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CHAPTER 1

1.1 INTRODUCTION

Competency-based HR is considered the best HR in India. However


competency development and mapping still remain an unexplored process in
most IT organizations despite the growing level of awareness. After all,
Level3 of PCMM is focused on the competency framework in an
organization. Is the underlying principle of competency mapping just about
finding the right people for the right job? The issue is much more complex
than it appears, and most Hr department have been struggling to formulate
the right framework for their organization.

The competency movement has caught on much better in the non-IT


sector than the IT sector. Only a few IT organization which are at the higher
end of the HR value chain known to be doing some work in this area; most
are busy handling recruitment and compensation relate matters.

Unless managements and HR head have holistic expectations from


their HR departments, the competency movement is unlikely to succeed as it
requires lot of time, dedication and money.
1.2 INDUSTRY PROFILE

IT Industry

The Indian software industry is fast becoming tradition of the modern


day information technology (IT) revolution, and it is considered as an
example for excellence of a technology-intensive industry establishing itself
in a developing country.

The Indian software industry, though successful, still faces major


hurdles, as it is still small in terms of its global market share and producing
low value-added products, while its own domestic market is only one-third
of the size of its export market.

According to the National Association of Software and Service


Companies (NASSCOM), the apex body for software services in India, the
revenue of the information technology sector has grown from 1.2 per cent of
the gross domestic product (GDP) in 1997-98 to an estimated 5.8 per cent in
2008-09. Software and services exports (includes exports of IT services,
BPO, engineering services and R&D and software products) reached US $
47 billion in FY2009.

The cross-border merger and acquisition (M&A) involving Indian IT


and IT-enabled companies increased by nearly 12 per cent between January
1 and December 15, 2008 to US$ 3.22 billion (in 98 deals) compared with
US$ 2.88 billion (in 159 deals) in 2007. The average deal size in 2008
increased to US$ 32.86 million (as compared to US$ 18.15 million),
according to Grant Thornton India.

Moreover, as top outsourcing customers in the US and Europe seek to


renew their computer infrastructure management contracts worth nearly
US$30 billion, Indian tech firms including HCL, Tata Consultancy Services
(TCS), Wipro and Infosys are bidding against incumbent multinational rivals
IBM and HP, for their share of the lucrative opportunity.
Export

According to NASSCOM, if India maintains its current share of the


global offshore IT-ITS market, the IT-ITeS exports from India will exceed
US$ 330 billion by 2019-20 (nearly 14 per cent of the projected worldwide
spend). Currently, exports stand at US$ 47.3 billion.

The ITeS sector is working towards reducing its dependence on the


US market and is exploring new and emerging markets such as those in
Australia and the Middle East.

Government Initiative

Realizing its potential, after IT Parks and IT special economic zone


(SEZs), the government has cleared a proposal for creating much larger
Information Technology Investment Regions (ITIRs) to give a fillip to the
country's growing IT and ITeS sector.
SWOT Analysis

Strengths Weaknesses

• Highly skilled human • Absence of practical


resource knowledge
• Low wage structure
• Quality of work • Dearth of suitable candidates
• Initiatives taken by the
Government (setting up Hi- • Less Research and
Tech Parks and Development
implementation of e-
• Contribution of IT sector to
governance projects)
India’s GDP is still rather small.
• Many global players have set-
up operations in India like • Employee salaries in IT
Microsoft, Oracle, Adobe, etc. sector are increasing tremendously.
• Following Quality Standards Low wages benefit will soon come to
such as ISO 9000, SEI CMM an end.
etc.
• English-speaking
professionals
• Cost competitiveness
• Quality telecommunications
infrastructure
• Indian time zone (24 x 7
services to the global
customers). Time difference
between India and America is
approximately 12 hours,
which is beneficial for
outsourcing of work.

Opportunities Threats

• High quality IT education • Lack of data security systems


market • Countries like China and
• Increasing number of working Philippines with qualified
age people workforce making efforts to
• India 's well developed soft overcome the English language
infrastructure barrier
• Upcoming International • IT development concentrated
Players in the market in a few cities only
1.5 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY

Competency mapping is process of identifying key competencies for


an organization and/or a job and incorporating those competencies
throughout the various processes (i.e. evaluation, trainging, recruitment) of
the organization. It generally examines two areas: emotional intelligence or
emotional quotient, and strengths of the individual in areas like team
structure, leadership, and decision making.

