Corrosion Electrochemistry 1

Michele Curioni

Lecture Overview
• Understand and use Faraday’s law
– Charge‐mass relationship
– Current and mass loss
– Current and corrosion depth
• Nernst Equation
– Equilibrium potentials and activity
• Pourbaix Diagrams
– Fe and Zn diagrams
– Use of Pourbaix Diagrams
– Limitations of Pourbaix Diagrams

Metal Oxidation

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+

Metallic Copper Electrolyte
Understand and use Faraday’s law

Anodic Reaction

Cu0 Cu2++ 2 e‐

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+

2 e‐ Cu2+ Net Charge = 0 Net Charge = 0
Cu0

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+

Metallic Copper Electrolyte
Understand and use Faraday’s law

2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu0 Cu2+ How charge  2 e‐ neutrality is  maintained? Metallic Copper Electrolyte Understand and use Faraday’s law . Charge Neutrality Charge neutrality must be maintained in ALL phases (metal and solution) at ALL times Copper metal cannot became  negatively charged. 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Electrolyte cannot become  positively charged.

Cathodic Reaction + ‐ EXTERNAL CIRCUIT 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ Metallic Copper Electrolyte Metallic Electrode Understand and use Faraday’s law .

Cathodic Reaction I 8 e‐ 8 e‐ 8 e‐ WORK MUST BE  PROVIDED BY  THE EXTERNAL  2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ CIRCUIT FOR THIS  REACTION TO  2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ PROCEED AT  FINITE SPEED! 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ Cu2+ Cu0 2 e‐ Metallic Copper Electrolyte Metallic Electrode Understand and use Faraday’s law .

Cathodic Reaction II 8 e‐ 8 e‐ 8 e‐ In principle it  could happened  O2(g) without external  2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 4OH‐ 4 e‐ work at some pH  (0‐4) 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 2H2O(l) (but there is  small driving  2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ force) O2(g) 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 4OH‐ 4 e‐ 2H2O(l) Metallic Copper Electrolyte Metallic Electrode Understand and use Faraday’s law .

Cathodic Reaction III + 8 e‐ 8 e‐ 8 e‐ ‐ WORK MUST BE  PROVIDED BY  H2(g) THE EXTERNAL  2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 2OH‐ 2 e‐ CIRCUIT FOR THIS  REACTION! 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 2H2O(l) NOT  2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ SPONTANEOUS! H2(g) 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 2 e‐ 2OH‐ 2H2O(l) Metallic Copper Electrolyte Metallic Electrode Understand and use Faraday’s law .

Corrosion 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ 2 e‐ Cu0 Cu2+ O2(g) 4 e‐ 4OH‐ 2H2O(l) .

Current and reactions Anodic Reaction Cathodic Reaction 4Al 4Al3++ 12 e‐ 3O2(g)+ 6H2O(l) + 12 e‐ 12OH‐ Move within the metal Electric current Move within the electrolyte Direct relationship between the current flowing into the metal and  the amount of metal oxidized .

 and use Oxygen reduction) . Cathodic Reaction‐Example Most usual cathodic reactions are ‐ Oxygen reduction ‐ Hydrogen evolution ‐ Metal (re)deposition Write complete and balanced cell reaction (anodic+cathodic) for  Aluminium (hint: Al in solution becomes Al3+ .

  Charge=‐4 in both sides Cell Reaction  ‐ Not Balanced Al + O2(g) + H2O(l) Al3+ + OH‐ Cell Reaction  ‐ Balanced 4 Al in both sides 4Al + 3O2(g)+ 6H2O(l) 4Al3+ + 12OH‐ 12 O in both sides 12 H in both sides Charge = 0 in both sides . 4 Hydrogen in  O2(g) + 2H2O(l) + 4 e‐ 4OH‐ both sides. Solution Anodic Reaction Al Al3+ + 3 e‐ 1 Al in both sides Charge=0 in both sides Cathodic Reaction 4 Oxygen in both sides.

Can we measure charge flow? Current Electric current is a flow of electric charge through a medium. ? Electron flow is easier to measure than ionic flow as we can use  a resistor and apply Ohm’s law Resistance = R Ohm’s Law Anions (‐)  V=RI Current = I Cations (+)  I=V/R Cathode Anode Voltage = V (measured) .

