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Cyber Security
Course summary
This course has been developed in response to the demand from industry for cyber security
professionals who have a systematic understanding of the principles and technologies underpinning
todays IT systems.
Cyber security is a key problem in the provision of services, from the application layer through to the
basic building blocks of computer and network systems. People trained in cyber security are greatly
sought after and in the UK analysts expect that there will be a shortage of security professionals for
the next 10 years or more.
The digital world is a complex place, varied in form and distributed, serving different types of
stakeholder who use a variety of devices to access information. Specialists who recognise the
diversity of business needs and the breadth of technologies and techniques to combat cyber threats,
and have a systematic approach to understanding the impact of technology on organisations, are
essential to the success of today's and tomorrow's cyber systems.
Equal in importance to securing cyber systems and their supporting technologies, is the
management and delivery of content and services through to the users. These systems are in reality
socio-technical-economic systems incorporating people, technologies, service providers, content
providers, governments (laws, regulations, policies) through to law enforcement. The cyber security
specialist is a broadly based professional able to work with technologists, senior management,
service providers and suppliers, through to the end users, with their aim to provide secure services
and investigate breaches.
This course builds on typical undergraduate computing courses, or those degrees with a high degree
of computing content, whose graduates are looking to develop new knowledge and skills in cyber
security. This course is designed to help the student gain an understanding of how cyber security
systems are designed and constructed, and of the impact of technology into an organisation. The
course will also give you the skills you need to work effectively in a business environment, and
provide a solid basis for cyber security research. The course is supported by several research
groups within the School of Computing and Engineering and the school has received research
funding in cyber security.

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Course detail
The course will also give you the skills you need to work effectively in a business environment, and
provide a solid basis for cyber security research and development. The course is supported by
several research groups within the School of Computing and Engineering and the School has
received research funding in cyber security.
Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and laboratory work to provide a basis for the intensive
individual study you need to undertake to maximise your achievements and the potential outcomes
from taking the course.
Modules

Fundamentals of Cyber Security


Security Management
Network and Systems Security
Security Operations and Assurance
Learning and Professional Development
Employability Skills and Employment
Knowledge Management (option)
Computer Networks (option)
Distributed Application Development (option)
Project Management (option)
Mobile Application Development (option)
Research Methods
Dissertation.

Fundamentals of Cyber Security


This module provides an introduction to key techniques and technologies used in cyber security. The
security landscape is discussed with emphasis on the CIA of security which leads into cryptography
which is the basis of confidentiality, integrity and authentication systems. The module covers
symmetric and asymmetric encryption, steganography, principles of cryptanalysis, message
confidentiality, message authentication, security protocols and security in distributed systems as
well as the application of cryptographic techniques to authentication and identity management.
Security Operations and Assurance
This module provides an introduction to security operations and assurance of systems, networks,
data and user identities, which is an essential aspect of organisation and information systems. This
module provides an introduction to security operations and assurance of systems, networks, data
and user identities, which is an essential aspect of organization and information systems. New
threats are emerging as digital technologies permeate into most aspects of work and social life and
in transactions between parties opening potential for fraud, deception and corruption. Coverage
includes information assurance, incident management, audit and business continuity.
Network and Systems Security
This module provides an introduction to network and systems security by firstly discussing security
threats, vulnerabilities and attack patterns. This leads onto firewalls, intrusion detection and
protection systems for networks and computer systems through to security management, such as
Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) systems. Topics also include anti-virus systems,
system hardening and security testing.

