you remain on the level of

92
POSTFACE

the persona, the social mask, you cannot but
follow your sense-givers, your religions, your
ideological molds and concepts, and you are
disconnected from your true mission and
dharma.

To connect with your soul reality, you need
to unwind this social and cultural conditioning
as much as possible. This does however not
mean that you will end up as a clochard or
hermit.

It means that you remain questioning the
outside reality you are facing, the culture in
which you are embedded, the society of which
you are a citizen.

This quest, if it is honest and nonjudgmen-
tal, is individual and personal, and it’s a matter
of peaceful transformation.

It will not trigger a bloody revolution, nor
will you go out to missionarize for your point

93
CREATIVE PRAYER

of view. In this sense, this personal transforma-
tion, this revolution is, to use Krishnamurti’s
words, psychological—and not political.

I have shown in this essay that one of the
most important elements in Life Authoring is
creative prayer, a self-coaching technique that
helped me heal the emotional scars originat-
ing from adverse childhood experiences, and
a climate, in which I grew, that I felt as oppres-
sive and manipulative.

I have equally shown in this essay that crea-
tive prayer is not a religious concept and was
not taken over from any religion; it doesn’t in-
terfere with your religious concepts and it
doesn’t sidetrack you from your particular re-
ligious worship and dogma. It is not normative
in the sense that it doesn’t consider itself to
be the only way there is for self-coaching,
healing and building self-confidence.

94
POSTFACE

In this sense, it is humble enough to rec-
ognize that there are many ways to perceive
reality, and that agnosticism is not to be
frowned upon simply because it denies a god
concept.

Let me repeat here the perhaps most im-
portant reason why I talk about prayer, and
not about auto-suggestion, self-suggestion,
or auto-hypnosis. First of all, and despite of
some overlapping, creative prayer is not to be
confounded with auto-hypnosis.

You are not going to hypnotize yourself
when you repeat positive affirmations. You
stay fully awake, while you are, and should be,
relaxed.

The overlapping here is that relaxation is
indeed the first stage in the process of hyp-
notic induction, but only the first of several
stages.

95
CREATIVE PRAYER

That is why I speak of overlapping, but still
the two techniques have nothing in common
except that they start out with relaxation.

So far, so good. However, there is well a
difference between creative prayer and prayer
concepts that involve a personal god. To
stand for a god concept is a potential source
of strife, and a potential source of antinomy.

It is for that and other reasons that I chose
to define prayer in a way to be valid even
without a god concept. Without using such a
concept, I however fully affirm that there is in-
ner guidance, that there is a universal kind of
intelligence, that there is a creator force, and
that there is resonance and synergy in a uni-
verse that is conscious, responsive and holo-
graphic.

Not many would have guessed just half a
century ago that the scientific revolution

96
POSTFACE

would also bring about a religious revolution,
and at the same time a psychological revolu-
tion.

When we pray, we address that universal
field, called the quantum field, the zero-point
field, the quantum scale, or the quantum vac-
uum. While these scientific terms differ in
some ways, what is basic to all of them is the
fact that this universal field is both an energy
field, and an information field.

We have here, on the subatomic level, a
convergence phenomenon set in place, where
all experience in our universe can be de-
scribed as a constant, multi-vectorial and
complex energy and information flow that is
instantly updated when any new information
arises.

Some speak of the Akashic field, or the
Akasha library of emotional patterns, or the

97
CREATIVE PRAYER

universal pattern library. Plato had perhaps
the first vision of that field when he spoke
about the eidós, the ideas.

Hence, apart from the technique itself, that
I have sufficiently explained in this article, it is
important to behold that creative prayer is a
modern technique to connect with our inner
quantum field level, also called atman, in
Hindu religion, the holy spirit of Christian re-
ligion, the indwelling spirit in the Sufi esoteric
teaching, or the Buddha Nature known in Zen.

In its functional usefulness, creative prayer
is to be defined as a technique that helps in-
ner healing, inner growth, soul expansion and
soul healing, without having in any way the in-
tention to replace the prayer that religions de-
fine and ordain for their followers.

In fact, I have been reproached by some of
those who know about my polyglot spirit that

98
POSTFACE

regarding creative prayer, I was unnecessarily
restricting myself to a ‘Christian’ mindset, and
that the method could not be possibly ap-
plied by people who adhere to other religious
beliefs and dogmas.

I strongly contradict. While Ernest Holmes
and Joseph Murphy, the founders of the
original method they called ‘scientific prayer’
were indeed focused upon a god-concept
and applied the prayer technique they in-
vented in that way, I was opposed from the
start to their dogmatic views and for that very
reason renamed the method into Creative
Prayer.

Later I found out to my surprise that the
term is since long known in the Sufi tradition,
which is the wisdom quest of Islam. I believe
that not only Christians, but also Muslims,
Jews and Buddhists, and even Taoists can

99
CREATIVE PRAYER

practice creative prayer, precisely because the
method is not based upon a particular relig-
ion, nor a god-concept.

And let’s go up one level in the hierarchy of
wisdom, and ask what prayer in fact repre-
sents? In other words, is prayer worship? Is
prayer an expression of being signed up with
a particular religious faith? It may be so inside
of religions, but it’s not outside. In real life,
prayer simply is a form of connecting with our
inner source, our inner wisdom, our inner
guide.

Thus prayer is a wisdom quest just as the
sweat-lodge is with native Americans, or sacri-
fice was for ancient religions, or regular tither
is for the practicing Jew.

And there is a reason why I called this
method creative prayer.

100
POSTFACE

Psychoneuroimmunology delivered much
evidence for the fact that mind and body are
mere concepts; there is simply no such sepa-
ration; body and mind are one, and there is
intelligence in every cell, and our emotions
are not in the brain, as modern psychology
still wrongly believes, but in the human energy
field. There is also our memory, as it’s a func-
tion of emotional flow, while the matrix is
somehow reflected in the brain, but that is like
the copy of an image. The image itself is con-
tained in the aura or luminous body.

This being said, I made it clear enough in
this booklet that I refuse to ‘agnosticize’ my
technique, calling it ‘auto-suggestion’ or the
like because we are not machines, we are not
mechanical devices, we are not ‘gadgets’ of
nature, but spirit beings by nature. We are
connected in the quantum field and religio

101
CREATIVE PRAYER

simply means to connect with our primordial
energy source.

Prayer is not really an intellectual process.
It’s actually your body talking to your body,
your physical body talking to the complete
body, which consists of seven layers of energy
that have different density.

Hence, prayer, in the sense not as religions
use it, but in the sense of a psychological tool,
is a way to connect with the quantum field, by
sending out vibrations into the universe that
return to us in the form of what we desire, be
it money, wealth, love, relationships of value,
business connections, good health, wellbeing,
and so forth. That’s how it works, not more,
and not less.

102
Glossary

Terms

Alpha, Alpha State

Our two brain hemispheres carry out differ-
ent tasks and are organized in different
ways. We reach our full creative potential
only if we imply the right brain in our
thought processes and thus think with both
brain hemispheres simultaneously en-
gaged.

