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Scheme of Work English Stage 5

Introduction
This document is a scheme of work created by Cambridge as a suggested plan for delivery of Cambridge Primary English Stage 5. Learning objectives for the
stage have been grouped into topic areas or units. These have then been arranged in a recommended teaching order, but you are free to teach objectives in any
order within a stage as your local requirements and resources dictate.

The scheme of work assumes a term length of 10 weeks, with three terms per stage and three units per term. An overview of the sequence, number and title of
each unit for Stage 5 can be seen in the table on the next page. The scheme of work is based on the minimum length of a school year to allow flexibility. You
should be able to add in more teaching time as necessary, to suit the pace of your learners and to fit the work comfortably into your own term times.

Some learning objectives are designed to be recurring across all units. As such, these are listed separately at the beginning of the scheme of work as ongoing
work across Stage 5. These ongoing learning objectives are followed by the learning objectives for the topic of the unit, and related grammar and punctuation.
(Learning objectives are given using their curriculum framework codes and a summary rather than following the precise wording in the curriculum frameworks.)
Activities and resources are suggested against the objectives to illustrate possible methods of delivery. In the fiction and non-fiction units, these include more
general activities that can be carried out at any point across the unit to reinforce learners skills.

There is no obligation to follow the published Cambridge schemes of work to deliver Cambridge Primary. They have been created solely to provide an illustration of
how delivery might be planned over the six stages. A step-by-step guide to creating your own scheme of work and implementing Cambridge Primary in your school
can be found in the Cambridge Primary Teacher Guide available on the Cambridge Primary support site. Blank templates are also available on the Cambridge
Primary support site for you to use if you wish.

Two sample lesson plans (short-term plans) are included in Appendix A at the end of this document.

Cambridge International Examinations is not responsible for the content of materials or websites recommended in this document. All website references were
accurate at the time of writing. As websites may be changed and newer, better websites are being created, teachers are advised to check all websites before using
them and encouraged to actively search for appropriate new online resources.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 1


Overview
Nine units of work are suggested for Stage 5. In each school term there are three units: fiction, non-fiction and poetry. The range of topics suggested is:

TERM 1 TERM 2 TERM 3

Fiction Unit 1A: Stories by significant childrens Unit 2A: Traditional tales, myths, legends Unit 3A: Stories from different cultures
writers and fables.
(40% of teaching Reading and analysing stories from a
time) Reading and analysing stories by Reading and analysing traditional tales, variety of different cultures and writing a
significant childrens writers then planning including myths, legends and fables, then story.
and writing a story. planning and writing a tale.

Non-fiction Unit 1B: Non-chronological reports and Unit 2B: Recounts Unit 3B: Persuasive writing
explanations
(40% of teaching Reading, analysing and writing recounts. Reading and analysing samples of
time) Reading and analysing non-chronological persuasive writing then writing a
reports and explanations then planning and persuasive letter and commentary.
writing them.

Poetry Unit 1C: Poems by significant poets and Unit 2C: Narrative poetry Unit 3C: Performance poetry
plays
(20% of teaching Reading and discussing narrative poetry and Reading and discussing performance
time) Reading and analysing poems and performing a poem. poetry and performing poems.
playscripts and planning and writing them.

For learners to become more proficient in English skills it is important that they keep revisiting and consolidating skills in different contexts. For this reason, many
of the learning objectives are revisited in different ways in different units. This gives all learners the opportunity to grasp the ideas involved. Within each term, the
order in which units are taught is not important the level of expectation is consistent across all three units. It is important, however, that you teach the Term 1
units before the Term 2 units, and the Term 2 units before the Term 3 units.

The teaching and learning of English skills is a continuum. The prior knowledge expected for these units is developed in earlier stages, and the skills and
understanding developed in Stage 5 are important for learners to make good progress in subsequent stages. If the Stage 5 level of work is not appropriate for the
learners in your class, it is recommended that you use ideas from the Stage 4 or Stage 6 units of work: comparable texts are often studied in each stage, so
matching a text type with the appropriate learning objectives is usually fairly easy.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 2


Key prior knowledge expected for these units is that learners should be able to:
apply effective strategies to tackle unfamiliar words in reading
identify syllables, prefixes and suffixes in multisyllabic words, and use this information in spelling and reading
generate some spelling rules and ways of remembering spellings
recognise and respond to all punctuation marks
recognise all tenses of most verbs
understand that commas can be used to mark clauses in a sentence
understand that sentences can have both main and subordinate clauses, and begin to recognise which is which
use joined-up handwriting in all writing and use appropriate handwriting for the audience and purpose of a piece of writing
adapt the pace and volume when reading aloud for the audience and purpose.

In general, specific texts are not recommended because of the different resources available in each school and location. Teachers have the flexibility to include
resources that they have available and locally or nationally relevant resources. Descriptions of the types of texts you will need to teach are given at the beginning
of each unit. The availability of large print and picture book texts is never assumed, although many are available and you will be able to teach more effectively if
learners can see and read the text. It is assumed throughout that you have access to a whiteboard, blackboard or flipchart to record brief texts for general
discussion and analysis.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 3


Ongoing work
The learning objectives listed below should be taught, reinforced and developed throughout the entire school year.
You may wish to allocate time each day to teaching these learning objectives, or you may prefer to allocate a set amount of time each week.

Ongoing spelling
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo1 Learn and apply effective Give the learners regular opportunities for exploring and investigating spelling errors, in particular errors
5Ws3 ways of spelling new words. they have made in their own writing. Encourage use of strategies such as:
5Ws4 using known spellings to work out the spelling of related words
5Ws5 building words from syllables, prefixes, suffixes and recognised spelling patterns
5Ws8 remembering common letter strings which have different pronunciations
5Ws11 using visual skills to check on the likelihood of a particular spelling of the word.

To support these strategies, include lessons on:


revising known prefixes and suffixes and learning new ones, e.g. auto, bi, trans
identifying word roots and finding derivations, e.g. sign, signature, signal
the patterns of single and double consonants at the end of words, e.g. -ful and full.

Once learners have learnt to spell a word, insist that it is spelt properly on all occasions.
5Ws1 Identify unstressed vowel in This is probably the area in which most spelling errors are made by learners in this age group, so it needs
5Ws6 polysyllabic words. consistent work. Useful strategies include:
making links with related words, e.g. medicine, medical
investigating the spelling of final unstressed vowels, e.g. final unstressed er in butter and ee in city
sometimes saying the unstressed syllable as if it was a stressed syllable, e.g. in-ter-est for interest
finding words within words, e.g. car-pet; theres a rat in separate!
using rhymes and mnemonics, e.g. difficulty Mrs D, Mrs I, Mrs FFI, Mrs C, Mrs U, Mrs LTY!
5Ws2 Learn plurals, and spelling Explore and revise known spelling rules, including the rules for making plurals of words ending in -e, -es,
5Ws7 rules for words ending in -e -y and -f, for adding any suffix to words ending in -e and -y.
and -y.
5Rw8 Use dictionaries, spell checks Allow learners free access to dictionaries and electronic spell checks in class and establish a culture of
5Wo3 and thesauruses to check using of them to explore the meanings of unrecognised words and when redrafting a piece of work. When
5Wa6 spelling and improve learners have looked up a word, they should record it in their spelling log and try to find other, related
knowledge of words. words.

Learners should also be encouraged to use thesauruses as a matter of routine to enlarge their vocabulary.
Thesauruses are particularly useful during the revising and redrafting phase of writing.

Ongoing reading
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ro1 Read widely and know about By Stage 5, learners should be becoming active readers who read with understanding and enjoyment for
5Ri1 different fiction genres. a range of purposes. Teach and encourage them to:
5Rv1 develop a knowledge of authors and swap recommendations
5Rv6 Use and evaluate non-fiction develop a knowledge of genre, so that they can begin to identify those they find most appealing
5Wa13 books. make use of a variety of non-fiction books in all curricular areas and to further leisure interests
find out as much as they can about a book (fiction or non-fiction) before they read it, and evaluate the
book for writing style, topic and genre, audience, purpose, clarity and organisation before beginning to
read it properly
skim read texts for gist and scan them for specific words and phrases
provide references from more than one point in a story to support answers to questions
keep a reading log with comments, observations and predictions during reading as well as reviews of
books read after reading.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 5


Ongoing grammar
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rw10 Understand conventions of When they are writing formal English, it is important that learners use it accurately. Give learners the
standard English. opportunity to proofread their writing and correct common errors, which include:
non-agreement of pronoun and verb (in particular with the verb to be, e.g. we was; I were)
using an adjective instead of an adverb (e.g. I was real excited)
using the wrong part of a verb (e.g. I seen)
having a double negative (e.g. I didnt have no )
using them instead of those (e.g. I liked them gloves).
5Wt2 Use pronouns, making clear to Pronouns are an essential part of a cohesive text, and learners often have difficulty linking a pronoun
what/whom they refer. correctly with the noun it refers to. They need practice at this, including proofreading their work so they get
used to spotting an ambiguous pronoun and clarifying meaning.
5Rw4 Understand clauses in Build on learners understanding of main and subordinate clauses. Explore the formation and punctuation
5Wp1 complex sentences and how to of complex sentences through:
5Wp2 punctuate them. finding complex sentences in reading, identifying the clauses and discussing the punctuation
5Wp3 exploring the connectives which can be used in complex sentences
giving learners the experience of combining two or three short, simple sentences into a complex
sentence
asking learners to separate a complex sentence into two or three short, simple sentences
identifying main and subordinate clauses in complex sentences
using an increasing range of subordinating connectives
punctuating complex sentences.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 6


Ongoing writing
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo2 Review, proofread, revise and Learners should proofread all of their work before they expect anyone else to read it. Proofreading should
5Wo5 edit writing. Work with another include reading the text at least four times to:
5Wa14 learner as response partners check for sense
5Wa15 and evaluate own and others check for best choice of words and sentence types
writing. check for spelling errors
check for punctuation errors.