Large organizations frequently employ some form of competency


mapping to understand how to most effectively employ the competencies of
strengths of workers. This study helps to analyze the combination of
strengths in different workers to produce the most effective teams and the
highest quality work. Competency mapping can also be done for contract or
freelance workers, or for those seeking employment to potential employer.
These kinds of skills can be determined, when one is ready to do the work.
1.6 NEED FOR THE STUDY

• Have a reasonable understanding of the term competency mapping.


• Understand what needs to be done for its effective implementation
• Know the key areas of performance indicators and key player, who do
the process
• Understand the benefits of the system
• Know how it helps in designing the competency based hiring system.
• Know how it helps in planning training and development of the
employees.
• Know how it helps in the future knowledge requirement of the
organization as its grows
1.7 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

• The main objective of this project is to study the organization and its
functional wings.
• This project has been undertaken to share my experiences on
competency mapping as well as to enhance my understanding of this
fascinating subject by doing some study and research.
• The project explains the meaning of competency mapping, different
method used to evaluate the performance of employees, its effective
implementation and the benefits of the system.
• It also aims at understanding the problems associated with
competency mapping and suggests measures to be adopted to
overcome these issues.
• Overall objective of the project is to understand the effectiveness of
competency mapping systems.
1.8 SCOPE OF THE STUDY

• The project report covers the detailed study of the organization


along with its functional wings.
• It also covers the definition and meaning of competency mapping.
It elucidates the benefits and drawbacks of the traditional methods
as well as recent advances in the field of setting up standard skill
set.
• The project throws light on the concern areas for different people
involved in designing the competency mapping and attempts to
find out base to overcome those problems.
• The system can help management to take informed decisions on
competency based hiring and career enhancement for their
employees.
• Few recommendation and methodology of the competency
mapping have been included in the project to show the way
different companies are evaluating performance of their employees
CHAPTER 2

Literature Survey

INTRODUCTION

Competency Mapping is processes of identifying key competencies


for an organization and/or a job and incorporating those competencies
throughout the various processes (i.e. job evaluation, training, recruitment)
of the organization. It generally examines two areas: emotional intelligence
or emotional quotient (EQ), and strengths of the individual in areas like team
structure, leadership, and decision-making. Large organizations frequently
employ some form of competency mapping to understand how to most
effectively employ the competencies of strengths of workers. . Competency
mapping can also be done for contract or freelance workers, or for those
seeking employment to emphasize the specific skills which would make
them valuable to a potential employer. These kinds of skills can be
determined, when one is ready to do the work.

DEFINITION:

According to Boyatzis (1982) “A capacity that exists in a person that


leads to behaviors that meets the job demands within parameters of
organizational environment, and that, in turn brings about desired results”

COMPONENTS OF COMPETENCY

There are four major components of competency:

1. SKILL: capabilities acquired through practice. It can be a financial


skill such as budgeting, or a verbal skill such as making a presentation.

2. KNOWLEDGE: understanding acquired through learning. This


refers to a body of information relevant to job performance. It is what people
have to know to be able to perform a job, such as knowledge of policies and
procedures for a recruitment process.

3. PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES: inherent characteristics which are


brought to the job, representing the essential foundation upon which
knowledge and skill can be developed.

4. BEHAVIOR: The observable demonstration of some competency,


skill, knowledge and personal attributes. It is an essentially definitive
expression of a competency in that it is a set of action that, presumably, can
be observed, taught, learned, and measured.
MAPPING PROCESS:

There are about five stages while performing competency mapping.


The following are the five stages discussed in detail.

FIRST STAGE:

The first stage of mapping requires understanding the vision and


mission of the organization.

SECOND STAGE:

Second stage requires understanding from the superior performers the


behavioral as well as the functional aspects required to perform job
effectively.

THIRD STAGE:

Third stage involves thorough study of the BEI Reports/ Structured


Interview Reports.

Identification of the competency based on competency frame work.

Measurement of competency.

Required levels of competency for each job family.

Development of dictionary which involves detail description of the


competency based on the indicators.

Care should be taken that the indicators should be measurable and


gives objective judgment.

