You are on page 1of 30

See

discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/296825270

Islamic Interbank Money Market: Contracts,


Instruments and their pricing

Chapter · June 2016


DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-33991-7

CITATIONS READS

0 983

3 authors:

Buerhan Saiti Aznan Hasan


Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University International Islamic University Malaysia
129 PUBLICATIONS 191 CITATIONS 15 PUBLICATIONS 8 CITATIONS

SEE PROFILE SEE PROFILE

Engku Rabiah Adawiah


International Islamic University Malaysia
18 PUBLICATIONS 6 CITATIONS

SEE PROFILE

Some of the authors of this publication are also working on these related projects:

Indexing Literature under KAUJIE Classification Scheme Project View project

Transparency of Islamic and conventional banks View project

All content following this page was uploaded by Buerhan Saiti on 02 August 2016.

The user has requested enhancement of the downloaded file.


Islamic Interbank Money Market: Contracts,
Instruments and Their Pricing
Buerhan  Saiti  1,*
AQ1
AQ2

Aznan  Hasan  1

Engku Rabiah Adawiah Engku  Ali  1
1 Institute of Islamic Banking and Finance (IIiBF), International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract
This  chapter  discusses  the  Islamic  interbank  money  market,  its  instruments  and  operations.  The
discussion demonstrates that the existence of a viable Islamic interbank money market is crucial for
the  successful  implementation  of  an  Islamic  financial  system.  The  chapter  examines  the  various
interbank money market instruments, their underlying Islamic contracts and their pricing mechanisms,
with  appropriate  examples.  The  availability  of  various  Islamic  interbank  money  market  instruments
allows  Islamic  banks  to  cover  their  exposure  (in  case  of  deficit)  and  make  placement  on  short­term
basis  (in  case  of  surplus).  Moving  forward,  a  greater  variety  of  instruments  with  fixed  return
mechanisms  and  tradability  features,  which  at  the  same  time  invite  fewer  Shariah  issues,  must  be
offered in the market to ensure a more vibrant Islamic interbank money market.

Keywords
Islamic finance
Islamic interbank money market
Islamic contracts
Pricing

5.1.  Introduction
An interbank market basically provides a bank with a lower cost of obtaining funds (so called cheap
money) compared to other fund raising activities. The activity of obtaining funds in an interbank money
market is conventionally done through borrowing and lending transactions. In the Malaysian Islamic
Interbank Money Market (IIMM), a bank can raise cheap funds from the interbank players and corporate
customers on a short­term basis normally ranging between overnight and a year, whenever the bank is in
deficit or short position. However, the transactions in IIMM rarely involve borrowing and lending
transactions. Instead, they use other contracts, such as buying and selling, investment, agency, leasing
and others.

Bank Islam Malaysia Berhad (BIMB), the first Islamic bank in Malaysia, began its operations in 1983.
As an Islamic bank, BIMB is not allowed to be involved in borrowing and lending transactions with
interest. Due to the Shariah restriction and a serious need for BIMB to hold non­interest bearing
instruments to park idle funds, BNM issued the Government Investment Issue (GII), initially under the
concept of qard hasan, then bay al­inah and finally commodity murabahah­tawarruq arrangements. 1
The fact that BIMB was the sole Islamic bank providing Islamic financial services in Malaysia between
1983 and 1993, meant that there could not be an Islamic interbank money market (IIMM) during that
period.

In 1993, the central bank of Malaysia, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), decided to increase the number of
Islamic banking players by allowing the conventional banks to open Islamic windows in a scheme called
‘Skim Perbankan Tanpa Faedah’ (SPTF), provided that the Islamic banking business is properly
segregated from the conventional business. This move accentuated the need for an Islamic interbank
market to facilitate the flow of funds among the Islamic windows and BIMB. The Bank Negara Malaysia
(BNM) then initiated a new market called the Islamic Interbank Money Market (IIMM). The ‘Guidelines
on the IIMM’ was issued on 18 December 1993 and subsequently IIMM was introduced on 3 January
1994.
AQ4

5.1.1.  Function of Islamic Interbank Money Market
There are two main functions of the IIMM highlighted on the IIMM official website governed by BNM,
firstly to provide Islamic Financial Institutions (IFI) with the facility for funding and adjusting portfolios
over the short term, and secondly, to serve as a channel for the transmission of monetary policy. 2

IFI as a financial intermediary will collect deposits and raise funds from the surplus units, either
individuals or firms, and government bodies or private sectors, to finance the deficit units. The deposits
or liabilities of the bank are normally held on a short­term basis. Furthermore, the money deposited in
normal savings and current accounts can be withdrawn upon customers’ demand. On the other hand, the
financing or receivables which are recognised as assets of the bank will normally be for a longer term.
So, how can IFI manage the time gap between its liabilities and assets?
AQ5

When an IFI approves long term financing to its customers, a monthly payment schedule will be given.
The money will be credited into the IFI’s account on a monthly basis where it can be rolled over to
provide new customers with financing. There is a time when the IFI’s rolled over money is not able to
satisfy the market demand and this requires it to search for instant additional funds on a short­term basis.
That is why the IFI relies on the IIMM to provide a funding facility and at the same time the IIMM
enables the IFI to adjust its portfolios over the short term according to its needs. By using the IIMM, the
IFI does not need to wait until the maturity date of its financing facilities before it can get back the lump
sum of money that would otherwise be payable by its customers.
AQ6

BNM, as a regulatory body responsible for the licensing and supervision of banks in Malaysia, utilises
the IIMM to carry out monetary policy. Monetary policy is defined as the process by which the
government, central bank or monetary authority of a country controls (i) the supply of money, (ii)
availability of money and (iii) cost of money or rate of interest, in order to attain a set of objectives
oriented towards the growth and stability of the economy (Jain and Sandhu  2009 ; Fernando  2011 ). It is
referred to as either expansionary policy: it increases the total supply of money in the economy, an
instrument traditionally used to combat unemployment in a recession by lowering interest rates, or as
contractionary policy: an instrument to decrease the total supply of money by raising the interest rates in
order to combat inflation.
The latest Malaysian Monetary Policy Statement was announced on 24 November 2009 by the Monetary
Policy Committee (MPC). MPC decides on the Overnight Policy Rate (OPR) eight times a year but for
2010, they scheduled only six meetings which fell in odd months. 3  The OPR works as an economic
growth indicator as well as the benchmark in quoting the interbank money market interest rate. IIMM
also adopted this indicator in negotiating the IIMM profit margin between the players. However, banks
are allowed to vary the spread depending on their internal method of pricing. IIMM is a small market as
the numbers of players are limited to interbank participation, though it is a very important market. The
developments of BNM operations in IIMM are shown in Table  5.1 .