Redrafting is not just about copying it out in neat handwriting, but is also about improving it. Initially,
learners need direction so they understand what to improve. This can include:
reference to the success criteria agreed for the piece of work
reference to personal targets
redrafting a particular part of their writing, e.g. the climax of the story to use more senses, or the
beginning to include a hook, or the end to add a twist.

The use of response partners is a valuable aid to learners development in writing. Response partners:
read plans, drafts and final drafts and comment constructively (as for proofreading)
listen to oral plans for, and versions of, a piece of writing and comment constructively.

Ongoing speaking and listening


Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5SL1 Speak confidently and make Across the curriculum, when you have class and group discussions, encourage learners to:
5SL3 effective contributions in group talk confidently and listen carefully in a range of contexts
5SL5 and class discussions. describe events and talk with increasing clarity
5SL7 shape and organise ideas clearly when speaking
5SL9 ask questions to develop ideas and extend understanding
take different roles and responsibilities within a group.
Unit 1A: Stories by significant childrens writers
Reading and analysing stories by significant childrens writers then planning and writing a story

This is the first of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is four
weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of stories, first enjoying the texts as readers, then reading as writers and analysing features of the text. Then they will plan
and write a story based on one of the texts you have read and analysed.

Resources needed:
Three or four short stories or extracts from longer works by significant childrens writers. Try to include a mixture of classic and modern writers. You will need
to have extracts of these stories enlarged for all learners to share, or multiple copies.
The video, DVD or taped reading of one of the texts is a useful addition.
A class novel, which is a chapter book that you can read gradually throughout the unit. You should expect to read it aloud to the class, either with learners
simply listening, or with them following in their own copies.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 1A: Stories by significant childrens writers
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
code objectives

5Rv6 Read widely and explore the Introduce the chosen authors. Find information about the authors and their life in books and on the
features of different fiction internet.
genres.
Read a story by a chosen author. Ask learners to give their first responses, supported by reference to the
text.
What did they like/dislike? How did it make them feel?
Which passages/events were particularly effective or interesting? Can they begin to explain the
features of those parts of the text?
Which characters did they like? Why did they like / were they interested in these characters?
Do they think the story may have grown out of the writers experience? If so, why?
5Rv6 Consider what is meant by Read and enjoy the chosen stories.
significant childrens writers
and decide whether there is Introduce the phrase significant childrens writers and discuss it in terms of the stories you have read,
evidence in the story you have asking learners to provide evidence for their answers.
read to justify the description. What are the merits of each story? Do learners think they have special features?
Compare stories by one significant writer with another. Which ones do learners prefer? Why?
Why are some authors granted the status of significant? Is it simply to do with how many books they
have written, or are there other reasons?

Poll the learners to find their ideas about other significant childrens writers.
5Ro2 Consider how characters are Discuss the characters in a story. What sort of character are they victim, bully, hero ? Are they
5Ro3 presented. successful? How does the author want us as readers to respond to them? Are our feelings about a
5Ri1 character being manipulated? If so, how? Discuss how we know about the characters. Learners should
5Rv5 always provide evidence for their responses by considering:
5Rv7 a characters actions and other characters reactions
how a character speaks as well as what they say
how a character is described
the relationships between characters.

If possible, have learners compare their responses to the print and film versions of the story. How are the
characters presented on screen?
Unit 1A: Stories by significant childrens writers
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
code objectives

5Rw5 Compare the structure of Re-read a story. Remind learners of the work they have done previously in drawing bridges (or story
different stories. mountains) to represent the structure of a story (see Stage 4 Scheme of Work, Unit 2A). Do learners
remember the five stages in a conventional story (introduction, problem/build-up, climax/conflict,
resolution, and conclusion)?

Does the story being read have this structure? Some stories in chapters are made up of a series of little
story bridges, one in each chapter, as well as having an overall story bridge structure. Ask learners to draw
a diagram of the structure of the story.

Consider the opening of the story. Can the learners spot any hooks which draw the reader in? A hook is
an event or question which makes the reader sit up and take notice and want to continue reading to find
the answer.
5Wa2 Consider how the addition of a Consider one of the stories that has been read. How would the story be different if, for example:
5Wa4 new character would change a the main character was a different, better, version of themselves even cleverer, more cunning or
5Wa8 story. more beautiful (or whatever the key trait of the main character is)?
5SL1 the main character was a completely different version of themselves, perhaps with the opposite
5SL3 characteristics from those described by the author?
5SL5 there was a new character who always undermined the main character?
a playful creature was introduced into the story?

Ask groups of learners to consider a variety of different scenarios whereby one of the characters is
changed or a new character is introduced into the story. They should consider the impact on the story and
prepare a character study of the new character, making careful choices of words and maintaining the
viewpoint.

They could then write a new first paragraph for the story, including a hook which introduces their new
character.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 10


Unit 1A: Stories by significant childrens writers
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
code objectives

5Wo2 Plan to retell a story with a Remind learners how to use a paragraph planner to plan their story. Each paragraph on the plan should
5Wa2 different or new character. have:
5Wa4 a heading showing which part of the story the paragraph relates to
5Wa8 notes about the characters and setting
5Wt1 notes about the action in the paragraph
clear links between the paragraphs, sections and chapters.

If you give learners a limited amount of space on the page for their planning, it will encourage them to plan
effectively and they wont be able to write the whole story in their plan.

Ask learners to share their plan with a response partner and tell their story aloud, using the plan as a
guide. The response partner should make suggestions for improvement. Learners can alter their plans as
necessary.
5Wo2 Write a story from a plan. When learners have planned their story, ask them to write the first draft. Give them the shared success
5Wa2 criteria for the story, e.g.:
5Wa4 base your story on one you have read but with a different or new character
5Wa8 include a hook in the beginning of the story to draw readers in and introduce the new character
5Wt1 show how the inclusion of the new character changes the story
choose words and phrases carefully for your description.
5Wo2 Proofread, edit and redraft the After learners have written their first draft of their story, ask them to do the writers mumble, i.e. read it
5Wa14 story, improving the selection aloud several times to check it.
5Wa15 of vocabulary and checking Does it meet the success criteria?
5Ws5 spelling and punctuation. Does it make sense, with the events following each other logically?
Have you chosen the best words? Try to improve the quality of the verbs and nouns.
Are punctuation and spelling correct?

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 11


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 1A
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ws8 Investigate the effect of adding Ask learners to list the prefixes and suffixes they are familiar with. Are they aware that suffixes generally
5Ws9 prefixes and suffixes. affect the word class of a word and prefixes generally affect its meaning?

Explore this in more detail.


Create opposites by adding a prefix to a verb, e.g. un- (e.g. undo), de- (e.g. destabilise), dis- (e.g.
disobey), and in- (which becomes ir- before words beginning with r, as in irregular, il- before words
beginning with l, as in illegal, and im- before words beginning with p, as in impossible).
Turn nouns into adjectives using suffixes, e.g. -able (as in comfortable) and -ful (as in fearful).
Create opposites by changing prefixes and suffixes, e.g. -ful to -less as in fearfulfearless, mindful
mindless. What about hopefulhopeless? Are they true opposites? With many words, you need a
different suffix or a prefix instead of a suffix, e.g. tastytasteless, sensiblesenseless, eventful
uneventful.
Make comparative and superlative adjectives, e.g. with suffixes -er and -est in regular adjectives (e.g.
cold, colder, coldest). Ask learners to explore other sets of comparatives and superlatives including
those which dont use suffixes (e.g. more beautiful, most beautiful) and those of irregular adjectives
(e.g. good, better, best).
5Wa5 Collect synonyms and Extend work on comparative and superlative adjectives to using adjectives to describe shades of meaning.
opposites and investigate Discuss differences of meaning in progressions such as:
shades of meaning. good, better, best (adjective plus its comparative and superlative forms)
a bit (early), quite (early), early, very (early), extremely (early) (modifiers which can be added to
adjectives)
adequate, fair, good, excellent, outstanding (specific adjectives containing the shade of meaning in
themselves).

