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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

COMMUNITY SERVICES BLOCK GRANT


2012/2013 PROGRAM YEAR COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN COVER PAGE TO: Department of Community Services and Development Attention: Field Operations PO Box 1947 Sacramento, CA 95812-1947 Agency: Address: City: North Coast Opportunities, Inc. 413 N State Street Ukiah, CA 95482

FROM:

Agency Contact Person Regarding Community Action Plan Name: Title: Phone: FAX: E-mail address: Patty Bruder Director of Community Action 707-462-1956 707-467-3213 pbruder@ncoinc.org

Certification Of Community Action Plan And Assurances


The undersigned hereby certify that this agency complies with the Assurances and Requirements of this 2012/2013 Community Action Plan and the information in this CAP is correct and has been authorized by the governing body of this organization.

Board Chairperson Executive Director

Date Date

NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013

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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover page Summary/Checklist Agency Vision and Mission Statements and Strategic Plan Requirement 1. Community Information Profile and Needs Assessment Community Information Profile Community Needs Assessment Requirement 2. 2012/2013 Statewide Priority/Strategy Statement Requirement 3. Federal Assurances Requirement 4. State Assurances Requirement 5. Documentation Of Public Hearings Requirement 6. Monitoring And Evaluation Plan 1 3 4 5 6 27 34 35 42 43 44

NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013

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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013

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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN REQUIREMENTS Summary/Checklist


The 2012/2013 Request for Community Action Plan (CAP) must meet specific requirements as defined by law and are described in detail in this package. The CAP forms, with specific instructions on how to complete each form, are assembled separately for ease in preparing. Once you have completed your CAP, submit to CSD one original document (marked "original") and two copies (marked "copy") no later than June 30, 2011. The following is a checklist of the components to be included in the CAP: CAP Cover Page with appropriate signatures Table of Contents and all CAP pages numbered consecutively Agency Vision & Mission Statements Requirement 1: Community Information Profile and Needs Assessment Requirement 2: Statewide Priority Requirement 3: Federal Assurances (Indicate the applicable assurances) Requirement 4: State Assurances (Indicate the applicable assurances) Requirement 5: Documentation of Public Hearing(s) Requirement 6: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013

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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

AGENCY VISION AND MISSION STATEMENTS and STRATEGIC PLAN The Vision Statement describes a desired future based on your agencys values. The vision is broader than what any one agency can achieve; the agency collaborates with others in pursuit of the vision. Provide your agencys Vision Statement. VISION STATEMENT: Promoting healthy and self-sustaining communities and inspiring individuals to reach their potential. The Mission Statement describes the agencys reason for existence and may state its role in achieving its vision. Provide your agencys Mission Statement. MISSION STATEMENT: To develop and provide services that strengthen our community.
Lake County residents are reeling from the impact of an economic collapse that is unprecedented in our lifetime. The faltering economy threatens the viability of all of our institutions, particularly those that provide services to the vulnerable groups that are least able to advocate for themselves. The urgency of this situation compels communities and the organizations that serve them to undertake a close review of how we, as organizations focused on the needs of the underserved, will do business in new ways in the future. North Coast Opportunities (NCO) views these times as an opportunity to provide more appropriate, effective, and innovative services to the residents of Lake County. As a non-political organization, NCO is uniquely situated to function as a resource to other service providers, convene communities and partner organizations throughout the county, and facilitate non-threatening discussions that map community assets and rethink the ways that we collaborate, partner, and coordinate services. We must put the days of fragmented efforts behind us and collaborate to maximize the benefit of resources that are growing more and more scarce. Instead of splinter groups forming around a cause and creating more divisiveness, we will explore common ground to create unity.

NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013

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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

Requirement 1. COMMUNITY INFORMATION PROFILE AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT


State law requires each CSBG eligible entity to develop a Community Action Plan (CAP) that will assess poverty-related needs, available resources, feasible goals, and strategies to prioritize its services and activities to promote the goals of self-sufficiency among the lowincome populations in its service area. (Government Code 12747(a)) Each CAP shall include the Community Information Profile and Needs Assessment as follows:

1. Community Information Profile: Describes the problems and causes of poverty in the
agencys service area, based on objective, verifiable data and information. (Government Code 12754(a)) Attach the agencys Community Information Profile. This must include corresponding heading (i.e., Community Information Profile), sequence, and description of:

A. Agencys service area in terms of factors such as poverty, unemployment,


educational attainment, health, nutrition, housing conditions, homelessness, crime rates, incidents of delinquency, the degree of participation by community members in the affairs of their communities and/or other similar factors deemed appropriate by the agency. Factors described in the Community Information Profile must be typical for baseline data and substantiated by corroboration gained through public forums, customer questionnaires, surveys of service providers, surveys of potential customers, statistical data, evaluation studies, key informants, anecdotal sources, and/or other sources deemed reliable by the agency.

NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013

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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

Community Information Profile


Acronyms used in this document ABC ADA AOD AODS BEANS CAA CAHSEE CAMP CERT CHIS CHKS CSBG EITC ELA FQHC FMR HPSA HSRFEI LCOE LTA MUA NCO R&R RCCC RCRC ROMA RSVP SSI USDA California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control Americans with Disabilities Act Alcohol and Other Drugs Department of Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drug Services Division Better Education And Nutrition for Students Project Community Action Agency California High School Exit Exam California Campaign Against Marijuana Production Community Emergency Response Team California Health Interview Survey California Healthy Kids Survey Community Service Block Grant Earned Income Tax Credit English Language Arts Federally-Qualified Health Center Fair Market Rent Health Professional Shortage Area Home and School Retail Food Environment Index Lake County Office of Education Lake Transit Authority Medically Underserved Area North Coast Opportunities, Inc. Resource and Referral Program Rural Communities Child Care Redwood Caregiver Resource Center Results-Oriented Management and Accountability System Retired Senior Volunteer Program Supplemental Security Income US Department of Agriculture

OVERVIEW Rural Lake County has been described in very different ways, ranging from the Garden of Eden to the Appalachia of the North Coast. Lake County is located in northern California, a two-hour drive from San Francisco to the south, Sacramento to the east, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. The county is about 100 miles long by about 50 miles wide, with Clear Lake, the largest natural lake lying entirely within California borders, at its center. Lake Countys 64,784 residents occupy an area of 1,258 square miles, resulting in a population density of 51.4 persons per square mile.
Table 1. 2011 population of Lake County and incorporated cities 1 AREA Lake County City of Clearlake City of Lakeport Unincorporated areas POPULATION 64,784 15,289 4,745 44,750

California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit, City Population Estimates (http://www.dof.ca.gov/research/demographic/reports/estimates/e-1/view.php). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 7

Figure 1. Lake County map


State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

Approximately 30% of all Lake County residents live in the countys two incorporated cities Lakeport, the county seat of government, and Clearlake, the countys largest communitywhich are situated 28 miles apart on opposite sides of Clear Lake. Scattered around the lakes 100-mile shoreline and in the surrounding foothills, there are 16 small communities;2 Lake County also has seven Native American Indian settlements lying within its borders.3 These communities include tribal people self-identifying from at least 111 different tribes, including 20 of the states 22 Pomo tribes. The three largest Pomo tribesBig Valley, Middletown, and Robinson Rancheriasall operate casinos. Lake County is surrounded by 4,000-6,000 foot mountain ranges and bordered by Mendocino, Sonoma, Napa, and Colusa counties. Less than 10% of the countys 1,258 square miles of largely mountainous terrain are developed, and approximately half are publicly owned. Lake Countys rugged rural geography, winding two-lane roads, and widely-separated towns limit access to services, including health care, recreation, social support, employment, and even food. The US Department of Agricultures (USDA) interactive food desert locator map4 identifies two Lake County census tracts where there are no nearby supermarkets or large grocery stores. In these areas, there are a total of 2,271 residents with limited access to markets, about 11% of the population in these communities.
Table 2. Food deserts in project area COMMUNITY/CENSUS TRACT Clearlake (06033000800) Lakeport (06033000400) TOTAL POP. 6,616 5,690 12,306 NUMBER WITH LOW ACCESS 1,216 (18.4%) 1,056 (18.6%) 2,271 NUMBER OF LOW-INCOME POPULATION WITH LOW ACCESS 825 (12.5%) 466 (8.2%) 1,291