FOURTH STAGE:

a. This stage requires preparation for assessment.

b. Methods of assessment can be either through assessment centers or


360 Degree Feedback

c. If assessment centre is the choice for assessment then tools has to


be ready beforehand

i. Tools should objectively measure the entire competency required.

ii. Determine the type of the tools for measuring competency

iii. Prepare the schedule for assessment


iv. Training to the assessor should indicate their thorough
understanding of the competencies and the tools and also as to how the
behavior has to be documented.

FIFTH STAGE:

This stage involves conducting assessment centre. Usually it is a two


day program which would involve giving a brief feedback to the participant
about the competencies that has been assessed and where they stand to.

SIXTH STAGE:

Sixth stage involves detailed report of the competencies assessed and


also the development plan for the developmental areas.

BENEFITS OF USING COMPETENCY MODEL

There are some useful benefits of using competency model for the
company, managers, and employees as well.

FOR THE COMPANY:

Reinforce corporate strategy, culture, and vision.

Establish expectations for performance excellence, resulting in a


systematic approach to professional development, improved job satisfaction,
and better employee retention.

Increase the effectiveness of training and professional development


programs by linking them to the success criteria (i.e., behavioral standards of
excellence).

Provide a common framework and language for discussing how to


implement and communicate key strategies.

Provide a common understanding of the scope and requirements of a


specific role.

Provide common, organization-wide standards for career levels that


enable employees to move across business boundaries.

FOR MANAGERS:

Identify performance criteria to improve the accuracy and ease of the


hiring and selection process.

Provide more objective performance standards.

Clarify standards of excellence for easier communication of


performance expectations to direct reports.
Provide a clear foundation for dialogue to occur between the manager
and employee about performance, development, and career-related issues.

FOR EMPLOYEES:

Identify the success criteria (i.e., behavioral standards of performance


excellence) required to be successful in their role.

Support a more specific and objective assessment of their strengths


and specify targeted areas for professional development.

Provide development tools and methods for enhancing their skills.

Provide the basis for a more objective dialogue with their manager or
team about performance, development, and career related issues.

FIVE TYPES OF COMPETENCY CHARACTERISTICS:

1. Motives: the things a person consistently thinks about or wants that cause
action. Motives “ drive, direct, and select” behavior toward certain actions or
goals and away from others.
E.g. Achievement-motivated people consistently set challenging goals for
themselves and use feedback to do better.

2. Traits: physical characteristics and consistent response to situation or


information.
E.g. reaction time and good eyesight are physical trait competencies of
combat pilots.

3. Self-concept: A person’s attitude, values, or self-image.


E.g. Self-confidence, a person’s belief that he can be effective in any
situation is a part of that person’s concept of self.

4. Knowledge: Information a person has in specific content areas


E.g. A surgeon’s knowledge of nerves and muscles in the human body.

Skill: The ability to perform a certain physical or mental task.


E.g. A dentist’s physical skill to fill a tooth without damaging the nerve.

The type or level of a competency has practical implications for human


resource planning. Knowledge and skills tend to be visible and relatively
surface, characteristics of people. But attitude, trait and motive competencies
are more hidden “deeper” and central to personality. Surface knowledge and
skills are relatively easy to develop. But core motive and trait competencies
are at the base of the personality iceberg and are more difficult to assess and
develop as shown in the figure..
Competency Mapping Methods:

• The Behavioral Event Interview (BEI)


• Expert panels
• Focus groups
• Surveys
• Psychometric tests

The Behavioral Event Interview:

It is a structured interview to identify specific behaviors which


produce successful results. It identifies and compares thoughts, feelings,
behaviors and outcomes reported by outstanding performers with those
reported by average performers and is a tool for identifying differentiating
competencies.

 Assessment Centres
 Use multiple methods and multiple assessors to enhance
objectivity.
 Use psychometric tests, stimulation exercises, presentations, in
basket exercises, interviews, role plays, group discussions etc.
 Methods used depend on nature of competencies
 Competencies can be identified by experts, HR specialists, job
analysts, psychologists etc.. in consultation with line managers,
current and past role holders, supervisors, internal customers
and subordinates.

Dr. T V Rao says …

“Competency mapping is essentially an in-house job. Consultants can


at best give the methodology and train up the line managers and HR staff.
Consultants cannot do competency mapping all by themselves because no
consultant can ever have all the knowledge required to identify the
technologies, managerial, human relations and other conceptual knowledge,
attitudes and skills required for all jobs in a firm. Where consultant are
extensively relied upon the data generated are likely to enrich the consultant
much more than the firm. The lower the consultant’s involvement, more the
work needs to done internally and higher the intellectual capital generation
and retention within the organization.”
CHAPTER 3

3.1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

RESEARCH MEANING

“Research means a search for knowledge”. Sometimes, it may refer to


a scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific
topic. In fact, research is an art of scientific investigation.