Table 5.1
Development of BNM operations in Islamic interbank money market

Date Developments

03
Jan Islamic Interbank Money Market (IIMM) was established
1994

13
Feb Mudharabah Interbank Investment (MII) was introduced to ensure mobility of funds in the MII
1996

05 Bay al­inah funding facility was announced. The role of this product is to serve as a last resort funding
Aug facility by BNM to protect an Islamic banking institution's (IBI) deficit position
1999

21 Mudharabah money market tender was introduced by BNM. IBIs which join in the tender exercise have
Sep to submit their bids via Fully Automated System for Issuing/Tendering System (FAST)
1999

29
Nov Bank Negara Negotiable Notes (BNNN) (underlying contract is bay al­inah) was introduced
2000

15 Government Investment Issue (GII) (underlying contract is bay al­inah) was announced and issued on
Jun behalf of the Government of Malaysia (GOM)
2001

01
Oct BNM issued a circular on When Issue (WI) to all the IBIs
2001

15
Apr Wadiah Acceptance (underlying contract is al wadiah) was introduced
2002

13 Akauntan Negara Malaysia (ANM) opened a current account (Islamic) (underlying contract is al wadiah)
May with BNM
2002

01
Aug Guidance Notes on Sell and Buy Back Agreement (SBBA) to IBIs was issued by BNM
2002

21
Dec Fully automated system of Issuing/Tendering system (FAST) on Sell and Buy Back tender was introduced
2002

09
09
Jul Management Committee of BNM approved Ar Rahnu Agreement­i
2003

17
Sep The first Malaysian Islamic Treasury Bills (MITB) were issued
2004

8
Oct Islamic interbank money market website was launched by the Governor – Zeti Akhtar Aziz
2004

17
Jan Islamic Overnight Tender (underlying contract is al wadiah) through FAST was introduced
2005

16
Mar The first Profit­Based GII (Government Investment Issues) were issued which were coupon bearing
2005

16
Feb Sukuk Bank Negara Malaysia Ijarah (SBNMI) were issued
2006

08
Feb Commodity Murabahah Programme (CMP) was introduced
2007

02
Jul Bank Negara Monetary Notes Murabahah (BNMN­Murabahah) were issued
2009

17 Bursa Malaysia launched Bursa Suq Al Sila – a world’s first, end­to­end Shariah­compliant commodity
Aug trading platform ­ to facilitate commodity­based Islamic financing and investment transactions under the
2009 Shariah principles of murabahah, tawarruq and musawwamah using crude palm oil (CPO)

21 The Corporate Murabahah Master Agreement (CMMA) was launched by the Association of Islamic
Aug Banking Institutions Malaysia (AIBIM)
2009

24 The Association of Islamic Banking Institutions Malaysia (AIBIM) launched the standard Wakalah
Nov Placement Agreement (WPA)
2009

Source: http://iimm.bnm.gov.my

AQ7
AQ8
AQ9
AQ10
AQ3

5.2.  Contracts Applied in the Islamic Money Market
In this section, we are going to discuss some basic contracts that are applied in the Islamic money
market. The types of contracts, their definitions and their applications in the instruments of the IIMM are
highlighted in Table  5.2 .
Table 5.2
Types of contracts, definitions and applications in IIMM instruments

Application in
Contract Definition
instruments

It refers to ‘a profit­sharing trustee partnership contract, where one Mudharabah Interbank
party, the financier (rabb al­mal), entrusts funds to the other party, the Instrument (MII);
entrepreneur (mudarib), to undertake a business venture’ (Çizakça Cagamas Mudharabah
Mudharabah 2011 ). Any profit generated will be shared according to a pre­agreed Bonds (SMC); Islamic
ratio and losses will be borne by the financier (except in the case of Negotiable Instruments
negligence, fraud or breach of the entrepreneur). of Deposit; Islamic
Securities

It refers to ‘a sale with the seller declaring a profit margin, but as a Islamic Accepted Bills
Murabahah modern mode of finance, it involves a sale of an asset with a declared (IAB); Islamic
mark­up; for example a bank purchases an asset and sells it to the Securities
client on the basis of a cost plus mark­up’ (Ahmad  1993 ).

It is a contract to sell an asset to a customer on deferred payment Government Investment
terms and repurchase the same asset on cash terms. Alternatively, a Issues; Bank Negara
Bay al­inah person sells an asset to another for a cash price. He later purchases the Monetary Notes­i
same asset back at a price higher than that he received in the first (BNMN­I); Negotiable
transaction, to be paid in the future or through instalments. Islamic Debt Certificate
(NIDC)

It is an agency contract, where the principal provides the capital and
Wakalah the agent manages the capital. Put differently, the giving of a mandate Wakalah Placement
by one person to another person to carry out a certain task on their Agreement (WPA)
behalf .

Ar rahn, or mortgage or collateral, is defined in Islamic jurisprudence Ar Rahnu Agreement­i
Ar rahn as ‘possessions offered as security for a debt so that the debt will be (RA­i)
taken from it in case the debtor failed to pay back the due moneya.’

Ijarah Sometimes known as kira which means the rent or fee, it refers to the Sukuk Bank Negara


selling of benefit or usage or services for a price or rental. Malaysia Ijarah

Bay It simply means sale with deferred instalment. It is a kind of sale
bithaman where the good is sold on a deferred instalment basis where the price Islamic Securities
ajil includes a profit margin agreed by both parties.

Wadiah It is a safe custody contract, where a person is entrusted to keep an Wadiah Acceptance


asset for the benefit of the owner.

In a tawarruq arrangement, a person purchases an asset from a seller
on deferred terms, i.e. on credit. Later, he sells the asset to a third Commodity Murabahah
Tawarruq party buyer or to the market at large on a cash basis. This results in Programme (CMP)
him getting cash, but he is indebted to the first seller.

It means benevolent loan or gratuitous loan. Chapra ( 1985 ) has Ar Rahnu Agreement­i


Qard hasan defined qard hasan as ‘a loan which is returned at the end of the (RA­i);
agreed period without any interest or share in the profit or loss of the Government Investment
business’. Issues

Musharakah A partnership contract between two or more individuals or bodies, Islamic Securities


each contributing capital. Profit and loss is shared between the parties
a https://cief.wordpress.com/2006/03/06/contract­of­ar­rahn­definition­and­conditions/ . Retrieved on 15 Jan 2016
5.3.  Types of IIMM Instruments
There are many instruments being offered in the current IIMM. We can divide them into two main types:
deposit and placement, and paper trading. The Mudharabah Interbank Instrument (MII), Wadiah
Acceptance, Commodity Murabahah programme (CMP), Wakalah Placement Agreement (WPA) and Ar
Rahnu Agreement­I (RA­i) are categorised as deposit and placement instruments. These instruments
provide similar benefits to conventional interbank instruments even though the product structure and
method of applications are not the same. There are several papers that are currently traded on IIMM:
Government Investment Issue (GII), Bank Negara Monetary Notes­i (BNMN­i), Cagamas Mudharabah
Bonds (SMC), Islamic Accepted Bills (IAB), Islamic Negotiable Instruments (INI), Islamic Private Debt
Securities (IPDS), When Issue (WI) and Sukuk BNM Ijarah (SBNMI).

5.4. Deposit and Placement
We will gothrough the deposit and placement instruments one by one in order to understand the product
structure, the nature of the Islamic contract applied and how the instruments are priced.

5.4.1. The Mudharabah Interbank Instrument
The Mudharabah Interbank Instrument (MII) is an instrument where the depositor is the rabbul­mal or
investor while the counterparty is the mudharib or entrepreneur. Profit ratio will be pre­determined by
both parties while losses will be borne by the investor. The tenure of MII can be from overnight up to a
year. On maturity date, principal plus profit will be paid to the investor. Figure  5.1  below shows a
bilateral relation between Bank A and Bank B in a MII transaction. In this illustration, the profit sharing
ratio is put at 30:70. This ratio is determined based on mutual agreement and negotiation between the
parties.