Ask learners to draw ladder diagrams to represent the shades of meaning expressed using
comparatives/superlatives, modified adjectives and specific adjectives. Discuss the meanings.

Ask them to look out for different ways of indicating precise shades of meaning in their reading. Make sure
they understand that sometimes the simple forms are more effective.

Try to find synonyms and antonyms of the words in the ladder diagrams. Make sure learners understand
that synonyms are rarely true synonyms, because the meaning of a word depends on its context. Ask
learners to consult thesauruses to find how different sets if synonyms can be gathered for one word.
Grammar and punctuation for Unit 1A
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rw6 Understand the difference Teach learners the difference between direct and reported speech and how to recognise them. Find
5Rw7 between direct and reported examples in books and discuss why the author chose to use one type of speech rather than the other.
5Wp4 speech, and how to set out
5Wp6 and punctuate dialogue. Revisit punctuation of both direct and reported speech.

For both types of speech, teach a wider range of adverbs to describe how people speak (e.g. peevishly,
waspishly, enthusiastically).

Explore different examples of replacing verb + adverb with a more powerful verb.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 13


Unit 1B: Non-chronological reports and explanations
Reading and analysing non-chronological reports and explanations then planning and writing them

This is the second of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is
four weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of reports and explanation texts, first enjoying the texts as readers, then reading as writers and analysing features of the
text. Then they will plan and write their own report and explanation text based on one of the texts you have read and analysed.

Resources needed:
A range of non-chronological reports and explanations that are related to a cross-curricular subject you are studying. You will need multiple copies or
photocopies of extracts from some of the reports for shared work.
A video or DVD is also useful to give learners the experience of listening to a non-chronological report text (most documentary programmes fit this
description).
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 1B: Non-chronological reports and explanations
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rx3 Locate information from Ask learners if they can remember the organisational devices used to locate information. Ask them to list
different sources. them in the order in which they are used. The list should include book title, contents page, index,
headings, and subheadings. It could also include visuals, e.g. captions, maps, charts.

Discuss the lists, asking learners to explain why they have written the devices in the order they have.

Ask them to find information in a book. Do they use the features in the same order they wrote in their list?
5Ro1 Locate information from Remind learners how to draw and use a KWWL grid. This is a grid with four columns: What I Know, What
5Rx1 different sources and use it to I Want to know, Where I will look, and What I have Learnt. Ask learners to suggest research questions
5Rx3 build on what is already they could address and model writing them in the grid.
known.
Put learners into pairs. Give them the opportunity to do their own research to find answers to their own
questions using a variety of sources, including non-book sources such as videos and e-texts.
5Rx2 Extract key points and group Introduce learners to the idea of making notes in a diagrammatic form (similar to a mind map) to link ideas
5Wo4 and link ideas; make notes, even at the note-taking stage.
using simple abbreviations
and write in your own words. Model using simple abbreviations in note-making. Stress the fact that the writer will need to understand
the notes when they re-read them, so the abbreviations should be clear and useful.

Ask learners to make notes in answer to a research question, using a diagram and showing links between
their ideas. Check that their notes:
include key words and phrases as well as the main ideas
show ways in which ideas can be linked
are written in note form (no sentences, no punctuation).
Unit 1B: Non-chronological reports and explanations
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rw9 Revise the features and style Choose a non-fiction book that contains both non-chronological report text and explanations. Read a
5Rv1 of non-chronological reports paragraph of report text. Agree a list of language features (revision from previous stages), including:
and explanatory texts, use of the present tense, unless its a historical report
evaluating the writers use of the third person
purpose, style, clarity and a more formal style, not chatty
organisation. full sentences, with few questions (except as headings or subheadings) and no dialogue
topic sentences to introduce the topic for the paragraph.

Now read a paragraph of an explanatory text and compare the two styles of language. Learners will find
that although it is similar there are usually more connectives, especially of cause and effect (e.g. so,
because) and of sequence (e.g. first, next, meanwhile) in an explanation text.

Ask learners to read the complete report and explanatory text. Do they notice any difference in the
structure of the two types of text? Think about the purpose of each type of text.
The purpose of a non-chronological report is to describe how things are. You should be able to read
sections of the text in any order. There is usually some logic in the order the writer chooses to present
the information, but the text should still work if presented in a different order.
The purpose of an explanatory text if to explain how something works. The text usually has an
introduction which is then followed by a series of logical steps explaining the process. The order of the
events is important.
5Rv1 Read and evaluate reports for Let learners read a page from a report and consider the use of paragraphs.
organisation. How do the paragraphs help to structure and organise the ideas?
How are paragraphs in non-fiction texts used differently from those in fiction texts?

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 16


Unit 1B: Non-chronological reports and explanations
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo4 Plan to write a non- Learners will need a diagrammatic plan showing the notes they have taken about a process they are
5Wa7 chronological report from going to report on. Model how to use notes to plan paragraphs. If learners have already grouped key ideas
notes taken. together, they have mainly achieved this objective already.

Check that all learners have enough information on their plans to write their texts. Ask them to number the
paragraphs to show the order they plan to write in.

Discuss the difference between research and plagiarism. For research purposes, learners can make notes
containing key words and ideas. When writing a report, these key words and phrases can be used, but
sentences and paragraphs cannot be copied from a source (e.g. a book or website) without
acknowledging the source and putting the sentences in inverted commas. Copying someone elses words
is plagiarism and is unacceptable. Learners must write their reports in their own words, combining ideas
and key words from several different sources.
5Wo4 Plan to write an explanation The explanation should be linked to something learners have done (e.g. in science or technology) or
5Wa7 from notes taken. something you have studied (e.g. in geography or science). Learners will need a good knowledge of the
topic and the processes involved.

Learners should plan their explanation on a flow chart so that they can show the sequence of events.
Model planning an explanation using a flow chart.

Remind learners of the key connectives to show sequence and cause and effect. Include these on the flow
chart.

Learners record their ideas on their plans in note form, including abbreviations where appropriate.
5SL3 Talk through the plans, Let learners work with a response partner to talk through their plans. As much as possible, they should
5SL5 describing the events, before use words and phrases they plan to use when they write. Response partners can give feedback and verify
writing. that the planned text makes sense.
5Rw9 Write a text from a plan. Once learners have planned their text, ask them to write the first draft. Give them the success criteria for
5Wo4 the text, e.g.:
5Wa7 follow the language style and structural conventions of the text
include key words and ideas from your sources, but write in your own words
keep the language fairly formal and choose precise words
write a clear introduction at the beginning and a concluding paragraph at the end.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 17


Unit 1B: Non-chronological reports and explanations
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo2 Proofread, edit and redraft the After learners have written a first draft, ask them to do the writers mumble, i.e. read it aloud several
5Wa14 text, improving the selection of times to check it.
5Wa15 vocabulary and checking Does it meet the success criteria?
5Ws5 spelling and punctuation. Does it make sense? Is it well structured? Have you included everything from your plan?
Have you chosen the best words?
Are punctuation and spelling correct?
5SL8 Report back to a group, using After learners have written their texts, divide the class into groups (preferably grouping together learners
notes to present findings about who have written about slightly different aspects of a topic). Ask each member to give a brief oral report to
a topic studied. the group using the notes they used to plan their written text.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 18


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 1B
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ws8 Investigate the effect of adding Ask learners to list the prefixes and suffixes they are familiar with. Are they aware that suffixes generally
5Ws9 prefixes and suffixes. affect the word class of a word and prefixes generally affect its meaning?

Explore this in more detail.


Create opposites by adding a prefix to a verb, e.g. un- (e.g. undo), de- (e.g. destabilise), dis- (e.g.
disobey), and in- (which becomes ir- before words beginning with r, as in irregular, il- before words
beginning with l, as in illegal, and im- before words beginning with p, as in impossible).
Turn nouns into adjectives using suffixes, e.g. -able (as in comfortable) and -ful (as in fearful).
Create opposites by changing prefixes and suffixes, e.g. -ful to -less as in fearfulfearless, mindful
mindless. What about hopefulhopeless? Are they true opposites? With many words, you need a
different suffix or a prefix instead of a suffix, e.g. tastytasteless, sensiblesenseless, eventful
uneventful.
Make comparative and superlative adjectives, e.g. with suffixes -er and -est in regular adjectives (e.g.
cold, colder, coldest). Ask learners to explore other sets of comparatives and superlatives including
those which dont use suffixes (e.g. more beautiful, most beautiful) and those of irregular adjectives
(e.g. good, better, best).
5Wa5 Collect synonyms and Extend work on comparative and superlative adjectives to using adjectives to describe shades of meaning.
opposites and investigate Discuss differences of meaning in progressions such as:
shades of meaning. good, better, best (adjective plus its comparative and superlative forms)
a bit (early), quite (early), early, very (early), extremely (early) (modifiers which can be added to
adjectives)
adequate, fair, good, excellent, outstanding (specific adjectives containing the shade of meaning in
themselves).