Lake Countys population is increasing in ethnic diversity. Socially, the population comprises fifthgeneration ranchers and fishermen, transplanted urban professionals, individualists living off the grid in the surrounding hills, and so on. According to the California Department of Finance, 75.9% of county residents are White/non-Hispanic, 16.1% are Hispanic, and 2.6% are Native American Indian. (By contrast, the 2010 Census reported that 3.2% of Lake County residents claimed only Native American Indian race while an additional 2.5% claimed one additional race, for a total Native American Indian population of 5.7%.) Since 2000, the countys Hispanic population has

Blue Lakes, Clearlake Oaks, Cobb, Finley, Glenhaven, Hidden Valley Lake, Kelseyville, Loch Lomond, Lower Lake, Lucerne, Nice, Middletown, Spring Valley, Anderson Springs, Upper Lake, and Witter Springs. 3 Big Valley Rancheria Pomo, Elem Indian Colony of Pomo Indians of the Sulphur Bank Rancheria, Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake, Middletown Rancheria of Pomo and Lake Miwok Indians, Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians, and Robinson Rancheria Pomo Indians. From Lake County Tribal Health Consortium, Needs Assessment (http://www.lcthc.com/human_services.shtml). 4 USDA Food Desert Locator (http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/fooddesert/fooddesert.html). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 8

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

increased from 11.4% and is projected to reach 20.9% by 2020. Although Californians as a whole continue to be younger than the national average, 21% of Lake County residents are over the age of 65 (almost double the statewide rate of 11.2%), and while the total population showed no growth over the past decade, the number of residents over the age of 65 increased by more than 25%, to 21% of the total. The California Department of Finance has projected that this age group will increase by 38% over the next decadeby 2020, seniors will account for a full quarter of all residents.5 One-third (33.9%) of Lake County households include persons 65 years of age or older, and half of the individuals age 65 and older report a disability (50.1%), compared with 40.9% statewide.6 POVERTY AND FAMILY ECONOMICS Lake Countys scenic beauty belies the reality of life faced by many county residents. In 2010, Lake Countys median household income of $34,910 was only 60% that of the statewide median of $57,708, leaving 22.1% of the population living below the federal poverty level.7 In 2009, the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) found that 33% of Lake County families with incomes below 200% of the federal poverty level could not afford enough food. Food stamp enrollment in Lake County has risen by 41% over the past three years, increasing from 2,825 households (11% of all households in the county) in July 2008 to 4,751 households (19% of all households) in July 2011. By comparison, the current state average is just under 14%.8 At 2.96%, bankruptcies in Lake County have tripled since 2007, when there were less than 1%, and foreclosures have also tripled, from 0.48% to 1.55%. Distressed properties (bank-owned, foreclosed, or pre-foreclosed properties) outnumbered voluntary sales two to one in April 2011, and in July there were 215 foreclosure properties listed1 in every 165 housing units in the county.9 Not surprisingly, Lake Countys Economic Stress Index, as of May 2011, stood at 20.51. By contrast, the California Economic Stress Index is 15.07; Lake Countys Economic Stress Index was 9.34 in October 2007.10
Table 3. Comparison of 2009 poverty levels: Lake County and California 11 LIVING IN POVERTY General population Children under age 18 years Children age 5-17 People age 65 and older12 LAKE COUNTY 22.1% 30.7% 28.2% 6.8%% CALIFORNIA 14.2% 19.9% 18.6% 8.4%

Countywide, 68% of Lake County students participated in Free/Reduced Price Meal Programs during the 2010-2011 school year, ranging from a low of 46% in Middletown to 81% in
5

California Department of Finance, Population Projections by Race/Ethnicity and Age Report (http://www.dof.ca.gov/research/demographic/reports/view.php). 6 Area Agency on Aging of Lake and Mendocino Counties, 2008-2009 Area Plan Needs Assessment (www.co.mendocino.ca.us/hhsa/pdf/adult_aaa_areaPlan_summary.pdf). 7 US Census Bureau: Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/saipe/saipe.cgi). 8 California Department of Social Services, Food Stamp Participation and Benefit Issuance Report DFA-256:July 2011 (www.dss.cahwnet.gov/research/res/pdf/DFA256/2011/DFA256Jul11.pdf). 9 Realty Trac, Foreclosure Rate Heat Map (http://www.realtytrac.com/trendcenter/ca-trend.html). 10 Associated Press Economic Stress Index measures the combined impact of unemployment, foreclosures, and bankruptcies (http://hosted.ap.org/specials/interactives/_national/stress_index/). 11 US Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts (http://factfinder2.census.gov). 12 2005-2009 US American Community Survey (http://factfinder.census.gov/home/saff/main.html?_lang=en). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 9

