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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

SAINT MARY OF JESUS CRUCIFIED

Everything passes here on earth. What are we? Nothing but dust, nothingness, and God is so great, so beautiful,
so lovable and He is not loved. ST. MARY OF JESUS CRUCIFIED
Holy Spirit, inspire me. Love of God consume me. Along the true road, lead me. Mary, my
good mother, look down upon me. With Jesus, bless me. From all evil, all illusion, all
danger, preserve me. ST. MARY OF JESUS CRUCIFIED
Mary Baouardy was born in 1846 in Abellin, near Nazareth. She was the first surviving child
of Georges and Mary Baouardy, poor powder-makers who had lost twelve boys in
infancy. Mary was born in answer to a novena to the Blessed Virgin in Bethlehem, with the
promise that she would be named for her. Two years later, her brother Paul was born, and
then, tragically, both parents died of an infectious disease, leaving Mary and Paul
orphaned. They went to live with different relatives, and never saw each other again. These
events were only the first of many sufferings in store for little Mary. Her wealthy uncle treated
her well, but as was the custom during those times, he had arranged a marriage for her when
she was only thirteen. Mary had always loved Jesus and the Virgin, and she did not want to
marry. She prayed. The night before her wedding, Jesus spoke to her, telling her that He would help her. She cut off
her beautiful long braids, wrapped the jewels she had been given in them, and sent them to her uncle. This made
him furious, and from that day Mary was treated as a household slave. In her anguish, she befriended another servant,
a man who was a Muslim. He promised to help her to deliver a letter to her brother in a different town. But when
she went to his home with the letter, he tried to force her to renounce her faith in Christ. This she refused to do, and
the angry man slit her throat. The next thing Mary remembered was a beautiful woman in blue came to her with a
delicious broth that gave her strength. The woman dressed her wound, and then told her that she would enter a
Carmelite monastery, make her vows in another, and die in another. This prediction proved true, because Mary later
entered the Carmel of Pau, France. She assisted a foundation in India where she made her vows, and she died in the
Carmel that she had helped to found in Bethlehem. Awaking in a confessional in a Franciscan church located in
Jerusalem, Mary began working as a domestic. A series of positions led her to the family that brought her to France,
where she began her religious life as a Sister of St. Joseph of the Apparition, but her mystical graces alarmed the
sisters, and they did not accept her there. Her novice mistress brought her to the Carmel of Pau, where she was
accepted and given the name Mary of Jesus Crucified. She died in the Carmel of Bethlehem from a fall that wounded
her leg in 1878. Mary of Jesus Crucified was just canonized by Pope Francis on May 17th, 2015.*******************

St. Mary is shown here as a novice and


as a professed nun of the black veil.
Although she made her profession as
a lay nun, that is, a sister who does
not chant in the choir and wears a
white veil, she was given the black
veil. Mary of Jesus Crucified, also
known as the Little Arab, received
many gifts of the Holy Spirit. She was
seen to levitate, had gifts of
knowledge, spoke with her guardian
angel, and received the stigmata.

Here in the peace of the Lord reposes Sister Mary of Jesus Crucified, professed religious of the white veil. A soul of
singular graces, she was conspicuous for her humility, her obedience and her charity. Jesus, the sole love of her heart
called her to Himself in the 33rd year of her age and the 12th year of her religious life at Bethlehem, 26 August 1878.

(Words engraved on the tombstone of Saint Mary of Jesus Crucified in Bethlehem, the Carmel that she founded.)
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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

SAINT TERESA OF THE ANDES


Jesus alone is beautiful. He is
my only joy. I call for Him, I cry
after Him, I search for Him
within my heart.St. Teresa of the Andes
Born in Santiago, Chile, on July 13, 1900, Juanita Fernandez Solar,
one of six children of devoted Catholic parents, began her life with
Jesus at an early age. At the age of fifteen, she made a private vow
of virginity, which she renewed continually until she entered the
Carmel of the Holy Spirit in the town of Los Andes at the age of
eighteen. Juanita had been praying for many years, and had worked to overcome her difficult
personality traits such as pride and anger. Her prioress recognized holiness in her new postulant, who
confided to her that Jesus had told her that she would die young. Within a few months after her clothing
day, October 14, 1919, Juanita, now Sr. Teresa of Jesus, contracted typhus and died in her convent. Her
prioress allowed her to make her solemn vows on her deathbed. Juanita was not yet twenty years of
age. She was beatified in 1987 and canonized in 1993 by Pope John Paul II, who proposed her example
as a model for youth. She is the first Chilean canonized saint. Her feast day is celebrated on July 13th.
I want to be athirst with love so that other souls may possess this love. I would die to creatures and to
myself so that He may live in me.from the letters of St. Teresa of the Andes