241 x 10 18 electrons • 1 Ampere (A)   = 1 Coulomb / Second • 1 mol is 6.241  10 18 mol Constant Faraday’s Constant is needed when  converting current/charge in mass .022 x 10 23 units (of anything) The charge of one mol of electrons is 6.96485 10  96485 5 6. Charge and Current • 1 Coulomb (C) = 6.022  10 23 C Faraday’s   0.

Summary • We know how many (mol of) electrons we need to oxidize  each (mole of) metal atom • We know that we need an external circuit to have a cell  reaction • We can measure the current and charge passing through the  external circuit • We know how much charge there is in a mol of electrons We can work out the relationship between  the current we measure and the metal we  oxidize .

Faraday’s Law I Charge Passed (C)  C = = moles of oxidized metal (mol) Valence Number Faraday’s Constant (C/mol) n F Charge Passed = Current (A) x time (s) Mass (g) = Molar mass (g/mol) x number of mol Charge Passed (C) x Molar mass (g/mol) C  M = = mass of oxidized metal (g) Valence Number Faraday’s Constant (C/mol) n F .

Faraday’s Law II Charge Passed (C) x Molar mass (g/mol) C  M = = mass of oxidized metal (g) Valence Number Faraday’s Constant (C/mol) n F Mass (g) Volume (cm3)=  ρ= density g/cm3 Density  (g/cm3) C  M = Volume of Oxidized Material nF ρ C=current(A) x time (s)= I x t I  t  M = Volume of Oxidized Material nF ρ .

Faraday’s Law III I  t  M = Volume of Oxidized Material nF ρ Volume  of oxidized material = Electrode area (cm2) x Thickness (cm)= A x h  I  t  M = Thickness n F ρ A .

 then I  t  M Note: if I(t) is not constant you need to  Oxidized material at time t = calculate the integral of I(t)dt between  n F ρ A 0 and t to get the charge I M Corrosion rate = n F ρ A . and it is coupled to another electrode by an  external circuit (which might or might not provide work to the  cell).Faraday’s Law applied to corrosion • If one metal electrode in a given environment only support an  anodic reaction.

Nernst Equation .

Electrochemical Potential ???? How much work can we produce from this system? Cu Zn Zn2+ + 2 e− Zn  Cu2+ + 2 e− Cu  Cu2+ Zn2+ See example cell .

Hydrogen Reference Electrode .

15 K (25 °C) • Pressure 1 Bar Why do we need standard conditions? . Standard conditions • Concentration 1 mol dm‐3   but infinite dilution  behavior • Temperature 298.

Standard Cell Potential/Hydrogen  electrode .

Gibbs Free Energy • Gibbs free energy accounts for the non‐ mechanical work that can be done by a system G  H  TS • For an electrochemical cell (standard conditions)  G 0   RT ln K eqst • Where Reduced  species [ products ] IN STANDARD  K st eq  CONDITIONS [reagents] Oxidized species .

Equilibrium Constants • Keq can be calculated from concentrations Reduced species Oxidized species Reduced species Oxidized species .

Nernst Equation I • Gibbs free energy accounts for the non‐ mechanical work that can be done by a system G 0   RT ln K eqst • In an electrochemical cell. this is also  equivalent to the electrical work G 0  welectrical  (Q)(V )  ( I )(t )(V ) .

Nernst Equation II G 0  welectrical  (Q)(V )  ( I )(t )(V ) For one mol G  (n)( F )( E ) 0 0 cell So  RT ln K  (n)( F )( E ) st eq 0 cell G 0 G 0 .

] .. Nernst Equation III STANDARD CONDITIONS RT ln K st 0  eq E cell nF NON STANDARD CONDITIONS 1 2 [a p1a p 2 ....] G   RT ln K 0 st eq  RT ln  1  1 [a r1a r1.

] . Nernst Equation – The basis of  Pourbaix diagrams  Oxidized species Reduced species 0..059 [C  1 p1C  2 p 2 ..] Ecell  Ecell 0  log  1  1 n [C r1C r1...

