The

Grail
St. Joseph of Arimathea

OctOber 2010

103 Countr y Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075 | stjosephofarimathea.org | T: 625-824-2910 | info@stjosephofarimathea.org

From the Priest’s Desk
What qualifies something for the moniker “Christian?” If we look around our community today, we can find quite a few things that claim that title. There are “Christian” book stores which presumably sell Christian books—though I have to admit that even when the quality is not uneven, the claim can be questionable. There are Christian television stations (there’s one headquartered right up the road from St. Joseph of Arimathea in fact). And yet, I would doubt that everything stalking the airwaves from any of these networks would really qualify for the description, despite the good intentions of those involved. And finally, here in Nashville, there’s the Christian music industry. In listening to music labeled Christian, I often find myself attempting to discern what makes this or that song quantifiably more Christian than that which is produced by other artists who eschew the label. Certainly God and Jesus are mentioned more often in the lyrics, but is that enough to label this music as Christian and other music as “secular” or non-Christian... even anti-Christian? More and more I find myself rejecting the label “Christian” when applied to anything other than people. Of course, I recognize that there is a Christian artistic tradition, and that there are genres of music, writing and schools of painting that owe their existence to the Christian faith. But today, what seems to have happened, is that people use the label as a short hand not so much for the content of the work, but for the target market they hope to draw to the product. I come to find myself thinking in this way: an author is a Christian, his book is not. A musician may sing beautifully about her devotion to Christ, with her faith shining through, but I don’t believe that makes her music Christian. The truth of the matter is that Christian values and perspectives can be expressed by Christians and nonChristians whether they are aware of it or not. A Christian may write a work devoid of Christian meaning, while a professed atheist may have internalized some aspect of the tradition and expressed it in a dramatic way.
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“To encourage and equip one another as the baptized people of God, to witness to the transforming and reconciling power of Jesus Christ.”

Our Mission:

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Want to see the Grail in Color? Interested in extended content, such as devotionals? If you’re receiving the Grail in printed form and would like to see it in color with more content, you can visit http://stjosephofarimathea.org/congregational-resources/grail to download a PDF version.

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Recently I read a review of the film “Get Low” staring Robert Duvall in which the reviewer said that this was not a “Christian movie.” He did, to his credit, admit that the film is Christ haunted. Not to fall into the trap I condemn above, I won’t say that this film is a Christian one, but I will say after viewing it that I believe it’s a film that Christians ought to see.

For the past several weeks many members of our community have been reading the book Free of Charge: Giving and Forgiving in a Culture Stripped of Grace by theologian Miroslav Volf. I believe that this film makes a powerful companion to our reflections on repentance and forgiveness. The film is well acted, as one would expect from a cast that includes Duvall, Sissy Spacek and Bill Murray, and it does a good job at pulling the viewer in and pulling them along in events. “Get Low” is the story of a hermit in the woods of West Tennessee. The people from town tell stories about him and the children throw stones at his house. His only friend is an old mule. As the film progresses we come to suspect that there is something deeper in this old man, as he starts to encourage folks to tell him the stories they’ve heard and tries to organize his “funeral party,” a gathering he wants to attend while alive. Eventually we learn the dark secret that caused him to build a prison and put himself in it for forty years, and in an inspired scene, the tormented Felix Bush (Duvall) reveals what has kept him confined—literally and figuratively for so many years. — Get Low may not meet some folks’ standard of what characterizes a Christian film, but it certainly does deal with the real human issues of guilt, repentance and forgiveness in an amazing way. The clergy even get a few good words in. I highly recommend it.

ECW BakE SalE
The ECW will be holding a bake sale on Saturday, November 6. We ask that all the ladies bring at least one bake-sale item to the church early that morning. If you cannot get it there on Saturday, contact another member to have them bring your item(s). This Bake Sale takes place in conjunction with the men’s BBQ Chicken sale. A sign-up sheet will be downstairs for those willing to participate.