This means that our thought processes
have to be coordinated so that they work as
one whole integrated thought process. Not
only learning but all our creative potential is
greatly enhanced from the moment we use
the full brain. relaxation induces in our brain
the so-called alpha-state, a state of higher
receptivity, which brings about higher coor-
dination between brain hemispheres. In the
state in which alpha waves (9-13 Hz) are
predominant, the two brain hemispheres
CREATIVE PRAYER

have shown to be most coordinated. When
are we in alpha? Typically, in the interval be-
tween wake and sleep or, artificially in-
duced, while we do relaxation. In alpha,
typically our brain functions in a way that
left and right brain hemispheres work in
sync, through a process of synergistic and
complementary cooperation. This greatly
enhances memory and increases our overall
learning capacities.

Brain and Mind Research

Latest consciousness research strongly sug-
gests that mind and brain are not the same,
but that the brain is something like an inter-
face for the mind, and that, therefore, mind
is the larger notion, and bears an essential
connectedness with the whole of the uni-
verse and creation.

This holistic view of the brain-mind replaces
the former view that saw mind and brain as
separated and that gave an undue impor-
tance and exclusiveness to the human brain
in explaining cognition. Typically, this scien-
tific residue paradigm was unable to ex-
plain extrasensorial perception (ESP) and
generally, psychic phenomena.

104
GLOSSARY

Besides, this general agreement, systems
research has shed a particularly important
light upon the relationship between mind
and brain. Fritjof Capra explains in his book
The Web of Life (1997) that still back in 1994
the editors of an anthology titled Con-
sciousness in Philosophy and Cognitive
Neuroscience stated frankly in their intro-
duction: ‘Even though everybody agrees
that mind has something to do with the
brain, there is still no general agreement on
the exact nature of this relationship.’

He then explains that science was held by
Descartes’ assumption that mind is a thing,
the ‘thinking thing’ (res cogitans).

However, systems research has brought to
daylight that mind is not a thing but a
process—the process of cognition, which is
identified with the process of life itself. Ca-
pra then explains that the brain simply is
the structure through which this process of
cognition operations. The relationship be-
tween mind and brain, therefore is one be-
tween process and structure.

Capra finally adds that the entire structure
of the organism participates in the process
of cognition whether or not the organism
has a brain and a higher nervous system.
(Id., 175-176).

105
CREATIVE PRAYER

—David Bohm, Wholeness and the Implicate
Order (2002) and Thought as a System (1994),
Gregory Bateson, Steps to an Ecology of Mind
(2000), Fritjof Capra, The Turning Point (1982/
1987), The Web of Life (1996/1997), The Hidden
Connections (2002), Stanislav Grof, Beyond the
Brain (1985) and The Holotropic Mind (1993),
Michael Talbot, The Holographic Universe
(1992), Amit Goswami, The Self-Aware Universe
(1995), Dean Radin, The Conscious Universe
(1997), Lynne McTaggart, The Field (2002),
Hameroff et. al, Consciousness: 20 Scientists
Interviewed, DVD (2003).

Cartesian Science and Worldview

A Cartesian or Newtonian worldview is a life
philosophy marked by a dominance of de-
ductive and logical thinking to the detri-
ment of the qualities of the right brain such
as associative and imaginative thinking, and
generally fantasy. It’s also a worldview that
tends to disregard or deny dreams and
dreaming, extrasensorial, multisensorial
perception and ESP faculties, as well as
genuine spirituality.

The term Cartesian has been coined from
the name of French philosopher René Des-

106
GLOSSARY

cartes. While nature is coded in energy pat-
terns, Cartesian scientists deny the cosmic
energy field as a ‘vitalistic theory’; they have
split mind and matter into opposite poles.

Historically, and philosophically, it was not
René Descartes who has been at the origin
of this schizoid worldview, but the so-called
Eleatic School, a philosophical movement
in ancient Greece that opposed the holistic
and organic worldview represented by the
philosophy of Heraclites; but it was through
the affirmation and pseudo-scientific cor-
roboration of the ancient Eleatic dualism
that in the history of Western science, the
reductionist approach to reality, which is ac-
tually a fallacy of perception, became the
dominant science paradigm between ap-
proximately the 17th and the 20th centuries.

We are right now at a point in time where
this limited worldview is gradually being
overcome and replaced by the novel in-
sights of quantum physics, systems theory,
and a new holistic science paradigm that
connects us back to the oldest of wisdom
traditions.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

Consciousness

Consciousness basically consists of three
major elements: Perception, Information
Processing, and Energy.

The most important part of my scientific
observation of consciousness is that it con-
tains energy, the information field, or hu-
man energy field, so that energy must be
seen as a constituent part of it, next to per-
ception and information processing.

In Western scientific history, the energy part
of consciousness has been consistently
blinded out from scrutiny and occulted, to a
point that in modern society, there is a huge
knowledge gap about the human energy
field as a result of this cultural and religious
prohibition of the ‘tree of knowledge.’

Consequently, my consciousness research is
focused upon bringing in the missing links
so as to arrive at a unified field of integra-
tive perception and thus a coherent model
of consciousness.

—David Bohm, Wholeness and the Implicate
Order (2002), Thought as a System (1994),
Gregory Bateson, Steps to an Ecology of Mind
(2000), Fritjof Capra, The Turning Point (1987),
The Web of Life (1997), The Hidden Connec-

108
GLOSSARY

tions (2002), Amit Goswami, The Self-Aware
Universe (1995), Stanislav Grof, Beyond the
Brain (1985), The Holotropic Mind (1993), The
Three Levels of Human Consciousness (1993),
Hameroff, Newberg, Woolf, Bierman, Ra-
machandran, Chalmers, Consciousness: 20 Sci-
entists Interviewed, Director: Gregory Alsbury, 5
DVD Box Set (2003), Dean Radin, The Con-
scious Universe (1997), Lynne McTaggart, The
Field (2002), Michael Talbot, The Holographic
Universe (1992).

Creative Visualization

Creative Visualization is based on the in-
sight that through thought forms and emo-
tional patterns, we impact upon the outer
world, be this influence positive or nega-
tive.

Thus creative visualization helps us achieve
higher by teaching correct thinking and
right action, by changing our thoughts so as
to bring them in alignment with cosmic in-
tention. Creative visualization ideally ac-
companies creative prayer and can be said
to be a basic technique underlying positive
thinking. It is frequently used by athletes to
enhance their performance.

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CREATIVE PRAYER

For example, a golfer may visualize the
‘perfect’ stroke over and over again to men-
tally train muscle memory. It can also be
used to attract certain positive events or to
find the right partner or business partner.
Creative visualization is different from day-
dreaming in only one respect, namely that it
is intentional and purposeful. Creative visu-
alization is increasingly used in modern
psychotherapies, for stress relief and for
curing psychosomatic diseases.