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Security Management
This module provides an introduction to assuring the security of systems, networks, data and user
identities, which is an essential aspect of organization and information systems. New threats are
emerging as digital technologies permeate into most aspects of work and social life and in
transactions between parties opening potential for fraud, deception and corruption.
Research Methods
This module gives you the skills to acquire and distil knowledge, preparing you to carry out applied
research in the area of cyber security, and in computing in general. You will learn to use appropriate
data collection and statistical methods and tools to support your research ideas. Each masters
course provides a set of common lectures/seminars plus specific lectures and workshops on research
and developments within their chosen specialism to act as the focus for the dissertation project.
(Taught by Wei Jie and supported by other course team members).
Dissertation
With this module, you have the opportunity to carry out an original piece of research, adding to
existing knowledge and demonstrating an ability to select, define and focus on an issue at an
appropriate level. You will also develop and apply relevant methodologies to analyse your topic areas,
and to develop recommendations and logical conclusions in the context of existing work in the area.
For example your dissertation can be the research, design and implementation of a cyber-system, a
literature-focused study, a research-focused study, or an industry project for example.
Learning and Professional Development
This is a preparatory module for all students enrolling on the MSc Information Systems. Learning
and Professional Development (LPD) is designed to orientate new master students and especially
international students to masters level study. It is delivered on a weekly basis in two hour sessions to
provide regular support in areas of content, competence and development. The module is
preparatory for Research Methods in a subsequent semester which then forms the basis for the
dissertation.
Employability Skills and Employment
This additional learning support module aims to provide students with an opportunity to prepare for
employment and further develop skills proportionate with postgraduate study and industry
requirements in preparation for a professional career.
Distributed Application Development (option)
In this module, you will learn how to apply software engineering skills, using mainly Java as the
programming language, to develop distributed applications. You will cover both Java programming
and distributed application architecture content. There is a particular focus on emerging
technologies, such as service orientated architectures and business process management toolsets.
Knowledge Management (option)
In this module, you will explore the widely accepted theories and frameworks for knowledge
management - and their application in technologies and learning organisations. On completion, you
will understand the way knowledge from these diverse disciplines is used within the development of
Decision Support Systems (DSS). Knowledge management techniques can be widely used in cyber
security to analyse log files through to the creation of situational awareness systems.
Computer Networks (option)
This module covers the breadth and depth of computer networks such as Enterprise networks, the
Internet and service provider networks. The module covers protocols, switching, routing and overlay

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networks, including new techniques such as Software Defined Networks (SDN) and the Network
Virtualisation Function (NVF). Security is a key element in network design so aspects such as high
availability networking are investigated.
Project Management (option)
Project management is growing in importance within a wide range of private and public sector
environments, where the need for efficiency, budgetary control and timely completion is increasing.
This module gives you a comprehensive understanding of good project management practice, the
skills and professional techniques needed, and the interactions within, or associated with,
commercial project teams. The life cycle of any project needs to be appreciated by all stakeholders,
and you will learn how to support and encourage others to aim for successful completion. Project
management is a core skill for professionals to plan and rolling out secure cyber systems.
Mobile Applications Development (optional)
This module has been developed in conjunction with industry to provide hands-on experience
developing software for mobile devices. An open source approach to software development will be
used throughout the module. Students will gain experience using relevant industry standard tools to
support their work.

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Entry requirements
A degree (at least 2:2) in a computing subject. A business or an engineering degree with a
significant level of computing content may also be considered.
Applicants with equivalent professional qualifications, or a relevant Higher National Diploma (HND)
will be considered, provided they can demonstrate significant, relevant work experience and the
ability to benefit fully from the course. Such applicants will be considered on an individual basis by
interview. Some optional modules may not be available to students without a first degree in
computing.
International students need to meet our English language requirement at either IELTS at 6.5 or
above, and a minimum of 5.5 for each of the 4 individual components (Reading, Writing, Speaking
and Listening). In some countries where teaching is in English, we may accept local qualifications.
Please visit http://www.uwl.ac.uk/international/your-country to check for local equivalencies. We
offer pre-sessional English language courses, an International Foundation Programme and a
Pre-Masters Programme if you do not meet these requirements. You can read more about these
courses here - http://www.uwl.ac.uk/international/english-language-programmes

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Fees
UK fees
Main fee
GBP6,950

International (non-UK/EU) fees


Main fee
GBP10,995
Find out if you are a home or overseas student.

Funding
Find out more about funding, scholarships and bursaries

Please note that fees given are per academic year unless otherwise stated, and may be subject to
change. Costs can increase each year.

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How to apply
Tips on applying
When you submit your application for this course it is very helpful to make a positive statement to
help us as we consider your application. It is helpful to show that you have a cyber security career
in mind. This means aspiring generally to work in the public or private sector organizations in a
strategic, service orientated, managerial and professional role in the broad areas of information
security, network security, security management, cyber security, law enforcement etc. You might
also wish to develop yourself towards self-employment and small enterprises: such as security
consultancies.
In the ICT industry the cyber security professional role is significant. This signals that you aspire to
be involved at both the strategic and operational levels of network and information systems and
service provision or in research. You would see yourself being a member of the British Computer
Society (BCS), the Institute of Engineering Technology (IET), or a similar professional body.
Apply for this course
Apply now

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During the course


Notable aspects
The School of Computing and Engineering has a growing research and enterprise culture with 30
PhD students as well as a diversity of research groups.
Students can take advantage of a London base, which is one of the major information capitals of the
world as well as being a global business hub and with a good representation of IS/IT firms and
consultancies. These may provide subjects for investigation and dissertation work as well as access
to contacts and potential employment. The Thames Valley region to the west of London is a location
for many global IT firms (in towns such as Bracknell, Reading, Newbury, Maidenhead and
Basingstoke).