I want to be athirst with love so that other souls may possess this love. I would die to
creatures and to myself so that He may live in me. St. Teresa of the Andes

Juanita at age eighteen months and eighteen years, her First Communion, and her cell in Carmel.
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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

SAINT EDITH STEIN


(BENEDICTA OF THE CROSS)

Born on the holiest day of the Jewish calendar, Yom Kippur (Day of
Atonement), the youngest of eleven children of an observant Jewish family
in Breslau, Germany, in 1891, "smart Edith" as she was called by friends
and family renounced her faith as a young girl. Her search for truth led
her to the study of philosophy, at which she excelled at the University of
Gottingen and the University of Freiburg. In 1916, she received her
doctorate at the University of Freiburg with her dissertation On the
Problem of Empathy. She became a member of the faculty and worked as
assistant to the phenomenologist Edmund Husserl, a Protestant
Christian. After reading the Life of Saint Teresa of Avila, Edith
was baptized a Catholic on January 1st, 1922. She taught at a Dominican
Catholic school in Speyer until 1931, and then served as a lecturer at the
Catholic affiliated Institute for Scientific Pedagogy in Munster until forced
to resign in 1933 by Nazi persecution. In October of 1934, she entered the Carmelite monastery in Cologne,
taking the name Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Blessed of the Cross). In obedience to superiors, Sr. Teresa
Benedicta continued her contribution to the field of philosophy with the work Finite and Eternal Being, an
exploration of the possibilities of a Catholic phenomenology by combining the teaching of St. Thomas
Aquinas and Husserl. As Nazi persecution increased, Sr. Teresa Benedicta and her sister Rosa, who had
become a Catholic and was serving the monastery as an extern sister, took shelter in the Carmelite
monastery of Echt, Holland where she wrote The Science of the Cross, a study of St. John of the Cross. In
June of 1939, Sr. Teresa Benedicta requested permission of her prioress to offer her life for her people, for
the Church, for the salvation of Germany and for the peace of the world. "I beg the Lord to take my

life and my death....for all concerns of the sacred hearts of Jesus and Mary and
the holy Church, especially for the preservation of our holy Order, in particular
the Carmelite monasteries of Cologne and Echt, as atonement for the unbelief of
the Jewish people, and that the Lord will be received by His own people, and His
kingdom shall come in glory, for the salvation of Germany and the peace of the
world; at last for my own loved ones, living or dead, for all that God gave to me:
that none of them will go astray. By August of the following year, the Nazis had invaded the

Netherlands. Sr. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross and her sister Rosa were arrested along with two hundred
and forty-three baptized Jews living in the Netherlands. Several days later, at the notorious Auschwitz
concentration camp, Saint Edith Stein was martyred together with her sister Rosa and many other Jewish
Christians in a gas chamber.

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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

SAINT MARAVILLAS OF JESUS

The St. Teresa Association is a group of


monasteries of Discalced Carmelite Nuns
formed in 1975 to strengthen one another in
living our contemplative vocation in the
Church. Membership is based on spiritual
affinity rather than geographical boundaries,
and we share a common desire to bear witness
in these times to the charism and spirit of the
Order of Discalced Carmelite Nuns founded
by St. Teresa of Avila in 1562. Maria de las Maravillas
was born in Madrid, Spain, on November 1, 1891 to Luis and Christina

Pidal, devout Catholics. Her father was the Spanish Ambassador to the Vatican. Maria was a deeply
religious child who made a vow of chastity at the age of five. She wanted to enter the Carmel of Madrid
after reading the works of St. John of the Cross and St. Teresa of Avila, but her entrance was delayed until
the age of twenty-seven after her father's death. Before making her solemn vows in 1924, Sr. Maria had
already founded a Carmelite monastery six miles south of Madrid, in Getafe. This was the first of many
Teresian Carmelite Monasteries founded by Mother Maravillas, who served as prioress throughout her
life. In 1972, she received permission from the Holy See to establish the Association of Saint Teresa as
members of the Order of Discalced Carmelites. Although beginning in Spain, there are now at least ten
monasteries of the Association in Canada and the United States. The monasteries belonging to the
Association keep the observance as established by St. Teresa of Avila in 1582. After a life of service, Mother
Maravillas died peacefully in one of the Carmels she had founded in Aldehuela, Spain, at the age of eightyfour, on December 11, 1974.