Direct Perception

Direct Perception is the primary mode of
learning that nature applies in evolution.
Direct perception is the mode the human
brain uses to receive and store information
in its capacity as a passively organizing sys-
tem. The child learns his or her first lan-
guage through direct perception, the
picking-up of whole patterns, using the in-
tegrative and associative mode of the right
brain. Obedience and imitation are not the
appropriate means to develop the human
potential; therefore civilization can only
function on an outside or superficial level,
but not as a motor of integrating man into a
truly functional power unit that is operating
on all levels at once.

110
GLOSSARY

The mainstream educational system has put
this natural intelligent and holistic learning
mode upside down in forcing children to
learn with their left brain hemisphere only,
cutting off the necessary mode of synthesis
provided by the right brain hemisphere.
This is the single major reason why the
modern educational system, while it is very
costly, is totally ineffective, and brings
about people who are alienated from their
own inner source, out of touch as they are
with their innermost human potential. This
also is the reason for the astonishing lack of
creativity in the corporate world, that the
world-famous coach and corporate trainer
Edward de Bono deplored in his books.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence is one of the four
types of intelligence, which are logical-
rational intelligence, emotional intelligence,
graphical-spacial intelligence and tactile
intelligence. Emotional intelligence is espe-
cially active when it goes to understand re-
lationships, human affairs, and the psycho-
logical implications within them.

—Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
(1995).

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CREATIVE PRAYER

I Ching

The I Ching or Book of Changes is the old-
est of the Chinese classic texts. A symbol
system designed to identify order in what
appear to be chance events, it describes an
ancient system of cosmology and philoso-
phy that is at the heart of Chinese cultural
beliefs. It is based on the alternation of
complementary energies called Yin and
Yang, which are developmental poles that
by their alternation trigger inevitable
change. It is also based on the old integra-
tive philosophy of the five elements that is
part of many other esoteric science tradi-
tions. The philosophy centers on the ideas
of the dynamic balance of opposites, the
evolution of events as a process, and ac-
ceptance of the inevitability of change.

The I Ching consists of 64 hexagrams. Each
hexagram or kua is an energy pattern that is
a unique mix of the two base energies, yin
and yang, represented symbolically by
lines. Yang is represented by a solid line, yin
by a dotted line. Each hexagram is com-
posed of six lines, and two trigrams consist-
ing of three lines each. The lower trigram
deals with matters that are in their begin-
ning stage, from the start of a project until
about half of its realization. The upper tri-
gram deals with the culmination and the

112
GLOSSARY

end of processes or projects, positively or
negatively.

The I Ching has been a book for divination
and relief, and for spiritual learning for
many great and famous people such as
Confucius, Hermann Hesse, John Lennon,
Carl Gustav Jung, and many others. I per-
sonally consult the I Ching on a regular ba-
sis since 1990, as well as Astrology and the
Tarot since the 1980s.

—Richard Wilhelm, The I Ching or Book of
Changes (1967), Helmut Wilhelm, The Wilhelm
Lectures on the Book of Changes (1995), Hua-
Ching Ni, I Ching: The Book of Changes and
the Unchanging Truth (1999), Alfred Huang, The
Complete I Ching (1998), Richard Wilhelm &
Charles Baynes, The I Ching or Book of
Changes (1967), John Blofeld, The Book of
Changes (1965), Thomas Cleary, The Taoist I
Ching (1986), R.L. Wing, The I Ching Workbook
(1984).

Inner Selves

GENERALITIES

Inner Selves are energies in our psyche that
form part of our total and integral whole-
ness. In the ideal case, they should be bal-

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CREATIVE PRAYER

anced and in harmony with each other. This
means that all inner selves ideally should
work in sync, as a sort of inner team, in
which all members are fully awake and
communicate with each other. In most peo-
ple’s psyche, however, the inner child is
somnolent or asleep, and either the inner
parent or the inner adult dominate the psy-
che. While the truth about our inner selves
goes back to Antiquity, the insight in mod-
ern times has been made fruitful for psy-
chiatry through Eric Berne in 1950, the
founder of Transactional Analysis (TA).

He recognized three essential inner selves:
Inner Child, Inner Parent and Inner Adult. In
my own research and work with the inner
dialogue, I encountered the presence of
additional entities such as the Inner Con-
troller or Inner Critic as the instance in the
psyche that represents the societal, cultural
and moral values that we have internalized
through education and early conditioning. If
the Inner Critic hijacks the psyche, we are
unable to realize our love wishes, nor can
we be creative. In addition to these inner
selves, I encountered an entity of superior
wisdom that I called Lux and a shadow en-
tity I called Sad King and which embodied
repressed emotions that had turned into
sadistic drives.

114
GLOSSARY

INNER CHILD

Inner Child is a psychic entity, part-
personality, or psychic energy, created be-
tween our 7th and 14th year of life, and that
is part of our inner triangle. Positively, the
inner child energy is primarily emotional
and wistful, predominantly creative. It is the
motor of every human being’s creativity. It
can be said to be the creative motor, the
very source energy in humans that makes
that we can be spontaneous, creative and
sometimes a little mad, to go beyond the
limiting framework of the rational and re-
petitive mind. Negatively, the inner child is
either mute or cataleptic so that its energy
cannot manifest, or else its energy is domi-
nant in the psyche or turned upside-down
which makes an inner child that is rebel-
lious, capricious, willful or overbearing,
producing the ‘clochard’ personality, the
‘hippie’, the ‘anarchist’, the ‘eternal student’
and abuser of the social system.

INNER ADULT

Inner Adult is a psychic entity, part-
personality or psychic energy that repre-
sents our logical thinking, our reason, our
maturity. Positively, it makes for our bal-
anced decisions, our down-to-earth attitude
and our sense for daily responsibilities.
Negatively, the inner adult manifests as the

115
CREATIVE PRAYER

intellectual nerd or through emotional fri-
gidity, cynicism or an obsession to measure
human relations on a scale of reasonable-
ness or straightness without considering the
emotional dimension. The dominant inner
adult energy plays a major role in modern
education where it results in devastating
damage on the next generations’ emo-
tional integrity. The dominant inner adult
also produces the ‘professional skeptic’, the
obnoxious ‘total rationalist’ who considers
ten percent of the human nature as pre-
dominantly important, flushing the other
ninety percent down the toilet!

INNER PARENT

Inner Parent is a psychic entity, part-
personality or psychic energy that repre-
sents our inner value standards, our moral
attitudes, our caring for self and others, but
negatively also our judging others, our I-
know-better attitude or blunt interference
into the lives of others without regard for
their privacy. The dominant inner parent
energy plays a recurring role in tyrannical
and persecutory societal, religious and po-
litical systems.

INNER TRIANGLE/INNER TEAM

The term inner triangle or inner team is an
expression that denotes two things. First, it

116
GLOSSARY

is a summary of the main inner energies,
the inner child, inner adult and inner parent
who can be seen to be in a triangular rela-
tionship. Second, the expression also sug-
gests that there should be balance or har-
mony between these inner entities so that
neither of them dominates the psyche and
that they react flexibly, not in a stiff manner,
to any events that arise, or in communica-
tions with the outside world.