RESEARCH DESIGN

The research design followed in this study is descriptive research.

Descriptive research includes surveys and fact - finding enquiries of


different kinds. Descriptive study is concerned with describing the particular
characteristic of individual or a group. The purpose is description of the state
of affairs as it exists at the present.

SOURCES OF INFORMATION

The research is used primary data and secondary data.

Primary data

The information of data was collected for the first time by the
researcher, it is referred to primary data. The data sources used in this study
primary data collected from the employees of Mani India Technologies (P)
Ltd.

Secondary data

Secondary data are the data that already exists which could be utilized
accordingly. Secondary data for this study are collected through the
organization library, brouchers, reports and from company website.
Data collection tool

Primary data was collected using a well structured questionnaire.


Closed ended questions have been used in the questionnaire. In this closed
ended questionnaire, Richard’s 5 point scale is used.

Population Size:

All the items under consideration in any field of inquiry constitute the
universe or population.

Population size of Mani India Technology is around 200, and we took


the response of 100

SAMPLING PROCEDURE

i. Sampling technique

In this study convenience sampling was done. When the population


elements are selected for the inclusion in the sample based on the ease of the
access, it can be called convenience sampling.

ii. Sample size

The Sample size consists of 100 respondents of Mani India


Technology (P) ltd.

Tools used for data analysis:

The collected information has been processed both manually and with
the help of computers and analyzed suitably.
The following statistical tools are used in this study,

1. Simple percentage analysis.


2. Weighted average
3. correlation

SIMPLE PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS

Simple percentage analysis refers to a ratio, with the help of absolute


figures it will be difficult to interpret any meaning from the collected data,
but when percentages are found out then it becomes easy to find the relative
difference between two or more attributes.

No . of respondent s
Percentage = ×100
Total no . of respondent s

WEIGHTED AVERAGE

Weighted average can be defined as an average whose component


items are multiplied by certain values (weights) and the aggregate of the
products are divided by the total of weights.

X=Σwx/Σw
CORRELATION

This is one of the statistical tools used to measure the relationship


between two or more than two variables. The measure of correlation is
coefficient of correlation.

Of the several mathematical methods of measuring correlation, Karl’s


Pearson method popularly known as pearsonian coefficient of correlation, is
most widely used in practice. The correlation coefficient is popularly
denoted as R.

The correlation coefficient R value should be between -1 to +1. The


value is 0 means there is no relationship between the variables.

The values + ve means there is a positive relationship between the


variables. The value is – ve means there is a negative relationship between
the variables.

Mathematically solved by using this equation,

R= (N ΣDxDy – ΣdxΣDy)/ ((NΣDx2 – (ΣDx) 2) (NΣDy2 – (ΣDy)2))1/2


3.2 Limitations of the study

• The respondents may (team leaders) have a chance to give wrong


information due to personal bias.

• I cannot get exact information because some of the employees are


unwilling to share the information.
CHAPTER 4

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

4.1 Percentage Analysis

Table 4.1.1

Gender Percentage

Number of
S.No Gender respondents Percentage

1 Male 58 58

2 Female 42 42

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.1

Gender Percentage

male
Female

Inference:

In the sampling 58% people are male and 42% people are female.
Table 4.1.2

Experience Percentage
Number of
S.No Year of experience respondents Percentage

1 0–1 68 68

2 1.1 – 2 22 22

3 2.1 – 4 6 6

4 4.1 – 6 4 4

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.2

years of experience

80
68
number of respondents

70
60
50
40 Table 2 Percentage
30 22
20
10 6 4
0
0-1 1.1 - 2 2.1 - 4 4.1 - 6
years

Inference:

From the table it is clear that, 68% of the people are having 0 – 1
years of experience. 4% of the people only are having 4 – 6 years of
experience. Most of the employees are fresher and their recruitment was
based on the Competency. The greater part of this study is to identify the
effectiveness of the competency based recruitment.
Table 4.1.3

Stress tolerance
Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 52 52

2 Above average 40 40

3 Average 8 8

4 Below average 0 0

5 least 0 0

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.3

Stress tolerance

60
52
50
No.of respondents

40
40

30 percentage
20
8
10
0 0
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5 point scale

