You are on page 1of 6

Primary Sources

Freedman, Estelle B. The New Woman: Changing Views of Women in the 1920s. 2nd ed. Vol. 61.
Oxford: Oxford UP, 1974. Print. We used this text because it explained how the views of women
changed after they exchanged their ideas among themselves.

"[Inez Milholland Boissevain Preparing to Lead the March 3, 1913, Suffrage Parade in
Washington, D.C.]." The Library of Congress. N.p., n.d. Web. This photo displays Inez
Boissevain. We used this photo because Boissevain was preparing to lead a women's suffrage
march in Washington D.C.

"Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams." Mass History. N.p., n.d. Web. We used this letter
written by Abigail Adams to demonstrate her urgency to her husband about treating women better
in colonial America during the time of his presidency.

"Modern American History." Modern American History. N.p., n.d. Web. This image depicts a
flapper, which was a young single woman who had drifted away from the traditional image of a
woman at this time period. We used this photo because it demonstrates the transformation of
women after the ratification of the 19th amendment.

"Positive Atheism's Big List of Elizabeth Cady Stanton Quotations." Positive Atheism's Big List
of Elizabeth Cady Stanton Quotations. N.p., n.d. Web. We used this website because it gave us
quotes from Susan B. Anthony, who was a dynamic figure in the women's suffrage movement.

The 19th Amendment. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. We chose to have
the 19th Amendment on our website because it is a primary source that represented the strength
and power that women possess when they come together to make an impact upon something. The
19th amendment allowed all women of America the right to vote.

Strayer. "Social Hierarchies: Modern." Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures (n.d.): n. pag.
Web. We used the information found in this text because it allowed us to comprehend the position
of women; not only in America, but internationally.

"[Suffragists Demonstrating against Woodrow Wilson in Chicago, 1916]." The Library of


Congress. N.p., n.d. Web. We used this image because it displays suffragists demanding the
support of Woodrow Wilson, the 28th president of the U.S., to assist them with their cause.

"Susan B. Anthony on Suffrage and Equal Rights, 1901." Susan B. Anthony on Suffrage and
Equal Rights, 1901. N.p., n.d. Web. We used this source because it provided us with words from
Susan B. Anthony on her thoughts on suffrage and equal rights between the sexes.

"The Seneca Falls Convention (Reason): American Treasures of the Library of Congress." The
Seneca Falls Convention (Reason): American Treasures of the Library of Congress. N.p., n.d.
Web. We used this photo because it displayed all of the signatures from the women and men that

were present at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, which was the first women's right
convention.

"Tulsa Daily World. (Tulsa, Indian Territory [Okla.]) 1905-1919, November 03, 1918, Club News
and Personals, Page 9, Image 31." News about Chronicling America RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. We used
this document because it displayed the opinion of individuals that believed that you should say no
to the women's suffrage movement.

"Votes for Women." Votes for Women. The Library of Congress, n.d. Web. We selected these
photos because they displayed a collection of the suffragettes that had an impact on women's
rights in portraits, such as, Paulina W. Davis, Lucretia Mott, and Susan B. Anthony.

"Women's Roles in Ancient Mesopotamia." Women's Roles in Ancient Mesopotamia. N.p., n.d.
Web. Our group used the information in this document because it explained the roles of women in
ancient times and elaborated on how women were restricted to few roles in most societies.

"WOMEN IN WORLD HISTORY." WOMEN IN WORLD HISTORY. George Mason University,


n.d. Web. Our group used this book because we were able to obtain information and primary
sources about women internationally in the ancient times.

Secondary Sources

"19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Women's Right to Vote." National Archives and
Records Administration. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. Our group
used this source because it elaborates upon the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which
provided women the right to vote.

"Elizabeth Cady Stanton." National Park Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, n.d. Web. Our
group used this article about Elizabeth Cady Stanton because she was one of the organizers for
the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, which was the first women's rights convention.

"Joseph P. Bradley | United States Jurist." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia


Britannica, n.d. Web. Joseph P. Bradley was a part of the U.S. Supreme Court and we used him as
a source because he would speak about how women did not possess the ability to have a civil role
or occupation in society.

"The Fight for Womens Suffrage." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. We used
this as a source because it provided us with specific steps suffragists took when fighting for their
rights.

"The Harlem Renaissance." Harlem Renaissance Facts: US History for Kids ***. N.p., n.d. Web.
Our group used this site because it gave us an explanation of the events that occurred during the
Harlem Renaissance.

"Medieval Women." Medievalistsnet. N.p., 17 Sept. 2011. Web. Our group used this material
because it provided quality information about powerful women in the Middle Ages, such as Joan
of Arc and Julian of Norwich.

"The Private Realm of the Literati." The Private Realm of the Literati. N.p., n.d. Web. We used
this photo because it exhibits women throughout history by displaying a woman during the
medieval times.

"The Roaring Twenties." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. We used this source
because it provided us with an understanding on what type of environment the women in the
1920s were placed in.

Shetterly, Robert. "Alice Paul." Alice Paul. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Feb. 2016. We used this because it
provided us with further information upon women's rights activist Alice Paul.

"Supreme Court during the Civil War." Supreme Court during the Civil War. N.p., n.d. Web. Our
group used this source because of the Minor v. Happersett case. Minor was denied of her rights
given by the 15th amendment even after bringing her argument to the Supreme Court in 1874.

"Who Is Alice Paul?" Who Is Alice Paul? Sewall-Belmont House Museum, n.d. Web. We used
this source because it provided us information about Alice Paul, who was the militant side of the
women's suffrage movement.

"Women in the 1920s." : Changing Roles and Famous Women for Kids ***. N.p., n.d. Web. Our
group used this website because it provided us with pictures and information that explained the
transformation of the women in the 1920s.

"Women in the Progressive Era." Women in the Progressive Era. National Women's History
Museum, 2007. Web. Our group used the information found on this site because it provided us
with specific actions reformers had committed so women could be lifted of the restrictions placed
upon themselves.

"Women's Suffrage Timeline Facts." Women's Suffrage for Kids: The Right to Vote ***. N.p., n.d.
Web. We used this source because it provided us with a timeline that displayed the events of the
women's suffrage movement in chronological order.