INNER DIALOGUE

The inner dialogue is a technique to get in
touch with our inner selves through relaxa-
tion or self-hypnosis and subsequent dia-
logues with one or several of our inner
selves, in a state of light trance. The state of
light trance can be self-induced, with no
facilitator needed, and outside of a psycho-
therapy. The inner dialogue should ideally
be fixed on paper, at least in the beginning,
because the voices that come up are very
soft and writing down the dialogues helps
to keep focus. The technique is also called
Voice Dialogue, for example by Stone &
Stone, in their book Embracing Our Selves
(1982). However, the expression could mis-
lead novice users as the ‘voices’ are not
really voices of course, as they are not to be
heard with our ears, but something like
flashes of intuition, or sudden precisely

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CREATIVE PRAYER

formulated thoughts that seem to come
‘from nowhere.’

Intuition

Intuition is inner knowledge that typically
manifests spontaneously and that is all-wise
and non-judgmental, broad in scope and
wistful; typically, intuition is transpersonal in
intent, not ego-based, thus manifesting
something like cosmic intention. In the old
wisdom traditions, intuition was more highly
valued than in modern consumer culture; it
was typically called ‘the knowledge of the
heart.’

Koan

Zen Buddhists learn the art of holistic dia-
logue. The whole of Zen training puts a
stress on the fallacies inherent in mere ver-
bal communication; the koan system they
developed is a unique way of transmitting
truth nonverbally. Zen considers spontane-
ity as an essential part of a creative and
happy life. The techniques Zen uses for self-
development are designed to block
thought processes in order to free humans’
potential for spontaneous creation and ac-
tion. The Koan is a way to get to directly

118
GLOSSARY

experience truth, by circumventing the
thought interface. This is how the non-
logical, non-rational and emotional realms
can be integrated.

Koans are riddles which are meant to make
the student of Zen realize the limitations of
logic reasoning. The irrational wording and
paradoxical content of these riddles make it
impossible to solve them via the thought
process. Hence, they are designed precisely
to stop the thought process and make sure
the student uses intuition, directly experi-
enced truth, for the direct perception of re-
ality.

Life Authoring

People generally know what authoring is, as
for example authoring a book. But can one
author one’s life? While this sounds some-
what queer and pretentious, I have thor-
oughly tested it before I came to present it
as a self-coaching method that facilitates
self-healing, by helping overcome an early
abuse trauma, healing depressions, and it
helps realizing unused talents, virgin poten-
tial, or an ‘old dream.’

I designed three concise elements, tech-
niques or activities in life authoring. None

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of them was invented by myself, but I have
developed them into elements of a coher-
ent system of tools, or method. They should
be done simultaneously, and on a daily ba-
sis for the time of at least one month. The
day should be started and ended by 5 to 15
minutes of Creative Prayer, then Story Writ-
ing should by preference be done in the
morning, and Voice Dialogue and Sponta-
neous Art in the late afternoon or evening.

Quantum Physics

DEFINITION

Quantum Physics or quantum mechanics is
a fundamental branch of theoretical physics
with wide applications in experimental
physics that replaces classical mechanics
and classical electromagnetism for the
subatomic realm. It is the underlying
mathematical framework of many fields of
physics and chemistry, including condensed
matter physics, atomic physics, molecular
physics, computational chemistry, quantum
chemistry, particle physics, and nuclear
physics. Along with general relativity, quan-
tum mechanics is one of the pillars of mod-
ern physics.

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GLOSSARY

THE UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLE

The once certain basic assumptions about
life, that were the pillars of Cartesian sci-
ence, were replaced by uncertainty. It was
by Werner Heisenberg that this often-
quoted uncertainty principle was estab-
lished in physics, and notoriously much to
the exasperation of Albert Einstein who re-
portedly objected ‘God does not play
dice!’

And it was perhaps through Werner Hei-
senberg that quantum physics was estab-
lished as a science. Vidette Todaro writes in
her elucidating study The Enigma of Energy
(1991):

VIDETTE TODARO-FRANCESCHI

It was but one small leap from the uncer-
tainty principle and the dual wave-particle
character of matter to physicist Niels Bohr's
theory of complementarity. He proposed
that on the quantum level nothing can be
divided into discrete parts. Everything is re-
lated; everything complements everything
else. Since it is impossible to completely
predict outcomes on a quantum level, we
are forced to look at the whole.
Furthermore, Bohr illuminated the philo-
sophical issues entwining complementarity
in the quantum physics world with psychic

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experience and the study of living organ-
isms in general. The simple fact is that eve-
rything is inseparably connected. (Id., 37).

This has done us a lot of good because this
is more than just physics. It’s life. What im-
pact this new worldview can have upon
healing, Dr. Villoldo recognized and ex-
plained it in his bestselling book Shaman,
Healer, Sage (2000). He writes:

ALBERTO VILLOLDO

Physicist Werner Heisenberg developed a
key principle of quantum mechanics: that
one could determine either the velocity or
the position of an electron accurately, but
not both. The Heisenberg uncertainty prin-
ciple states that the act of observing an
event influences its outcome or destiny.
Heisenberg's discovery seems to indicate
that the ability to change the physical world
through the exercise of vision is very limited
once energy has manifested into form. The
time to change the world is before form has
emerged from the formless, before energy
has manifested into matter. Thus many of
the healing practices developed by sha-
mans heal conditions before they manifest
in the body, before old imprints in the Lu-
minous Energy Field have organized matter
into illness or misfortune. (Id., 131).

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GLOSSARY

NONLOCALITY

Another basic discovery of quantum physics
is nonlocality. Nonlocality means that ef-
fects be triggered by element A in element
B without element A and element B having
any form of physical connection. They can
in fact be light years away from each other.
Nonlocality, then, is not bound to relativity,
and effects therefore are not a function of
the speed of the light nor any higher veloc-
ity; in other words, they are instantaneous.
The term used for nonlocal effects is entan-
glement or quantum entanglement. An al-
ternative explanation was given by Rupert
Sheldrake who explains nonlocal effects by
morphic resonance.

As I am not a physicist, I will quote Dean
Radin, who writes in his book Entangled
Minds (2006):

DEAN RADIN

At a level of reality deeper than the ordinary
senses can grasp, our brains and minds are
in intimate communion with the universe.
It’s as though we lived in a gigantic bowl of
clear jello. Every wiggle—every movement,
event, and thought—within that medium is
felt throughout the entire bowl. Except that
this / particular form of jello is a rather pe-
culiar medium, in that it’s not localized in

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the usual way, nor is it squishy like ordinary
Jell-O. It extends beyond the bonds of or-
dinary spacetime, and it’s not even a sub-
stance in the usual sense of that word.
     Because of this nonlocal Jell-O in which
we are embedded, we can get glimpses of
information about other people’s minds,
distant objects, or the future or past. We
get this not through the ordinary senses
and not because signals from those other
minds and objects travel to our brain. But
because at some level of our mind/brain is
already coexistent with other people’s
minds, distant objects, and everything else.
To navigate through this space, we use at-
tention and intention. From this perspec-
tive, psychic experiences are reframed not
as mysterious ‘powers of the mind’ but as
momentary glimpses of the entangled fab-
ric of reality.
     Particles that are quantum entangled do
not imply that signals pass between them.
Entanglement means that separated sys-
tems are correlated. (Id., 263-264).

