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Scientific and Financial Report

Transylvanian Experimental Neuroscience


Summer School (TENSS 2016)
www.tenss.ro
June 1-19, 2016, Pike Lake, Romania

Raul C. Murean

Florin Albeanu

Adam Kampff

- July 15, 2016 -

Table of contents
1. Testimonials about TENSS 2016 .................................................................................................................... 1
2. Scientific content of the event ....................................................................................................................... 2
2.1. Objectives ..................................................................................................................................................... 2
2.2. Selection of students................................................................................................................................. 2
2.3. Pre-TENSS workshop ................................................................................................................................. 5
2.4. General structure of the program ......................................................................................................... 6
2.5. Lab sessions.................................................................................................................................................. 7
2.6. Lectures ....................................................................................................................................................... 11
2.7. Some pictures from TENSS 2016 ......................................................................................................... 15
2.8. Contribution of TENSS to Neuroscience and future directions ................................................ 58
3. Information regarding the organizing of TENSS.................................................................................... 59
4. Financial report ................................................................................................................................................. 61
5. Final program of the event............................................................................................................................ 62

1. Testimonials about TENSS 2016


I think it has surpassed my expectations. From talking to other people I thought I would
learn a lot, but it was really great to not only learn but to revive the eagerness for science in
me.
TENSS 2016 student A
This was the most intense but also the most wonderful learning period of my life. All the
teachers were just wonderful! It's a privilege to be selected for this course.
TENSS 2016 student B
It was the perfect balance of functional and buggy.
TENSS 2016 student C
This was far-and-away the best course i have been on, both in terms of learning and
enjoyment. I will be *strongly* recommending it to others, and I hope it continues for many
years to come!
TENSS 2016 student D
Congratulations on making such a huge boost to the careers of 13 young scientists!
TENSS 2016 student E

For the next editions of TENSS: keep the free beer!


TENSS 2016 student F

2. Scientific content of the event


2.1. Objectives
The Transylvanian Experimental Neuroscience Summer School (TENSS) was born in 2010,
from an idea that Florin Albeanu shared to Raul Murean during a conference in Romania.
The first edition of TENSS took place in 2012, on the shores of Pike Lake, in the picturesque
province of Transylvania. Starting with its third edition in 2014, TENSS has welcomed a third
permanent organizer, Adam Kampff, from Sainsbury-Wellcome Centre at University College
London, UK.
The main objective of TENSS is to provide participants top-level, hands-on training in
experimental techniques used in neuroscience, from optical all the way to electrophysiological methods and behavioral setups. To the best of our knowledge the
opportunity for such training is scarce and is covered only in a few places in the world, such
as Cold Spring Harbor and Woods Hole, in the USA, Champalimaud-Lisbon in Portugal, or
Plymouth in UK, for example. A second objective of TENSS is to attract a large number of
top-level scientists from all over the world, who can provide theoretical lectures to
participants and can interact with participants, among themselves, giving rise to scientific
debates of the highest quality. Finally, TENSS aims to make experimental neuroscience
more accessible to scientists by removing the technical barriers and by promoting do-ityourself, open solutions.

2.2. Selection of students


TENSS 2016 has received 120 applications with students originating (citizenship) from 39
countries, distributed as follows:
1. Argentina: 4 applications
2. Armenia: 2 applications
3. Austria: 1 application
4. Brazil: 5 applications
5. China: 1 application
6. Cyprus: 1 application
7. Czech Republic: 1 application
2

8. Egypt: 4 applications
9. Estonia: 1 application
10. Ethiopia: 1 application
11. Finland: 2 applications
12. France: 3 application
13. Germany: 5 applications
14. Greece: 1 application
15. Hungary: 2 applications
16. India: 8 applications
17. Iran: 3 applications
18. Israel: 4 applications
19. Italy: 7 applications
20. Kenya: 1 application
21. Lithuania: 1 application
22. Mexico: 4 applications
23. Morocco: 1 application
24. Netherlands: 3 applications
25. Nigeria: 2 applications
26. Norway: 3 applications
27. Pakistan: 3 applications
28. Poland: 9 applications
29. Portugal: 5 applications
30. Romania: 8 applications
31. Russia: 8 applications
32. Singapore: 1 application
33. Slovak Republic: 1 application
34. Spain: 1 application
35. Switzerland: 2 applications
36. Turkey: 1 application
37. United Kingdom: 4 applications
38. United States of America: 5 applications
39. Uruguay: 1 application
3

The selection process has been performed by 19 evaluators (organizers and TAs) distributed
in several labs around the world. We initially created 6 groups of 3 evaluators for screening
the applications and selecting the top ones for the second round. From the 6 groups, 2
received an identical selection of applications but evaluators were not aware of this. We
wanted to estimate the consistency of the evaluation across groups, for the same
applications, to improve the quality of the first round of selections. Each group selected 1015 applications that made it in the second round. For two corresponding groups (with the
same set to evaluate) we merged their selection lists there was about 70-80% agreement
between groups but we also included those applications that a group selected but the
other one did not. The second round contained a number of 50 applications that were
evaluated by all 19 evaluators, to level out individual preferences and eliminate as much as
possible subjective bias. We selected 13 top students by mixing those from well-established
labs with promising and talented students from less favored countries, such as places in
South America, Eastern Europe and Asia. From the initial selection, two students could not
attend due to their commitment to other courses and we selected the next two on the
waiting list. We ended up having the following 13 students to attend TENSS 2016:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Student name

Affiliation

E-mail

Bast, Walter
Beniaguev,
David
Bottura de
Barros, Ana
Carolina
Coen, Philip
Javadzadeh,
Mitra
Kondrakiewicz,
Kacper

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA

walter.bast@uns.edu.ar
david.beniaguev@gmail.c
om

Hebrew University, Israel


University of Oxford, UK
University College London, UK
Biozentrum, University of Basel,
Switzerland
Nencki Institute of Experimental
Biology, Poland
Institute of Experimental Medicine of
the Hungarian Academy of Sciences,
Hungary

7.

Laszlovszky,
Tamas

8.

Mahn, Mathias

9.

Technion University, Israel


Mcley, Liron
Nevala, Noora
University of Helsinki, Finland
Emilia
Sorrells, Trevor The Rockefeller University, USA

10.
11.

Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

ana.botturadebarros@dp
ag.ox.ac.uk
pipcoen@gmail.com
mitrajz89@gmail.com
k.kondrakiewicz@nencki.
gov.pl
laszlovszky.tamas@koki.m
ta.hu
mathias.mahn@weizman
n.ac.il
lironmcley@gmail.com
noora.nevala@helsinki.fi
tsorrells@rockefeller.edu
4

12.

Zamfir, Elena

University College London, UK

elena.zamfir07@gmail.co
m

13.

Zimmermann,
Robert

University of Geneva, Switzerland

bobofon@gmail.com

Table 1. Students participating in TENSS 2016 (alphabetic order)


Due to the experimental nature of TENSS where students have to get a direct hands-on
experience, only a limited number of places was made available. Students were grouped in
4 teams that worked on 4 independent setups running in parallel during lab sessions. By
having small groups at any given setup, the individual access to laboratory equipment was
maximized. The small group structure also ensured that each student had full exposure to
various techniques taught during the course and acquired the relevant experimental skills.
A number of students with limited financial possibilities received fee waivers and/or travel
support. Mitra Javadzadeh, Kacper Kondrakiewicz, Mathias Mahn, and Noora Emilia Nevala
received a full registration fee waiver from TENSS and an additional 500 EUR as travel
support from FENS-IBRO via the NENS Schools. Tamas Laszlovszky and Ana Carolina Bottura
de Barros each received travel support in amount of 1250 USD from the Simons Foundation.

2.3. Pre-TENSS workshop


This year included an absolute novelty, in that a pre-TENSS workshop was organized in
collaboration with the Sainsbury-Wellcome Centre in London. The main driver behind the
workshop was Adam Kampff, who assembled a group of scientists and company reps
working on the next generation of electrophysiology recording probes FPGA-based
probes with hundreds and thousands of recording contacts. The workshop started in
London, where the theoretical part took place, and then the participants flew into Romania,
to Pike Lake, the TENSS venue, for the practical part. The pre-TENSS practical part started on
May 27th and lasted until May 31st, when TENSS participants arrived. The workshop
participants included:
1. Kampff, Adam Sainsbury Wellcome Centre, UK
2. Albeanu, Florin Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA
3. Harrison, Reid Intantech, USA
4. Voigts, Jakob Open Ephys, USA
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5. Newman, Paul Jonathan Open Ephys / MIT, USA


6. Sanders, Josh Open Ephys / Allen Brain Institute, USA
7. Cuevas Lopes, Aaron Open Ephys, Spain
8. Pachitariu, Marius University College London, UK
9. Murean, Raul Romanian Institute of Science and Technology, Romania
10. Karlsson, Hans Peter Mattias Spike Gadgets, USA
The pre-TENSS workshop included practical sessions, with implantation of mice with next
generation high-density probes (128-384 independent channels, IMEC), recording of large
amounts of data, spike sorting and also debates and discussions going long into the night.
By all standards, the workshop was a great success, allowing different groups, which
develop the new electrophysiology probes independently to know each other, to share
expertise and start new collaborations. On the neuroscience side, involved scientists could
get an important insight into what will be possible in 1-2 years when these probes will
become available and to plan ahead novel, ground-breaking experiments.

2.4. General structure of the program


The program of TENSS 2016 included typically 2-3 lectures per day, interleaved with several
lab sessions. Lectures were limited to 1 hour, including questions. Lab sessions usually took
several hours and could continue until late in the night. Students directly interacted with
lecturers and had plenty of opportunities to discuss, ask questions, and get first-hand
experience from them in the labs. Experienced teaching assistants provided rigorous
experimental training to students during lab sessions. TENSS covered a broad list of topics
focusing on experimental and computational methods currently employed in the field to
understand the function of neural circuits in the mammalian brain. The course lectures and
laboratory sessions included: modern optical, optogenetic and electrophysiological
recording techniques in anesthetized as well as awake (behavior) rodents, zebra fish and
flies (Drosophila), data analysis, in depth lectures on specific neural circuits and direct
applications, as detailed below. New elements introduced in 2016 compared to previous
editions are marked in red.
Optics
1.
2.

Basic Optics Diffraction, Lenses, Resolution, Illumination


Fluorescence & Noise Measurements
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3.
4.
5.

Skywatch (stars & beads, telescopes & microscopes)


In vivo Intrinsic Optical Imaging, Widefield Fluorescence
Scanning Microscopy Confocal, 2p build, code,

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Two tunable lasers 2 customs & 1 commercial setups


Light sheet microscopy custom build
Optical Imaging analysis pipelines Marius 10P
Electronics & Arduinos & Matlab coding, Github, Open-frame
Light Activated Channels and Pumps optogenetics
Labview, Arduino, Python coding
Electronics & Arduinos
Light Activated Channels and Pumps optogenetics
Adaptive optics
Miniaturized (headmounted) microscopes
Patterned Illumination techniques DLP, SLM (holography)

Electrophysiology & Behavior


17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.

Extracellular Recordings multiunits, single units


Open ephys, Tetrode & drive making & implanting
In vivo Patching blind & 2p guided,
Behavior & Circuit Manipulation philosophy and tricks of flies, fish & mice
Virtual reality & closed loop environments
Machine vision
Bonsai open traps & cameras in the real reality
Sensors, actuators
Head-fixed & freely moving behaviors: closed loop, discrimination
Spike sorting ephys analysis, pipelines Kilosort
Synchrony & Oscillations
Student projects