Mother Maravillas of Jesus was canonized by Saint Pope John


Paul II in 2003. Her feastday is December 11th.

Yesterday, Sunday, on climbing the stairs to go to the upper choir for the sung Mass,
I was quite recollected, yet without any particular thought, when I heard clearly within
me, "My delight is to be with the children of men." These words which made a strong
impression on me, I understood were not for me this time, but rather in the nature of a
request the Lord was making me to offer the whole of myself to give Him these souls
He so much desires. It is hard to explain, but I saw clearly, that a soul which sanctifies
itself becomes fruitful in attracting souls to God. This so deeply moved me that
I offered with my whole heart to the Lord all my sufferings of body and soul for this
purpose, despite my poverty. It then seemed to me that this offering was right, but what
was strictly important was to surrender myself, wholly and completely to the divine will,
so that He could do what He desired in me and likewise I would accept the pain along
with the pleasure. I seemed to understand that what pleased Him was not the greatest
sacrifice but rather the exact and loving fulfillment in the least detail of that will. In this
I understood many things I find hard to explain, and how He wished me to be very
sensitive in this fulfillment, which would carry me a long way in self-sacrifice and love.

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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

SAINT RAPHAEL KALINOWSKI

JULY 2015

Canonized in 1991 by Saint Pope John Paul II, Raphael Kalinowski is


the first male Carmelite to be raised to the altars since St. John of the
Cross. Born in 1835 in Vilnius, Poland, which at the time was under
Russian rule (formerly a Polish-Lithuanian territory), Joseph was the
second of nine children of Andrew Kalinowski, who remarried twice
after the death of Joseph's mother Josephine Polanska. Like his father
who taught mathematics, Joseph excelled at math and engineering
under the patronage of the Imperial Russian Army, which he joined
at the age of eighteen. Although promoted to Lieutenant and then
Captain, Joseph resigned from the Russian army in 1863 to join the
Polish uprising in the Vilnius region, a choice which cost him
dearly. In 1864 he was arrested and sentenced to death, but his sentence was commuted to ten years in
the labor camps after a treacherous nine-month trek through the salt-mines of Siberia. He was able to
continue some of his scholarly work for the Russian Geographical Society during the later years of his
imprisonment, and then he was released 1873. Exiled from his homeland of Lithuania, Joseph went to
Paris and then returned to Warsaw, where he became the private tutor of Prince August Czartoryski,
who later became a priest and was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 2004. In 1877, Joseph joined the
Carmelites in Linz, where he was given the name Raphael of St. Joseph. He was ordained a priest in
1882 at the monastery in Czerna, where he served as prior beginning in 1883. From there, St. Raphael
Kalinowski worked to establish the Carmelite monastery in Wadowice, where he served as prior. He
also helped to found two Carmelite monasteries for Discalced Carmelite nuns. He died in Wadowice of
tuberculosis in 1907 where, fourteen years later, Pope John Paul II (Karol Wojtyla) was born.

The photos above show Joseph Kalinowski as an officer in the Russian army, and later as a tutor
to Prince August Czartoryski, who was beatified in 2004 (shown at right).
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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