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ThE laW

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UninTEndEd ConSEqUEnCES
details are provided in the story below). This situation highlights one of the reasons we as Christians— especially American Christians—need to be particularly aware of what is happening around the globe: our actions can have immediate consequences for our brothers and sisters overseas. According to another news source, the mob that attacked the school as retaliation for insults to the Quran (which, of course, were never actually carried out) managed to burn several copies of the Quran that were housed in the school. Some might see this as poetic justice, but in reality it’s just that law of unintended consequences, and highlights the sort of thing that happens when we resort to hateful polemic and violence.

Two weeks ago the Hendersonville pastor’s association drafted a letter condemning the planned burning of Qurans by Pastor Terry Jones of Dove World Outreach center in Gainesville, Florida. Of course, anyone following the news heard about this publicity stunt as it spread quickly through the various news outlets. There was the expected outcry as people sought to convince Pastor Jones to reconsider his actions, since, as Paul reminds us what is lawful is not always beneficial (1 Cor. 10:23). Eventually he relented and said he would not hold the Quran burning. People in America breathed a sigh of relief that such an offensive action was averted and then promptly changed the channel on the TV, moving on with their lives. I know that was my reaction. And yet, I should have been thinking about the second half of that verse from Corinthians. It reads, in its entirety: ‘All things are lawful’, but not all things are beneficial. ‘All things are lawful’, but not all things build up. Do not seek your own advantage, but that of others (1 Corinthians 10:23-24 NRSV). I should have thought of these two verses for a few reasons. The first is simply to reflect on the question of how such an activity could possibly be salubrious, how it could possibly build up the body of Christ, the community at large or the Muslims that might be counted among Pastor Jones’ near neighbors. In perusing this action, was Pastor Jones seeking his own advantage or that of others? Whatever the sincerity in his actions, Pastor Jones set the stage for a very sad example of the law of unintended consequences. When I opened my email on September 15th to read the update from Anglican Communion News Service, I was greeted with the following headline: Call to protect Christians after “most beautiful school” lost to Quran anger violence. The headline is a little rough, but the story fleshes out the details. A school was destroyed by a mob in Kashmir, the Muslim-dominated northern territory of India. Certain radicals in that community took Pastor Jones’ threat as the occasion to attack and burn a school supported by the Church of North India (the

Call to protect Christians after “most beautiful school” lost to Quran anger violence
ACNS: http://www.aco.org/acns/news.cfm/2010/9/15/ ACNS4731

The Bishop of Amritsar has called on the President of India Pratibha Devisingh Patil to protect Christians in northern India after a mob burned down the oldest school in Kashmir and also attacked other Christian institutions. The Church of North India’s Rt Revd Pradeep Kumar Samantaroy, wrote that it was “with a heavy heart” that he informed the President of the complete destruction of the Tungmarg Tyndale Biscoe branch school that provided “quality education to five hundred fifty children from one hundred fifty villages around Tangmarg.” The school, managed by the Diocese of Amritsar, had 27 staff and 16 support staff and had been founded in 1996 by Tyndale Biscoe and Mallinson School Educational Society to cater for the economically deprived sectors of the community. The whole three-storey wooden structure with 26 classrooms, computer labs and a library containing,
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among other books, copies of the Quran was completely destroyed on Monday after being set on fire by a large mob that marched on the school after hearing reports of a man desecrating the Quran in America. None of the staff were injured; they all managed to escape the blaze. “I am pained to state that though the local authorities were informed about a possible attack… no protection was provided,” said Bishop Samantaroy in his message to the President. “As a result of it the whole building was burnt to ashes incurring a huge loss of property and causing irreparable damage to the sentiments of the Christian Community. “You are aware that the Christians in the State of Jammu and Kashmir are a tiny minority who always live and serve under stressful and sometimes threatening situations. The present situation has made the Christians in Jammu and Kashmir feel very insecure.”