2.5. Lab sessions


Lab sessions are the most important component of TENSS, and take place in several
dedicated rooms at Pike Lake. Many independent rigs have been operated in parallel,
including custom optical setups for optic bench exercises, microscopes (widefield
fluorescence, intrinsic imaging, 2-photon laser scanning), surgery equipment (anesthesia,
drills, surgery microscopes), several electrophysiology setups (patch clamp, custom-built
tetrode recording, tetrode manufacturing, chronic multi-tetrode / optogenetic headstages
implanted with stereotaxic guidance for behaving mice, and so on). The students also built
custom electronic circuits to learn principles of signal acquisition and understand basic
principles of electrophysiology in a dish and design custom software to control
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galvanometric scanners and video cameras using National Instruments and Digilent boards
and Labview. Lab sessions were organized by experienced teaching assistants (TAs) that
helped & taught the students throughout the duration of the course: Priyanka Gupta,
Mehrab Modi, Federico Carnevale and Arkarup Bandyopadhyay from Cold Spring
Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), Balzs Hangya from the Institute for Experimental Medicine in
Budapest, Hungary, Iuliu Vasilescu from TIA Research, Petr Znamenskyi, Ivana Orsolic
and Rob Campbell from Biozentrum Basel, Josh Siegle from the Allen Brain Institute,
Gonalo Lopes from Sainsbury Wellcome Centre in London, Marius Pachitariu from
University College London, Nacho Sanguinetti from the Bernstein Center for
Computational Neuroscience in Berlin, Adriana Dbcan,

Vasile Vlad Moca and

Medorian Gheorghiu from the Romanian Institute of Science and Technology, and Ovidiu
Jurju from the Centre for Integrative Neuroscience in Tbingen.
Chronologically, lab sessions covered the following:
1.

A first set of labs was concerned with basic optics, lenses, custom building simple
microscopes, Koehler illumination. Students learned how to construct microscopes
themselves on the horizontal, on an optical rail by using lenses and accessories (blue
LEDs, irises, lens holders, posts, post holders, laser pointers, CCD and CMOS cameras)
bought from the course budget, or obtained on loan from companies participating in
TENSS, and used their custom setups to image samples ranging from their own hair to
Golgi stains in fixed rat brain slices. Each group had to present images that they
acquired with their custom microscope.

2.

In a second set of labs, students learned to build custom fluorescence microscopes


relying on knowledge acquired in the previous lab session, transforming the bright
light microscopes into fluorescence rigs. Custom setups were used to image fluorescent
beads, pollen grain, fluorescent paper and fixed brain slices. Students were next taught
to identify and measure noise sources in their setups (dark noise, read out noise, shot
noise) and to use image analysis methods. Also, commercial Olympus and Sutter
microscopes were used for wide-field fluorescence to determine noise and pointspread functions by comparison.

3.

The next set of lab sessions were concerned with intrinsic optical imaging, whereby
students needed to build custom rigs for intrinsic imaging and recorded in vivo data
from the olfactory system from anesthetized animals receiving olfactory stimulation
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(EMX-Cre x Ai95-GCaMP6f mice). The microscopes were built from custom parts (Nikkor
SLR lenses, cameras from Allied/Vosskuhler and Andor controlled by NI boards with
Labview) and were used both for fluorescence and intrinsic imaging of brain slices and
in vivo. An odor delivery machine was assembled to stimulate the olfactory system of
transgenic mice and results were compared across intrinsic and fluorescence
techniques (imaging GCaMP6 responses in the glomerular layer of the bulb).
4.

In parallel with the intrinsic and fluorescence microscopy, students received also
training in Matlab,, Arduino and Bonsai with extended sessions teaching them basic
programming rules and preparing them to program the scanners for 2-photon imaging.

5.

Further, Ruben Portugues with help from Priyanka Gupta and Mehrab Modi set up a
functional custom light sheet microscope in the lab which they demo-ed to the
students in small groups using zebra fish samples. The microscope was built onsite
within 2 days time and the students enjoyed the demo and the realization that such
cutting edge tools are within their grasp both in terms of the underlying theory and
practical implementation.

6.

With the next set of labs, individual groups started to work on different rigs/setups.
Two-photon (2p) microscopy was now done in parallel in two independent custom
setups and students used various parts to build their own 2p microscope from scratch.
Demos were made also with a commercial microscope: the MOM from Sutter.

7.

When the custom 2p microscopes were ready they were used to acquire 2p images
from fixed slices as well as in vivo preparations in transgenic mice. Images were
compared to those obtained by the commercial Sutter 2p setup that TENSS received on
loan.

8.

Next, the electrophysiology module began, where students first learned how to design
custom electronic signal amplifiers by using electrical breadboards and various
electronic parts (operational amplifiers, resistors, transistors, diodes, capacitors and so
on).

9.

In the next lab sessions, participants learned electrophysiology in a dish of saline and
agarose. They went through demonstration experiments relating position of electric
field dipoles and signals acquired by electrodes. Participants were also taught about
basic principles of extracellular recordings, how to make tetrodes and design and
mount microdrives and fiber optics and headstages for behavioral experiments, etc.
9

10. The next day was dedicated to monitoring animal behavior and in vivo patch clamping.
To monitor animal behavior they learned to write small programs in Bonsai that used
input from CMOS cameras and also concepts related to state machines to describe the
trajectory of the animal in time in open or closed loop. The in vivo patch clamp
demonstrations allowed students to see and also do themselves in vivo patching. The
evening was used to prepare the behavioral and acute setups for the following days
and students could witness how various parts have to be assembled to obtain
functional setups. In addition, we included also some more intensive modules for
teaching students how to program, the sessions being taught in an interactive fashion.
11. The next lab sessions dealt with monitoring animal behavior and in vivo extracellular
recordings with optogenetics from freely moving mice. Mice were implanted with
several tetrodes 10 days before the lab sessions started by the Teaching Assistants in
the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum and were trained to follow a food pellet. The
monitoring of animal behavior was used in parallel with recording from these behaving
mice and also causally interfering with brain activity using optogenetics.
12. Recording sessions were complemented with extensive sessions for training in data
analysis. Students analyzed the very data they recorded from the behaving mice with
the analysis techniques they learned in those sessions. They wrote their own custom
software in Matlab for spike sorting. In addition, students took got exposure and used a
state-of-the-art spike sorting automated algorithm (Kilosort), designed and
implemented by Dr. Marius Pachitariu.
13. In addition, an important emphasis was on teaching students how to design their
custom behavioral paradigms, which they then applied directly during the recording
sessions.
14. Finally, students had the chance to go more in depth with techniques that were most
interesting to them and/or that were still unclear.
15. Michael Dickinson set a closed-loop fly flight arena demo and prepared flies for the
demo with help from Adriana Dabacan, Iuliu Vasilescu and Priyanka Gupta. This
premiere of fly flight arena at TENSS was a real success (after finding proper
transformers from 110V to 220V!), and students monitored changes in flight as a
function of optic flow and visual patterns presented