Ask learners to draw ladder diagrams to represent the shades of meaning expressed using
comparatives/superlatives, modified adjectives and specific adjectives. Discuss the meanings.

Ask them to look out for different ways of indicating precise shades of meaning in their reading. Make sure
they understand that sometimes the simple forms are more effective.

Try to find synonyms and antonyms of the words in the ladder diagrams. Make sure learners understand
that synonyms are rarely true synonyms, because the meaning of a word depends on its context. Ask
learners to consult thesauruses to find how different sets if synonyms can be gathered for one word.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 19


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 1B
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rw6 Understand the difference Teach learners the difference between direct and reported speech and how to recognise them. Find
5Rw7 between direct and reported examples in books and discuss why the author chose to use one type of speech rather than the other.
5Wp4 speech, and how to set out
5Wp6 and punctuate dialogue. Revisit punctuation of both direct and reported speech.

For both types of speech, teach a wider range of adverbs to describe how people speak (e.g. peevishly,
waspishly, enthusiastically).

Explore different examples of replacing verb + adverb with a more powerful verb.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 20


Unit 1C: Poems by significant poets and plays
Reading and analysing poems and playscripts and planning and writing them

This is the third of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is two
weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of poems and plays, first enjoying the texts as readers, then reading as writers and analysing features of the text. Then
they will plan and write a poem and playscript based on a text they have read and analysed.

Resources needed:
Poetry anthologies with poems by significant poets. Try to include a mixture of classic and modern writers. You will need to have some of the poems enlarged
for all learners to share, or multiple copies.
Playscripts that learners can read, enjoy and perform.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 1C: Poems by significant poets and plays
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ro5 Read poems by significant Let learners browse through poems in particular forms. Work in groups with the learners and discuss a
poets and compare style, chosen poem:
forms and themes. likes and dislikes Did you like/dislike the poem? Why? Were there certain words or phrases that
you liked/disliked?
effects What effect does the poem have on you, the reader?
pictures Does the poem paint a picture in your mind? How?
patterns Look for patterns of rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, lines, verse structure.
words Which words and phrases were particularly effective? Why?
interesting things What else would you like to say about the poem?

For individual poems, you can ask questions and have discussions about different topics, but this list
includes many of the issues it is interesting to discuss with poetry.

Bring some of the poems discussed by groups back to the whole class for a wider-ranging discussion and
to model good discussion for groups where it didnt happen.
5Ro5 Find out more about poets and Select some significant poets, including modern poets, and challenge learners to find out more about
5Rx2 report back. them. This can include research in non-fiction books, reference books and on the internet. Learners
5Rx3 should make notes to record what they find out then report back what they have found to share the
5SL8 information with the rest of the class.
5Ro5 Identify what is distinctive Ask learners to research the poetry of the poets they have investigated. They should read extensively and
about a particular poet. collect information about:
style What is the poets style? Is it consistent across several poems? What changes?
form Does the poet use the same form every time (e.g. rhyme and rhythm, blank verse, free verse,
sonnet form, haiku, limerick)?
themes Are there particular themes the poet likes to write about?
personal reaction Would learners recommend this poet to others? Why?

Make sure they give evidence in their responses.

Let learners share their research, including reading some typical poems.
Unit 1C: Poems by significant poets and plays
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ro5 Develop the language needed Extend the learners vocabulary to discuss sounds in poetry. Find examples of:
5Rw1 to describe the poems. full rhyme
half rhyme (including spelling rhymes, e.g. again, rain, as well as words which nearly rhyme, e.g. cat,
cap)
internal rhyme (where a word in the middle of a line rhymes with a word at the end of the same line)
assonance (the same vowel sounds in a sequence of words, e.g. I heard of a pearl which burned)

Look also at word play and check learners are familiar the terms pun, ambiguity, homophone, homograph
and homonym.
5Wa15 Write a poem based on poems Re-read one of the poems that has been previously read and discussed. Ask learners what they recall of
of significant poets. its:
theme
structure (verses, rhyme and rhythm)
vocabulary.

In shared writing, write a new poem which is closely linked to one of those studied. It should have the
same theme and a similar structure.

Ask learners to decide what sort of poem they want to write a new poem based on one they have read
or a new verse for an existing poem. Let them write a first draft of their own poem.

When they have made their first attempt, remind learners that poems need to be drafted, redrafted and
polished many times before they are finished. To help with this, they can re-read the poems by significant
poets, particularly those in the same form and style they have chosen for their own poem. Ask them to jot
down the key features of the form they are writing in.

Learners can then work in pairs, or alone, to redraft their poem.


5Ro3 Read and enjoy playscripts. Let groups of learners read through some playscripts and choose one they would like to perform. Remind
them of the conventions of playscripts so they know how to distinguish the speeches from the stage
directions, and can appreciate how the play is divided into acts and scenes.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 23


Unit 1C: Poems by significant poets and plays
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ro3 Begin to plan to perform a When learners are familiar with the playscripts, ask them to begin to plan for a performance. The
5SL10 play. performance doesnt need to be a full costume drama, although you may want learners to consider what
props they may need.

Model how to annotate the playscript with the additional stage directions needed to perform the play.

Give learners the chance to perform the play to a small audience.


5Wa11 Write a playscript, including After learners have read (and possibly performed) their play, ask them to plan and write an extra scene.
production notes to guide Their scene should include:
performance. character(s) and reference(s) to events from the original play
the main features of a playscript
an event which is related to the play.

When learners have drafted their play, ask them to plan their performance and to include production notes
as a guide.

While they are rehearsing the play, learners should amend and revise their playscript as necessary.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 24


Unit 2A: Traditional tales, myths, legends and fables
Reading and analysing traditional tales, including myths, legends and fables, then planning and writing a tale

This is the fourth of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is
four weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of stories, first enjoying the texts as readers and then reading as writers and analysing features of the text. Then they will
plan and write a story based on one of the texts you have read and analysed.

Resources needed:
A range of traditional tales including myths, legends and fables from around the world including the part of the world you are living in. Try to include a
mixture of classic and modern versions, straight retellings and those with a twist. You will need to have extracts of these stories enlarged for all learners to
share, or multiple copies.
A class novel, which is a chapter book that you can read gradually throughout the unit. You should expect to read it aloud to the class, either with learners
simply listening, or with them following in their own copies.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 2A: Traditional tales, myths, legends and fables
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rv5 Read and identify What do learners know about myths, legends and fables?
characteristics of myths, Myths are stories whose main aim is to explain why something happens, e.g. Why the sun rises in the
legends and fables. east, Why the giraffe has a long neck. They can include amazing creatures that sometimes talk. Many
ancient cultures have myths which have been handed down in the oral tradition.
Legends are stories about heroes. It is believed many have some basis in historical fact (e.g. the
Arthurian legends and other legends from ancient civilisations). Legends have also been handed down
from generation to generation in the oral tradition.
Fables are stories with morals. They often have talking creatures in them. Aesops fables are the best
known.
5Rv5 Read and identify While reading a variety of these tales, ask learners to contribute to a class list of common characteristics of
characteristics of myths, them. These are narratives and have the characteristic shape of most narratives. Discuss the following
legends and fables. distinctive features.
In these tales, the action is the most important element, not the character or setting, so they usually
include stock characters and settings. Stock characters include princesses (always good and pure),
wolves (always evil), foxes (cunning), princes and heroes (brave), dragons (wicked). Stock settings
include islands, woods, castles and deserts. (The use of stock characters and settings makes these
stories easier to parody and to move from one setting to another.)
Often, the only thing the reader knows about the characters is that they are clever, poor, kind and
generous, stupid or greedy (or some other defining characteristic). Whatever the characteristic is, that
is usually the pivot of the story. Names are simple and conventional, or are not given.
Common themes run through many of the tales and these can involve opposites (e.g. good versus
evil, rich versus poor, generous versus selfish) or a transformation (e.g. from rags to riches, proud to
humble, greedy to generous).
The rule of three is common: there may be three people, three tasks, three events, three wishes. Many
things happen in threes.
Unit 2A: Traditional tales, myths, legends and fables
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rv5 Read and identify Make another chart which learners can add observations to. The tales are narratives and have the usual
characteristics of myths, language characteristics of narratives (e.g. past tense, dialogue, powerful verbs). Other features include:
legends and fables. traditional openings (Once upon a time, When the world was young)
connectives that clearly signal time (e.g. early the next morning, later that same morning, once that
was done)
language to create images in the readers mind (including simile, metaphor, idiom and figures of
speech)
rhetorical questions and asides which address and engage the reader (e.g. How do you think he felt
then? But was he furious?)
some use of repetition (He tried once, he tried a second time and on the third try )
good rhythms for reading aloud remember that these tales have come down through an oral
tradition, so always read a modern equivalent aloud to check it sounds right and has a good rhythm.
5Wa1 Plan a new version of a myth, Re-read a tale and revisit the key characteristics of the genre. Tell learners they are going to write their
5Wa4 legend or fable, using imagery own version of the tale. Make sure they understand this can be:
5Wa10 and figurative language, a retelling
choosing words and phrases a new story based closely on the original but in a different setting, with different characters, etc.
carefully to convey feeling and a parody of the original, where there is a modern twist to one of the characters, the setting or the
atmosphere. outcome of the story (harder to achieve successfully; if learners want to try this, read some examples
of parodies).