Inference:

From the above table it is clear that 52% of the respondents are
maximum that the stress tolerance. 40% of the respondents above average
and 8% of the respondents are average of the employees i.e. almost 92 % of
them are able to manage their work related stress.
Table 4.1.4

Self starting and proactive


Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 44 44

2 Above average 32 32

3 Average 22 22

4 Below average 2 2

5 least 0 0

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.4

Self starting and proactive

50 44
number of respondents

40
32
30
22 Percentage
20

10
2 0
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:

The 76% of the sample population have a potential to be self starter


and proactive. This is the good sign of the organization, since most of the
younger population have intent towards self proactive nature. This will
certainly helps the organization to develop new leaders.
Table 4.1.5

Detail consciousness
Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 37 37

2 Above average 30 30

3 Average 20 20

4 Below average 8 8

5 least 5 5

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.5

Detail consciousness

37
number of respondents

40
35 30
30
25 20
20 Percentage
15
8
10 5
5
0
g

g
um

t
av

as
av

av

le
im

w
ov
ax

lo
ab

be
m

5-point scale

Inference:

In spite of the less experience, the sample population have agreed that
they are able to concentrate on the detail consciousness. 67 % of the people
have fall under this category and 20% of them showed neutral response.
Table 4.1.6

Team Player
Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 35 35

2 Above average 25 25

3 Average 20 20

4 Below average 15 15

5 least 5 5

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.6

Team player

40 35
number of scale

35
30 25
25 20
20 15 Percentage
15
10 5
5
0
g

g
g
um

t
av

av

as
av
im

le
e

w
ov
ax

lo
ab

be
m

5-point scale

Inference:

60 % of the people have agreed that they are having good team spirit
and they believe in same. The worrying factor is remaining 40 percent has
neutral and below; being in the knowledge based industry, the people should
have team work. This can be one of the training need for the further
development of the organization.
Table 4.1.7

Software Development Knowledge

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 35 35

2 Above average 26 26

3 Average 19 19

4 Below average 14 14

5 least 6 6

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.7

Software Development Knowledge

40 35
Number of respondents

35
30 26
25
19 Percentage
20
14
15
10 6
5
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale
Inference:

The graph again alarms at the development of the software


development knowledge of the employees. The reason may be lack of ready
to deploy resource from the college; the GAP difference from Academic and
Corporate. In spite of the competency based interview only 61% of the
sample population have agreed fully that they have enough Software
development knowledge.
Table 4.1.8

Numerical interpretation

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 45 45

2 Above average 32 32

3 Average 16 16

4 Below average 7 7

5 least 0 0

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.8

Numerical interpretation

50 45
Number of respondents

40
32
30
Percentage
20 16

10 7
0
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:

Numerical ability is always going to be a very important factor for the


selection of the candidates, particularly when it comes to the Software
industry. Interestingly 77% of the candidates have agreed that they have
enough Numerical ability to perform their job profile.

Table 4.1.9

Programming Knowledge

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 50 45

2 Above average 32 32

3 Average 14 16

4 Below average 4 7

5 least 0 0

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.9

Programming Knowledge

60
50
Number of respondents

50

40
32
30 Percentage
20 14
10 4
0
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:

Similar to the Numerical ability, the programming knowledge of the


employees is a vital for a software company. The competency based
selection has proved that it helps the organization to have competent
resource with sound programming knowledge. 72% of the sample
population have agreed that they have enough programming knowledge.

Table 4.1.10

Knowledge level on Respective Coding concepts, standards and


specification

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 48 48

2 Above average 34 34

3 Average 12 12

4 Below average 6 6

5 least 0 0

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.10

Knowledge on respective

60
Number of respondents

48
50
40 34
30 Percentage
20
12
10 6
0
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:
82% have agreed that they are very well equipped in Coding concepts,
standards and specification to perform a particular job profile. The
recruitment was efficient in hiring these resources with preferred
competence.

Table 4.1.11

Technical skills

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 32 32

2 Above average 34 34

3 Average 22 22

4 Below average 9 9

5 least 3 3

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.11

Technical Skills

40
34
Number of respondents

35 32
30
25 22
20 Percentage
15
9
10
5 3
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:
From the above table it is clear that 34% of the respondents are above
avg that the Technical skills. 32% of the respondents’ maximum to the
above statement, so the technical skills is almost effective.