10

16. The last three days were dedicated to student projects, whereby participants could
propose and carry out short projects of their own choice, working together in small
informal groups and applying what they have learned during the school. These last
days were the most creative ones, with projects ranging from tracking and recording
from grasshopers, to in vivo closed-loop Brain machine interface (BMI) experiments in
behaving mice using either 2p imaging or extracellular recordings to closed-loop
monitoring and controlling escape responses of Pike Lake grasshopper caught from the
wild and monitoring social interactions between mice in an arena, and firing of
neuronal ensembles in the entorhinal cortex, while conditioning their proximity using
white noise stimuli. Lab sessions were particularly exciting and intensive, but also quite
exhaustive for participants and teaching assistants. Frequently, labs continued well
beyond midnight, showing the dedication and excitement of students. For these
reasons, the program also included break days (1 full day and 2 half days) with trips
through Transylvania such that participants could relax and recover after the
exhausting activities in the labs.

2.6. Lectures
Apart from intense experimental training, participants also received theoretical lectures
from top-level scientists and had the opportunity for a close interaction with these,
sprouting interesting scientific debates. The following instructors and TAs gave
presentations on various topics covered by the summer school:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Lecturer/TA name
Albeanu, Florin

Institution
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA

Bandyopadhyay,
Arkarup

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA

Bhalla, Upinder
Burrone, Juan
Campbell,
Alexander
Carnevale, Federico
Dbcan, Adriana
Dickinson, Michael
Engert, Florian
Freiwald, Winrich
Freund, Tamas
Gupta, Priyanka
Hangya, Balzs

NCBS, India
Kings College London, UK
Biozentrum Basel, Switzerland
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA
Romanian Institute of Science and Technology, Romania
Caltech, USA
Harvard University, USA
Rockefeller University, USA
Institute for Experimental Medicine, Hungary
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA
Institute for Experimental Medicine, Hungary

11

14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.

Hromdka, Tom
Hbener, Mark
Ji, Na
Kampff, Adam
Keller, Georg
Kodandaramaiah,
Suhasa
Lopes, Gonalo
Modi, Mehrab
Monyer, Hannah
Mrsic-Flgel, Tom
Murean, Raul
Murthy, Venkatesh
Nikolic, Danko
Orsolic, Ivana
Portugues, Ruben
Sanguinetti, Nacho
Siegle, Josh
Singer, Wolf
Svoboda, Karel
Vasilescu, Iuliu
Watson, James
Zador, Tony
Znamenskyi, Petr

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA


Max Planck Institute, Martinsried, Germany
HHMI Janelia Farm, USA
University College London, UK
Friedrich Miescher Institute, Switzerland
University of Minnesota, USA
Champalimaud Foundation, Institute for the Unknown, Portugal
National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India
University of Heidelberg, Germany
Biozentrum Basel, Switzerland
Romanian Institute of Science and Technology, Romania
Harvard University, USA
Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Germany
Biozentrum Basel, Switzerland
Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Germany
Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Germany
Allen Brain Institute, USA
Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Germany
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Farm, USA
TIA Research, Romania
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA
Biozentrum Basel, Switzerland

Table 2. Instructors at TENSS 2016


As a TENSS first, in 2016 we had as a guest a Nobel Prize winner at the course, Jim Watson
from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, one of the discoverers of DNA structure. Jim shared
the 1962 Nobel Prize with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins for their discoveries
concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information
transfer in living material.
Lectures were held in the lecture room allocated to TENSS and had coffee breaks that
stimulated more informal questions and interaction between lecturers and students.
Overall, students were very interested and asked many excellent questions such that TENSS
organizers received very good remarks about the students from the instructors. Worth
noting is also the fun part of the lectures and interaction with lecturers. While in previous
year Florian Engert gave his lectures by the pool, this year he lectured on the hills
surrounding the pension, at a barbecue, using only a whiteboard. During past editions, the
interaction between students and professors sprouted ensuing collaborations, several of
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the students going to either PhD or postdoc in labs of TENSS lecturers. Not only students
and lecturers interacted but also lecturers among themselves. Therefore, TENSS is an
excellent opportunity for networking and to discuss science.
Lectures covered a wide range of the important topics that were studied in the labs (see
also section 5). The opening lecture happened on May 31st in the evening, after the arrival of
all students. On the first two days of the school, Florin Albeanu, Priyanka Gupta, Adriana
Dbcan, and Mehrab Modi started with basic principles related to optics (nature of light,
lenses, microscopes, Koehler illumination, Resolution, and so on), made a recap on
diffraction, resolution, numerical aperture, and objectives, and discussed wide-field
fluorescence imaging, general problems related to fluorescence (bleaching, ratiometry, and
so on). Adam Kampff and Goncalo Lopez lectured on detectors (cameras, photodiodes,
photomultipliers, with a brief foray into transistors MOSFET & CMOS etc) and noise.
Then, Juan Burrone covered fluorescent probes (GFP, calcium indicators, voltage dyes,
synaptophluorins etc) and Jim Watson talked about Going for the scientific gold!,
describing a set of basic rules for scientific success. On the fourth day, students had half-aday off to relax after the very intense introduction into the course activities. On June 5th,
Mark Hbener discussed wide-field intrinsic optical imaging in comparison with wide-field
fluorescence imaging while Florian Engert presented principles behind confocal and 2photon microscopy. On the sixth day Ruben Portugues gave both a demo and a lecture on
Light Sheet and Light Field microscopy. The next day, Georg Keller discussed building of 2p
microscopes and resonant scanning and Na Ji lectured on adaptive optics. On day 8, Petr
Znamenskiyexplained concepts of optogenetics and optical stimulation methods and Florin
Albeanu and Na Ji gave a lectures on 1p and 2p- structured illumination using intensity and
respectively phase modulation. On day 9, Hannah Monyer lectured on interneurons in the
entorhinal cortex and methods of recording and tracing. Day 10 was again half free, in the
morning Nacho Sanguinetti giving a talk on animal behavior and machine vision. On the
same day, Florian Engert gave a talk on LASERS on a hilltop close to Pike Lake, during an
informal barbecue. The electrophysiology began on day 11 with a talk by Upi Bhalla on
biophysics of neurons followed by a lecture by Petr Znamenskii on chronic extracellular
recordings and Georg Keller on virtual reality and closed-loop experiments in mice. The
introduction to patch clamp was given by Tomas Hromadka on day 12 and then Tom Mrsic13