Ask learners to use a story bridge to plot in one colour the original story they plan to base their new
version on. In a different colour, they can show what they plan to change (if anything) and explore the
implications of that change. Remind them of the work they did last term in changing character it can have
a significant impact on the plot development.
5Wo2 Plan to retell a story with a Remind learners how to use a paragraph planner to plan their story. Each paragraph on the plan should
5Wa1 different or new character. have:
5Wa4 notes about the action in the paragraph
5Wa10 some words and phrases which will enhance the retelling, including ideas for figurative language
5Wt1 connectives to show clear links between the paragraphs, sections and chapters.

Ask learners to share their plan with a response partner and tell their story aloud, using the plan as a
guide. The response partner should make suggestions for improvement. Learners can alter their plans as
necessary.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 27


Unit 2A: Traditional tales, myths, legends and fables
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo2 Write a story from a plan. When learners have planned their story, ask them to write the first draft. Give them the success criteria for
5Wa1 the story, e.g.:
5Wa4 the new story should have the features of a fable, myth or legend
5Wa10 use stock settings and characters even if these are different from the original story
5Wt1 choose words and phrases carefully when describing, particularly when describing actions and
feelings
use figurative language to enhance the impact on the reader.
5Wo2 Proofread, edit and redraft the After learners have written the first draft of their story, ask them to do the writers mumble, i.e. read the
5Wa14 story, improving the selection story aloud several times to check it.
5Wa15 of vocabulary and checking Does it meet the success criteria?
5Ws5 spelling and punctuation. Does it make sense, with events following one another logically?
Have you chosen the best words? Try to improve the quality of the verbs and nouns
Are punctuation and spelling correct?

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 28


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 2A
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ws8 Investigate the effect of adding Continue to explore the effects on spelling and meaning of adding prefixes and suffixes to base words.
5Ws9 prefixes and suffixes.
5Rw6 Understand the difference Continue to work on different ways of writing speech with the correct punctuation.
5Rw7 between direct and reported
5Wp4 speech, and how to set out
5Wp6 and punctuate dialogue.
5Ro6 Find out more about idioms, Ask learners to find out the meaning of the following terms:
5Rw2 metaphors and figures of idiom (an expression which is not meant literally; its meaning cannot be deduced from an
5Rw3 speech and make effective understanding of the individual words, e.g. let the cat out of the bag, look under the weather, the name
use of them in reading and rings a bell)
writing. metaphor (an expression describing something or someone as if they really were something else, e.g.
he is an ass!, in his fury he became a bull and charged at the other boy)
simile (an expression comparing something or someone with something else, e.g. she was as happy
as a lark and as cunning as a fox)
figure of speech (an expression using a word or words to create an effect, but where they do not have
their ordinary, literal meaning, e.g. Im starving = Im very hungry).

Once learners know and understand the terms, look out for them in reading and discuss the examples you
find. What sort of technique is it idiom, metaphor, simile or figure of speech? Why has the author chosen
to use it here? What effect does it have more impact, more memorable ? What alternative words and
phrases could the author have used? Would they have been as good? Does the expression help you to
understand the text better?

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 29


Unit 2B: Recounts
Reading, analysing and writing recounts

This is the fifth of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is four
weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of recounts, first finding information and enjoying them as readers, then reading as writers and analysing features of the
text. Then they will plan and write recounts based on ones you have read and analysed.

Resources needed:
Recounts can include autobiography and biography and are also found in, e.g., novels, shorter books, diaries and letters. There are also often recount texts in
newspapers. Try to include all sorts in your selection . You will need to have extracts of these texts enlarged for all learners to share, or multiple copies.
Radio and TV also offer opportunities to hear recounts as people discuss and relive their own experiences and adventures. It is useful for learners to be able
to compare their experiences of written and audio texts.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 2B: Recounts
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Rv1 Read different kinds of Ask learners what kind of personal writing they do when they record their own experiences and ideas
recounts. diaries, thank you letters, letters or emails to friends, family members or pen pals?

Discuss why people write about their own experiences. What kinds of things do they usually write about?

Let groups of learners read a variety of recounts, including letters, diaries, biographies, autobiographies,
obituaries and recount newspaper articles.

Ask learners to think about their responses to the recounts.


Did they enjoy them? Why, or why not?
What do they feel about reading about someone elses life? Is it interesting? Why, or why not?
Did they find any of the extracts particularly appealing? Which ones? Ask learners to read their
favourite ones to the class and explain what they liked about them.
5Rv2 Explore the features of texts Once learners have read a variety of different recount texts, ask them to consider the features they share.
which are about events and These should include:
experiences. their purpose is to tell about the life, or an event in the life, of one person
they are chronological they report events in the order in which they happened so have time
connectives, e.g. afterwards, meanwhile, next day
they usually begin with a scene-setting opening and end with a reorientation statement
they are usually written in the past tense the events have already happened
they are similar to narratives as they are telling the story of one persons life.

Can learners find any differences between the various kinds of recount texts? (Some are first person
recounts, with pronouns I and we; others are third person, with he or she. First-person recounts often say
more about the thoughts and feelings of the person. Third-person recounts usually concentrate more on
the persons actions and on other peoples reactions to them.)

Introduce the words biography and autobiography and help learners to break the words down to analyse
their meanings (bio = life, -graphy = writing about, auto = by oneself).
5Rv1 Read and listen to more Give learners more opportunities to read, watch and listen to recount texts so that they become familiar
5Rv2 recounts to verify the style and with the language and style of them.
features of this kind of text.
Unit 2B: Recounts
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo4 Plan a recount. Learners should have opportunities to write different kinds of short recount texts, e.g. an autobiographical
5Wt1 piece, a biographical piece (preferably about someone else in the school, family or neighbourhood who is
prepared to be interviewed) or a letter to a pen pal. This will allow them to fully appreciate the similarities
and differences between recount texts.

Whichever kind of recount text learners are going to write, they should plan it on a flow chart with boxes
headed with the questions Who?, When?, Where?, What? and Why?

Revisit the key features of the text type. Then model completing the flow chart, based on a text you have
shared.

Ask learners to make notes on what they know or have found out about their chosen subject.

When they have gathered their information, ask them to complete their plan. Remind them to include time
connectives.

Remind learners that recounts are similar to narratives in that they tell a story of a life. They should
therefore:
include detail to liven the recount up often expressed using figurative language
write about a specific incident that will amuse or interest others
include a commentary on the persons thoughts, reactions and feelings as well as actions.
5SL3 Talk confidently, recounting Before learners write their recount texts, ask them to use their planning notes to tell the recount to a
5SL5 and describing events, and response partner. This kind of conversation is familiar to most learners through their daily anecdotes and
respond to guidance and chats. However, on this occasion, encourage them to use the more formal language of a written recount.
feedback.
The response partner should comment on whether the recount makes sense, as well as on detail of
language and features.
5Wa1 Write a recount from a plan. Once learners have planned their recount, ask them to write the first draft. Give them the success criteria,
5Wa4 e.g.:
include the text type features you have discussed
choose words and phrases carefully in your description, particularly when describing actions and
feelings
use figurative language to enhance the impact on the reader.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 32


Unit 2B: Recounts
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo2 Proofread, edit and redraft the After learners have written the first draft of their recount, ask them to do the writers mumble, i.e. read it
5Wa14 recount, improving the aloud several times to check it.
5Wa15 selection of vocabulary and Does it meet the success criteria?
5Ws5 checking spelling and Does it make sense? Is it well structured? Have you included everything from your plan?
punctuation. Have you chosen the best words? Try to improve the quality of the verbs and nouns.
Are punctuation and spelling correct?
5SL1 Recount an anecdote orally. After they have written their recounts, put learners in groups. Learners take turns to tell their anecdote
5SL4 Remember key features of the from their plan to the rest of the group. The others listen, recall the main features of the anecdote and ask
5SL5 talk. questions about it.
5SL6

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 33


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 2B
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ws8 Investigate the effect of adding Continue to explore the effects on spelling and meaning of adding prefixes and suffixes to base words.
5Ws9 prefixes and suffixes.
5Rw6 Understand the difference Continue to develop work on different ways of writing speech with the correct punctuation.
5Rw7 between direct and reported
5Wp4 speech, and how to set out
5Wp6 and punctuate dialogue.
5Ro6 Find out more about idioms, Ask learners to find out the meaning of the following terms:
5Rw2 metaphors and figures of idiom (an expression which is not meant literally; its meaning cannot be deduced from an
5Rw3 speech and make effective understanding of the individual words, e.g. let the cat out of the bag, look under the weather, the name
use of them in reading and rings a bell)
writing. metaphor (an expression describing something or someone as if they really were something else, e.g.
he is an ass!, in his fury he became a bull and charged at the other boy)
simile (an expression comparing something or someone with something else, e.g. she was as happy
as a lark and as cunning as a fox)
figure of speech (an expression using a word or words to create an effect, but where they do not have
their ordinary, literal meaning, e.g. Im starving = Im very hungry).