LOUIS AND ZELIE MARTIN


SOON-TO-BE SAINTS
The parents of Saint Therese of the
Child Jesus (Therese of Lisieux) will
be canonized on October 18th of this
year. They will be the first married
couple to be canonized together.
Louis Martin (1823 1894) was born in Bordeaux,
France, into a military family. From his youth he longed
for monastic life, and attempted to join the Augustinians and later, the Carthusians, in the hope of becoming
a priest. His difficulty learning Latin and further discernment led him to abandon these efforts. Resolved
to live piously as a single man, Louis moved to Alencon, where he set up a successful watchmaking and
jewelers shop. He lived happily there for several years, caring for his mother, as the only surviving child of
Pierre-Francois Martin and Marie-Anne-Fanie Boureau.
God had other plans. One day, at the age of thirty-five, as he was crossing the Saint-Leonard Bridge, he
noticed a young lady, who noticed him. An interior voice spoke then to Marie-Azelie Guerin, known as
Zelie. This is he whom I have prepared for you.
Zelie Guerin Martin (1831 1877), also born into a military family whose father served in the police force
and later retired at Alencon, had longed to be a religious sister of the Daughters of Charity. She studied
under the Sisters of Perpetual Adoration, where she learned the delicate skill of lacemaking. Before their
marriage in 1858, Zelie had already established a successful lacemaking business, operated from her home.
Within three months of their providential meeting, Louis and Zelie were married at midnight, July 13 th,
at the cathedral of the Assumption in Alencon. The couple saw their marriage as a work of God, deciding
that God would always be the first served in their home. From the beginning, they decided to try to
maintain perfect chastity, adopting an eleven-year-old child of a distressed widower as an act of charity and
parenthood. Upon the advice of a priest-friend, after ten months the happily married couple decided to have
as many children as possible to offer to the Lord. They were blessed with nine children, all given the first
name of Marie. But only five survived to adult life. These five young women all entered religious life, for
which their mother Zelie had prayed fervently.
Family life at the Martin household was joyful and pious. The family prayed together each day, with
daily Mass and a reading from the daily liturgy of the hours. Among the saints familiar to the family were
St. Louis de Montfort, St. Francis de Sales and St. Vincent de Paul. In the city of Paris, in 1830, a young
member of the congregation of the Daughters of Charity, founded by St. Vincent de Paul, named Catherine
Laboure had received a vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary, asking her to promote the use of what is now
known as the Miraculous Medal, with the words, Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have
recourse to Thee. The devotion was approved and spread rapidly throughout France, although the dogma
of the Immaculate Conception had not yet been proclaimed. On the other side of France, in the southern
town of Lourdes, in 1858 a young peasant girl named Bernadette Soubirous reported the apparition of a
beautiful lady who identified herself as the Immaculate Conception, confirming the recent dogmatic
proclamation of Pope Pius IX. Surely these events influenced the spirituality of the Martin family.
The family was not poor, thanks to the prosperity of Zelies business. Louis had retired from his
watchmaking. Tragedy struck the family with the deaths of four of their beloved children, but they did not
lose hope. God sent little Therese, their youngest, who will become a great saint, canonized in 1925, and
proclaimed Doctor of the Church in 1997 by Saint Pope John Paul II.

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JULY 2015

The death of Zelie in August of 1877 of breast cancer at the age of forty-six
left Louis with his five daughters, the youngest being only four years old.
Grief-stricken, he sold Zelies lace-making business and moved the family
to Lisieux, where Zelies brothers family also lived. His oldest daughters
Marie and Pauline cared for the younger girls, with the help of hired
servants. During these years, Louis gave himself over more and more to his
first love the love of God even maintaining a small hermitage on some
property in the country, where he loved to retire for contemplation and a bit
of fishing. Therese, for whom he held a deep, fatherly affection, calling her
his little queen, would sometimes accompany him on these excursions,
and on visits to the Blessed Sacrament.
One by one, Louis daughters left the family circle to enter convents. First
Marie entered the Carmel of Lisieux, and later Pauline. This left three girls,
Leonie, Celine and Therese, at home. Asking for her fathers permission to
enter the Carmel of Lisieux at the age of fifteen must have been one of the
Youngest daughter of Louis and Zelie
most painful sacrifices of Thereses life. Not long after she had entered, her
Martin, the future Saint and Doctor of
father confided to his three daughters in Carmel that he had visited the
the Church, Therese of the Child Jesus
church where he had married their mother. My God, I am too happy. Its
not possible to go to Heaven like that. I want to suffer something for you.
He offered himself then to God. This was in May of 1888. Less than ten years later, his youngest daughter
would offer herself as a Victim of Merciful Love. In 1889, after suffering two paralyzing strokes, Louis Martin
was committed to the care of the Good Savior hospital in Caen, a decision that was enforced by his devoted
brother-in-law Isidore Guerin, who became legal guardian of the family. In 1892, returning to the home in
Lisieux paralyzed and unable to speak, Louis was cared for devotedly by his daughters Leonie and Celine
until his death in 1894. Soon both Leonie and Celine had entered convents. The deepest desire of Louis and
Zelie Martin had been fulfilled: all of their children on earth had been consecrated to God.
BREAKING NEWS: Bishop Jean-Claude Boulanger of the diocese of Lisieux
announced his intention of officially opening the
CAUSE FOR THE BEATIFICATION OF LEONIE
MARTIN, third child of Louis and Zelie Martin and
SISTER OF ST. THERESE. Leonie Martin (Sister
Francoise-Therese) June 3, 1863 to June 16,
1941, was a Visitandine Nun at the convent of
Caen, France, for most of her life. Miracles have
been reported to have occurred at her gravesite.
Leonie was known as the difficult child of the
family. She attempted to join the Poor Clares
three times before finally discovering her true
vocation with the Visitation Nuns, founded by
Saint Francis de Sales and Saint Jane Frances
Chantal in 1610. It was Thereses Little Way of Spiritual Childhood, of which
Leonie was a devoted disciple, which opened up for her a path of spiritual growth.
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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

