Commute r ommuter Chronicl e hronicle

Vol. 7, Issue 2
By Jennifer Fairbanks The only benefit to having an 8 a.m. class is beating out the larger Hamline community to a highly coveted parking spot. Anyone who arrives to the campus for classes after 10 a.m. better either live near campus or be skilled in parallel parking because options for parking are limited and scarce. In contrast, Hamline's neighboring University, St. Thomas, has plans to start building a parking ramp in the spring of 2009 to create a significant increase in parking spaces for their students. Although a parking ramp could help students find a parking space, avoid tickets for illegal parking, and maybe even help some commuter students make it to class on time, whether or not Hamline plans to invest in one is still unclear. "We are always looking at improving the parking situation," said, the Director of Safety and Security, Shirleen

Ramen Ramen:

Reinventing the college classic with four easy recipes
Find out more on page 3
Winter 2007

Hamline University

Parking at Hamline: bumper to bumper
Talking Back:
Snow plow policies ineffective
By Jennifer Fairbanks To me, there’s nothing that can add to the parking problems at Hamline University quite like snow. Not only does snow make everything in the parking lots slippery and slushy, but when it doesn’t get plowed very well the number of accessible parking lots can be cut down. When a parking lot is plowed, the areas around the light posts and the dividers commonly get snow packed around them. The parking spots around these problem areas then get either narrowed or completely eliminated. Unless of course you like parking in a spot that has three feet of packed up snow on one side. TALK: continued on page 4

Photo by Jennifer Fairbanks

The Drew parking lot filled to capacity on a typical weekday.

Hoffman. "It is too early in the process to tell you how we will be addressing the issue." While Hamline offers parking permits from a lottery based system, the students who win the permits must still pay the $130 fee. Even if the student wins a permit and pays the fee, there is still no guarantee that they'll get a parking spot. The good news is that permits are not required dur-

ing weekends, and the weekdays before 8 a.m. and after 4 p.m. That is also when most students don't have classes. These are all factors that students find problematic. "We pay $130 for parking fees and therefore we should be guaranteed a parking spot on campus, not three blocks away on a city street," said, Hamline residential Senior, Koome Kirimi.
PARK: continued on page 4

A day in the life of a commuter student
Page 2

New location breathes life into commuter lounge
Page 4

The commuting vs. on-campus life
Page 5

Looking to get more involved at school?
Page 6 1

Vol. 7, Issue 2

Commuter Chronicle: Hamline University

Winter 2007

A Day in the Life:
I was once diagnosed with hyper germaphobiaclaustrophobia-strangerisis. This complicated medical condition, in layman’s terms, is an acute fear of riding the public bus. You see, school was finally wrapping up for the semester and I anxiously awaited the days until I sashayed my way off campus to embark on my much anticipated (and highly earned) leisurely winter break. Only weeks before my campus exit grandeur, I received the crushing news that I would no longer be clawing my way through rush-hour traffic while reclined in a temperature controlled car like the rest of you good people. Instead, I would be joining the congested population of thousands who daringly opt to ride Minnesota’s Metro Transit system. WARNING: side effects to this kind of news may be, but are not limited to, shortness of breath from the millions of polluted and infectious air particles swirling around the bus , severe twitching of the arm while reluctantly inserting a life’s savings of $2.75 into the bottomless belly of the steel beast, and tightening of the muscles while bracing to be thrown about like Raggedy Ann after each Grand Canyonesque pothole and sharp right turn. On that fateful Monday morning I felt like I had graduated to the first grade all over again— totting a lunch box and backpack while propped up on the latest bejeweled shoe at the bus stop. Holding back tears this time, I swapped my pocket change for a transfer 2 ticket and took the empty seat next to the window (an opportunity to grovel at the mocking cars humming nearby). Fate was left up to God and

