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Hsing-I Is an Excellent Bridge from the External Martial Arts to the Internal

Hsing-i s practitioners are military in approach marching in straightlines, with a p
owerful emphasis at the end of every technique on mentallyor physically taking a
n enemy down. In this sense, hsing-i is similarto most punch-and-kick martial ar
ts. The obvious external attributesof punching and striking are inherent to the
way hsing-i is practiced. Formany external martial artists not satis?ed with the
slow-motion formpractice of tai chi, hsing-i done at normal speed ?ts the bill.
Moreover, hidden within the apparently linear techniques of hsing-i isa signi?ca
nt amount of very small, almost unseen, complete circles thatare normally lackin
g in external martial arts. In many ways, hsing-i is akind of sophisticated inte
rnal karate. Rather than using muscular tensionor anger for power, hsing-i focus
es instead on utilizing relaxation, chi, andstillness of mind to accomplish the
pragmatic martial goal of winning ina violent confrontation. Hsing-i possesses e
ither the same or similarprimary goals as other more external ?ghting arts, such
as karate or boxing,but includes the chi work, health aspects, and ability to b
e martially effec-tiveinto old age that most of the external martial arts lack H
sing-I Is an Excellent Bridge from the External Martial Arts to the Internal
Hsing-i s practitioners are military in approach marching in straightlines, with a p
owerful emphasis at the end of every technique on mentallyor physically taking a
n enemy down. In this sense, hsing-i is similarto most punch-and-kick martial ar
ts. The obvious external attributesof punching and striking are inherent to the
way hsing-i is practiced. Formany external martial artists not satis?ed with the
slow-motion formpractice of tai chi, hsing-i done at normal speed ?ts the bill.
Moreover, hidden within the apparently linear techniques of hsing-i isa signi?ca
nt amount of very small, almost unseen, complete circles thatare normally lackin
g in external martial arts. In many ways, hsing-i is akind of sophisticated inte
rnal karate. Rather than using muscular tensionor anger for power, hsing-i focus
es instead on utilizing relaxation, chi, andstillness of mind to accomplish the
pragmatic martial goal of winning ina violent confrontation. Hsing-i possesses e
ither the same or similarprimary goals as other more external ?ghting arts, such
as karate or boxing,but includes the chi work, health aspects, and ability to b
e martially effec-tiveinto old age that most of the external martial arts lack