BLESSED ELIA OF SAINT CLEMENT


Theodora, a name meaning "gift of God," was born
January 17, 1901, in Bari, Italy. She entered the
Carmelite monastery there at the age of nineteen,
and died seven years later on Christmas day after
making her total offering of herself to God in 1924.
She was beatified in 2005 by Pope Benedict XVI.

From her writings: My Delight, who could ever separate


me from You? Who could be capable of breaking these
strong chains that keep my heart attached to
Yours? Perhaps the abandonment of creatures? It is
precisely this that unites the soul to its Creator. . . . Perhaps
tribulations, suffering, crosses? It is in these thorns that the
canticle of the soul that loves You is freest and lightest.
Perhaps death? But this will be nothing but the beginning
of true happiness for the soul. . . . Nothing, nothing can
separate this soul from You, not even for a brief moment. It was created for You and is lost
if it does not abandon itself to you. My life is love; this sweet nectar surrounds me, this
merciful love penetrates me, purifies me, renews me, and I feel it consuming me. The cry of
my heart is: Love of my God, my soul searches for You alone. My soul, suffer and be quiet;
love and hope; offer yourself, but hide your suffering behind a smile, and always move on . .
. . I want to spend my life in deep silence, in the depths of my heart, in order to listen to the
gentle voice of my sweet Jesus.

Souls, I will search for a way to cast you into the


sea of Merciful Love: souls of sinners, but above
all souls of priests and religious. To this end my
existence is slowly disappearing, consumed like
the oil of the lamp that watches near the
Tabernacle. I sense the vastness of my soul, its infinite
greatness that the immensity of this world cannot
contain. It was created to lose itself in You, my God,
because You alone are great, infinite, and thus You alone
can make me completely happy.
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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

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JULY 2015

BLESSED MARIA CANDIDA OF THE EUCHARIST


Maria Barba was born in 1884 and grew up in Palermo, Sicily where
her father served as a judge. She wanted to begin religious life at
the age of fifteen, but had to wait twenty years. After her entrance
and formation in the Carmel of Ragusa, she was elected
prioress. She worked to revive the spirit of St. Teresa of Avila in her
community. Under her leadership the community grew enough to
make a foundation in Syracuse. She also helped to bring the
Carmelite friars back to Sicily. But she is best known for her many
writings on the Holy Eucharist: To contemplate with deep faith