Once learners know and understand the terms, look out for them in reading and discuss the examples you
find. What sort of technique is it idiom, metaphor, simile or figure of speech? Why has the author chosen
to use it here? What effect does it have more impact, more memorable ? What alternative words and
phrases could the author have used? Would they have been as good? Does the expression help you to
understand the text better?

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 34


Unit 2C: Narrative poetry
Reading and discussing narrative poetry and performing a poem

This is the sixth of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is
two weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of narrative poems, first enjoying the texts as readers, then reading as performers and analysing features of the text. Then
they will plan a performance and perform a narrative poem.

Resources needed:
Poetry anthologies including narrative poems. Try to include a mixture of classic and modern writers. You will need to have some of the poems enlarged for all
learners to share, or multiple copies.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 2C: Narrative poetry

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Ro4 Read and enjoy narrative Let learners browse through a range of narrative poems. Work in groups with the learners and discuss a
poems and comment on the chosen poem:
5Rw1
poets use of language.
likes and dislikes Did you like/dislike the poem? Why? Were there certain words or phrases that
you liked/disliked?
effects What effect does the poem have on you, the reader?
pictures Does the poem paint a picture in your mind? How?
patterns Look for patterns of rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, lines, verse structure.
words Which words and phrases were particularly effective? Why?
interesting things What else would you like to say about the poem?

For individual poems, you can ask questions and have discussions about different topics, but this list
includes many of the issues it is interesting to discuss with poetry.

Bring some of the poems discussed by groups back to the whole class for a wider-ranging discussion and
to model good discussion for groups where it didnt happen.
Unit 2C: Narrative poetry

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Ro4 Discuss the form of narrative When all learners have read a range of narrative poems, discuss what they have in common. (They all tell
poems. a story.) What other kinds of poetry can learners think of poems which describe people, things, places,
seasons? Love poems? Funny poems?

Discuss the fact that narrative poems can vary from short and simple poems (e.g. nursery rhymes like
Humpty Dumpty, Little Bo Peep, Jack and Jill) to more complex poems like The Ancient Mariner and The
Charge of the Light Brigade.

Tell learners that narrative poems are some of the oldest poems in many cultures. Beowulf is a narrative
poem from Anglo Saxon times; The Canterbury Tales and ballads are from medieval times.

Try to find narrative poems from different times and cultures. Explore what they have in common and how
the time and culture in which they were written impact on them.

5Ro4 Understand the poets use of Let groups of learners choose a narrative poem to perform. Before they can perform it, they will need to
language and features of a understand:
5Rw2
poem.
its form and structure
its patterns of rhythm and rhyme
what its images (if any) and figurative language mean
what all the words, phrases, sentences and verses mean.

Support learners while they work to understand their poem without a good understanding of the poem,
their performance of it will be meaningless. Model reading the poem aloud so that it becomes more than a
chant. Learners need to properly read it for sense.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 37


Unit 2C: Narrative poetry

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Ro4 Prepare to perform a narrative When you are sure learners understand the language of the poem, they will need to decide:
poem.
5Wa11 how they are going to perform it (e.g. as a puppet show, play, mime or recitation )
how they are going to share out the reading (e.g. by simple division, by allocating different voices to
different characters )
how they will read the chorus.

Encourage learners to make production notes on their scripts to remind them what they have to do and
how to do it.

Learners will need time to rehearse their performance.

5SL4 Develop confidence in Let learners perform their chosen poem in front of an audience. Evaluate:
performing, with voice,
5SL10 how well they read the poem (Do they show a good understanding of the meaning through their
gestures and movements to
reading?)
suit their part.
how well they have planned and rehearsed before performing
how slick their performance is.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 38


Unit 3A: Stories from different cultures
Reading and analysing stories from a variety of different cultures and writing a story

This is the seventh of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is
four weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss either a short novel or a variety of stories, first enjoying the texts as readers, then reading as writers and analysing features of the
text. Then they will plan and write a story based on one of the texts you have read and analysed.

Resources needed:
A range of stories set in different cultures. You may wish to choose some longer and more challenging texts for your shared work, though you should also
have some shorter and more accessible stories for your group and independent work. You will need to have extracts of your main text enlarged for all learners
to share, or multiple copies.
A class novel, which is a chapter book that you can read gradually throughout the unit. You should expect to read it aloud to the class, either with learners
simply listening, or with them following in their own copies.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 3A: Stories from different cultures
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ri2 Read stories from around the Read and enjoy a variety of stories and ask learners to give their first responses, supported by reference
5Rv7 world and consider how to the text.
characters are presented. What did they like/dislike? How did it make them feel?
Which passages/events were particularly effective or interesting? Can they begin to explain the
features of those parts of the text?
Which characters did they like? Why did they like / were they interested in these characters?
5Ri2 Re-read stories from around Ask learners which of the characters in a story is the point of view character (i.e. the one from whose
5Rv7 the world and consider the point of view the story is told). This is also referred to as the narrators (or narrative) perspective. In most
point of view from which the books, this is the main character. Re-read one of the stories while learners consider who the point of view
story is told and how character is. What is the evidence they have? The point of view character could be the character:
characters are presented. whose thoughts and opinions we know most about
who is always presented in a good light and whose motives we know and understand
who is the first to be mentioned in the story
who is always present when events happen in the story.

Once you have identified the point of view character, look again at the other characters in the story.
How are they presented?
What do we know of their thoughts and opinions?
Might they have a different perspective form the main character?
5Ri2 Consider what the beginning Re-read a story and consider the information given in the opening.
5Rw5 of the story tells us about the Since its a story set in a particular culture, how soon into the story are there clues that let us identify
5Rv7 setting and the characters. the culture? What kind of clues are we given?
When are the characters introduced?
How soon in the story do we know who the point of view character is likely to be?
What kind of information are we given about the characters?

Discuss why all of this information has to be given towards the beginning of a short story. How would the
reading experience be different if we didnt know any of it?

Does the writer include a hook to draw readers into the story from the start and keep them interested in
carrying on reading? What hook does the author of the story that you are reading use?
Unit 3A: Stories from different cultures
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wa1 Plan an alternative version of a Tell learners they are going to retell a story, changing the point of view character. Unlike the story they
5Wa2 story you have read with a wrote in the first term, this time they wont change any of the characters in the story, just tell the same
5Wa4 different point of view story from a different point of view. Ask them to think about how this change will alter the story.
5Wa8 character.
5Wt1 If learners have difficulty with this idea, ask them to think of an easy story like Jack and the Beanstalk:
How did the giant feel when a boy stole his belongings?
Why did he think it was acceptable to want to grind his bones to make my bread?
Could the story be about a poor giant who simply chases a thief off his land?
If so, is the way the story ends fair? What could be different?

Ask learners to use a story bridge to plot in one colour the original story they plan to base their new
version on. In a different colour, they can show what they plan to change in the story structure (if anything
remember this is the same story). In the different colour, they can also show changes in the way events
are viewed because the point of view character has changed.
5Wo2 Plan to retell a story with a Remind learners how to use a paragraph planner to plan their story. Each paragraph on the plan should
5Wa1 different point of view have:
5Wa4 character. notes about the action in the paragraph
5Wa8 some words and phrases which will enhance the retelling, including ideas for figurative language
5Wt1 connectives and adverbials to show clear links between the paragraphs, sections and chapters.
5Wt3
Ask learners to share their plan with a response partner and tell their story aloud, using the plan as a
guide. The response partner should make suggestions for improvement. Learners can alter their plans as
necessary.
5Wo2 Write a story from a plan. When learners have planned their story, ask them to write the first draft. Give them the success criteria for
5Wa1 the story, e.g.:
5Wa4 retell a story, changing only the point of view character
5Wa8 make sure all the actions in the original story have the same results
5Wt1 give the story a strong beginning which introduces the characters and settings and has a hook
choose words and phrases carefully for your description, particularly when describing actions and
feelings
use figurative language to enhance the impact on the reader.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 41


Unit 3A: Stories from different cultures
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Wo2 Proofread, edit and redraft the After learners have written the first draft of their story, ask them to do the writers mumble, i.e. read the
5Wa14 story, improving the selection story aloud several times to check it.
5Wa15 of vocabulary and checking Does it meet the success criteria?
5Ws5 spelling and punctuation. Does it make sense, with events following one another logically?
Have you chosen the best words? Try to improve the quality of the verbs and nouns
Are punctuation and spelling correct?