Fig. 5.1
Mudharabah Interbank Investment (MII)

As the Shariah principle of mudharabah is acceptable worldwide, no significant issue arises in the
conceptual structure of MII. However, operationally there are still issues to be ironed out to make sure
the structure complies with the actual mudharabah concept. Under normal circumstances, the investee
bank will quote an indicative rate to the counterparty and the actual profit rate will be relatively the same
as the indicative rate especially when maturity is on overnight basis, as the daily change of profit is
insignificant. Even though the bank’s Shariah Committee had issued a statement that the rate of return
shall be based on the gross profit before distribution of the receiving bank for a one­year investment, the
Overnight Policy Rate (OPR) announced by the BNM in its Monetary Policy Statement will still be the
base for quoting the indicative rate. Furthermore, counterparties are expecting a fixed rate of return as
most of the dealers come from a conventional background and they are used to the fixed return regime,
which is contrary to the rules of mudharabah. They rarely care about the potential events of losses
because MII used to be classified as a deposit and not an investment scheme.

A valid question arises about how this MII can contribute towards economic growth? We are aware that
mudharabah is a profit and loss sharing contract where the possibility of gaining profits or incurring
losses is derived from economic activities. The maturity of MII in the IIMM can be on an overnight
basis, so the question iswhat kind of economic growth does MII contribute to in this short span of time?
In this small but important market, we have to look at the initial purpose and objective of the market in
order to find an answer to this question. The IIMM is meant for short­term liquidity management to back
pure banking activities, which is to use funds from the surplus unit, fund the deficit unit, and to match the
socioeconomic and financial needs between the two units. MII itself may not directly contribute to
economic growth but the whole structure of the IFI needs IIMM to ensure the continuity of their
businesses, and MII acts as a tool for this continuity. At some point, IFI will also generate overnight
income from other investment portfolios and this is shared with the depositors and investors.

5.4.1.1.  Pricing of Mudharabah Interbank Instrument
There are two important factors applicable in determining the cost of MII, namely, the profit sharing ratio
(PSR) (known and agreed by both parties) and the gross profit (GP) before distribution of the receiving
bank (the one who receives fund), which is annualised and unknown before its accrual. It was evident
that there was an agency or incentive problem here. It was to the receiving bank’s advantage to ‘declare’
a lower profit rate. To solve this problem, BNM revised the rules by setting a minimum benchmark rate
for the MII. With this revision, the minimum rate of return for the MII was set to equal the prevailing rate
of the GIC (Government Investment Certificate) plus a spread of 0.5 % (Bacha  2008 ). The purpose of
the benchmark rate is to ensure that only banks with reasonable rates of return participate in the MII.
Therefore, the uncertainty in GP is ‘reduced’ because it will be the higher of the following:
i. The prevailing rate on the Government Investment Certificate (GIC) of the same tenor + 0.5 %
(annualised), if the declared profit is lower; or

ii. The declared profit adjusted for PSR; if it is higher than the GIC + 0.5 % annualised;

The formula used in determining the (price) profit amount due to the provider of funds (investing bank)
is as shown Table  5.3 .

Table 5.3
The  formula  for  determination  of  the  (price)  profit  amount  for  the
provider of funds

  Formula

Profit sharing ratio in favour of customer PSR

Deposit placement D

Declared dividend rate r

Tenor (months) or, days to maturity t

Profit sharing ratio k

( )
Proceeds X = D ∗ (1 +
r∗t∗k

365
)

Customer’s profit Profit (π)

Illustration
Suppose Maybank Islamic has a surplus of RM10 million that it wishes to place for 6 months in IIMM.
CIMB Islamic on the other hand is in need of liquidity. Assume it needs RM10 million for 6 months.
Assume the negotiated PSR is 70:30 (Maybank Islamic: CIMB Islamic) on CIMB Islamic’s declared
gross profit in the year when the investment (deposits) is made.

If r > GIC rate + 0.5 %, user

If r < GIC rate + 0.5 %, use GIC rate + 0.5 %

Assuming CIMB Islamic’s r = 7 % (r > GIC + 0.5 %), therefore:

0.07 ∗ 180 ∗ 0.70


X = 10m ∗ (1 + )
365

X = RM10, 241, 643.84

On the 181st day, CIMB Islamic would have to return RM10, 241, 643.84 to Maybank Islamic.

5.4.2.  Wadiah Acceptance
Wadiah Acceptance is one of the most common principles in the Islamic banking environment as this is
the first concept applied in the earlier establishment of Islamic banks for deposit products. In IIMM, IFI
will, at the end of the trading day, place their excess funds with BNM on overnight basis. On the next
day, BNM will return the funds, possibly with hibah, based on its discretion, and such hibah shall not be
contracted for in the wadiah arrangement. There is no placement limit per day and IFIs may place all
their excess funds with BNM. They will only retain a balance of a few millions in their current accounts
with BNM for call deposits standby. BNM also offers BNM Money Tender through FAST (Fully
Automated System for Issuing/Tendering) using wadiah for one week to three months placement.
However, currently, the use of the Commodity Murabahah Program (CMP) is more encouraged for this
money tender.
AQ11
AQ12
AQ13

Originally, wadiah means safe­keeping on amanah. A depositor will place money with the counterparty
on a trust basis and upon the request of the depositor, the counterparty shall return back the exact amount
of money placed under its custody. In banking practice, the money will be pooled together with other
monies and be reinvested. This should not happen in the first place under the original concept of wadiah
yad amanah. Since the money is not segregated and not kept as it is, and is instead re­invested, the IFI
guarantees the deposit, thus bringing the concept of yad dhamanah to the wadiah arrangement. This
makes the deposit a guaranteed wadiah.
AQ14

5.4.3.  Commodity Murabahah
Another arrangement applied in IIMM is murabahah with tawarruq. This arrangement is commonly
known as Commodity Murabahah (CM). Figure  5.2  illustrates the structure of CM placement using the
Malaysian Bursa Suq al­Sila’ (BSAS) commodity house as the trading platform. In this illustration, both
Bank A and Bank B are presumed to be registered traders on BSAS who can directly do transactions
without having to use agents or brokers.

Fig. 5.2
Commodity Murabahah (CM) placement

In the CM placement structure (Fig.  5.2 ), Bank A (investor) buys the commodities, that is Crude Palm


Oil (CPO) from the CPO supplier on a spot/cash basis at a value equivalent to the amount of money that
Bank A wants to place. Bank A then sells the CPO to Bank B (the investee) with a mark­up
(murabahah), payable on deferred payment terms. Bank B then sells the same CPO to Bursa Malaysia
Islamic Services (BMIS) for spot/cash price equivalent to the value of placement made by Bank A. BMIS
will then sell the CPO to any interested buyer on BSAS on a random basis. In this arrangement, Bank B
effectively practices tawarruq when it buys the CPO on credit from Bank A and then sells it to the third
party, that is BMIS, to get the cash that it needs.
AQ15
AQ16

Most of the practitioners and bankers prefer to adapt this CM instrument as it provides fixed returns for
easier financial forecast and meets the market demands. However, a number of criticisms have been
raised about the transaction flow and operation of the CM. In the original tawarruq arrangement, the
buying and selling transactions will take place in an ad hoc manner, where one party buys an asset and
subsequently sells it to the market without knowing or arranging who will be the next buyer. In CM with
4
tawarruq features,  the transaction flow has been earlier arranged and the seller and buyer have been
identified before the actual selling and buying transactions take place. Hence, many scholars (for
example, Al­Zuhayli  1989 ; El­Gamal  2006 ) disagree with this arrangement and consider it a legal
device (hilah) to circumvent the prohibition of riba. They argue that this kind of structured arrangement
does not seem natural if compared to another transaction that happens in an open market. However, some
5
other scholars (Yaquby, 2009 ) allow this arrangement on the basis that it fulfills all the required tenets
of sale and purchase contracts. There are ijab (offer) and qabul (acceptance) by the parties to sell and
purchase the commodities. There are real buyers and sellers in each of the sale and purchase transactions
in the CM arrangement. In addition, there are real commodities and prices exchanged in each of the sale
and purchase transactions. This can be certified and verified by BMIS through the trade confirmations
made on the BSAS electronic system. Moreover, physical delivery of the commodities is possible,
6
although parties may choose not to take physical delivery and sell on the commodities to other parties.
AQ17
AQ18
AQ19

Bursa Malaysia launched Bursa Suq Al­Sila’ (BSAS), formally known as Commodity Murabahah
House, on 17 August 2009, an initiative spearheaded by the Malaysia International Islamic Finance
7
Centre (MIFC).  To understand more about the CM arrangement on BSAS, see Fig.  5.3 .