Flogel explained how to combine 2p microscopy with behavior and electrophysiology. On


day 13, Tony Zador lectured on what novel DNA barcoding strategies to sequence the brain
connectome, and Danko Nikoli gave a primer of typical data analysis techniques, starting
from PSTH and cross-correlation to tuning curves and spike sorting. In the evening, Marius
Pachitariu also discussed spike sorting, presenting his implementation on fast GPU
processors (Kilosort). On day 14, Karel Svoboda gave a talk about the role of excitation and
inhibition in mouse cortex, with examples from his own research. Day 15 was a day off and
participants visited the ancient salt mine of Turda and then roamed around in the city of
Cluj-Napoca. On day 16, Michael Dickinson presented his own work about behavioral setups
and recording from flies and Tamas Freund talked about the role of GABA-ergic inhibition is
shaping theta oscillation function in rat hippocampus. Day 17 was marked by the beginning
of student projects and had no talks, while on day 18 Raul Murean gave the last lecture of
the school on oscillations and analysis techniques. Venki Murthy, Winrich Freiwald and
Suhasa Kodandaramaiah could not make it to the school and cancelled in the last moment,
due to unforeseen problems.

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2.7. Some pictures from TENSS 2016

Pre-TENSS workshop people debating. With: Florin Albeanu, Adam Kampff, Jakob
Voigts, Aaron Cuevas, Mattias Karlsson, Reid Harrison, Jon Newman, Goncalo Lopes.

Setting up the lasers. With: Medorian Gheorghiu and Raul Murean.

15

Precision work by Florin.

Setting up the table for the Sutter microscope. With: Ivana Orsolic, Petr Znamenskii
and Adriana Dbcan.

16

The big table, for custom setups. With: Priyanka Gupta and Petr.

Federico Carnevale preparing the drives for surgery.

17

The Pre-TENSS workshop people during a practical session.

Rick Ayer from Sutter setting up the MOM.

18

Opening evening of TENSS 2016 Adam, Florin & Raul

Curious students about what will happen during the course.

19

The students...

Jon and Jakob from Open Ephys setting up an experiment.

20

The first debate over a beer.

Rick and Raul discussing.

21

The best way to start TENSS with a swim in Pike Lake.

First lecture on day one by Florin.

22

Rick, advancing with the setup.

Jim and Liz Watson inspecting the optics lab.

23

And they start building right away basic optics lab session.

Light sources and lenses.

24

Team work.

Mehrab Modi, teaching Khler illumination.

25

Fiddling with lenses.

Viewing a sample through the horizontal microscope.

26

Finetuning with Medorian, Mehrab and Nacho Sanguinetti.

When it works, it is simply fun.

27

Whos got the nicest microscope?

Rick is almost there...

28

Jim and Liz visiting the Nicula monastery, close to Pike Lake.

29

Jim gives an interview for the Romnia Curat news portal.

Ruben Portugues setting up the light-sheet microscope.

30

More optics with Priyanka.

Relaxing after a very intense day with Juan Burrone, Balzs Hangya and Fede.

31

Thats how you teach programming! With Goncalo and Tomas.

Jims lecture at TENSS: Going for the scientific GOLD!

32

Tomas on Arduinos.

First student presentations.

33

Adam Kampff...

Every student gets to speak during student presentations.

34

Each group presents its own experiments.

Jim lecturing at the Babe-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca.

35

Jim and the Biology Olympiad team of Romania.

Party people.

Florian Engert teaching by the pool.


36

Ruben explaining the light-sheet microscopy setup to the students.

Ruben, fine tuning his setup.


37

One photon two photon: with Florian Engert.

Georg Keller explaining the principles of 2-photon microscopy.

38

Florin...

Na Ji on adaptive optics.

39

Inspecting the Sutter commercial 2p setup.

By comparison, a custom 2p microscope setup built by students.

40

Hannah Monyer lecturing.

And, we celebrated everyones birthday during TENSS...

41

Carrying the whiteboard to the barbecue on the hills.

Florian lecturing on lasers, on the top of a Transylvanian hill near Pike Lake.
42

Playing football while the barbecue is being cooked on the hill.

Arkarup Bandyopadhyay singing with a local band from the Cluj Music Conservatory.

43

Upi Bhalla lecturing on the biophysics of neurons.

And student projects have begun...


44

We are in a pension, after all.

Tony Zador lecturing.


45

Wondering what inverted tables are good for?

Danko Nikoli lecturing on spikes, LFP, PSTHs and correlation.


46

Interesting student projects going on...

Heres another teams setup waiting for the students.

47

And Tomas helping out.

Tom Mrsic-Flogel and Tony...

48

Patching with Tomas.

Raul and Balzs in the Shadow bar waiting for some shots.

49

Warming up with some beers in Shadow.

Finally, warmed up!

50

Wandering on the medieval streets of Cluj.

Tams Freund lecturing on the importance of inhibition.

51

Live demo of fruit fly behavioral experiments Michael Dickinson, Balzs, Priyanka.

Michael lecturing on behavioral experiments in flies.


52

Raul introducing oscillations.

Its all in the details showing oscillatory entrainment in the gamma band.

53

Student projects going on. On a very an intensive schedule...

Priyanka and Petr doing some last-minute experiments on the MOM 2p setup.
54

Time for fun!

55

And the last evening of the school, with Nacho handing out certificates of attendance.

A well-deserved, crazy closing party.

56

Participants in TENSS 2016

The end of TENSS 2016, looking forward to TENSS 2017!