our Beloved in the Sacrament, to live with Him Who comes to us


every day, to remain with Him in the depths of our hearts, this is
our life! The more intense this intimate life is the more we will be
Carmelites and make progress in perfection. This contact,
this union with Jesus is everything: what fruits of virtue will come
from it! You must have this experience. To live with Jesus and to
live by His virtues, is to listen to His beautiful voice, to His most
loving wish and immediately obey it, to please quickly Him. Our
eyes close, longing to find Him again, to contemplate Him in the
depths of our hearts: is this not the reason why He gives us Holy Communion in the morning? Is it not
the attraction for Him that remains in the Blessed Sacrament, where He lives? I do not know how to separate
the ciborium in the sacred Tabernacle from the ciborium in our hearts! Oh how many times, even though
we are in the choir, before His sacred Presence, at times exposed, we experience with our Jesus the need to
go deeply into ourselves, and there rediscover and remain! What mystery of love is this intimacy with our
Beloved! I reflect on this, sometimes with emotion, and give praise to Him Who is Love! And with tears I
contemplate this intimacy. Everything here on this earth is nothing for us, withdrawn as we are, far from
Him Who loved us so much; our eyes no longer see anything: we close them again to lose ourselves in the
same sacred environment, we close them anxious to find Him again, to see Jesus! The most delightful
Mystery of Love! He allows Himself to be found by the heart that searches for Him, by the soul that knows
how to do without many things for love of Him. To be close to our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, like the
Saints in Heaven, who contemplate the supreme Good, is what we must do, according to our Holy Mother
Teresa. Seven times a day, we come together around the throne (of our Good God), the sacred Tabernacle,
reciting the divine praises: oh how much faith merits such lofty activity, what dying to self! May adoration
and love accompany and beautify everything! (from Eucharist: True Jewel of Eucharistic Spirituality)
After serving as prioress until 1947, Mother Candida was diagnosed with a tumor in her liver. She died on
the 12th June 1949. It was the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity. She was beatified March 21, 2004, by Saint
Pope John Paul II, who described Maria Candida as "an authentic mystic of the Eucharist the unifying
center of the whole of life, following the Carmelite tradition.

"She was so in love with Jesus in the Eucharist that she felt a constant and ardent
desire to be a tireless apostle of the Eucharist." Saint Pope John Paul II

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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

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JULY 2015

BLESSED TITUS BRANDSMA

Born 1881 Anno Brandsma to Titus and Tjitsje Brandsma, small


dairy farmers in Friesland, Holland. Five of their six children
entered religious life. Titus began his studies with the Franciscans,
and entered the Carmelite novitiate in Boxmeer in 1898, taking his
father's name Titus for his religious name. He was ordained in 1905,
studied at the Roman Gregorian University, and graduated in 1909
with a doctorate in philosophy.
Titus dedicated his life to education, particularly to Carmelite
mysticism, philosophy, and journalism. In 1923 he helped found the
Catholic University of Nijmegen in Holland, where he taught and
served as rector. In 1935, he completed a lecture tour in the United
States at various Carmelite institutions, and in the same year he was appointed by his
archbishop to serve as advisor to Catholic journalists in Holland.
In January of 1942, the Third Reich had invaded Holland and ordered Catholic newspapers
to print Nazi propaganda. Titus hand-delivered a letter written by the Dutch bishops to the
editors of 14 newspapers asking them not to obey, before he was arrested on the 19th of
January. By the 19th of June, he was in Dachau concentration camp, where he was
hospitalized. On the 26th of July he was killed with a lethal injection administered by a nurse
as part of the Nazi medical experimentation on prisoners.
Blessed Titus Brandsma was beatified by Pope Saint John Paul II in 1985.

Titus as a boy, as a young Carmelite (left) with his family, and as a professor and journalist during his adult life.

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JULY 2015

BLESSED MARIA SAGRARIO


OF SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA

Born in Lilo, Spain, to Ricardo Moragas and Isabel Cantarero


January 8, 1881, Elvira was the first woman in Spain to become
a pharmacist, like her father, at which she excelled. She
entered a Carmelite monastery in Madrid at the age of thirtyfive, made her solemn profession of vows on Epiphany
1920, was elected prioress in 1927 and became novice mistress
in 1930. Her desire to be a martyr was fulfilled when, on July
20th of 1936, (a few week earlier she had again been elected
prioress of the community), her convent was attacked. Mother Maria found shelter for all of
her daughters in the homes of friends, but was herself arrested, along with another Sister, on
August 14th. Refusing to reveal the hiding places of her daughters, Blessed Maria was shot
to death on August 15th, Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Her daughters
survived the ordeal and were spared. She was beatified in 1998 by Saint Pope John Paul II.