Hamline commuter student Caroline Joseph opens up her dairy and recounts a memorable experience riding public transportation.
me, motionless for most of our ride, briefly broke her gaze away from the adjacent window, turned to me and said, “See all those cars, there’s only

body. I wondered how we will ever manage global warming, the sky-rocketing gas prices and weaning America off its dependence on foreign oil if we’re still practicing the every (wo)man for his/her self doctrine? If ignorance is bliss than knowledge must surely be guilt because in that moment I sulked over embarrassed at my own negligent behavior. And I no doubt was the worst kind of offender… the kind that drove twenty yards to the mailbox just to fetch the mail. Returning back home that day I missed my connecting bus which coincidentally was the last one on route for the next two hours. My sidewalk supermodel strut quickly collapsed into a painful trudge as I was forced to walk the fifteen blocks to my house in last week’s treacherous evening snowstorm no less. God surely collected his retribution from me that day. Against the Arctic wind, beating sleet, snow, and cold I managed to arrive home just in time to nurse my frost bite and ward off the imposing symptoms of hypothermia. Regardless of my thawing exterior, I sure felt all warm and toasty inside because I had made a Tired of dealing with this traffic everyday? There’s a solution. contribution to the “green the bus driver who started eas- one person riding in all of movement” and erased some ing off the brakes: cue to reach them.” In a swift gesture to not of my own carbon imprint. I for my brown paper breathing offend the woman, I followed had beat the system. Conbag. “It’ll be fine” I chanted to her gaze back to the window quered “The Man.” Discovered myself between inhales, “I’ll be and mimicked her interest. I the eighth wonder. I had ridthere in no time.” began to count the cars we den the public bus! …About an hour and a half passed on the highway. The The world seemed boundlater I made a transformation, woman was right. The hunless. Where couldn’t I go?! a metamorphosis of sorts. A dreds of stalled vehicles were woman scrunched up next to all occupied by one single TRAFFIC: continued on page 5

Vol. 7, Issue 2

Commuter Chronicle: Hamline University

Winter 2007

Is there such a thing as too much ramen?
No—not when you’re a broke college student who needs to stretch every dollar to the limit. Check out these non-traditional ramen recipes to spice up your life on a budget!
Breakfast Saskatoon Ramen Ingredients: • 1 package of chicken ramen (do not crush) • 2 small eggs, beaten • cheddar cheese, cut into small cubes • bacon • tomato • green onion Boil ramen noodles via normal methods. Cook bacon to your desired crispness. Drain all water from the noodles. Chop bacon, cheese, tomato, and onions and place in skillet on medium heat—stirring mixture well. Add eggs, and cook for a few minutes until eggs are done. Alternatively, cook the onions with the bacon to soften them up.

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Lunch

Dinne r

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Lunch Easy Peanut Sauce Ramen

Ingredients: • 1 package ramen noodles (throw away flavor packet) • 1/3 cup natural peanut butter • 1 Tsp. garlic powder • 2 tbsp. lemon juice • 2 tbsp. soy sauce • 1 tsp. sugar • 1/3 cup water • Sprinkle of cayenne to taste (Sauce) Place the ingredients (except ramen) in a bowl. Stir well and microwave for 30 seconds. (Ramen) Cook the noodles like you normally do. When they are finished, strain the noodles until fairly dry. Pour in the peanut sauce to taste.

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Dinner Crunchy Ramen Salad Ingredients: • 2 packages chicken ramen noodles • cooked, cubed chicken breast • 5-6 sliced green onions (or more to taste) • chopped cilantro, to taste • slivered almonds • sesame seeds • head of cabbage (Napa or Savoy) • 1 stick butter • 1 bottle Asian-style salad dressing Melt butter in large saucepan. Add crushed ramen noodles, sesame seeds, slivered almonds. Toss with melted butter, sprinkle in soup seasoning packets. Cook in butter until nuts and noodles get toasty. Toss cabbage, chicken, onions, and cilantro with dressing. Add toasty mixture and toss again. Reserve a little in the pan for sprinkling on top.

Dessert Simple Caramel Ramen Ingredients: • 1 package of ramen (flavor packet removed) • 1/2 cup butter • 1/2 cup brown sugar • 1 tablespoon corn syrup Preheat the over to 300 degrees. Mix the butter, brown sugar and corn syrup in a pot, and heat on medium until it starts to bubble and thicken, stirring often. When it gets to this point, remove from heat. Break up a pack of ramen and add into the mixture until it is entirely coated. Pour the mixture onto a baking sheet and put it into the oven for 4 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool in the fridge or freezer.
Compiled by Serri Graslie Recipes courtesy of www.mattfischer.com