57

2.8. Contribution of TENSS to Neuroscience and future directions


The main objective of TENSS is to provide top experimental training to graduate students
from all over the world. Although the organizational effort for this type of summer school is
tremendous, it pays off because in about three weeks the school exposes students to such a
wide range of experimental techniques that sometimes require months or years and
switching between several labs to learn. Therefore, we believe that TENSS brings an
important contribution to the field worldwide.
We intend to make TENSS a tradition and have it organized on an annual basis. Already at its
fifth edition, TENSS has a promising outlook and we are already taking steps to secure
funding for 2017. In the past years, the school had important echoes in the international
and national press and we present a few examples:
In National Geographic:
http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2013/02/27/romanias-scienceproblem-a-tale-of-two-florins-part-2/
In Nature:
http://www.nature.com/news/summer-skills-1.15416
On Digi24 news TV channel:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCPAl_vlY0g
In Romania Curat:
http://www.romaniacurata.ro/cu-desfiintarea-uefiscdi-moare-si-ultima-sperantatenss-unul-dintre-cele-mai-ambitioase-proiecte-din-cercetarea-autohtonacontinua-exclusiv-cu-finantari-externe/

58

3. Information regarding the organizing of TENSS


Organizing TENSS requires months of intensive preparations. The organizing team for the
2016 edition consisted of 20 people that worked around the clock, pro bono, to make
TENSS happen. In addition, several external factors also contributed to the success of TENSS.
For example, several large companies that produce scientific equipment are involved by
providing equipment for free, on loan, to be used during the course. TENSS 2016 benefited
from the following equipment:
Optical bench equipment (lenses, irises, lens tubes, posts, post holders, mirrors,
mirror holders, optical cage cubes, objectives, SLR lenses, galvanometric-scanners,
clamps, analog input/output and digital input/output acquisition boards, excitation
filters, emission filters, dichroic mirrors, photomultiplier tubes) mostly bought from
the courses budget.
Femto-second pulsed tunable laser infrared Chameleon XR90 MHz from
Coherent, received as a donation for the course and for the host institute.
A second femto-second pulsed laser (tunable) Chameleon Ultra II laser on loan
from Coherent.
Intrinsic Optical Imaging and wide-field epifluorescence LED based rig (custom
built). The setup was built from SLR lenses, tubes, lens holders, LEDs, and CCD
cameras (Allied Vosskuhler) bought from the course budget.
One epifluorescence microscope based on Olympus design BX51 donated as
permanent equipment for the course by Olympus Europe.
Extracellular Recording (Tetrode Arrays) headstages and recording setup from
Open Ephys. Tetrodes were manufactures using equipment from Neuralynx received
on loan for the course.
Axopatch 200B amplifiers for the clamp setups manufactured by Molecular
Devices, USA able to record/induce action potentials and sub-threshold (synaptic)
activity in individual neurons.
A pipette puller received on loan, manufactured by Narishige.
Micro-manipulators for maneuvering recording electrodes manufactured by Sutter
Instruments (MP-285 and MP-225).
A MOM 2-photon microscope received on loan from Sutter Instruments and
assembled by Rick Ayer on spot.
59

Data acquisition and hardware control electronic boards by National


Instruments.
Optical and optomechanical components and breadboards for assembling the
optical imaging setups, manufactured by Thorlabs.
Many parts were bought from the budget of the course and will be used also for future
editions of the course. Since the course started more than 500 individual parts had to be
purchased for the course.
The budget of TENSS 2016 totaled at almost 90,000 EUR, that were covered by the Gatsby
Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Simons Foundation, FENS-IBRO, PERC, The Company of
Biologists and student participation fees. In addition, the course received support from labs
in Europe and USA (Florin Albeanu, Lszl Acsdi, Tom Mrsic-Flogel) which provided
transgenic mice and various equipment for free. The University of Medicine and Pharmacy
in Cluj-Napoca also helped the course by loaning two surgery microscopes and donating
wild-type mice.
The notification & selection of students took several months to complete. A call for
applications was issued in January 2016 and the deadline was on March 13th. Applications
consisted of one letter of intent, one CV and two independent recommendation letters. A
board of 19 scientists rated the applications as objectively as possible in a 2-phase selection
process and notification of acceptance was sent out on April 10th. Immediately before the
beginning of the summer school, the organizing team together with company
representatives went to Pike Lake to set up the labs and prepare everything for the arrival of
students. After the conclusion of TENSS 2016, the dismantling of lab equipment and return
of loan equipment takes several additional days. Therefore, the total logistics effort for this
type of experimental summer school lasts for about 1.5 months (2 weeks before, 3 weeks
the summer school, 1 week after). This adds up to the several months necessary to raise
funding and organize the logistics of the course, including equipment delivery.
Presently, the TENSS team is finishing all activities related to TENSS 2016 and already started
to raise funds for the next edition, TENSS 2017.

60

4. Financial report
The total budget of TENSS 2016 was a very large one because of the nature of the summer
school. Experimental schools require a tremendous logistic effort and lots of equipment and
therefore costs are much higher than in schools which are limited to theoretical lectures
only. The total spending of TENSS 2016 was around 88636 EUR as of June 24th, 2016. The
budget structure of TENSS 2016 is outlined in the following table.
Nr.
crt.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Budget category

Cost (RON)

Accommodation & meals


Travel costs
Logistics****
Equipment
Travel support for students
Total

106810
142130
109263
33593
10088
401884

Cost
(EUR*)
31347
23557
24098
7409
2225
88636

Cost
(GBP**)
18549
24683
18975
5834
1752
69793

Cost
(USD***)
35221
26469
27076
8325
2500
99591

Table 3. Spending per budget categories (rounded figures). *The costs in EUR were
estimated at the National Bank of Romanias exchange rate for 17.06.2016 (4.5341
EUR/RON). **The costs in GBP were computed by taking an average GBP/EUR exchange rate
of 1.27. ***The costs in USD were computed considering an exchange rate of 0.89 USD/EUR.
****Logistics costs are estimates as of 30th June 2016, because there are additional costs for
shipping loaned equipment back which, on this date, could only be estimated.
The sources of funding are described as follows.
Funding source
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Gatsby Foundation
Wellcome Trust
Simons Foundation
FENS-IBRO
PERC
The Company of Biologists
Registration fees
Total

Amount
(EUR)
25400
25400
12460
4000
4000
3876*
13500
88636

Amount
(GBP)
20000
20000
9811
3150
3150
3052
10630
69793

Amount
(USD)
28539
28539
14000
4494
4494
4356
15169
99591

% Budget
28.66%
28.66%
14.06%
4.51%
4.51%
4.37%
15.23%
100%

Table 4. Funding sources that covered the budget for TENSS 2016. * - the actual amount
received in the institutes account.