As quantum physics really is a prototypical
example of complexity in action, the litera-
ture I recommend is not limited to the ex-
planation of quantum mechanics in the
strict sense.

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Jeffrey Satinover’s book The Quantum Brain
(2001) artfully weaves quantum mechanics,
neuroscience and psychiatry into one epic
tale of grandiose dimensions that offers a
broad outlook on the possibilities of a fu-
ture humanity. The book is a good example
how poetic a scientist may become when
he thoroughly gets involved with quantum
mechanics. And the interesting thing about
Satinover is that he is a trained psychiatrist
and only in a 2nd life study cycle has be-
come a quantum physicist. This is extraor-
dinary in itself!

Another book, which I have reviewed, is
Deepak Chopra’s Life After Death (2006), a
book that is apparently only about life after
death, but it’s also about quantum physics,
as without our discovery of quantum phys-
ics, this book could not have been written,
because most people simply would not un-
derstand and accept a truth that runs
counter to the teachings of 2000 years of
Christianity. The success of this book is in
my view not due to Chopra’s fame and
popularity. Quantum physics has opened
certain pathways in our brain that before
were lying dormant in the sense of looking
at the world. The precepts of quantum me-
chanics all compound in demonstrating that
there is more to visual reality, that there is a

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reality out there, and within us, that is not
tangible, and that all physics paradigms be-
fore quantum mechanics simply could not
explain. This has opened our view to di-
mensions that are highly paradoxical if we
look at them with our conditioned mind.
Hence the need to change our entire view-
point in the cognitive assessment of reality.
This involves then, forcible also, the domain
after death, and the fate of the soul.

—Fritjof Capra, The Tao of Physics (1975/2000),
Deepak Chopra, Life After Death (2006), Russell
DiCarlo, A New Worldview (1996), Amit Gos-
wami, The Self-Aware Universe (1995), Ervin
Laszlo, Science and the Akashic Field (2004),
Lynne McTaggart, The Field (2002), Rupert
Sheldrake, A New Science (1995), Michael Tal-
bot, The Holographic Universe (1992), Russell
Targ, Miracles of Mind (1999), Vidette Todaro-
Franceschi, The Enigma of Energy (1999).

Self

It is important to clarify the notion of Self,
which is ambiguous, used in different ways
by different people, and by different relig-
ions. To begin with, the Self needs to be
distinguished from the ego. While it is gen-
erally true that the ego isolates and suffo-

126
GLOSSARY

cates human creativity in an ego-bound
shell, this is not true for the Self as the
greater notion. In this sense the Self con-
tains the ego, but not vice versa. The Hindu
notion of atman as the higher self that is
considered as an outflow of the universal
spirit or oversoul, brahman, may be a good
conceptual aid. It is in this sense that the
Indian sage Ramana Maharshi uses the no-
tion of self and this comes very close to my
own idea of selfhood. However, my idea has
been influenced also strongly by the psy-
chology of Carl Gustav Jung. In Jungian
psychology, the self is the archetype sym-
bolizing the totality of the personality. It
represents the striving for unity, wholeness,
and integration. As such, it embraces not
only the conscious but also the uncon-
scious.

Soul Power

Soul Power, which I synonymously call Pri-
mary Power or Self-Power is a concept I
have created to connote our original power,
and which is distinct from the harmful sec-
ondary powers or worldly powers that pro-
foundly mark our current society, and which
are clearly violence-inducing, and in the
long run damaging the human potential
and natural human spirituality.

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Synchronicity

Synchronicity is a term attributed to Carl-
Gustav Jung; it may be of older and peren-
nial origin. It is a quite handy expression
that connotes that two apparently unrelated
events are behaving in sync, in a sense of
being linked by an information field. In fact,
what was found by research is that such in-
formation fields truly exist. When two parti-
cles are linked in an information field, that
is, entangled, they behave exactly in the
same way, be they light years away from
each other. How we explain this with terms
like quantum connectivity, a ‘holographic’
universe or morphogenetic resonance is of
secondary importance; the fact cannot be
denied and has been observed in all ex-
periments of quantum mechanics.

Synchronistic events are typically increasing
when emotional tension and release are
high, which often occurs during therapy and
cathartic events. Typical examples are given
by all our famous psychoanalysts, as by
Jung himself. One of his patients for exam-
ple suffered from a phobia against frogs
and on the last day of the therapy, when a
breakthrough was reached, and the patient
finally utters that she can now meet any
frog without panic, a frog was sitting on the
window sill of the psychiatric practice. This

128
GLOSSARY

is a case for synchronicity because the two
events are not just randomly connected,
but are intelligently linked in an information
field and thus are to be considered as syn-
chronistic.

—Michael Talbot, The Holographic Universe
(1992), Amit Goswami, The Self-Aware Universe
(1995), Lynne McTaggart, The Field (2002), Frit-
jof Capra, The Hidden Connections (2002), Vale-
rie Hunt, Infinite Mind (2000), Ervin Laszlo, Sci-
ence and the Akashic Field (2004), Rupert Shel-
drake, A New Science of Life (1995), Ken Wilber
(Ed.), Quantum Questions (2001).

Taoism, Tao

Taoism is a philosophical school from an-
cient China. One of its foremost sources are
the Tao Te Ching, by Lao-tzu. Tao means
path or way, but in Chinese religion and
philosophy it has taken on abstract mean-
ings.

Some of the foremost qualities that charac-
terize Taoism are a non-biased and non-
judgmental mindset, acceptance of all-that-
is, including the world, integration of emo-
tions, magnanimity, patience and tolerance
toward the uneducated and ‘brute’ and the

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‘perverse’ majority of humans who are
caught in innumerable projections due to
their refusal to face what-is and their entan-
glement in possessions, status and time-
bound concepts.

Lao-Tzu is considered, together with
Chuang-tzu, as the primary representative
of Taoism.

Very similar to Taoism is Chang Buddhism,
which after its propagation in Japan was
termed as Zen. Like Taoism it is a philo-
sophical school that warns of the concep-
tual trap by saying in a metaphor that the
finger that points to the moon is not the
moon. Both philosophies stress the impor-
tance of daily life as a plane of sharpening
the mind through developing attention.

Tarot

The Tarot de Marseille is one of the stan-
dard patterns for the design of tarot cards.
It is a pattern from which many subsequent
tarot decks derive. Research showed that
the Tarot deck was invented in northern It-
aly in the fifteenth century. The name Tarot
de Marseille is not of particularly ancient
vintage; it was coined in the 1930s by the
French cartomancer Paul Marteau, who

130
GLOSSARY

gave this collective name to a variety of
closely related designs that were being
made in the city of Marseille in the south of
France, a city that was a centre of playing
card manufacture. The Tarot de Marseille is
one of the standards from which many tarot
decks of the nineteenth century and later
are derived. Like other Tarot decks, the
Tarot de Marseille contains fifty-six cards in
the four standard suits.