The school’s headmaster Rahinder Kaul expressed his sorrow at the destruction of the school: “As word spread, my phone hasn’t stopped ringing, with students, parents, staff members, friends and well-wishers all expressing their shock and disbelief—many, many students broke down completely while talking to me— theirs is by far the biggest loss. He added, “Today the school, the pride of the children who studied here and the staff who have put everything into the school, is a heap of ashes. I cannot express my own shock and sense of loss.” Other Christian institutions also came under attack including the Roman Catholic Good Shepherd High School at Pulwama that was also set on fire and the Church of North India hospital at Anantnag was stormed by protestors, two of whom were shot and killed by security forces.

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liSTEning
But blame can be associated with the failure to hear. Think of Stephen in Acts 7:51, railing at an audience of religious officials: “You stiff-necked people, uncircumcised in heart and ears, you are forever opposing the Holy Spirit . . .” And when Jesus frames a parable with the comment, “Let those with ears to hear listen,” he is intimating that there is some element of moral or spiritual choice behind success or failure in hearing and understanding the parables. Is hearing or the failure to hear a matter of responsibility and culpability, or is it not? Maybe another family story will help sort this out. Eight years ago, I suffered an ear infection that led to a puncturing of the eardrum. A doctor wanted to test how much damage had been done, so I was ushered into a sound-proof booth and administered a number of tests. When we were finished, I asked the technician about the results. She replied that, for a 45-year-old man, my hearing was slightly above average.

In the early 1990s my Grandma Adams, who had been a widow for several years, began to hang out with a widower named Bob. Grandma and Bob got along famously. They complemented one another: Grandma was hard of hearing and Bob was almost blind. My brother tells a story about joining them one night at a restaurant. Grandma, Bob and my brother were just tucking into steaks and baked potatoes when an amiable fellow approached the table. His demeanor was that of a longtime friend, and he talked to Bob and Grandma for several minutes. Grandma and Bob nodded and smiled as if they knew what was going on. After the gentleman left the table, Bob asked, “Who was that man?” Grandma replied, “I don’t know—what did he say?”

Grandma has been gone for years now, but this story remains a family favorite. We laugh freely about it because we are not laughing at Grandma (she loved the tale herself). We don’t assign to Grandma any moral responsibility for her hearing loss and its sometimes “Well, isn’t that interesting,” I said. “Now I have amusing (and sometimes frustrating) consequences. medico-scientific proof that my wife and daughter are Her physical capacity to hear had simply worn out. wrong. They think I’m getting hard of hearing.” The

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technician didn’t miss a beat. “There is a difference between hearing and listening,” she said. So there you have it: there is a distinction between hearing and listening. We may have functioning hearing organs and still fail to listen to what others are saying. Put differently, hearing is a matter of physical endowment, but listening is a skill at which we can work to become better, more adept. How does the virtue of listening fare in our noisy culture? Listening requires patience, and we are impatient. Listening requires a background silence, and we seem determined to use radios and iPods and televisions to blot out every threat of quietness. Listening requires focusing attention on another as he or she speaks, and our omnipresent consumerism habituates us to focus first and foremost on ourselves. The odds are against us learning the virtue or skill of listening. We won’t just stumble into good listening. If we are to achieve some level of aptitude in listening, we will have to be quite intent at practicing and sharpening the skill. Christians especially have a lot at stake in learning how to listen. As the theologian Stephen Webb remarks, “All of biblical religion can be summarized in the Shema of Deuteronomy, which begins, ‘Hear, O Israel.’” Hearing—listening—is the primary sense and skill that must be honed if we are to follow the God of Israel. This is true from creation onward in the biblical story. Webb again: “We are used to thinking that it was light that broke the primordial darkness from which all life comes, but it was really God’s voice . . . ‘Let there be light.’ Sound precedes light; we hear before we can see.” True to the biblical norm, Jesus is preeminently the voice of God, and we have his words to hear rather than photographs or portraits of him to gaze upon. Grandma was on to something then. When it comes to knowing the God of Israel and Jesus Christ, the first and most important question is: What did he say? by Rodney Clapp American Soundings August 24, 2010
Rodney Clapp’s American Soundings column appears in every other issue of the Century. Copyright © 2010 by the Christian Century. Reprinted by permission from the August, 2010, issue of the Christian Century. Subscriptions: $49/yr. from P.O. Box 700, Mt. Morris, IL 61054. (800) 208-4097.