5 M ZnSO4 .1 M CuSO4 and  0. Example 2 • 1 reactant (half cell) – Cu potential at 0.5 M CuSO4 • 2 reactants (full cell) – Cell potential of Cu‐Zn cell at a) 0.1 M CuSO4 and 0.

.

Pourbaix Diagrams  .

Pourbaix Diagrams Pourbaix Diagrams link potential. They will tell if corrosion is possible or not  for a given set of pH or electrode potential • Very important in predicting possible corrosion  issues . pH and species in  solution or on the electrode surface • Nernst equation provides a tool for drawing Pourbaix Diagrams • Pourbaix Diagrams relate to the thermodynamics of  corrosion.

Example .

 H2O + 2H+ ↔ 2Al(OH)2+ • If equilibrium involves oxidation of metal. it will generate a vertical line on Pourbaix diagrams – Example: Al2O3. it will be  affected only by potential. General rules for Pourbaix diagrams • If equilibrium involves only metal and metal ions.  – Example: Al↔Al3+ + 3e‐ • If equilibrium does not involve oxidation or reduction of  species. but the resulting  ions contains hydrogen or hydroxide ions. This generates horizontal lines on  Pourbaix diagrams. it will generate a  diagonal line in the pourbaix diagrams – Example:  Al+2 H2O ↔ AlO2‐ + 4H++ 3e‐ .

059 [ Zn] ER  E  0 R n log  Zn 2  0.059 [1] ER  E 0 R log NO pH effect on potential n [Const ] . Pourbaix diagrams • Changes in pH only affect reactions that have  hydrogen or hydroxide ions in the reactant or   products.  Zn  Zn2+ + 2e‐ 0.

Pourbaix diagrams • Changes in pH only affect reactions that have  oxygen or hydrogen ions in the reactant or   products.  Zn(OH)2 + 2e‐ Zn + 2OH‐  2 0 . 059 [ Zn ][OH ] ER  ER  0 log pH affects potential!! 2 [ Zn (OH ) 2 ] .

2 0.6 O2 is stable 1.2 H2 is stable -1.The Pourbaix (E-pH) Diagram 2.0 -0.6 0 7 14 pH .8 Potential 0.0 1.8 -1.4 -0.4 H2O is stable 0.

4 stable ZnO22- 0.6 0 7 14 pH .8 -1.Pourbaix Diagram for Zinc 2.2 Zn metal stable -1.6 1.0 1.2 0.8 Zn(OH)2 Potential 0.0 Zn2+ stable solid stable in -0.4 solution in solution -0.

2 Immunity Zn metal stable -1.4 solution in solution -0.Pourbaix Diagram for Zinc 2.0 Zn2+ stable solid stable in -0.2 Corrosion Passivity 0.8 Zn(OH)2 Potential 0.6 0 7 14 pH .4 Corrosion stable ZnO22- 0.6 1.0 1.8 -1.

0 1.6 C Passivity 1.8 -1.2 -1.4 or hydrogen evolution -0.0 with oxygen reduction Immunity -0.2 C 0.4 Gold Gold metalcan’t corrode stable 0.6 0 7 14 pH .8 Potential 0.Pourbaix Diagram for Gold 2.

2 stable 0.0 -0.8 Cu2+ stable Potential 0. 1.6 0 7 14 pH .8 Cu metal stable -1.4 in solution 0.6 Cu oxides 1.Pourbaix diagram for Copper 2.4 -0.2 -1.0 CuO22.stable in soln.

8 -1.0 1.6 1.8 Potential 0.0 stable -0.4 Fe oxides 0.2 Fe metal stable -1.2 Fe3+ 0.Pourbaix Diagram for Iron 2.6 0 7 14 .4 Fe2+ stable -0.

4 0.6 -2.Pourbaix diagram for Aluminium 1.2 AlO2- -1.0 Potential -0.8 0.0 Al -2.4 0 7 14 pH .2 0.4 -0.8 Al3+ Al2O3 -1.

 H2 HCl Reduction current > Oxidation current . Zinc in Acid Zn  Zn2+ + 2e- Zn Oxidation current > Reduction current 2H+ + 2e.