Fig. 5.3
CM on Bursa Suq Al­Sila’ (BSAS)

At the opening of trading session, commodities suppliers will supply their commodities to BSAS.
Whenever Bank A intends to purchase commodities, it will key in the amount of commodities required in
a web­based system provided by Bursa. Once the commodities available in BSAS match with what Bank
A wants to purchase, the sale and purchase is done and ownership of the commodities transferred. The
system will then automatically generate an e­Cert to acknowledge the ownership. Next, Bank A has to
credit the money into a Bursa account maintained with its branch (represented as (S) in Fig.  5.3  by Bank
A to BSAS).

After that, Bank A can proceed to sell the commodities to Bank B. Bank A has to create a sub e­Cert in
the system to declare that commodities have been sold to Bank B and the ownership transferred. This
selling transaction will be paid on a deferred basis which allows Bank B to pay Bank A on murabahah:
principal plus profit margin on maturity date. Subsequently, Bank B will sell the commodities to BMIS
who will then sell to the open market at random on BSAS. BSAS will then match the selling activity with
a request to purchasecommodities from the market. Once matched, Bank B may debit the money
transferred to the Bursa account earlier (shown as (S) in Fig.  5.3  by BSAS to Bank B).

If at the end of trading day there are no interbank players to purchase commodities and no match can be
done, BMIS will purchase all of the commodities and sell them all to the commodities buyers outside the
BSAS market. Players have to be more alert towards the end of the trading day as anyunsold
commodities will be physically delivered to them. Bursa will notify players with outstanding
commodities to sell them to the market before it closes or, if players wanted to take delivery of the
commodities, they may inform Bursa and delivery will take place within a week. Players have to make
sure that they have appointed a broker with a Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB) license as normally the
banks are not MPOB licensed.

In the event that Bank B is not a BSAS participant, or it does not want to handle the trading of
commodities on its own, as it does not want so many reconciliations to be done at its end, it may appoint
an agent in these BSAS transactions.

Brokerage fees for BSAS market usage will be paid to Bursa on a monthly basis. Fees are charged
according to trading volume per month, and are comparatively lower than the brokerage fees charged in
other commodity exchanges or platform.

In the Commodity Murabahah (CM) program, overseas brokers have to be appointed in order to back
foreign currencies IIMM through CM and of course the cost is higher. For the settlement of foreign
currencies in the IIMM deal, debiting and crediting of Bursa account will be made in RM equivalent,
using the same exchange rate to eliminate foreign exchange exposure.
AQ20

It seems that the existence of BSAS helps to remove some issues discussed relating to the CM structure.
However, the issue of the fluctuation of CPO prices is still there. Due to the price volatility, the volume
of CPO in each same price transaction may differ. What BSAS do is to fix the daily price of CPO before
the trading session starts. They even come out with a specification of CPO (as shown in Table  5.4 ) that is
tradable in BSAS.

Table 5.4
Specification of CPO

Specification Parameters

Contract code CM­CPO

Price Based on (benchmarked against) previous trading day settlement of the Crude Palm Oil
Futures (FCPO) spot month contract. Price remains the same for the day

Settlement Delivery of CPO (with provision for cash settlement)

Crude palm oil of good merchantable quality, in bulk, unbleached, in the tank located at the
option of the CSP

Contract grade Free Fatty Acid (FFA) of palm oil delivered into the tank must not exceed 4 % and from the
and delivery tank must not exceed 5 %
and delivery tank must not exceed 5 %
point
Moisture and Impurities (M&I) must not exceed 0.25 %

Deterioration of Bleachability Index (DOBI) value of palm oil delivered into the tank must be
at a minimum of 2.5 and of palm oil delivered from the tank must be at a minimum of 2.31

Source: Rules of Bursa Malaysia Islamic Services SDN. BHD

5.4.4.  Wakalah Placement Agreement
Another important instrument is the Wakalah Placement Agreement. This is widely practised by Islamic
banks either to receive a placement from their corporate clients or for their placement with other Islamic
8
banks. In Malaysia, on 24 November 2009,  the Association of Islamic Banking Institutions Malaysia
(AIBIM) launched the standard Wakalah Placement Agreement (WPA), with the aim at standardising the
agreement for deposit placements by corporate customers with Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) and
for interbank placements among IFIs under the wakalah concept. IFIs act as a wakil (agent) in investing
the deposits placed by the counterparties or so­called investors. Investors represent as principals of the
funds and shall bear all of the risks associated with the investment except the risk resulting from IFIs
misconduct and negligence. The concept is more or less similar to the mudharabah type of investment as
the profits are not fixed and depend on the performance of the investment and the losses are borne by the
investors. Banks can only indicate the expected return on investments and the payback of the principal
and actual profits can only be determined on the maturity date.

However, in term of profit distributions of this wakalah instrument, the structure might be seen as similar
to that of mudharabah, except for the payment of fees, instead of the sharing of profit as in mudharabah.
In the standard Wakalah Placement Agreement (WPA), there are three dimensions to the distribution of
profits. Firstly , if the actual profit is equal to the expected or anticipated profit, IFI pays investors the
anticipated profit less the wakalah fee. Secondly, if the actual profit generated is more than the
anticipated profit, IFI pays investors the anticipated profit less the wakalah fee and retains the difference.
Thirdly, whenever the actual profit is less than the anticipated profit, investors will get back the principal
with the actual profit less the wakalah fee.

Some of the expected issues that might be raised are on the second and third dimensions of the profit
payout structure. Investors might feel unhappy with the limited profits that they can get even though the
investment portfolios are doing well and gain higher actual profits than the indicative profit rate quoted
to them. It may be seen as an unfair distribution to the investors, however, the second structure is allowed
as the retained profit can be considered as jualah: commission or incentive (hafiz tashji’i) to the IFI in
managing the investment portfolios, and the investors achieve their targeted rate of return. The issue on
the third manner of distribution occurs when the investment portfolio did not produce a return as high as
the anticipated profits. In this event, investors might feel that the offer is less attractive; nevertheless, this
is the nature of wakalah which investors may need to understand. Since the investors here are Islamic
banks, we may assume that the issue of misunderstanding may not arise. To mitigate this, the wakil (IFI)
may give hibah on top of the profit payout on it sole discretion. This hibah shall not be contracted
upfront as it may tantamount to guaranteeing the return on investment.
AQ21
AQ22

Specifically, there are also some issues being discussed in deposit and placement transactions as a whole
beside the issues raised for each products implemented in IIMM. The major question is whether it is
permissible to involve conventional banks or non­halal corporate entities in IIMM or vice versa. The
majority of scholars allow IFI to transact with companies that are involved in mixed halal and non­halal
businesses as long as most of their capital portions come from halal sources. However, As­Syawkani and
Al­Muhasibi totally allow transactions with mixed­type companies regardless of their capital portions. It
is backed by the dalil that Rasulullah s.a.w. transacted with Mecca’s people, both Muslims and non­
Muslims. He never disallowed non­Muslims’businesses even though the non­Muslims’ incomes may
9
have come from non­halal sources.