BLESSEDS MARIA PILAR,


TERESA, AND MARIA ANGELES
Murdered by communists in 1936 during the Spanish
Civil War: Sisters Maria Pilar of Saint Francis Borgia, 58
years old, Teresa of the Child Jesus, 27, and Maria of the
Angels, 31. On July 22, eighteen nuns of the Carmelite
monastery in Guadalajara went into hiding in secular
dress. These three martyrs hid in the basement of a
hotel. Two days later, making their way along a street,
a woman soldier recognized them as nuns and ordered
them to be shot. Sr. Maria of the Angels died
instantly. Sr. Maria Pilar, although wounded, cried out: "Long live Christ the
King!" This infuriated the soldiers, who shot at her and slashed her with a
knife. She died with the words, "My God, pardon them. They do not know what
they are doing." Sr. Teresa was led to a nearby cemetery where, after her words
"Long live Christ the King!" she also was shot in the back. They were
beatified by Saint Pope John Paul II on March 29th, 1987. Their feast day is
observed on July 24th, the day of their martyrdom.

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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

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JULY 2015

BLESSED HILARY JANUSZEWSKI


Blessed Hilary was born June 12, 1907, in Krajenki, Poland, and
given the name Pawel by his parents, Martin and Marianne. He
entered the Carmelite Order in 1927 in Cracow, and was
ordained priest in 1934 after completing his studies at
the International College of Saint Albert in Rome. As one of
the best students, he obtained a lectorate in theology from the
Roman Academy of Saint Thomas, and returned to Cracow in
1935 where he was appointed Professor of Dogmatic Theology and Church
History at the Institute of the Polish Province. In 1939 he was appointed prior of
the community. The Nazis had invaded Poland a few weeks earlier. Within a
year, several friars had been arrested and deported. Fr. Hilary offered his life in
exchange for an older and sick friar. By April of 1941 he was imprisoned in the
concentration camp at Dachau along with several other Carmelites, including
Blessed Titus Brandsma whom he joined in prayer.
In response to an outbreak of typhus in the camp, thirty-two priests offered to
help. Fr. Hilary joined them. On March 25, 1945, just a few days before the
liberation of the camp, Fr. Hilary died of typhus at Dachau. His body was
cremated there. Along with 108 Polish martyrs of the Second World War, Father
Hilary Januszewski was beatified by Saint Pope John Paul II on June 13, 1999.

BLESSED ALFONSE MARIA MAZUREK


Blessed Alfonse Maria Mazurek was born March 1st, 1891, in
Poland. He attended seminary school during his youth, joined
the Carmelite Order in 1912 and was placed in charge of the
Minor Seminary. In 1930 he was elected prior of the Carmelite
monastery in Czerna. On August 24, 1944, Nazis invaded the
monastery. Fr. Alfonse was separated from the others and
tortured. He was taken by military car to a dirt path where he was kicked and
forced to walk a great distance before he was shot and wounded. He was kicked
more and his mouth filled with dirt by the Nazi guards who had mortally
wounded him. Some brother friars found him, and he received absolution before
his death on August 28th. He was beatified on June 13, 1999, by Saint Pope John
Paul II along with 108 Polish martyrs of the Second World War.
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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

BLESSED FRANCIS PALAU Y QUER


Blessed Francis Palau y Quer, like so many other Carmelites, writes
beautifully of the union of the soul with God in mystical
marriage. He was born in Spain in 1811, the seventh of nine children of
Jose Palau and Maria Antonia Quer. He entered the Order in 1832 and
was ordained a priest in 1836 during a period of civil unrest that resulted
in the closing of his monastery. Blessed Francis lived in exile and in
solitude in France, coming back to Spain in 1851 to found what he called
"The School of Virtue" for catechetical instruction. The school was
suppressed in 1854, forcing Francis into solitude again until 1860 on the
rocky coast of Ibiza where he shared mystically in the sufferings of the
Church. It was here that his writings, "The Struggle of the Soul with
God," were born. In 1861, Francis founded the Congregation of
Carmelite Brothers and Sisters. He died at Tarragona in 1872 and was
beatified by Pope John Paul II on April 24th, 1980.
From "Fr. Francisco Palau, OCD, Letters" Published Rome, Carmelite
Missionares, 1997 (Note: Juana was Bl. Francisco's spiritual daughter; the direction in this letter is beautiful
for any to read and ponder.) To Juana Gratias: Gramat (France) He is celebrating the octave of the Feast of

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, putting his interior life in order, as though these were the last days of his life.
Various possible ways for union-communion with God. Directives for Juana Gratias on prayer and
examination of conscience. JMJ, Day of Our Lady of Carmel, 1857, Long Live Jesus! Dearest sister in Jesus