Vol. 7, Issue 2

Commuter Chronicle: Hamline University

Winter 2007

Commuter lounge settles into new home
By Serri Graslie Like the students it caters to, the commuter lounge has a history of being relatively transient on Hamline's campus. Earlier this year in September, the commuter lounge moved from its old location on the main floor of Drew Science to a corner of the basement of Bush Library. Though there were many reasons for the move, a primary one was so the Center for Career Development (CDC) next door could expand into the lounge's space during their remodel. Another factor that prompted the lounge's move was the relative inaccessibility of the space because of its rather odd location in the middle of a low-profile building that has little student traffic outside of class. Melissa Hruza, a junior who works in the new commuter lounge, said although some students were upset about the move, the space is now in a more central location that better serves the majority of commuter students. "Others liked it before because they had their own space without other (non-commuter) students using it," Hruza said. For the most part, however, the move is considered an upgrade by Hruza partly because the TV and furniture are nicer and there are more computers available for commuter students exclusively. But is anyone utilizing the new space? Maybe, maybe not. It's hard to judge how many students use the lounge because there is no one posted in the center all the time. "There is a group of 15 that use it for lunch and between classes everyday," Hruza said. "They know each other from doing the same thing in the old lounge last year." Hruza guesses that numbers may increase in the evening during night classes. To increase usage, Wendy Burns of Student Activities has created events specifically for commuter students that include morning coffee and breakfast as students make

Photo by Jennifer Fairbanks

Popularity of the new commuter lounge remains to be seen.

their way to class. The lounge also offers chances to win free gas cards. But the center is just the first planned step in a larger movement to better incorporate commuter students in to the Hamline campus. Hruza is personally working on finding events to put on the calendar in the lounge meant to inform students about activities on and around campus. "Commuter students don't know what's going on around

campus […] (and) they aren't really involved on campus," she said. Despite improvements, the lounge's location is not set in stone. As the campus expands and new plans for a student center are discussed, it is likely that the center will move once again. "Wendy Burns and Student Activities are committed to doing all that they can to make campus a better place for commuter students," Hruza said.

TALK: continued from cover
I very seldom see those plows working in the parking lots though. The lanes in most of Hamline’s parking lots are pretty narrow as it is, and when your car is starting to fish-tail in the snow or spin-out, hitting another car becomes a scary and very possible situation. Turning out of or into the parking lots can also get tricky, since the plows never seem to take the time to go around corners. This year, on the second day we had snow, there was a thick layer of it in Parking Lot B at 8:30am when I arrived. When I left at 3pm, that layer 4 was still there, but by then it had become packed down into a slippery coating. I understand that it may be hard to plow the parking lots during the hours when most people have classes (8am-4pm), but I still feel like the parking lots should be a major concern during winter. Those plows certainly don’t have a problem plowing a walkway with people constantly crossing their path. So why don’t they try to plow the parking lots more often?

PARK: continued from cover
Kirimi says that if Hamline wants to increase the University's Undergraduate population, then they need to also increase the parking spaces. "Hamline needs a parking ramp badly, especially with the new strategic planning in place whereby they play to increase the number of student up to 2,500 undergrads in the next two years." Kirimi said the students who take night classes are also in need of more parking lots because residential students take up most of the parking spots during the evenings. Any plans for a parking ramp at Hamline are still vague and even if there were any plans set in stone, they most likely wouldn't be put into motion until 2010.

Vol. 7, Issue 2

Commuter Chronicle: Hamline University

Winter 2007

A Tale of Two Hamlines
“It was the best of times... it was the worst of times.”
OFF CAMPUS
Filling up the gas tank on a bi-weekly basis ($2.80/gallon) Enduring rush hour traffic ($0) Circling the block repeatedly when looking for a parking space ($0) Frequent tardiness ($0) Watching I Love New York marathons in the commuter lounge ($0) Independence… PRICELESS

ON CAMPUS
Close proximity to school facilities ($0) Close proximity to school events and club meetings ($0) Frequent dinning at Sorin, Klas and other nearby eateries ($1,500/semester) Visitation rules ($0) Community restrooms ($0) Waking up ten minutes before class starts…PRICELESS

We weigh the pros and cons of commuting versus living on campus for you.