From the above discussion, we may conclude that non­halal and mixed halal and non­halal companies
may place their funds with IFI. However, the reverse situation is not allowed. IFI cannot place its funds
with conventional banks as the profit to be generated will come from non­halal activities. The main point
here is that Muslims can only make profits from halal businesses and transactions to make sure that the
income generated from the business is halal income.

5.4.5.  Ar Rahnu Agreement­I (RA­i) 10
Under Ar Rahnu Agreement ­I, the financing provider will provide finance to another party which needs
financing, based on the concept of qard hasan. The recipient of the finance will pledge its securities as
collateral for the financing granted. However, in the event that the recipient fails to repay the loan on the
maturity date, the financier has the right to sell the collateral and use the proceeds from the sale of the
collateral to settle the financing. If there is any surplus money, the financier will return the balance to the
recipient of the finance.

BNM will use RA­I as a liquidity management tool for its money market operations. Return from the
RA­I will be in the form of a gift (hibah) and is determined based on the average interbank money
market rates. The giving of hibah is purely discretionary and must not be promised in the original rahn or
qard contracts.
AQ24
AQ25
AQ23

5.4.6.  Sell and Buy Back Agreement (SBBA)
A Sell and Buy Back Agreement (SBBA) is an Islamic money market transaction entered by two parties
in which an SBBA seller sells assets to an SBBA buyer at an agreed price, and subsequently, both parties
enter into a bilateral promise (muwa’adah) in which the buyer promises to sell back the said asset to the
11
seller at an agreed price.
1. Under the Sell and Buy Back Agreement (SBBA), the transacting parties shall enter into two
separate agreements as follows:

i. first agreement – the seller (owner) of Islamic negotiable instruments (INI) sells and the
buyer (investor) buys the instrument at a specified price agreed by both parties; and

ii. second agreement – a ‘forward purchase agreement’ whereby the buyer (investor)
promises to sell back the INI to the original owner, and the seller promises to buy it back
at a specified price on a specified future date.

2. Ownership of the INI shall be transferred to the buyer (investor) upon conclusion of the first
agreement of the SBBA.

3. An INI may be sold under SBBA, subject to the following conditions:

i. an Issuer shall not buy its own INI under SBBA; and

ii. the tenor of the SBBA must be within the tenor of the INI used for the transaction.

4. The Sell and Buy Back Agreement (SBBA) includes an INI which does not pay any interim
dividends or coupon as profit (as in the case of NIDC), the seller sells the SBBA on adiscount
basis under the first agreement.

5. Another financial institution shows its willingness to enter into SBBA on a regular basis using a
two­way quotation either by quoting rates or profit­sharing ratio.

6. Once it is released, the Sell and Buy Back Agreement Guidelines shall govern SBBA
transactions which involve INI.

One may argue that the issuance of an SBBA in actual fact follows the Shariah contract of bay al­inah.
This argument can be easily dismissed because in bay al­inah the second leg of the transaction shall take
place immediately after the conclusion of the first leg, whilst in SBBA, the second leg shall be performed
at a later time. It is only the bilateral promise that takes place immediately after the conclusion of the first
leg of the transaction. Similarly, it may be argued that the giving of a bilateral promise is not allowed in
Shariah. Though this argument is valid from certain juristic point of view, the SAC of BNM has resolved
12
that the use of a bilateral promise is allowed as it is not tantamount to a contract. The Resolution reads :

The Shariah Advisory Council of Bank Negara Malaysia (SAC) held its 157th meeting on 31st March
2015. The meeting discussed among others the concept of wa`d (promise) and muwa`adah (bilateral
promise).

Wa`d
The SAC ruled that wa`d is a promise by a person or a party to perform a certain task/action in the future.
Wa'd is unilaterally binding on the promisor if it is attached to a cause or circumstance. The bindingness
(mulzim) of wa`d shall take effect at the time when the wa`d is expressed. In the event that the promisor
fails to fulfil his binding promise (wa`d mulzim), the promisee may claim for compensation based on
actual loss suffered (if any) due to the breach.

Muwa`adah
The SAC is of the view that muwa`adah is a bilateral binding promise between two parties to enter into a
contract in the future. The SAC ruled that muwa`adah is permissible as it is not tantamount to a contract.
Since the contract is yet to be entered into during the muwa'adah period, it does not have the effect of a
contract. The promisor who breaches his promise is liable to pay compensation based on the actual loss
suffered (if any) by the aggrieved promisee due to the breach.

5.4.7.  Pricing of Sale­Based Instruments (Debt­Based Instruments)
Most money market instruments are traded at discount to face or nominal value and they are redeemable
at face value on maturity. In a similar way, the difference between the price paid and the redeemed
amount at maturity is ‘the return’ to the investor in the Islamic interbank money market. To determine the
correct price of the instrument we need to know four factors:
i. time left to maturity (in days);

ii. the nominal or face value of the instrument (redeemable amount) or selling price;

iii. the required returns or the yield for the instrument (discount factor);

iv. the coupon/interest payment if any (seldom);

The generalised pricing model of the Islamic money market instruments will be:

r ∗ t
P = SP ∗ (1 + )
365

Here:

P Price of instrument

SP Selling price (Face value or nominal value)

r Required yield (discount factor)

t Number of days left to maturity

5.5. Tradable Instruments
5.5.1. Government Investment Issues
Government Investment Certificates were introduced in 1983, with the establishment of the Islamic bank.
These are a long­term Shariah­compliant security which is issued by Government of Malaysia for the
funding of developmental projects initiated by the government. It is issued through competitive auction
by Bank Negara Malaysia on behalf of the government of Malaysia. 13  The government issued non­
interest bearing Government Investment Certificates for the first time to meet the special needs of the
bank and other corporations who are interested in these securities. The Islamic bank, governed by
Shariah law, is not allowed to hold interest­bearing government securities. However, there was a serious
need for the Islamic bank to hold such liquid papers to meet the statutory liquidity requirements as well
as to park its idle funds. To satisfy both requirements, the Malaysian Parliament passed the Government
Investment Act in 1983 to enable the government of Malaysia to issue non­interest bearing certificates
known as Government Investment Certificates (GIC) (now replaced with Government Investment Issues
14
(GII)). GII were introduced in July 1983 under the concept of qard hasan.  GII’s structure is shown in
Fig.  5.4 .

Fig. 5.4
The process of government investment issues

1. To get the required finance, firstly, the government will sell its Shariah­compliant assets, for
example equities, to financial institutions for spot cash payment.
AQ28

2. Once the sale is completed, financial institutions will subsequently sell the assets back to the
government at profit paid on deferred, and GII will be issued by the government as evidence of
the indebtedness.
AQ29

3. Profit from the sale will be paid periodically such as on a semi­annual basis, representing the
coupon on the GII.

4. On maturity (i.e. deferred payment), the government will pay the asset cost, representing the
principal amount, plus profit and the GII will be redeemed.
AQ26
AQ27

5.5.1.1.  Pricing of GII

RV N c
Price = { } + {∑ }
N −1+T /E K=1 N −1+T /E
[1 + r] [1 + r]

Note: if profit is paid semi­annually, the r and c need to divided by two (r/2, c/2)
Where:

RV Redemption amount or value at maturity

c Coupon rate

r Market yield for a similar maturity period

N Number of coupon payments between the value date and maturity date

T Number of days from the value date to the next interest payment date

E Number of days in the coupon period in which settlement takes place
AQ30

The issuance of GII is based on bay al­inah and bay al­dayn, whereby the issuance of GII is based on bay
al­inah and the trading of the instrument is based on bay al­dayn. The use of a bay al­inah contract in the
15
structuring of GII may be seen by many scholars as against the principle of Shariah.  In fact, the
introduction of certain amendments to the practice of bay al­inah makes the practice of bay al­inah,
including GII, much more difficult, if not impossible. Until now the issuance of GII following this new
guideline, issued by Shariah Advisory Council of the Bank Negara Malaysia, has yet to be seen in the
market. Also the use of bay al­dayn in the secondary trading of the instrument is controversial as the
16
majority of scholars disallow its practice.