61

5. Final program of the event


The schedule of TENSS 2016 included each day several lectures and lab sessions, with
breaks in between.

62

TENSS 2016 Schedule


DATE

DAY

TIME SLOT

MAIN RESPONSIBLE

31/5/2016

19:00 20:30

Florin, Raul, Adam

20:30 21:30

Dinner

1/6/2016

GROUPS

CONTENT

Introduction to the course and the people

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:00

Florin Albeanu

11:00 12:00

Adriana

Intro to Optics
Intro to image formation

12:00 12:15
12:15 13:00

Coffee break
TAs

ABCD

13:00 14:00
14:00 16:00

Simple microscopes : Lenses and image formation properties


Lunch

TAs

ABCD

16:00 16:30

Simple microscopes : Lenses and image formation properties


Coffee

16:30 18:00

Mehrab

18:00 20:30

TAs

Koehler Illumination: numerical aperture and resolution


ABCD

Bench-top koehler microscopes depth of field and aperture

63

20:30 21:30
21:30 23:00

2/6/2016

Dinner
TAs

ABCD

Bench-top koehler microscopes depth of field and aperture

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:00

Priyanka/Mehrab

Recap diffraction, resolution, numerical aperture, objectives

11:00 11:15
11:15 13:00

Coffee break
Fluorescence: Wide-field epi-fluorescence, PSFs and resolution, dF/F, bleaching,
ratiometry (dF/dR)

Florin Albeanu

13:00 14:00
14:00 16:30

Lunch
TAs

ABCD

16:30 16:45

Coffee break

16:45 18:30

Adam / Goncalo

18:30 20:30

TAs

Detecting signals: Noise, Cameras, PMTs and diodes, Introducing lab session on
noise measurements
ABCD

20:30 21:30
21:30 24:00

Convert bench-top koehler microscopes to epi-fluorescence

Noise measurements, measure PSFs using fluorescent beads


Dinner

TAs

ABCD

Discussion, analysis, continue Labs

64

3/6/2016

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:30

Juan Burrone

Fluorescent probes: GFP, calcium indicators vs. voltage dyes, synaptophluorins

11:30 11:45
11:45 13:00

Coffee break
Tomas, Goncalo

Programming I: Basics

13:00 14:00

Lunch

14:00 15:00

Jim Watson

15:00 17:30

Fede, Tomas, Goncalo

Going for the scientific gold!


Programming II: Arduinos

17:30 17:45
17:45 20:30

Coffee break
TAs

ABCD

20:30 21:30
21:30 onwards

4/6/2016

Image fixed brain slices on the bench-top fluorescence microscopes. Analyze


noise and PSF measurements, compile results and make presentations.
Dinner

TAs

ABCD

Continuation of analysis and making presentations.

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:00

Student presentations (10 + 5 minutes): PSFs, noise characterization of widefield microscopes

11:00 13:00
13:00 14:30

Tomas, Goncalo

Programming III: Matlab and Data acquisition


Buffet Lunch with student chalk talks

65

5/6/2016

14:30 20:30

Free time to relax

20:30 onwards

Dinner and party

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:30

Intrinsic Imaging - Principles and Intro to Lab session - practical aspects and
comparison with wide field fluorescence imaging

Mark Hubener

11:30 11:45
11:45 13:00

Coffee break
Florian Engert

Scanning and Confocal Microscopy

13:00 14:00
14:00 16:00

Lunch
TAs

AB

Set up microscopes for intrinsic and widefield fluorescence imaging and


determine optimal imaging parameters

Rob

CD

Set up bench top scanners and simple beam alignment

16:00 16:30
16:00 20:30

Coffee break
TAs

AB

Image intrinsic optical and fluorecence signals, analyze acquired signals

Rob

CD

Write scanning software

20:30 21:30
21:30 23:00

6/6/2016

08:00 09:00

Dinner
TAs

ABCD

Continue respective lab sessions

Morning run/swim

66

09:00 10:00
10:00 12:00

Breakfast
Rob

AB

Set up bench top scanners and simple beam alignment

TAs

CD

Set up microscopes for intrinsic and widefield fluorescence imaging and


determine optimal imaging parameters

12:00 13:00
13:00 - 14:00
14:00 18:15

Early Lunch
Ruben Portugues

Light Sheet and Light Field Microscopy

Rob

AB

Write scanning software

TAs

CD

Image intrinsic optical and fluorecence signals, analyze acquired signals

18:15 18:30
18:30 20:30

TAs, Ruben

ABCD

Light sheet demo / Continue respective lab sessions

20:30 21:30

Dinner

21:30 23:00

Student presentations (10 + 5 minutes): Widefield imaging

23:00 onwards

7/6/2016

Coffee break

TAs, Ruben

Continue Light sheet demo or lab sessions if needed

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:15

Two-photon microscopes Theory, Microscope basics, Resonant scanning,


Example applications in neuroscience

Georg Keller

11:15 11:30
11:30 13:00

Coffee break
Rob

AB

Write X-Y- Z scanning and image acquisition software

Florin

CD

Building a two-photon microscope general discussion on practical aspects and


optical diagram

67

13:00 14:00
14:00 19:00

Lunch
Rob

AB

Write X-Y- Z scanning and image acquisition software

TAs

CD

Building a two-photon microscope - lab

19:00 19:15
19:15 20:30

Coffee break
Na Ji

Adaptive Optics

20:30 21:30
21:30 23:00

8/6/2016

Dinner
TAs

ABCD

Continuation of lab sessions

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:15

Florin

Optogenetics and stimulation methods (LEDs, fibers, DLP)

11:15 11:30
11:30 13:00

Coffee break
Florin

AB

Building a two-photon microscope general discussion on practical aspects and


optical diagram

Rob

CD

Write X-Y- Z scanning and image acquisition software

13:00 14:00
14:00 19:00
19:00 19:15
19:15 20:30
20:30 21:30
21:30 23:00

Lunch
TAs

AB

Building a two-photon microscope - lab

Rob

CD

Write X-Y- Z scanning and image acquisition software

Na Ji
TAs

ABCD

Coffee break
Structured Illumination via Phase modulation and Temporal focusing
Dinner
Continuation of lab sessions