Divining with the Tarot can be done in simi-
lar ways as consulting the I Ching, using
serendipity (or the help of our unconscious
mind) to determine a set of correlated cards
that give an answer for a particular outcome
or question. However, unlike other divina-
tions, the Tarot is psychological in the sense
that cards, at least the great arcana, are ar-
chetypal images and need interpretation.
This is not always an easy task and can be
subject to error and misinterpretation.

Yin-Yang

The primordial energy, when working on
the earth plane, manifests itself in a dualis-
tic form, as two complementary energies,
called yin and yang. Both of the energies
can be associated with certain characteris-
tics. However, it would be wrong to identify

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yin with female and yang with male. It is not
that simplistic. Yin can well be associated
with the female principle but this does not
mean that it is identical with it. It’s actually a
bit like in the cabalistic system. We talk
about corresponding characteristics or
elements, and the system as such is one of
corresponding relationships.

Yin can be said to correspond with the fe-
male principle, the passive, receptive, soft
and dark, water, clouds, the moon, the tiger,
the turtle, the color black, the north, lead,
the direction down or a landscape that is
flat, as well as even numbers.

Yang can be said to correspond with the
male principle, the active, creative, bright
and hard, fire, the sun, the colors white and
red, the dragon, mercury , the direction up
or with a landscape that is mountainous, as
well as odd numbers.

What that means is that for example yin
moves towards its fullness in order to cul-
minate and swap its nature into yang. Yang,
when it culminates, becomes yin. That is
why we can say change is programmed into
the very essence of the yin-yang dualism
and thus, change cannot be avoided. We
can even go as far as saying that the very
fact of change is the proof that we deal with

132
GLOSSARY

a living thing. If there is no change, there is
no movement and, as a result, no life. Life is
change, living movement. This is what the
nature of life teaches us.

Zen

The Japanese word Zen comes from the
Chinese ch’an which in turn has its origins in
India. The establishment of Chan (Zen) is
traditionally credited to the Indian prince
turned monk, Bodhidharma.

—Roshi Philip Kapleau, Three Pillars of Zen
(1967), Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
(1971), Trevor P. Leggett, A First Zen Reader
(1972), Paul Reps, Zen Flesh, Zen Bones (1989),
Alan W. Watts, The Way of Zen (1999).

The meaning of Zen may be meditation;
however the deeper and more mystical in-
terpretation is that Zen means ‘revelation’
or ‘enlightenment’.

Zen emphasizes dharma practice and expe-
riential wisdom, particularly as realized in
the form of meditation known as zazen, in
the attainment of awakening. As such, it
putatively de-emphasizes both theoretical
knowledge and the study of religious texts
in favor of direct, experiential realization.

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Zen is within the Buddhist tradition, but it’s
not really a practice that is ‘religious’ in the
sense of Buddhist religion. It’s rather a
down-to-earth, practical and all about self-
empowerment in the everyday routine of
ordinary life. None of these are emphasized
by traditional Buddhism.

One doesn’t need to be a Zen master or
monk to practice Zen. Suffices to start with
a desire to be a complete novice with the
‘beginner’s mind‘—a clean slate. Practicing
Zen means to clear the mind from material
clutter, stripping thoughts away to the point
of ‘realization’—an all-embracing aware-
ness. This realization or awakening is known
as wu in Chinese, and satori or kensho in
Japanese. Besides meditation, Zen uses the
Koan, riddle-like poems, to scramble the
intellectual and conceptual mind and to
bring about a state of innocent and fresh
awareness. Koans are enigmatic little or
question-and-answer dialogues that can be
used to prompt to help understand the Zen
approach to enlightenment. Scholars and
followers of Zen say you don’t need words
to explain Zen. It is all about a direct expe-
rience of the ‘here and now,’ with an empty
mind—what Zen practitioners call ‘no-
mind’. In its free-form minimalist approach,

134
GLOSSARY

Zen is wholly concerned with the self and
with finding reality through realization.

—See: James Harrison, Endless Path Zen, Lon-
don: Flame Tree Publishing, 2006.

Personalities

Berne, Eric

Eric Berne (1910–1970) was a Canadian-
born psychiatrist best known as the creator
of Transactional Analysis (TA). He published
both technical and mass-market books on
the subject. In the early 1960s he published
both technical and popular accounts of his
conclusions.

The bestselling book Games People Play
made terms like scripts and tokens part of
the ordinary vocabulary. His Structures and
Dynamics of Organizations and Groups ex-
amined the same analysis in a broader con-
text than one-on-one interaction. His semi-
nar group from the 1950s developed the
term Transactional Analysis (TA) to describe
therapies based on his work. By 1964, this
method expanded into the International
Transactional Analysis Association. Many
therapists have put his ideas in practice.
Other applications have appeared in the

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CREATIVE PRAYER

practice of organization development con-
sultants. By 2003 the various TA organiza-
tions boast over 15,000 worldwide mem-
bers. Berne was famous for his use of ordi-
nary, easy-to-understand words instead of
psychiatric terminology.

Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama

Siddhartha Gautama (563 BC–483 BC) was a
spiritual teacher from Ancient India who
became the founder of Buddhism. He is
generally recognized by Buddhists as the
Supreme Buddha of our age. Gautama, also
known as Shakyamuni, the sage of the
Shakyas, is the key figure in Buddhism, and
accounts of his life, discourses, and monas-
tic rules are believed to have been summa-
rized after his death and memorized by his
followers. Various collections of teachings
attributed to Gautama were passed down
by oral tradition, and first committed to
writing about four hundred years later. The
Zen tradition, while today often seen as de-
tached from Buddhism, was originally
founded as a specific branch of Buddhism
in China, called Chan Buddhism. When this
tradition came to Japan, it was called Zen,
and this name has survived until today.

136
GLOSSARY

Confucius

Confucius (551–479 BC) was a Chinese
thinker and social philosopher, whose
teachings and philosophy have deeply in-
fluenced East Asian life and thought. His
philosophy emphasized personal and gov-
ernmental morality, correctness of social re-
lationships, justice and sincerity. These val-
ues gained prominence in China over other
doctrines, such as Legalism or Taoism dur-
ing the Han Dynasty. Confucius’ thoughts
have been developed into a system of phi-
losophy known as Confucianism. It was in-
troduced to Europe by the Jesuit Matteo
Ricci, who was the first to Latinize the name
as Confucius. His teachings are known pri-
marily through the Analects of Confucius, a
collection of ‘brief aphoristic fragments’,
which was compiled many years after his
death. Modern historians do not believe
that any specific documents can be said to
have been written by Confucius, but for
nearly 2,000 years he was thought to be the
editor or author of all the Five Classics such
as the Classic of Rites, and the Spring and
Autumn Annals.