5.5.2. Bank Negara Monetary Notes­i (BNMN­i)
BNMN­i is a sovereign instrument of Islamic security issued by Bank Negara Malaysia to replace the
existing Bank Negara Negotiable Notes (BNNN) for purposes of managing liquidity in the Islamic
money market. This instrument was issued using the principle of bay’ al­inah. The maturity of these
issuances have also been lengthened from one year to three years. New issuances of BNMN­i may be
issued either on a discounted or a coupon­bearing basis depending on the demand of investors. Discount­
based BNMN­i will be traded using the same market convention as the existing BNNN and Malaysian
Islamic Treasury Bills (MITB) while the profit­based BNMN­i will adopt the market convention of
17
Government Investment Issues (GII).  The process of BNMN­i is shown in Fig.  5.5 .

Fig. 5.5
The process of BNMN­i
1. To raise the required financing, BNM will identify the Shariah­compliant asset;

2. The BNM will sell its Shariah­compliant assets to principal dealers on a tender basis at a
discount from par value.

3. The BNM will subsequently buy the assets back at par value which to be paid on maturity date;

4. Once the debt created, the Bank Negara Monetary Notes­i will be issued;

5. The BNM allots BNMN­I to successful banks via the Real­time Transfer of Funds and Securities
System (RENTAS).

BNMN­I is issued to the principal bidder via a tender process and the information on the issuance will be
disseminated through FAST. The successful buyer or bidder is the market participant that tendered the
highest price for the asset that is offered. This issuance, which is created at the primary market using a
bay al­inah contract, is also tradable at the secondary market based on a bay al­dayn contract.

5.5.2.1.  Pricing of Bank Negara Monetary Notes­i

r ∗ t
P = F V ∗ (1 − )
36500

Where:

P Price of instrument

FV Face value or redeemable amount at maturity

r Required profit/return (discount factor)
t Number of days left to maturity

5.5.3. Cagamas Mudharabah Bonds (CMB)
Cagamas Mudharabah Bonds were introduced on 1 March 1994. They involve the purchase of Islamic
housing debts and Islamic hire purchase from Islamic financial institutions which provide Islamic
18
housing finance and Islamic hire purchase. The underlying concept is al­mudharabah.  The purchase of
housing debt on Islamic principles by Cagamas is based on the bay al­bayn concept whereas the issue of
Cagamas Mudharabah bonds is based on the al­mudharabah concept (Billah, 2009). Under this concept
the bondholder and Cagamas will share profits according to ratios agreed together earlier. The
agreements pertaining to the purchase of housing debt based on Islamic principles will be sealed between
Cagamas Berhad and Bank Islam Malaysia Berhad. Cagamas will purchase housing debts amounting
RM30 billion from Bank Islam. As a result of this agreement, a total of RM30 billion of Cagamas
Mudharabah Bonds is created. The government has distributed RM30 billion worth of bonds to financial
institutions that offer Islamic banking. The structure is shown in Fig.  5.6 .

Fig. 5.6
The process of Cagamas Mudharabah Bond

1. The approved seller (let’s say, Islamic Bank) provides financing to customers;

2. Customers will pay the financing amount with instalments;

3. The Islamic Bank sells the Islamic housing debt to Cagamas;

4. Cagamas pays cash to the Islamic Bank;
5.
Cagamas issues Cagamas Mudharabah Bonds to sukuk holders;

6. Sukuk holders invest in the Cagamas Mudharabah Bonds;

7. During the post­sale period, Cagamas appoints the Islamic Bank as the servicer;

8. Cagamas remits the instalments from the Islamic Bank;

9. The investors receive the coupons.
AQ31

5.5.3.1.  Pricing of Cagamas Mudharabah Bonds (CMB):
There are two steps in pricing of Cagamas Mudharabah Bonds (CMB). As the first step, the pricing of
CMB bonds are done on a RM100 face­value basis (Bacha and Mirakhor  2013 ).
C ∗E
⎡ 100(100 + ( )⎤
365 C ∗ t
P = ⎢ ⎥ − FV ( )
r∗T
100 + ( ) 36500
⎣ 365

Where

P Price per RM100 face value

C Indicative coupon for current coupon period

E Number of days in current coupon period

T Number of days from transaction date to next coupon payment day

r Yield to maturity

t Number of days from last coupon payment date to the value date

FV Face value of SMC transaction (RM100)

Since the pricing is based on RM100, the transaction value or proceeds can be determined as shown next.
NV ∗ P C ∗ t
Proceeds = + NV ∗
100 36, 500

As far as the Shariah issue is concerned, the debate about bay al­bayn, as has been discussed, is also
pertinent here.

5.5.4. Islamic Accepted Bills (IAB)
An Islamic Accepted Bill, also known as Interest­Free Accepted Bill (IAB) is a bill of exchange which
was introduced in 1991. The objectives of introducing IABs are to encourage and promote both domestic
and foreign trade, by providing Malaysian traders with an attractive Islamic financing product. The IAB
is formulated on the Islamic principles of al­murabahah (deferred lump­sum sale or cost­plus) and bay
19
al­dayn (debt­trading).
AQ32

Al­murabahah refers to the selling of merchandise at a price based on cost­plus profit margin agreed to
by both parties. Bay al­dayn refers to the sale of a debt arising from a trade transaction in the form of a
deferred payment sale. There are two types of financing under the IAB facility, as follows.

5.5.4.1.  Imports and Local Purchases
The financing takes place under an al­murabahah working capital financing mechanism. Under this
concept, the commercial bank appoints the customer as the purchasing agent for the bank. The customer
then purchases the required goods from the seller on behalf of the bank, which then pays the seller and
resells the goods to the customer at a price, inclusive of a profit margin. The customer is allowed a
deferred payment term of up to 200 days. Upon maturity of al­murabahah financing, the customer pays
the bank the cost of goods plus a profit margin.

5.5.4.2.  Exports and Local Sales
The bills created are traded under the concept of bay al­dayn. An exporter who had been approved for an
IAB facility prepares the export documentation as required under the sale contract or letter of credit. The
export documents are sent to the importer’s bank. The exporter draws on the commercial bank a new bill
of exchange as a substitution bill and this is the IAB. The bank purchases the IAB at a mutually agreed
price using the concept of bay al­dayn and the proceeds are credited to the exporter's account. Domestic
sales are treated in a similar manner.
AQ33

Similarly to the previous instrument, this instrument will suffer Shariah disagreement in the trading of
the instrument via bay al­dayn concept.
AQ34
AQ35

5.5.5. Islamic Negotiable Instruments (INI)
INI cover two instruments, that is:

5.5.5.1.  Islamic Negotiable Instruments of Deposit (INID)
The applicable concept is al­mudharabah. The INIDrefers to a sum of money deposited with the Islamic
banking institution and repayable to the bearer on a specified future date at the nominal value of INID
20
plus a declared dividend.