TRAFFIC: continued from page 2
With a pocket-size map and a twobus has been a sobering and rewarding hour limit on my transfer ticket I could experience for a few good reasons. I’ve discover a whole new world (cue theme become more cost-efficient, more time song from Aladdin). The Christian in me conscious, and more street savvy. I know wanted to shout the gospel of public my city and how to get around in it. The transportation from the roof tops. The bus lane is quite convenient; it’s the loopbroke student in me hole for budging. wanted to recycle used better seat ‘Americans spend an There’s nofor people in transfer tickets for the world average of 50 $0.50 on Facebook. watching. The pleasant minutes a day in Either way I decided to and helpful bus drivers do a little research on with all their abundant traffic and average behalf of my target 900 hours total over knowledge are at your audience. service. And for you the span of a lifetime.’ students: the bus has Americans spend an average of 50 mintwo stops on Hamline’s utes a day in traffic and average of 900 campus. Here’s the kicker: ahh the luxury hours total over the span of a lifetime ac- of spare time and hassle free mornings in cording to Metro Transit. Likely 900 hours lieu of road rage, metered parking, speedMetro Transit operates all over the Cities. alone and bored. Well, not really alone ing tickets, fender benders, etc, etc. considering the faux relationships we’ve A few extra coins buys a round trip built with our AM/FM radio deejays in lieu fare to Anywhere, Minnesota and relieves For bus schedules and of any real social interactions. And who some of the pressure off of your wallet more information about could be bored fiddling with the car gadg- and the ozone. In the meantime finish up using public transport ets, gizmos and hands off wireless what’s- the semester with a bang, and I’ll see you its while inching through traffic. on the bus this spring. visit MetroTransit.org Honestly the past few weeks riding the 5

Vol. 7, Issue 2

Commuter Chronicle: Hamline University

Winter 2007

Hamline Orgs: At a Glance
FUSION Support network for multi-ethnic and multiracial students; educates the community on political, cultural, and racial issues. (612) 229-2892 Hamline Outdoor Recreation Club Plans activities such as rock climbing, winter camping, cross-country and downhill skiing, hiking and roller blading. HU Entertainment/Activities Team HEAT plans monthly all-campus events such as Homecoming, dances, February Formal, and the End of the Year Party. (651) 788-2791 Students for Peace Interfaith organization committed to active nonviolence as a transforming way of life and as a means of radical change. Students Together Organizing Volunteer Events (STOVE) Coordinates student volunteer activities in the local community. (507) 459-0115 Theta Chi Founded on the ideals of academics, community service, and the principle of the “helping hand,” Theta Chi fraternity sponsors physical, social, and formal activities for the Hamline community. (612) 730-0660 Where’s the Fun?! (WTF!?) With the Office of Student Activities, WTF?! provides a variety of weekend activities. (651) 523-2420 What’s On The Weekend?! (WOW?!) A weekly email from the office of Student Activities and Leadership Development that highlights a variety of upcoming weekend events.

Getting involved is easier than you think
By Jennifer Fairbanks Commuter students are visibly absent at Hamline. Often they fall into a routine of coming to classes, then abandon campus all together then minute they are done for the day. Universities seem to frequently look for ways to get commuter students more involved with the campus life, but sometimes participating in activities on campus can be impractical or hard for commuter students to do-- a long commute home, a job, and other outside issues all factor into simply not having enough time. On Hamline's website there is an activity page that encourages students to "jump in and get connected to the Hamline community!" Colleges usually try to offer organizations and programs that fit the interests of a wide variety of students. The page also lets students know ways they can get involved and lists many organizations and clubs at Hamline. There is even a page that lists current events and things for students to do while on campus, which is directed at students who may feel like college life for them is getting boring. Yet, the University's website for commuter student services is bland and hard to find. The page lists basically the same things as the activities page does, with nothing exclusively for commuter students. Judging by the website page, the University also seems to lack the understanding that some commuter students, who want to get involved, don't have time or lack the motive. At the Multicultural and International Student Affairs Office (MISA), Vanessa Ramos, Coordinator of International Student Programs, thinks that their office sees a good amount of participation from commuter students despite the obstacles they face. "Although most of our students commute or work or have other obligations, there is a significant population that participates in student orgs and programs," said Ramos. Ramos says the MISA Office would still like to see more commuter students putting their office's resources to use. She said, "We would like to see students using the MISA house as a lounge space between classes, and to have students hold meetings there."

Contact the MISA or Student Activities office for more information on how to get involved. MISA: (651) 523-2423 Student Affairs: (651) 523-2088
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