Christ, We are celebrating the octave of our most holy Mother, Our Lady of Carmel, and I shall spend it
putting my things in order as though these were the last days of my life. Now for your affairs. I am awaiting
your letter in order to see to your exterior life. In the meantime, let us see the interior. God's great work in
man takes place in the Interior. The order that appears and is shown outside is the work and effect of the
order inside. The three theological virtues of faith, hope and charity, aided by the highest and most sublime
gifts of the Holy Spirit, such as understanding, wisdom, knowledge, and counsel, unite the creature, the
human spirit, with his God, the soul with the Word of God. It is this sacred union that you must seek, hold
and possess; in it lie the spiritual life, health and strength, and from it originate all the other virtues. The
soul looks to God under two aspects or forms: first as the object of all its affections, or as an infinitely good
and lovable being, and this imagining robs the heart; and insofar as he is good, infinitely beautiful, that is,
infinitely perfect, he captures our intellectual vision, our thoughts and meditations. In this regard, the
theological virtues and their gifts cause God and the soul to become one single thing through love and purity
of thoughts. While this divine union takes place primarily and mainly in the soul, all the other virtues are
like aids, attendants and armies of that guard, that assist and protect this work. This is the love of God for
the soul and the love of the soul for God. Moreover, while the said union is worked out and ordered, another
union begins; this is the one about which I have told you many times: the soul unites first with God as its
beloved, as the center of its affection and vision, and then as its King, Lord, master and universal governor
of the whole world. The first union turns the soul into a goddess, that is, it deifies, divinizes and makes it
God's spouse. The second one elevates it to the dignity of queen, co-redeemer of the world, lady and
princess. The first is the love of God and the second, the love of neighbor, and since the love of God and of
neighbor sums up the whole of God's work in the heart of men, and since this is the work to be started,
continued and perfected in us and the fulfillment of the whole law, no one can enter the kingdom of God if
this has not been done to a degree of perfection that God alone knows. Here we have life, health and
strength! Although I am far behind, I am happy to preach, talk, write and meditate on this great work.

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INCARNATION MAGAZINE

NEW SAINTS AND BLESSEDS

JULY 2015

BLESSEDS
JACQUES
RETOURET,
JOHN
BAPTIST,
MICHAEL
AND JAMES,

priests and martyrs for their


refusal to take the oath of the Civil
Constitution of the Clergy during
the French Revolution which,
among other things, demanded
election of future popes and bishops by popular vote. Saint Pope John Paul II beatified 63 priests and
religious on October 1, 1995, who had been imprisoned on board two ships stationed in Rochefort Bay,
France, for ten months awaiting deportation into slavery. The following are excerpts from Resolutions
Drawn Up by the Priests Imprisoned on the Ship Les Deux Associes: They will never give themselves up

to useless worries about being set free. Instead, they will make the effort to profit from the time of their
detention by meditating on their past years, by making holy resolutions for the future, so that they can find
in the captivity of their bodies, freedom for their souls ... If God permits them to recover totally or in part
this liberty nature longs for, they will avoid giving themselves up to an immoderate joy when they receive
the news. By keeping their souls tranquil they will show they support without murmur the cross placed on
them, and that they are disposed to bear it even longer with courage and as true Christians who never let
themselves be beaten by adversity. They will not show grief over the loss of their goods, no haste to recover
them, no resentment against those who possess them. They will never get mixed up in the new politics,
being content to pray for the welfare of their country and prepare themselves for a new life, if God permits
them to return to their homes, and there become subjects of edification and models of virtue for the people,
by their detachment from the world, their assiduousness in prayer, and their love for recollection and piety.

BLESSEDS EUFRASIO AND


EUSEBIO OF THE CHILD JESUS

Born February 8, 1897, Eufrasio Barredo Fernandez (Eufrasio


of the Child Jesus) in Asturias, Spain, where he was martyred
on October 12, 1934. He was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI on
October 12, 2007. Ovidio Fernandez Arenillas (Eusebio of the
Child Jesus) was born 21 February 1888 in Castifale, Leon,
Spain. He was martyred during the Spanish Civil War, 1936, in
Toledo, along with fifteen other Carmelites who were beatified
on October 28, 2007 by Pope Benedict XVI. (Please see
newsaints.faithweb.com for more information.)

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