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UnCondiTional lovE
A story is told about a soldier who was finally coming home after having fought in Vietnam. He called his parents from San Francisco. "Mom and Dad, I'm coming home, but I've a favor to ask. I have a friend I'd like to bring home with me." "Sure," they replied, "we'd love to meet him." "There's something you should know the son continued, he was hurt pretty badly in the fighting. He stepped on a land mine and lost an arm and a leg. He has nowhere else to go, and I want him to come live with us." "I'm sorry to hear that, son. Maybe we can help him find somewhere to live." "No, Mom and Dad, I want him to live with us." "Son," said the father, "you don't know what you're asking. Someone with such a handicap would be a terrible burden on us. We have our own lives to live, and we can't let something like this interfere with our lives. I think you should just come home and forget about this guy. He'll find a way to live on his own." At that point, the son hung up the phone. The parents heard nothing more from him. A few days later, however, they received a call from the San Francisco police. Their son had died after falling from a building, they were told. The police believed it was suicide. The grief-stricken parents flew to San Francisco and were taken to the city morgue to identify the body of their son. They recognized him, but to their horror they also discovered something they didn't know, their son had only one arm and one leg. The parents in this story are like many of us. We find it easy to love those who are good-looking or fun to have around, but we don't like people who inconvenience us or make us feel uncomfortable. We would rather stay away from people who aren't as healthy, beautiful, or smart as we are. Thankfully, there's someone who won't treat us that way. Someone who loves us with an unconditional love that welcomes us into the forever family, regardless of how messed up we are. Tonight, before you tuck yourself in for the night, say a little prayer that God will give you the strength you need to accept people as they are, and to help us all be more understanding of those who are different from us!! -- Author Unknown

hElp WanTEd
Nursery Worker
Do you know someone who loves to work with children? We are hiring a nursery worker for Sunday mornings, preferably someone who is not already a member of St. Joseph’s. This is a paid position. A background check will be done, and the employee will have to attend the 3-hour class “Safeguarding God’s People.” Contact Fr. Jody for more details.

Vestry Clerk
The vestry needs a new clerk to take minutes during each month’s meeting. Please see Fr. Jody if you are i nterested in serving in this role.

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SubmiSSionS:
Next deadline: Friday, Oct. 22 Did something in The Grail pique your interest? Feel free to send your comments, prayers, reflections, essays, articles, jokes or other material you would like to share to grail@ stjosephofarimathea.org with “the Grail” in the subject line. If you would like to change delivery preferences (change your address, recieve the Grail electronically in addition to or in place of a physical copy) visit our web site at: http://www. stjosephofarimathea.org/congregational-resources/ newsletter-survey/

BirThdayS & annivErSariES
Oct. 2 Oct. 3 Oct. 5 Oct. 6 Oct. 7 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct. 13 Oct. 14 Oct. 15 Oct. 16 Oct. 17 Oct. 18 Oct. 24 Oct. 26 Oct. 28 Oct. 29 Oct. 30 Nancy Manis Sarah Watts Wade Douglass Don Holt Deborah Jordan Debra Maggart Anne Theis Jane Black Fred Frank Andrew Mason Zoe Manis Jack Mason Andrew Gibson Donna Holt Dorothy Jones Denine Torr Dawn Harman David Heeks David Rose Laura Melcher

adUlT dinnEr groUp
The Adult Dinner Night Out will be held on Sunday, October 10, at 6:00 p.m., at Steamboat Bills, 248 Sanders Ferry Road, Hendersonville. All adult members are invited to attend. This social event is a great mixer with many different members from our church attending each month. For reservations, please contact Donna Holt by Friday, October 8, at 452-7242 or email at holt19@bellsouth.net.