68

9/6/2016

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:00
11:00 13:00

Marius

Introduction to 2p data analysis

TAs

AB

In vivo 2p Lab imaging session

Marius, Georg

CD

Image Analysis / VR, Miniature Microscope demo

13:00 14:00
14:00 16:00

Lunch
Marius, Georg

CD

Image Analysis / VR, Miniature Microscope demo

TAs

AB

In vivo 2p Lab imaging session

16:00 16:30

Coffee

16:30 19:30

Marius, TAs

19:30 20:30

Hannan Monyer

ABCD

TBA

20:30 21:30
21:30 23:30

10/6/2016

10

Analysis of 2p imaging data


Dinner

Marius, TAs

ABCD

Analysis of 2p imaging data, make presentations

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:15

Nacho

Intro to Animal Behavior and Machine Vision/Bonsai

11:15 11:30

Coffee

11:30 13:00

Student presentations - multiphoton microscopy

13:00 20:30

Picnic/Barbecue on the hills featuring Florian and LASERS

20:30 onwards

Dinner and Party

69

11/6/2016

11

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:15

Biophysics of neurons - RC circuits, dipoles and impedance (Introduce 'cell in a


dish' lab demo)

Upi Bhalla

11:15 11:30
11:30 13:00

Coffee break
Petr

Introduction to chronic extracellular recordings

13:00 14:00

Lunch
Upi, Mehrab, Adriana

AB

Cell in a dish: Bench top electronics and basics of electrophysiology, Tetrode


Making

TAs

CD

Animal behavior I - Assembling a simple re-inforcement learning setup

14:00 17:00

17:00 17:30

Coffee break
TAs

AB

Animal behavior I - Assembling a simple re-inforcement learning setup

Upi, Mehrab, Adriana

CD

Cell in a dish: Bench top electronics and basics of electrophysiology, Tetrode


Making

17:30 20:30

20:30 21:30
21:30 23:00

12/6/2016

12

Dinner
Georg Keller

Virtual reality and closed loop behaviors - Mice

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

70

10:00 13:00

TAs

AB
CD

13:00 14:00

Lunch

14:00 15:15

Tomas Hromadka

15:15 16:15

Suhasa

Introduction to patch clamp


Autopatcher

16:15 16:30
16:30 19:30

Coffee break
TAs

AB

Animal behavior II - machine vision

CD

Building Tetrodes and tetrode drives

19:30 20:30
20:30 21:30

Early Dinner
Tom Flogel

21:30 24:00

13/6/2016

13

Building Tetrodes and tetrode drives


Animal behavior II - machine vision

Combining two photon with behavior and physiology


ABCD

Continue building drives

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 13:00

TAs

AB

Physiology basics - record from implanted mice, spike detection, sorting,


optogenetic tagging

TAs

CD

Animal behavior III

13:00 14:00
14:00 15:00
15:00 18:00
18:00 18:30

Lunch
Tony Zador

TBA

TAs

AB

Animal behavior III

TAs

CD

Physiology basics - record from implanted mice, spike detection, sorting,


optogenetic tagging
Coffee break

71

18:30 20:30

Balazs, TAs

ABCD

20:30 21:30

14/6/2016

14

Analysis of acquired data (filtering, spike sorting, PSTH)


Dinner

21:30 22:30

Danko Nikolic

22:30 24:00

TAs

Analysis of neural data: cross-/scaled-correlation, PSTHs, tuning curves, spikesorting


ABCD

Continue analysis

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast
Physiology III - recording from behaving mice
In vivo patch clamp

10:00 13:00

TAs
Tomas, Suhasa

13:00 14:00

Karel Svoboda

AB
CD

TBA

14:00 - 15:00
15:00 17:00

Tomas, Suhasa

AB

In vivo patch clamp

TAs

CD

Physiology III - recording from behaving mice

17:00 17:30
17:30 20:30

Coffee break
ABCD

20:30 21:30

15/6/2016

DAY
15

Continue lab/analysis/presentation making


Dinner

21:30 22:30

ABCD

Continue lab/analysis/presentation making

22:30 24:00

ABCD

Student Talks

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

72

16/6/2016

DAY
16

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 20:30
20:30
onwards

Trip to Cluj and Turda

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

Dinner and Party

10:00 11:00

Mike Dickinson

Sensory-motor integration in the flight control behavior of fruit flies

11:00 12:00

Tamas Freund

The reciprocal GABAergic septo-hippocampal connection: wiring and dynamics


of circuits underlying theta oscillation

12:00 13:00
13:00 15:00

Early lunch
Venki, TAs

AB

Student Projects

Tomas, Suhasa, M.
Dickinson

CD

In vivo patching/ Flight arena demo

15:00 15:15
15:15 17:15

Coffee
Venki, TAs

CD

Student Projects

Tomas, Suhasa, M.
Dickinson

AB

In vivo patching / Flight arena demo

17:15 17:30
17:30 20:30

Coffee
TAs

20:30 21:30
21:00 23:00

Student Projects
Dinner

TAs

Student Projects

73

17/6/2016

18/6/2016

DAY
17

DAY
18

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 12:00

Group Experiments

12:00 13:00

Lunch

13:00 20:30

Group Experiments

20:30 21:30

Dinner

21:00 23:00

Group Experiments

08:00 09:00

Running around

09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:00

Raul Muresan

TBA : Oscillations and analysis techniques

11:00 12:00

19/6/2016

DAY

12:00 13:00

Lunch

13:00 18:00

Group Experiments

18:00 20:30

Group Experiments

20:30 21:30

Dinner

21:00 23:00

Student presentations - group projects

08:00 09:00

Morning run/swim

74

19
09:00 10:00

Breakfast

10:00 11:45

Informal chalk board talks by students (10 + 5 minutes): Very brief intro to
current research work and defend future proposals to use knowledge acquired
at the course

11:45 12:00

Coffee

12:00 13:30

Informal chalk board talks by students continue

13:30 14:30

Lunch

14:30 16:00
Evening
onwards

Round up and feedback


Music, movies, swim and party

75