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Descartes, René

René Descartes (1596–1650) was a French
philosopher, mathematician, scientist, and
writer who spent most of his adult life in the
Dutch Republic. He has been dubbed the
‘Father of Modern Philosophy’, and much of
subsequent Western philosophy is a re-
sponse to his writings, which continue to be
studied closely to this day. In particular, his
Meditations continues to be a standard text
at most university philosophy departments.
Descartes’ influence in mathematics is also
apparent, the Cartesian coordinate system
allowing geometric shapes to be expressed
in algebraic equations being named for
him. Descartes was also one of the key fig-
ures in the Scientific Revolution. As the in-
ventor of the Cartesian coordinate system,
Descartes founded analytic geometry, the
bridge between algebra and geometry,
crucial to the invention of calculus and
analysis. His most famous statement is: Co-
gito ergo sum.

The Cartesian system of thought, philoso-
phy and science is today generally ques-
tioned. One of the most prolific science
authors who is now world-famous, offering
in his books a comprehensive critique of
Cartesian thought and its limitations, is the
physicist and author Fritjof Capra.

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GLOSSARY

Einstein, Albert

Albert Einstein (1879–1955) was a German-
born theoretical physicist widely considered
one of the greatest physicists of all times.
He formulated the special and general
theories of relativity. In addition, he made
significant advancements to quantum the-
ory and statistical mechanics. While best
known for the Theory of Relativity, he was
awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize for Physics
for his 1905 explanation of the photoelec-
tric effect and ‘for his services to Theoretical
Physics’. In popular culture, the name Ein-
stein has become synonymous with great
intelligence and genius.

—Joyce Goldenstein, Physicist and Genius
(1995), Albert Einstein, The World As I See It
(1993), Out of My Later Years (1993), Ideas and
Opinions (1988), Albert Einstein Notebook
(1989).

Freud, Sigmund

I was first reading Sigmund Freud (1856–
1939), in its German original edition, back in
1975, upon entering law school. Freud’s
theory that children’s psychosexual devel-
opment was a process of libidinal (erotic)
identifications with first the same-sex parent

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(homosexual identification), and then with
the other-sex parent (heterosexual identifi-
cation), passing through the oral and anal
stages for finally arriving at the genital
stage—is an attractive surrogate for the real
knowledge!

Freud was the avatar for what later became,
and today still is, the mainstream paradigm
in child psychology and education. One of
the pitfalls of this paradigm is the denial or
exclusion of parameters that serve to build
identity through self-knowledge, intuitive or
inner knowledge, paranormal knowledge,
pre-life knowledge and relational experi-
ence. The identity that is said to be the only
possible one according to mainstream psy-
chiatry is a derived, not a genuine, identity.
It is derived from the parents’ identities. For
a boy, the process will be identification with
the father, as a primary homosexual identi-
fication, during the anal phase and identifi-
cation with the mother, as a secondary het-
erosexual identification during the genital
phase.

According to Freud, the so-called Oedipus
Complex comes in at that moment in the
child’s psychosexual development. True
identity is built, according to this theory,
when the boy has successfully liquidated
the Oedipus Complex by having developed

140
GLOSSARY

enough aggressiveness toward the father
and enough castration of his incestuous de-
sire toward the mother at the same time.

Heraclitus

Heraclitus of Ephesus (535-475 BC), was a
pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of
Ephesus on the coast of Asia Minor. Heracli-
tus was the first person of the Western
world to create a holistic philosophy and
who recognized the importance of flow in
all living organisms, thus anticipating mod-
ern systems theory for more than two thou-
sand years.

Jesus of Nazareth

Jesus (8–2 BC/BCE to 29–36 AD), also
known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central
figure of Christianity. He is commonly re-
ferred to as Jesus Christ, where Christ is a
title derived from the Greek christós, mean-
ing The Anointed One, which corresponds
to the Hebrew-derived Messiah. The name
Jesus is an Anglicization of the Greek Ie-
sous, itself believed to be a transliteration
of the Hebrew Yehoshua or Aramaic Ye-
shua, meaning YHWH is salvation.

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Jung, Carl Gustav

Carl Jung’s approach to psychoanalysis had
a strong impact on my understanding of
psychoanalysis. The first text I was reading
by Jung was a rather esoteric essay, Relig-
ious and Psychological Problems of Al-
chemy, and it showed me the depth of
Jung’s research into even highly esoteric
topics.

Soon I became aware that Jung was going
to cover that area that I found was missing
out in the other authors’ view upon the hu-
man psyche, that is, the spiritual dimension.
After having read Archetypes of the Collec-
tive Unconscious, The Myth of the Divine
Child and On the Nature of the Psyche, I
realized that for the first time, I had encoun-
tered something like holistic psychology.

Jung’s writings were also fruitful for my bio-
energy studies and my subsequent attempt
of a scientific vocabulary regarding the
cosmic energy field, which is ultimately
something like a systems approach to hu-
man emotions.

Krishnamurti, J. (K)

Jiddu Krishnamurti (1895–1986) was born in
a small village in south India. Soon after

142
GLOSSARY

moving to Madras with his family in 1909,
Krishnamurti was adopted by Annie Besant,
President of the Theosophical Society. She
was convinced that he was to become a
great spiritual teacher, and Reverend Char-
les Webster Leadbeater became his per-
sonal tutor. Three years later she took him
to England to be educated in preparation
for his future role. An organization called
The Order of the Star was set up to pro-
mote Krishnamurti’s anticipated role as a
World Teacher and Maitreya. In 1929, how-
ever, after many years of questioning the
destiny imposed upon him, Krishnamurti
disbanded this organization, turning away
all followers saying that: ‘Truth is a pathless
land, and you cannot approach it by any
path whatsoever, by any religion, by any
sect. Truth, being limitless, unconditioned,
unapproachable by any path whatsoever,
cannot be organized; nor should any or-
ganization be formed to lead or to coerce
people along any particular spiritual path.’
From that time until his death in February
1986 at the age of ninety, he traveled
around the world speaking as a private per-
son, teaching and giving talks and having
discussions. His aim was to set people psy-
chologically free so that they might be in
harmony with themselves, with nature and
with others. K taught that humanity has cre-

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ated the environment in which we live and
that nothing can ever put a stop to the vio-
lence and suffering that has been going on
for thousands of years except a transforma-
tion in the human psyche. If only a dozen
people are transformed, it would change
the world. He used to call this transforma-
tion ‘psychological revolution.’

Krishnamurti maintained that there is no
path to this transformation, no method for
achieving it, no gurus or spiritual authorities
who can help. He pointed to the need for
an ever-deepening and acute awareness in
which the limitations of the mind could
drop away. K was a universal and cosmo-
politan mind. Although born of Indian par-
entage, he stated repeatedly that he had
no nationality and belonged to no particu-
lar culture of group. What he hoped his
audience would learn, he himself was the
living example for it, which is, in my view,
the only way a guru can legitimize himself
as a true leader. Only what is brought over
as incarnated can be shared, not what is
merely preached or lectured as true as it
may be.