Oct. 7 Oct. 23 Oct. 24

Paul & Stephanie Love Bill & Sandra Disney Al & Ruth Torri

Upcoming EvEnts
Oct. 6 Daughters of the King, 6:30 pm Oct. 10 Dedication of the undercroft, 9:15 am Oct. 10 Blessing of the Animals, 3:00 pm Oct. 10 Adult Dinner night out, 6:00 pm Oct. 17 PB&J dedication Oct. 20 Vestry Meeting, 6:30 pm Oct. 22 Deadline for November’s Grail Nov. 3 Daughters of the King, 6:30 pm Nov. 6 Men of the Church chicken sale and ECW bake sale

hoSpiTal

admiSSion, SiCknESS,

or faCing SomE oThEr diffiCUlTy?

If you or a loved one are admited to the hospital, please let us know. While admissions clerks may ask specific questions regarding religious affiliation, due to government regulations they cannot and will not notify St. Joseph of Arimathea to let us know that you are there. Please get in touch with the church office (615-824-2910) or with Fr. Jody (615-440-6492). If you’re sick and in need of assistance please let us know that as well. You can call or fill out our new care calendar information sheet located at: http://www.stjosephofarimathea.org/how-can-wehelp-you/

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The

Address Service Requested Non-Profit Organization

St. Joseph of Arimathea Episcopal Church 103 Country Club Drive Hendersonville, TN 37075 Church Phone: (615) 824-2910 http://stjosephofarimathea.org Service Schedule Sunday 8:00 am Holy Communion, traditional language (Rite I), no music 10:30 am Holy Communion, contemporary language (Rite II), with music 9:15 am Christian formation for all ages

Grail

U.S. POSTAGE PAID
Hendersonville, TN Permit No. 12

Church Calendar, C o m m u n i t y u s e, K a l e n d a r, US Holidays
Tue 27 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 28 29 30 1 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Stanley Hauerwas book signing @ Christ Church Cathedral, Nashville TN Wed Thu Fri Sat 2

Oct 2010 (Central Time)

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8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 9 : 1 5 a m - Christian Formation @ Country Club Dr. St. Joseph of Arimathea H0 : 3 0 a mo-nHoly Eucharist @ St. ville TN 37075 1 enders

Joseph of Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

3 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: 6 : 3 0 p m - Daughters of the King St. Francis Hall @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 9 a m - First Sunday Breakfast @ Country Club Dr. St. Joseph of Arimathea: H: 1 5 a ms-oChristian Formation @ 9 ender nville TN 37075 St. Francis Hall St. Joseph of Arimathea 1 0 : 3 0 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

10 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 9 : 1 5 a m - Christian Formation @ Country Club Dr. St. Joseph of Arimathea H0 : 3 0 a mo-nHoly Eucharist @ St. ville TN 37075 1 enders

Columbus Day

Joseph of Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

17 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: 6 : 3 0 p m - Vestry Meeting @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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22 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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PB & J Dedication

8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 9 : 1 5 a m - Christian Formation @ Country Club Dr. St. Joseph of Arimathea H0 : 3 0 a mo-nHoly Eucharist @ St. ville TN 37075 1 enders Joseph of Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

24 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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27 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

28 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

29 7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 9 : 1 5 a m - Christian Formation @ Country Club Dr. St. Joseph of Arimathea H0 : 3 0 a mo-nHoly Eucharist @ St. ville TN 37075 1 enders Joseph of Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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Halloween

8 a m - Holy Eucharist @ St. Joseph of Arimathea, 103 9 : 1 5 a m - Christian Formation @ Country Club Dr. St. Joseph of Arimathea H0 : 3 0 a mo-nHoly Eucharist @ St. ville TN 37075 1 enders Joseph of Arimathea, 103 Country Club Dr. Hendersonville, TN 37075

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: 6 : 3 0 p m - Daughters of the King St. Francis Hall @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

7 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. Joseph of Arimathea: 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Community Use @ St. St. Francis Hall Joseph of Arimathea: St. Francis Hall

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