Special resources
Laboratories and dedicated ICT suites with access to specialist networks and software are available
with good resources for study space and meetings. Many staff members have specialist research
expertise.

Teaching methods
Diverse methods are used to explore all aspects of the field. A strong supportive culture exists
amongst the course tutors which enables students to achieve their potential.

Learning materials
Good levels of access to computer facilities are provided. The academic and professional elements
are well supported by the university library with a good range of digital resources. In addition,
virtualisation technology is used so that students can practice cyber security techniques on their
own computing resources.

Assessment
Coursework
Assessed work is a significant part of the total assessment in the masters. There is practical work,
report writing, presentations, critical academic writing and the skills and knowledge gained in these
contribute to a capacity to deliver a high quality dissertation.

Exams

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There are a number of end of module exams. Course tutors provide appropriate support throughout
the module to ensure candidates are well prepared.

Student support
The school and course team are experienced and qualified. The University also offers central support
for learning skills. A strong student role is actively encouraged.

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Teaching staff

Mr Colin Beeke

Wei Jie

Bruce Laurie

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Dr Nasser Matoorian

Dr Danni Novakovic

Dr Samia Oussena

Stephen Andrew Roberts

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Professor Thomas Roth-Berghofer

Christian Severin Sauer

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What our students say


Maryam Hajebi, MSc Information Systems student
I have studied for many years, but studying Information Systems at UWL has been
my best student experience.
The lecturers are excellent with high expectations, they helped me understand and
achieve the skills and professional techniques I needed as well as enhancing my
personal growth and confidence; their encouragements helped me demonstrate my
abilities and focus my determination. I am a different person since I joined UWL.
Being at UWL is not just about studying; it also involves working in groups, and being involved in
different parts of the university.

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Case studies
Maryam Hajebi, MSc Information Systems student
I have studied for many years, but studying Information Systems at UWL has been
my best student experience.
The lecturers are excellent with high expectations, they helped me understand and
achieve the skills and professional techniques I needed as well as enhancing my
personal growth and confidence; their encouragements helped me demonstrate my
abilities and focus my determination. I am a different person since I joined UWL.
Being at UWL is not just about studying; it also involves working in groups, and being involved in
different parts of the university.

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Jobs and placements


The School of Computing and Engineering has links with industry, creating opportunities for
industry projects, work placements and internships for our best students. We have set up a number
of successful knowledge transfer partnerships with industry, where we provide our expertise to
real-world projects.

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Career and study progression


The course aims to provide routes into a number of career opportunities especially in the ICT
industry and in organisations that are data and knowledge intensive. Employers require information
security officers at all levels including the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO), network and
computer security engineers, security managers and consultants, penetration testers, cyber security
analysts, security investigators and security researchers. Additionally some security experts find
themselves working in media, writing articles for magazines and papers etc.
Graduates in cyber security have a good record of achieving employment and progressing in their
professional work. The security industry is wide, including companies that need to protect
themselves, government and law enforcement through to the providers of equipment and services,
such as the:
anti-virus, security software vendors (such as McAfee, Kaspersky, Symantec, Sophos, EMC/RSA,
Entrust, etc.),
network and computer vendors (such as Cisco, Juniper, Palo Alto, HP, Barracuda, etc.),
network and service providers (such as British Telecom, Vodafone, Rackspace, Amazon, etc.),
consultancies (such as KPMG, IBM, Fujitsu, HP, etc.)
services companies and in government and law enforcement.
In the UK the analysts indicate there is a huge demand for cyber security professionals and the UK
government is investing 650 million into the area of cyber security over the next few years.

Study progression
Outstanding graduates have gone on to further study at the level of MPhil and PhD at UWL and at
other institutions.
We actively encourage students with potential for research to make their interest known early on in
their course.

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