Table 4.1.12

Programming Skills

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 48 48

2 Above average 34 34

3 Average 12 12

4 Below average 6 6

5 least 0 0

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.12

Programming skills

60
Number of respondents

48
50
40 34
30 Percentage
20
12
10 6
0
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:
From the above table it is clear that 48% of the respondents are
maximum that the programming skills. 34% of the respondents above
average to the above statement, so the programming skills is effective.

Table 4.1.13

Initiative
Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 2 2

2 Above average 18 18

3 Average 40 40

4 Below average 25 25

5 least 15 15

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.13

Initiative

45 40
Number of respondents

40
35
30 25
25
18 Percentage
20 15
15
10
5 2
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale
Initiative: Take voluntary steps to address existing and potential
problems at the work place

Inference:

From the above table it is clear that 40% of the respondents are
average that the initiative. 25% of the respondents above average to the
above statement, so the initiative among the employees only average level.

Table 4.1.14

Time management

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 13 13

2 Above average 40 40

3 Average 29 29

4 Below average 10 10

5 least 8 8

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.14
Time Management

45 40

Number of respondents
40
35
29
30
25
Percentage
20
13
15 10
8
10
5
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:

69% of the population opinion falls between above average and


average on time management. The most of the young population are
struggling to manage time in spite of their very good technical skills and
competency. Again time management of one of the need of the Training

Table 4.1.15

Team spirit

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 38 38

2 Above average 39 39

3 Average 16 16

4 Below average 6 6

5 least 1 1

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.15
Team Spirit

45
38 39

Number of respondents
40
35
30
25
Percentage
20 16
15
10 6
5 1
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5=point scale

Inference:

From the above table it is clear that 39% of the respondents are above
avg that the Team spirit 38% of the respondents maximum to the above
statement, so the team spirit is effective

Table 4.1.16

Flexibility
Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 14 14

2 Above average 37 37

3 Average 23 23

4 Below average 14 14

5 least 12 12

Total 100 100

Chart 4.1.16
Flexibility

40 37
Number of respondents 35
30
25 23
20 Percentage
14 14
15 12
10
5
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:

Flexibility is the factor which is missing, since the 60% of the


opinions falls between Above average and average. The lack of inexperience
and exposure may be the factor for not showing the flexibility at work.

Table 4.1.17

Precision in communication

Number of Percentage
S.No Opinion respondents (%)

1 Maximum 47 47

2 Above average 32 32

3 Average 12 12

4 Below average 8 8

5 least 1 1

Total 100 100


Chart 4.1.17

Precision in communication

50 47
45
40
35 32
30
25 Percentage
20
15 12
10 8
5 1
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least

Inference:

Most of the employees have good understanding of the process and


way they are suppose to communicate with their workers and subordinates.

Table 4.1.18

Committed to responsibilities

Number of
S.No Opinion respondents Percentage (%)

1 Maximum 42 42

2 Above average 36 36

3 Average 10 10

4 Below average 6 6

5 least 6 6

Total 100 100


Chart 4.1.18

Committed to responsibilities

45 42

Number of respondents 40 36
35
30
25
Percentage
20
15 10
10 6 6
5
0
maximum above avg avg below avg least
5-point scale

Inference:

The above graph says that the sample population is committed for the
job and they are willing to perform with commitment. They are very keen on
the responsibilities given to them

4.2 Weighted Average Analysis

Table 4.2.1

Number Of
respondents( Weighted Values
S.No opinion W) value (X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 42 5 210

2 Above average 36 4 144

3 Average 10 3 30

4 Below average 6 2 12

5 least 6 1 0

Total Σw=100 Σwx= 444


Stress tolerance

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 4.44

Table 4.2.2

Self starting and proactive

Number Of Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondents (W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 44 5 220

2 Above average 32 4 128

3 Average 22 3 66

4 Below average 2 2 4

5 least 0 1 0

Total Σw=100 Σwx = 418

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 4.18

Table 4.2.3

Detail consciousness

Number Of Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 37 5 185

2 Above average 30 4 120

3 Average 20 3 60

4 Below average 8 2 16

5 least 5 1 5

Total Σw=100 Σwx=386


Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 3.86

Table 4.2.4

Team Player
Number Of Weighte Values
S.No opinion respondents(W) d value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 35 5 175

2 Above average 25 4 100

3 Average 20 3 60

4 Below average 15 2 30

5 least 5 1 5

Total Σw=100 Σwx=37

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 3.7

1.Personal competencies Weight age Rank

Stress tolerance 4.44 I

Self starting and proactive 4.18 II


Detail consciousness 3.86 III

Team Player 3.7 IV


Inference:

In the personal competencies category, most of the opinions were


favoring towards stress tolerance; most of the employees can able to manage
their stress. The reason may be the location, working environment and
friendly approach form the management.