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 42


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 3A
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ro6 Find out more about idioms, Continue the work on figurative language, including idioms, metaphors, similes and figures of speech.
5Rw2 metaphors and figures of Remind learners that the aim of using these techniques is to help the readers to make pictures in their
5Rw3 speech and make effective use heads.
of them in reading and writing.
5Wp5 Identify prepositions and use Introduce the word preposition. Explain that prepositions are little words that show the relationship in time
the term preposition. or space between things, e.g. at, during, after, in, on, over, under, to, into, beyond, with, by, of.

A preposition followed by a noun phrase is a prepositional phrase, e.g. at dinner time, during the film, in
my bedroom, under the bridge, over the page, to the forest, beyond the hills, with my friends.

Learners may notice that many of these prepositional phrases would also function as adverbial phrases in
a sentence if they told you more about where or when something happened.

Once learners are familiar with the idea of prepositional phrases, they should look for them in their reading
and notice how they are used and when they occur. They will observe that many paragraphs begin with a
prepositional phrase.
5Wp7 Use apostrophes for Revisit the work done last year on pronouns. Can learners remember what the function of a pronoun is? (It
5Wp8 possession and shortened replaces a noun phrase to avoid being repetitive.)
5Ws10 forms.
Introduce the term possessive pronoun. Explain that this is a pronoun which replaces a noun phrase and
Spell and make correct use of tells you who the thing in the noun phrase belongs to. Write sentences like these:
possessive pronouns. That book is yours.
Is this their book?
Understand grammatical I think this is my book.
homophones.
Ask learners what word they could use to replace the underlined noun phrase (theirs, yours, mine). These
are possessive pronouns (the whole list is mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs). Ask learners to look out
for possessive noun phrases in their reading and collect them in their notebooks. Stress the fact that
although they show possession, possessive pronouns do not have an apostrophe.

Discuss the difference between its (to express possession, as in I got off my bike and put it down on its
side) and its (contraction of it is, as in Its a lovely day to go for a bike ride). Ask learners to think of ways
of distinguishing them (e.g. try to convert it into it is: if it doesnt make sense, there shouldnt be an
apostrophe).
V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 44
Unit 3B: Persuasive writing
Reading and analysing samples of persuasive writing then writing a persuasive letter and commentary

This is the eighth of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is
four weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of persuasive texts, first enjoying the texts as readers, then reading as writers and analysing features of the text. Then they
will plan and write persuasive texts based on ones you have read and analysed.

Resources needed:
A range of persuasive texts. These could include: advertisements, brochures for days out and holidays, letters to local newspapers, political documents either
local or national. You will need to have extracts of some of the texts enlarged for all learners to share, or multiple copies.
Access to the internet and to TV adverts will also support this work. Some TV programmes, e.g. consumer affairs and investigative journalism, can also be
good examples of persuasive texts.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 3B Persuasive writing

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5SL1 Persuade someone to do Use role-play to explore the language and features of persuasive texts. Prepare a set of role-play
something in a role-play. scenarios (e.g. Try to persuade your friend to come to the cinema with you; do something they
5SL2
shouldnt do; lie for you; spend their money on something they dont want to spend it on). Put
5SL11 learners in groups. In each group, two learners should perform the role-play one in the role of persuader,
the other reluctant to be persuaded. The other members of the group consider the features of the two
speakers talk. (Performers will need time to prepare their arguments, to come up with reasoned ideas and
explanations on both sides.)

Make a list of the combined features that learners observe.

5Rv4 Note the use of persuasive Evaluate adverts in newspaper, comics and magazines and on TV. Ask learners to make notes on the
devices, words and phrases in persuasive devices in each advert and to evaluate the impact of the advert. Features to consider include:
print and other media.
use of colour, size, shape and print to make an impact visually
use of sound and story to make an impact aurally and visually
use of brands, logos, slogans and jingles
how information is given mainly in words and phrases, or complete sentences? What kind of
sentences?
choice of vocabulary, including the use of new words
intended audience.

Let learners share their responses and evaluations to begin to build up a class list. Compare this with the
list of features of the spoken texts.

Explore how each of the different features has been used to good effect.
Unit 3B Persuasive writing

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Rv4 Note the use of persuasive Look at brochures advertising holidays and days out. Again, ask the learners to consider how they are
devices, words and phrases in persuasive and to evaluate their impact and effectiveness. Features learners may come across in these
print and other media. media include:
expression of opinion (e.g. an ideal birthday present)
use of imperative (command) verbs (e.g. step inside, visit, turn right)
use of first-person pronouns (mostly we) or second-person pronouns (you)
use of evaluative adjectives and encouraging adverbs (e.g. excellent, ideal, extensive, leisurely,
delightfully)
use of exaggerated claims (e.g. a wealth of topical flowers)
information given in short chunks.

Again, ask learners to contribute their lists of features to the one you are developing as a class.

Pause after the list is complete and consider the purpose of each of the different features and how it can
be used effectively.

5Rv4 Note the use of persuasive Introduce letters and persuasive texts which acknowledge that there is another point of view. Discuss:
devices, words and phrases in
5Wt3 how the text is structured (e.g. are all opinions for the case put forward first, followed by those against
print and other media, and
it, or are they intermingled?)
5SL11 begin to establish links and
discuss language choices. how ideas against the proposal are made light of or dismissed (e.g. Although some misguided people
think )
the use of rhetorical devices (e.g. How can anyone argue against this case?)
the use of connectives to sequence the ideas in the argument (e.g. furthermore, nevertheless,
moreover).

Look carefully at each of the features and evaluate how effectively it has been used.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 47


Unit 3B Persuasive writing

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Rv3 Compare writing that informs Let learners compare the persuasive letters with reports or explanation texts about the same topic. Ask
and persuades. learners to identify the differences between the different types of text.

5Wa1 Plan a persuasive text. Tell learners they are going to write a persuasive text advertising a place, event or holiday (e.g. it could be
a persuasive text about where you live). Tell them their task is to design both an advert and a brochure (or
5Wa4
longer text). They will need to decide who their audience is before they begin.
5Wt1

Revisit the features of advertising texts and brochures. Discuss the best way of planning them: diagram or
flow chart? These texts are usually non-chronological, so a diagram is often the most effective device.

Ask learners to make notes on their diagram about how they will persuade someone to visit the
place/event or go on the holiday. These should include the range of features you have discussed.

Possibly challenge learners to make a radio advert for the same place, event or holiday.

5Wa3 Plan a persuasive text, e.g. a Discuss issues that learners really care about. These could include issues at school (e.g. homework,
letter or commentary, that uniform), in the local community or in the wider community (e.g. conservation or an environmental issue).
5Wa9
acknowledges an opinion
5Wa12 different from your personal
view. Ask learners to draw up lists of ideas in favour of and against their own view and then transfer them to a
plan They should include connectives on their plan, and arrows or numbers to show the order in which
they intend to address the issues.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 48


Unit 3B Persuasive writing

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Wa1 Write a persuasive text from Ask learners to use their plan as the basis for the first draft of their persuasive writing. Give them the
the plan. success criteria. For example:
5Wa3
have a clear purpose and be clear about the audience you are writing for
5Wa4
persuade the reader to do or think something
5Wa9
include relevant features from the lists you have made, and use these features effectively
5Wa12
make sure the sentence structure and vocabulary suit the purpose of the text
5Wt1
use figurative language to enhance the impact on the reader
choose words and phrases carefully for your descriptions.

5Rw3 Proofread, edit and redraft the After learners have written their first draft, ask them to do the writers mumble, i.e. read it aloud several
text, improving the selection of times to check it.
5Wo2
vocabulary and checking
Does it meet the success criteria?
5Wa15 spelling and punctuation.
Does it make sense?
5Ws5
Does it make effective use of features of persuasive writing?
Have you chosen the best words? Try to improve the quality of the verbs and nouns.
Are punctuation and spelling correct?

5SL2 Prepare and present a When learners have written their commentary, they should use the notes as the basis for a persuasive
persuasive argument. argument they will deliver orally to other learners. Learners should listen and respond to the main points in
5SL6
the argument by asking questions to challenge or clarify points.
5SL11

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 49


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 3B

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Ro6 Find out more about idioms, Continue the work on figurative language, including idioms, metaphors, similes and figures of speech.
metaphors and figures of Remind learners that the aim of using these techniques is to help the readers to make pictures in their
5Rw2
speech and make effective use heads.
5Rw3 of them in reading and writing.

5Wp5 Identify prepositions and use Introduce the word preposition. Explain that prepositions are little words that show the relationship in time
the term preposition. or space between things, e.g. at, during, after, in, on, over, under, to, into, beyond, with, by, of.

A preposition followed by a noun phrase is a prepositional phrase, e.g. at dinner time, during the film, in
my bedroom, under the bridge, over the page, to the forest, beyond the hills, with my friends.

Learners may notice that many of these prepositional phrases would also function as adverbial phrases in
a sentence if they told you more about where or when something happened.