Education has always been one of Krishna-
murti’s concerns. If a young person could
learn to see his or her conditioning of race,
nationality, religion, dogma, tradition, opin-

144
GLOSSARY

ion etc., which inevitably leads to conflict,
then they might become fully intelligent
human beings for whom right action would
be a natural way of life. K reasoned that a
prejudiced or dogmatic mind can never be
free.

During his life time K established several
schools in different parts of the world where
young people and adults could come to-
gether and explore this possibility further in
actual daily living. Krishnamurti said of the
schools that they were places where stu-
dents and teachers can flower inwardly. Be-
cause, schools are meant for that, not just
merely to turn out human beings as me-
chanical, technological instru-
ments—though jobs and careers are neces-
sary—but also to flower as human beings,
without fear, without confusion, with great
integrity. He was concerned to bring about
a good human being, not in the respect-
able sense, but in the sense of whole, un-
fragmented. He wanted the schools to be
real centers of understanding, of real com-
prehension of life.

Lao-tzu

Lao-tzu (604 BC–531 BC) was a Chinese
classical philosopher. The reputed founder

145
CREATIVE PRAYER

of Taoism, he preached conformity to the
Tao, or eternal spirit of right conduct, and is
considered one of the great figures of Chi-
nese history. He is the author of the Tao Te
Ching. According to the legend Lao-tzu was
a contemporary of Confucius, and worked
as an archivist in the Imperial Library of the
Zhou Dynasty (1122–256 BC). Hearing of
Lao-tzu’s wisdom, Confucius traveled to
meet him. Confucius put much emphasis on
traditional rituals, customs and rites. Confu-
cius met him in Zhou, where he was going
to browse the library scrolls. Lao-tzu
strongly opposed what he felt to be hollow
practices. Taoist legend claims that these
discussions proved more educational for
Confucius than did the contents of the li-
braries. Lao-tzu perceived that the king-
dom’s affairs were disintegrating, so it was
time to leave. He was traveling West on a
buffalo when he came to the Han Gu Pass,
which was guarded. The keeper of the pass
realized Lao-tzu was leaving permanently,
so he requested that Lao-tzu write out
some of his wisdom so that it could be pre-
served once he was gone, Lao-tzu climbed
down from his buffalo and immediately
wrote the Tao Te Ching. He then left and
was never heard of again.

146
GLOSSARY

Murphy, Joseph

Dr. Joseph Murphy (1898–1981) wrote,
taught, counseled, and lectured to thou-
sands all over the world for nearly fifty
years. Born in 1898, he was educated in Ire-
land and England. Dr. Murphy was Minister-
Director of the Church of Divine Science in
Los Angeles for 28 years, where his lectures
were attended by 1300 to 1500 people
every Sunday. His daily radio program dur-
ing all that time was immensely popular. He
moved to Laguna Hills, California in 1976,
where he continued to speak every Sunday
until he made his transition in 1981. Murphy
refused requests for profiles and biogra-
phies, saying that his life was to be found in
his books. He wrote more than thirty books,
including The Amazing Laws of Cosmic
Mind Power (1973), Secrets of the I-Ching
(1970), The Miracle of Mind Dynamics
(1964), Think Yourself Rich (2001).

Dr. Joseph Murphy’s books have trans-
formed my life. I admit it was not a miracle
one-day cure. It took me a few years, but
these years of working with Murphy’s
method, and adapting it to my own needs,
really was worth millions of dollars as it
transformed my life from a victim-like and
anxiety-ridden existence into an endless

147
CREATIVE PRAYER

string of joy, excitement, creativity and ulti-
mately—happiness!

I have lectured about the Murphy method
in several of my books and videos, and
came to call it ‘Creative Prayer.’ However, I
do believe that no God concept is neces-
sary to benefit from this prayer technique
which Murphy called ‘scientific prayer.’
While faith is well needed to reap the bene-
fits, faith is not something necessarily linked
to religion. One can be faithful in one’s des-
tiny, in one’s proven success principles, in
one’s positive attitude, one can be faithful
in one’s genius, in one’s self-confidence or
problem-solving capability.

Picasso, Pablo

Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) was a Spanish
painter and sculptor. One of the most rec-
ognized figures in 20th century art, he is
best known as the co-founder, along with
Georges Braque, of cubism. It has been es-
timated that Picasso produced about
13,500 paintings or designs, 100,000 prints
or engravings, 34,000 book illustrations and
300 sculptures or ceramics.

—Brigitte Leal, et al., The Ultimate Picasso
(2000), Hans L.C. Jaffe, Picasso (1996), Brassai,

148
GLOSSARY

Conversations with Picasso (1999), Henri-
Georges Clouzot, The Mystery of Picasso (DVD,
2003), Edward Quinn, Picasso: The Man and His
Work, Part 1 (1881-1937) and Part 2 (1938-1973),
New York: Art Series (DVD).

Since high school times, Picasso was for me
the incarnation of the artist-genius, a true
archetype. There was no other visual artist
who ever could trigger so many emotions in
me, and so much admiration, while I also
like Marc Chagall, Juan Miró, Salvador Dali
and many others. But on a simple human
level, Picasso was and is closest to my heart
and soul.

Picasso is known to have not shunned tradi-
tion, but to have surpassed it, as he was
able already at age 14 to paint like the old
masters, which led his father, a reputed
Spanish painter, to put the paintbrush in his
hands in that early age.

Picasso also was a man of courage, a true
hero in the good sense, a lover of nature, of
all that is authentic, honest, great and origi-
nal. As such, he was unwavering even when,
in the 1930s, he was threatened through
Hitler’s getting to power in Germany, and
his friends urged him to leave France and
emigrate to the United States, but Picasso

149
CREATIVE PRAYER

heroically resisted. He stayed despite the
danger, and nothing happened to him. And
Picasso knew why he did not want to settle
in the USA. If there was one country that
truly shunned Picasso, it was Uncle Sam’s
hero paradise. As Picasso was for a while a
member of the Communist Party, he was
not allowed a visa for entering the United
States of America.

Picasso also was a wonderful father; his
daughter Paloma Picasso became a film
star. She was the child of Picasso and
Françoise Gilot, a French painter. She grew
up wild, first in the relation Picasso-Gilot
when her father was living in the manor La
Galoise, and then with Picasso and his sec-
ond wife, Jacqueline Roque, in the villa La
Californie in Cannes, France. The photo-
graph of adolescent Paloma was taken by
the American photographer David Douglas
Duncan and published in the photo book
The Private World of Pablo Picasso.

—Donald Douglas Duncan, The Private World
of Pablo Picasso, New York: Harper & Brothers,
1958.

—There is an enormous amount of literature
and media about Picasso. See, for example,
Brassai, Conversations with Picasso (1999), Hans

150
GLOSSARY

L.C. Jaffe, Picasso (1996), The Ultimate Picasso
(2000), Henri-Georges Clouzot, The Mystery of
Picasso, DVD (1956), Edward Quinn, Picasso:
The Man and His Work, DVD, 2002.

151
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172
Personal Notes