The least was towards team player and it can be consider as a training
need. So the workshops, training and couching is recommended.

Table 4.2.5

Software Development Knowledge


Number Of Weighted Values
S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 35 5 175

2 Above average 26 4 104

3 Average 19 3 57

4 Below average 14 2 28

5 least 6 1 6

Total Σw=100 Σwx=37


Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 3.7

Table 4.2.6

Numerical interpretation:

Number Of Weighted Value


S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) s (W*X)

1 Maximum 45 5 225

2 Above average 32 4 128

3 Average 16 3 48

4 Below average 7 2 14

5 least 0 1 0

Total Σw=100 Σwx=415

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σxw= 4.15

Table 4.2.7

Number Of Weighted Valu


S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) es (W*X)

1 Maximum 50 5 250

2 Above average 32 4 128

3 Average 14 3 42

4 Below average 4 2 8

5 least 0 1 0

Total Σw=100 Σwx=428


Programming Knowledge:

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 4.28

Table 4.2.8

Knowledge level on Respective Coding concepts, standards and


specification

Number of Weighted Valu


S.No opinion respondents(w) value(X) es (W*X)

1 Maximum 48 5 240

2 Above average 34 4 136

3 Average 12 3 36

4 Below average 6 2 12

5 least 0 1 0

Total Σw=100 Σwx=424

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 4.24

2.Knowledge level Weight age Rank


competencies

Software Development 3.7 IV


Knowledge

Numerical interpretation 4.15 III

Programming Knowledge 4.28 I


Knowledge on Respective 4.24 II
Coding concepts

Inference:

In this knowledge level competency category, least was towards


competency “Software Development Knowledge” – The employees may
have less visualization on the entire software development life cycle process.
The other competencies like Numerical interpretation, Programming
knowledge and coding skill are very impressive.

So again conducting lectures and workshop on the Software


development life cycle may be a good initiative for the development of the
organization.

Table 4.2.9

Technical skills

Number of Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 32 5 160

2 Above average 34 4 136

3 Average 22 3 66

4 Below average 9 2 18

5 least 6 1 6
Total Σw=100 Σwx=383

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 3.83

Table 4.2.10

Programming Skills

Number of Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 48 5 240

2 Above average 34 4 136

3 Average 12 3 36

4 Below average 6 2 12

5 least 0 1 0

Total Σw=100 Σwx=424

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 4.24

Table 4.2.11

Initiative

Number of Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 2 5 10

2 Above average 18 4 72

3 Average 40 3 120
4 Below average 25 2 50

5 least 15 1 15

Total Σw=100 Σwx=267

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw =2.67

Table 4.2.12

Time management

Number of Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondents(W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 13 5 65

2 Above average 40 4 160

3 Average 29 3 87

4 Below average 10 2 20

5 least 8 1 8

Total Σw=100 Σwx=34

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σxw= 3.4


3.Job related skills/ Weight Rank
competencies age

Technical skills 3.83 II

Programming Skills 4.24 I

Initiative 2.67 IV

Time management 3.4 III

Inference:

One of the least weighted average in the entire study is the initiatives
of the employees. Since more than 65% of the employees falls in the
category of less than one year experience, they new employees may not be
have that much stuff to take the initiatives.

The very important factor like the programming skills are showing
good numbers and it is very much necessary for the organization.