Once learners are familiar with the idea of prepositional phrases, they should look for them in their reading
and notice how they are used and when they occur. They will observe that many paragraphs begin with a
prepositional phrase.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 50


Grammar and punctuation for Unit 3B

Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities


codes objectives

5Wp7 Use apostrophes for Revisit the work done last year on pronouns. Can learners remember what the function of a pronoun is? (It
possession and shortened replaces a noun phrase to avoid being repetitive.)
5Wp8
forms.
5Ws10
Introduce the term possessive pronoun. Explain that this is a pronoun which replaces a noun phrase and
Spell and make correct use of tells you who the thing in the noun phrase belongs to. Write sentences like these:
possessive pronouns.
That book is yours.
Is this their book?
Understand grammatical
I think this is my book.
homophones.

Ask learners what word they could use to replace the underlined noun phrase (theirs, yours, mine). These
are possessive pronouns (the whole list is mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs). Ask learners to look out
for possessive noun phrases in their reading and collect them in their notebooks. Stress the fact that
although they show possession, possessive pronouns do not have an apostrophe.

Discuss the difference between its (to express possession, as in I got off my bike and put it down on its
side) and its (contraction of it is, as in Its a lovely day to go for a bike ride). Ask learners to think of ways
of distinguishing them (e.g. try to convert it into it is: if it doesnt make sense, there shouldnt be an
apostrophe).

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 51


Unit 3C: Performance poetry
Reading and discussing performance poetry

This is the ninth of nine units for Stage 5. You should expect to cover three units each term (fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays). Time suggested for this unit is
two weeks.

Outline:
Learners will read and discuss a variety of poems for performance, first enjoying the texts as readers, then reading as performers and analysing features of the
text. Then they will plan a performance and perform two poems.

Resources needed:
Poetry anthologies including poems for performance. Try to include a mixture of classic and modern writers. You will need to have some of the poems
enlarged for all learners to share, or multiple copies.
A tape or video of poets performing their own and others poems.
A range of books that learners can read with increasing independence.
Unit 3C: Performance poetry
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ro4 Read and perform narrative Let learners browse through a range of poems, deciding which ones would be most suitable for
poetry. performance. Work in groups with the learners and discuss a chosen poem:
likes and dislikes Did you like/dislike the poem? Why? Were there certain words or phrases that you
liked/disliked?
effects What effect does the poem have on you, the reader?
pictures Does the poem paint a picture in your mind? How?
patterns Look for patterns of rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, lines, verse structure.
words Which words and phrases were particularly effective? Why?
interesting things What else would you like to say about the poem?
what is it about the poem that makes it particularly suitable for performance?

Bring some of the poems discussed by groups back to the whole class for a wider-ranging discussion and
to model good discussion for groups where it didnt happen.
5Ro4 Read and perform narrative Unlike narrative poems, there is no single definition of what is a performance poem except that it must be
poetry a poem which people can perform successfully. Ask learners what criteria they used to decide which
poems to include in the list of poems that could be performed.

Encourage discussion and debate about whether all poetry can be performed.
5Ro4 Read and perform narrative Each group of learners chooses two contrasting poems to perform. All members of the group should be
poetry able to justify the choices, explaining:
why each of the poems was selected
what makes them suitable for performance
how they compare and contrast.
5Ro4 Understand the poets use of Before they can perform their poems, learners will need to understand:
5Rw1 language and features of the their form and structure
5Rw2 poem, and begin to interpret their patterns of rhythm and rhyme
imagery and techniques. what their images (if any) and figurative language mean
what all the words, phrases, sentences and verses mean.

Support learners while they work to understand their poems without a good understanding of them, the
performances will be meaningless. Model reading the poems aloud so that they become more than a
chant.
Learners need to properly read the poems for sense.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 53


Unit 3C: Performance poetry
Framework Summary of learning Suggested activities
codes objectives

5Ro4 Prepare to perform the poems. When you are sure learners have understood the language of the poems, they will need to decide:
5Wa11 how they are going to perform them (e.g. as puppet shows, plays, mimes or recitations )
how they are going to share out the reading (e.g. by simple division, by allocating different voices to
different characters )
how they will read the chorus.

Encourage learners to make production notes on their scripts to remind them what they have to do and
how to do it.

Learners will need time to rehearse their performances.


5SL4 Develop confidence in Let learners perform their chosen poems in front of an audience. Evaluate:
5SL10 performing, with voice, how well they read the poems (Do they show a good understanding of the meaning through their
gestures and movements to reading?)
suit their part. how well they have planned and rehearsed before performing
how slick their performance is.
Evaluate their own
performance. Within each group, ask learners to evaluate their performances. The evaluation should include:
whether they chose good poems
whether they made good choices about how they performed them
what was good about their performances and what they could have done better.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 54


Appendix A: Sample lesson plans

Stage 5: Lesson plan 1

Week beginning: Unit 2B: Recounts Class: Stage 5


Timing Framework Learning objectives Success criteria Activities Resources Evidence of
ref. (see notes below re. differentiation details, etc.) achievement
W: whole class; G: group; I: Individual
Description W/G/I
30 mins 5Rv7 Consider how a writer Can I describe from the Read Chapter 1 of Stig of the Dump. W/I Copies of book: Stig D
expresses their own perspective of a Discuss Chapter 1 in summary. of the Dump by Clive Q&A
point of view, e.g. how character? King
characters are Question: How would I feel if I was Barney? How
Can I identify differences would I feel if I was Stig?* PowerPoint summary
presented. in different characters of Chapter 1
points of view? Discuss responses.

25 mins 5Wp2 Combine simple Can I rewrite simple Discuss sentences on worksheet, identify clauses W/I Worksheets: M
sentences and re-order sentences using and suggest ways of rewriting by combining simple Sentences 1 (simple
clauses to make connectives to create sentences. sentences) and
compound and complex compound sentences? Write: Rewrite simple sentences as compound Sentences 2 (more
sentences. (Groups 1 & 2) (Groups 1 and 2) or complex sentences (Group 3).** challenging
Can I rewrite simple sentences)
sentence using
connectives to create
complex sentences?
(Group 3)
5 mins 5Wa8 Write from another Can a write from a Set homework see below. W Postcard sheet like a
viewpoint. characters viewpoint? template
Organisation: details of differentiation / groups / adults role (linked to activities) Notes / extension opportunities / homework
* Class in two groups: half answer one question, half the other. Extension for Group 3: Find different ways of ordering clauses without affecting Q&A: question and
meaning. answer
** Group 1 Worksheet: Sentences 1 simple sentences + given D: discussion
connectives Homework: Imagine you are Barney. Write a postcard to a friend describing what
Group 2 Worksheet: Sentences 1 no given connectives happened to you today. O: observation
Group 3 Worksheet: Sentences 2 complex sentences M: marked work
Next time: Planning ways of planning to create a new scene based on the story.
Teacher: work with Group 3; Helper: support Group 1.

V1 7Y01 English Stage 5 55


Stage 5: Lesson plan 2

Week beginning: Unit 2B: Recounts Class: Stage 5

Timing Framework Learning objectives Success criteria Activities Resources Evidence of


ref. (see notes below re. differentiation details, etc.) achievement
W: whole class; G: group; I: Individual
Description W/G/I
10 mins 5Wa8 Write from another Can I write from another Review homework. W/G Postcard homework from M
5Wo2 viewpoint. viewpoint? Work with partner to discuss improvements. previous session
Evaluate own and others
writing.
15 mins 5Wa8 Write a new scene into a Can I write a new scene for Discuss task. W Story: Stig of the Dump, O/D
5Wt1 story. a story? Demonstrate: as before
Map out writing to plan Can I use different ways of a mind map of ideas for showing ideas: central Flipchart or IWB with
structure, e.g. paragraphs, planning my work? setting and how new events happen PowerPoint demo
sections, chapters. (This is teachers broad showing different
a bubble chain for planning content of paragraphs. planning strategies
idea; learners will produce
a list during the lesson.)
10 mins Learners work with partner to decide the usefulness of G/W Good and not so good O/D
different ways of planning. examples of planning
Discuss/agree success criteria for planning task.
15 mins Learners work independently on own ideas for an I M
additional scene.
10 mins 5SL1 Shape and organise ideas Can I tell my story clearly Share with partner using plan to tell story. G O/D
clearly when speaking to so my partner understands Set homework see below.
aid the listener it?
Organisation: details of differentiation / groups / adults role (linked to activities) Notes / extension opportunities / homework
Give support for discussion of ideas as required: planning in pairs possible depending These two sessions may be taught at any time during the unit. If time allows at the end of Q&A: question and
on learners. Some may wish to use drawings on a storyboard to show their ideas. the unit, learners may wish to present their scenes as improvised drama. answer
Teacher acts as mentor for learners. D: discussion
Observation role during sharing time is critical. Homework: Create an illustration for their scene that summarises the main idea. O: observation
M: marked work