Bank Negara Malaysia has introduced floating INID with the following mechanisms 21 :
(a) a customer deposits money into a bank;

(b) the bank accepts the customer’s deposit and issues an INID to the customer as an evidence of
receiving the deposit;
(c) the INID is tradable in the secondary market;

(d) on maturity, the customer or holder of INID returns it to the bank and receives the principal
value of the INID and the declared dividend; and

(e) the declared dividend is from the profit derived from the investment of the deposit.

The term ‘floating’ refers to the characteristic of the product that it changes in value based on the
dividend declared by the bank from time to time. The question is whether the investment mechanism
mentioned above is in line with mudharabah principle.

The Council in its third meeting held on 28 October 1997, resolved that INID using the mudharabah
concept is permissible and can be tradable in the secondary market. The computation of INID is shown in
Table  5.5 .

Table 5.5
The computation of INID

  Formula Example

Profit sharing ratio in favour of customer PSR 70:30

Deposit placement D 1,000,000

Declared dividend rate R 10 %

Tenor (months) T 6

Or, days to maturity   182.5

r∗t∗k
Proceeds D ∗ (1 +
365
) 1,035,000

Customer’s profit Profit (π) 35,000

AQ36

5.5.5.2. Negotiable Islamic Debt Certificate (NIDC)
The transaction involves the contract of bay al­inah, in which the bank’s assets are sold to the customer
at an agreed price on a cash basis. Subsequently the assets are purchased back from the customer at
22
principal value plus profit,to be settled at an agreed future date.  Table  5.6  illustrates the computation
of NIDC.

Table 5.6
The computation of NIDC

  Formula Example

Bank sells an asset to its customer SP (selling price) 1,000,000


Profit margin R 7.5 %

Tenor (months) T 6

Or, days to maturity   182.5

r∗t
Bank buys back the asset from the customer SP ∗ (1 +
365
) 1,037,500

Customer’s profit Profit (π) 37,500

5.5.5.2.1.  Computation of Proceeds and Trading of NIDC
An NIDC is traded on price basis, whereby its principal value is quoted in terms of ‘price per RM100
nominal value’ specified to four (4) decimal places.

The proceeds to be paid by the buyer is equal to the principal value:
Price 
Proceeds = Nominal value ∗
100

Example: an NIDC with a nominal value of RM1,000,000 is purchased at a price of RM98.2222. The
proceeds will be:
98.2222 
Proceeds = 1, 000, 000 ∗ = RM  982, 222
100

The pricing of an NIDC can be computed as follows (Table  5.7 ):

Table 5.7
The pricing of an NIDC

Maturity is less than 1 year Maturity is more than 1 year

RV
Price =
DSC
n−1+
r
DCC
RV (1+ )
Price = 2

1+
t∗r

365
Where:
Where: RV = redemption value per RM100 nominal value;
RV = redemption value per RM100 DSC = number of days from settlement date (counted) to next quasi
nominal value coupon date (not counted), (as if to the instrument pays semi­
t = number of days from the settlement date annual profit);
(counted) to the maturity date (not counted) DCC = number of days in quasi coupon profit period (start date
r = yield p.a counted and end date not counted);
r = yield p.a.
n = number of remaining quasi­coupon profit periods

Example: an NIDC with the following features was sold for value
25 September 2014;
Example: the price of an NIDC with six Issue date: 15/05/2014
months to maturity and trading at the yield Maturity date: 15/05/2016
of 3.15 % Yield: 3.05 %
Settlement date: 25/09/2014
Coupon dates: 15 May and 15 November each year
RV = 100
r = 3.05 %
n = 4
Price =
100

182.5∗0.0315
= 98.4494 DSC = 133 days
1+
365 DCC = 182.5 days
100
Price = = 94.5128
133
4−1+
0.0305
182.5
(1+ )
2

AQ37

5.5.6.  Islamic Private Debt Securities
Islamic Private Debt Securities (IPDS) were introduced in 1990. At the moment, IDS have been
introduced using different types of Shariah concepts through Murabahah Commercial Papers (MCP),
namely: al­musharakah, al­mudharabah, qard hassan, murabahah, etc. Murabahah Commercial Papers
(MCP) are contracts which refer to the sale of goods on a deferred payment basis. Under the concept of
Murabahah Commercial Papers (MCP) the financiers purchase an asset from the seller and later resell it
back at a higher price which contains the cost and profile elements. In this Murabahah Commercial
Papers (MCP) are in essence bay al­inah, relating to which the Shariah discussion about validity has been
made before. . The debt, which arises from the transaction, will be securitised through the issuance of
two notes, that is the primary note, which is equivalent to the price of the asset that is purchased by the
financiers from the seller, and the secondary note which is equivalent to the profit value of the resell
23
price. Both of these notes will be traded in the secondary market under the concept of bay al­dayn.

5.5.7.  When Issue (WI)
24
A When Issue is a transaction of sale and purchase of debt securities before the securities are issued.
Treasury securities, stock splits, and new issues of stocks and bonds are all traded on a when­issued
basis. Prior to a new issue's offering, underwriters solicit potential investors who may elect to book an
order to purchase a portion of the new issue. These orders are made conditionally – ‘when issued’ –
25
because they may not be completed, particularly in the event that the offering is cancelled”.  The WI
transaction is allowed by the National Shariah Advisory Council based on the permissibility to promise
26
for sale and purchase transactions.
AQ38

5.5.8.  Sukuk Bank Negara Malaysia Ijarah (SBNMI)
Sukuk Bank Negara Malaysia Ijarah (SBNMI) is based on the al­ijarah or ‘sale and lease back’ concept
which is popular in the Middle East. A special purpose vehicle (SPV) has been established by BNM
Sukuk Berhad to issue the sukuk ijarah. The proceeds from the issuance (cash flow from the investors)
will be used to buy the assets of BNM. Subsequently, the assets will be leased to BNM for rental
payment, which is distributed to investors as a return (coupon) on a semi­annual basis. On the maturity of
the sukuk ijarah, by the time of ending of the rental tenure, BNM Sukuk Berhad will sell the assets back
to BNM at a predetermined price (principal). The structure of this instrument is illustrated in Fig.  5.7 .

Fig. 5.7
The structure of Sukuk Bank Negara Malaysia Ijarah (SBNMI)
This facility was introduced on 16 February 2006 with an issue size of RM400 million. BNM issues this
facility on a regular basis and the issues range from RM100 million to RM200 million
AQ39

From a Shariah point of view, this instrument uses the most accepted Shariah principle, that is ijarah
muntahiyah bi al­tamlik, a principle widely accepted by Shariah scholars. Nevertheless, its viability as a
money market instrument is questionable for its issuance requires the availability of assets to back the
issuance; a scenario may not be possible all the time.

5.6.  Conclusion
The foregoing discussion on the Islamic money market, its instruments and operations, demonstrates that
the existence of a viable Islamic money market is crucial for the successful implementation of an Islamic
financial system. It allows for Islamic financial institutions with a temporary cash surplus to invest in
short­term securities; conversely, Islamic financial institutions with a temporary cash shortfall can tap the
liquidity in the market by selling securities or borrow funds on a short­term basis. To be able to perform
this role successfully, Islamic money markets should offer instruments that fulfill two main criteria: being
easily tradable and offering fixed rates . Having discussed the available instruments in the market, it is
obvious that it is hard to find good and viable Islamic money market instruments that can fulfill these two
criteria without attracting any Shariah dispute. Murabahah­based money market instruments, for
instance, are able to provide fixed­rate instruments, but the tradability of these instruments remain an
issue of concern. It can be argued that the tradability of these instruments can be overcome by using the
mechanism of bay al­dayn bi al­sila (selling of debt with commodities), but this mechanism attracts more
cost which may affect its viability. On the other hand, although mudharabah­ and wakalah­based
instruments are easily tradable, they are unable to provide for a fixed­rate mechanism which is much
needed in money market practices.