Table 4.2.13

Team spirit
Number Weighted Values
S.No opinion no respondents value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 38 5 190

2 Above average 39 4 156

3 Average 16 3 48

4 Below average 6 2 12

5 least 1 1 1

Total Σw=100 Σwx=407

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw = 4.07

Table 4.2.14

Flexibility

Number no Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondents value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 14 5 70

2 Above average 37 4 148

3 Average 23 3 69

4 Below average 14 2 28

5 least 12 1 12

Total Σw=100 Σwx=327

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw= 3.27

Table 4.2.15
Precision in communication

Number of Weighted Values


S.No opinion respondent(W) value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 47 5 235

2 Above average 32 4 128

3 Average 12 3 36

4 Below average 8 2 16

5 least 1 1 1

Total Σw=100 Σwx=416

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw =4.16

Table 4.2.16

Committed to responsibilities

Number of Weigh Values


S.No Opinion respondents(W) ted value(X) (W*X)

1 Maximum 42 5 210

2 Above average 36 4 144

3 Average 10 3 30

4 Below average 6 2 12

5 least 6 1 6

Total Σw=100 Σwx=402

Formulae: X=Σwx/Σw= 4.02


4.Interpersonal and Weight age Rank
leadership
skills/competencies

Team spirit 4.07 II

Flexibility 3.27 IV

Precision n communication 4.16 I

Committed to 4.02 III


responsibilities

Inference:

In this category flexibility is the worrying factor and this will improve
as the organization matures.

4.2 Correlation
4.2.1 To find the correlation coefficient between the
organizational culture of MIT and its productivity of the employee.

FACTORS Maximum Above Average Below Least


average average

Technical skills 32 34 22 9 3
(X)

Programming 46 36 11 6 1
skills (Y)

X Y DX=X-20 DY= Y-20 DX^2 DY^2 DXDY

32 46 12 26 144 676 312

34 36 14 16 196 256 224

22 11 2 -9 4 81 -18

9 6 -11 -14 121 196 154

3 1 -17 -19 289 361 323

100 100 0 0 754 1570 995

R= (N ΣDxDy – ΣdxΣDy)/ ((NΣDx2 – (ΣDx) 2) (NΣDy2 – (ΣDy)2))1/2


=
(5*995 -0)/ ((5*754)-0) (5*1570-0))^1/2 = + 0.012965

Inference:

There is a high degree of positive correlation between the technical


skills and programming skills.
Bibliography

References:

• Human resource management – Bhatla


• Statistical analysis – Statistics for Management – Dr. P.N.
ARORA, Mrs. S. ARORA

Websites:

1. www.citehr.com
2. www.wikipedia.com
3. www.managementparadise.com
4. www.12manage.com
5. www.manisoftinternational.com
6. www.maniindiatech.com
Questionnaire

Personal Details :
Name :

Department :

Current position :

Years of experiences :

Reporting authority :

Competency Mapping

Competencies at Team member level – Software Development

Please ’ what you feel most appropriate tick ‘

Note: 5 – Maximum, 1- Least

1. Personal competencies
1 Stress tolerance: 5 4 3 2 1
Cope up with work strains
that arises as a consequence
of working situations of
targets, deadlines, work load
and pressure from superiors

2 Self starting and 5 4 3 2 1


proactive: Respond to the
needs of the instant
situations voluntarily

3 Detail 5 4 3 2 1
consciousness: Explore into
the necessary details, so as
to get the exact information
needed

4 Team Player: Can 5 4 3 2 1


able to work with the team
and contribute to team out
put
2.Knowledge level competencies
1 Software 5 4 3 2 1
Development Knowledge:
Know each and every Steps
of SDLC Cycle

2 Numerical 5 4 3 2 1
interpretation:
Comfortable with numerical
facts and exercises
quantitative reasoning
effectively to derive solution

3 Programming 5 4 3 2 1
Knowledge: Posses very
good programming
(Software Language Skills)
knowledge

4 Knowledge on Respective 5 4 3 2 1
Coding concepts,
standards and
specification

3. Job related skills/competencies


1 Technical skills 5 4 3 2 1

2 Programming 5 4 3 2 1
Skills: Have excellent
Software coding knowledge
and able to apply this
knowledge to the work for
the effective performance of
the job things

3 Initiative: Take 5 4 3 2 1
voluntary steps to address
existing and potential
problems at the work place

4 Time management: timely 5 4 3 2 1


plan the works
and complete the
task on time to
meet the deadline.

4.Interpersonal and leadership skills/competencies


1 Team spirit: Work 5 4 3 2 1
with the spirit unity and
shares knowledge with one
another

2 Flexibility: Alter 5 4 3 2 1
and deviate individual work
plan to suite to the changing
needs of the organization
and the department

3 Precision in 5 4 3 2 1
communication

4 Committed to 5 4 3 2 1
responsibilities: Exercise
the responsibilities with
trust, sincerity and
commitment