Having said that, it should be recognised that, for the time being, the availability of various Islamic
money market instruments, which have been discussed already, is able to fill the gap felt by Islamic
banks, to cover their exposure (in case of deficit) and allowtheir placement on a short­term basis (in case
of surplus). Moving forward, to ensure more viable Islamic money market instruments, a variety of
instruments with features of fixed­return mechanisms and tradability, and at the same time invite fewer
Shariah issues, must be offered in the market.

5.7.  Notes
1. http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/ . Since 2013, all GIIs are issued using the commodity murabahah­
tawarruq arrangements.

2. http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=4&pg=4&ac=22

3. http://www.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=8&pg=14&ac=1950

4. Sometimes referred to as Tawarruq Munazzam by some people.

5. http://www.islamicfinancenews.com/newsletter­issue/volume7issue27

6. These assertions are made in relation to the CM arrangement made on BSAS. Whether or not the
same is true for the CM arrangement made on other commodity exchanges (e.g. the London
Metal Exchange) or with other commodity providers needs to be further verified.

7. Bursa Bytes Issue 3 Vol 1 Oct  2009 . Issued by Bursa Malaysia.

8. http://aibim.com/content/view/2246/26/

9. http://www.zaharuddin.net/content/view/140/101/

10. http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=4&pg=4&ac=22#11

11. Malaysian Islamic Money Market, Available at: http://www.islamic­world.net/islamic­
state/malay_islamoneymarket.htm , (Accessed on: 19 September 2009).

12. http://www.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=en_about&pg=en_sac_updates&ac=445

13. Monetary Policy Implementation Section, Investment Operations and Financial Market
Department (BNM), a Guide to Malaysian Government Securities, 2007, 2nd ed, pg. 7

14. Islamic Interbank Money Market, About IIMM, Available at:
http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=4&pg=4&ac=22 , (Accessed on: 19 September 2015).

15. Al­Shawkani, Nayl al­Awtar, (Riyadh: Dar al­‘ilmiyyah li al­buhuth wa al­Ifta wa al­da’wah wa
al­irsyad  1982 ), vol. 5, p. 319.

16. Ibn Qayyim al­Jawziyyaj, I’lam al­Muwaqqi’in, (Damascus: Maktabah Dar al­Bayan  2000 ),


vol. 1, p. 388.

17. Islamic Interbank Money Market, About IIMM, op cit.
18. Mohd Ma’sum Billah, Concept of Islamic Money Market, Available at: http://www.applied
islamicfinance.com/sp_money_market_1.htm, (Accessed on: 20 September 2009).

19. Islamic Interbank Money Market, About IIMM, op cit.

20. Islamic Interbank Money Market, About IIMM, op cit.

21. Mudharabah, Available at:
http://www.bnm.gov.my/microsites/financial/pdf/resolutions/shariah_resolutions_2nd_edition_EN.pdf,
(Accessed on: 15 February  2016 ).

22. Islamic Interbank Money Market, About IIMM, op cit.

23. Mohd Ma’sum Billah, op cit.

24. http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=4&pg=4&ac=22

25. http://www.investopedia.com/terms/w/wi.asp#ixzz40qukqgt5

26. http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=4&pg=4&ac=22

References
Books and Articles

Ahmad, A. (1993). Contemporary practices of Islamic financing techniques. Research paper, (20).
AQ40

Al­Shawkani. (1982). Nayl al­Awtar (Vol. 5, p. 319). Riyadh: Dar al­‘ilmiyyah li al­buhuth wa al­Ifta wa
al­da’wah wa al­irsyad.

Al­Zuhayli, W. (1989). Al­Fiqh Al­Islami Wa Adillatuhu (3rd ed.). Beirut: Dar al­Fikr.

Bacha, O. I. (2008). The Islamic interbank money market and a dual banking system: The Malaysian
experience. International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, 1(3), 210–
226.

Bacha, O. I., & Mirakhor, A. (2013). Islamic capital markets: A comparative approach. Singapore:
Wiley.
AQ41

Bursa Bytes Issue 3 Vol 1 Oct 2009. Issued by Bursa Malaysia.

Chapra, M. U. (1985). Towards a just monetary system: A discussion of money, banking, and monetary
policy in the light of Islamic teaching. Leicester: The Islamic Foundation.

Çizakça, M. (2011). Islamic capitalism and finance: Origins, evolution and the future. Cheltenham:
Edward Elgar.

El­Gamal, M. A. (2006). Islamic finance: Law, economics and practice. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.

Fernando, A. C. (2011). Business environment. Pearson Education India.
AQ42

Ibn Qayyim al­Jawziyyaj. (2000). I’lam al­Muwaqqi’in (Vol. 1, p. 388). Damascus: Maktabah Dar al­
Bayan.

Jain, T. R., & Sandhu, A. S. (2009). Macroeconomics. Delhi: V.K. Publications.

Monetary Policy Implementation Section. (2007). Investment operations and financial market
department (BNM), a guide to Malaysian government securities, 2nd ed, p. 7.

Online Resources

Dalil on permissibility of transacting with non­halal counterparties. Available at:
http://www.zaharuddin.net/content/view/140/101/ . Accessed 15 Sept 2015.

http://www.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=en_about&pg=en_sac_updates&ac=445 . Accessed 15 Feb 2016.

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/w/wi.asp#ixzz40qukqgt5 . Accessed 21 Sept 2015.

http://www.islamicfinancenews.com/newsletter­issue/volume7issue27 . Accessed 20 Jan 2016.

https://cief.wordpress.com/2006/03/06/contract­of­ar­rahn­definition­and­conditions/ . Accessed 15 Jan
2016.

Islamic Interbank Money Market. About IIMM. Available at: http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/index.php?
ch=4&pg=4&ac=22 . Accessed 19 Sept 2015.

Islamic Interbank Money Market. About IIMM. Available at: http://iimm.bnm.gov.my/ . Accessed 25 Feb
2016.

Malaysian Islamic Money Market. Available at: http://www.islamic­world.net/islamic­
state/malay_islamoneymarket.htm . Accessed 19 Sept 2009.

Mohd Ma’sum Billah, concept of Islamic Money Market. Available at:
http://www.appliedislamicfinance.com/sp_money_market_1.htm . Accessed 20 Sept 2009.

Monetary Policy Statement issued on 24th November 2009. Available at:
http://www.bnm.gov.my/index.php?ch=8&pg=14&ac=1950

Mudharabah. Available at:
http://www.bnm.gov.my/microsites/financial/pdf/resolutions/shariah_resolutions_2nd_edition_EN.pdf .
Accessed 15 Feb 2016.
View publication stats

Resolutions of Shariah Advisory Council of Bank Negara Malaysia, Islamic Banking and Takaful
Department, Bai’ Inah, p.16.

Resolutions of the Securities Commission Shariah Advisory Council. (2006) Second ed., p. 20. Bai Inah.

Resolutions of the Securities Commission Shariah Advisory Council (2006), Second edition, Bai Dayn,
p.16.

Wakalah Placement Agreement Launching Ceremony. Available at:
http://aibim.com/content/view/2246/26/ . Accessed 13 Nov 2015.