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

Kelseyville, as detailed in Figure 2 below.13 However, according to California Food Policy Advocates, 31% of children eligible for Free and Reduced Price Meal programs are not enrolled.14
Figure 1

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT Lake Countys economy is based largely on tourism and recreation, due to the accessibility and popularity of its numerous lakes and recreational areas and its superior air quality. However, unemployment is high. From a 2000 average of 7%, unemployment rates had increased by 158% by 2010. In July 2011, unemployment stood at 17.5%, ranging from a low of 9.2% in Upper Lake to 25.7% in Clearlake Oaks.15

F Figure 3

In 2008, businesses with one to four employees accounted for 77% of all Lake County establishments. An additional 10% consisted of only five to nine employees. The largest employers in the county are in the sectors of services, including health care and social services, educational services, business management, information, and professional services (45%); retail trade (12%); and construction (12%).16 Service and retail jobs tend to be low paying, part-time, and seasonal, without benefits or stability.
13 14

California Department of Education, School Fiscal Services Division (October 2010 data collection). California Food Policy Advocates, Mendocino County 2010 Nutritional Profile (http://www.cfpa.net/2010CountyProfiles/Main.html). 15 California Employment Development Department, Labor Market Information (http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/). 16 Center for Economic Development, California State University, Chico in Lake County 2009-2010 Economic and Demographic Profile (www.cedcal.com/assets/09-10-Profile-PDFs/Lake-County-2009-10.pdf). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 10

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

EDUCATION School enrollment, currently at 8,734, has decreased steadily since 1998, falling 13% in the past five years alone. The dropout rate for Lake Countys class of 2009-2010 was 19%, compared with 18% statewide.17 There are seven school districts in the countysix linked to individual communities and the Alternative Education Program offered by the Lake County Office of Education (LCOE) for students who have been expelled, are on probation, are habitual truants, have substance abuse issues, or are pregnant or parenting. Together, the school districts operate 40 schools throughout the county. Lake County is also served by two community colleges: Mendocino College operates a campus in Lakeport, and Yuba College operates a campus in Clearlake. The nearest four-year university is Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park. US Census updates show that 86.3% of the Lake County population 25 years and older hold a high school diploma (compared to 80.5% statewide). College degree rates are much lower, with only 16.1% holding a four-year degree, compared with 29.7% statewide.18
TABLE 4. DEMOGRAPHICS IN LAKE COUNTY SCHOOLS, 2010-201119 KINDERGARTEN Total Enrollment African American Native American Indian Asian Hispanic White/not Hispanic Other or Multiple 680 2% 4% 1% 33% 56% 4% ELEMENTARY (GRADES 1-5) 3,108 2% 4% 2% 31% 56% 5% MIDDLE HIGH (GRADES 6-8) (GRADES 9-12) 1,941 3005 2% 3% 4% 4% 2% 2% 27% 25% 59% 64% 6% 2% TOTAL 8,734 2% 4% 2% 28% 59% 5%

At the end of the 2009-2010 school year, 33% of Lake Countys 678 high school graduates met University of California entrance requirements (compared with 35% statewide). Testing conducted in 2010 found that 76% of county tenth graders passed the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) Math component (compared with 83% statewide), and 77% passed the English Language Arts component (compared with 82% statewide). By ethnic group, 73% of Hispanic and 75% of Native American Indian youth passed in Math and 72% of both Hispanic and Native American Indian students passed in English. Other state testing results from the 2010-2011 school year show that 45% of county students achieved proficiency in English and 45% of elementary students achieved proficiency in Math. Among subgroups, only 27% of Native American Indian students and 36% of Hispanic students achieved proficiency in English, and only 32% of Native American Indian elementary students and 44% of Hispanic elementary students achieved proficiency in Math.
Table 5. 2009-2010 education indicators20 INDICATOR Truancy Rate 2008-2009 Adj. Grade 9-12 1-Year Derived Dropout Rate 2008-2009 Adj. Grade 9-12 4-Year Derived Dropout Rate Proficiency in English Language Arts (ELA) and Math
17 18 21

LAKE COUNTY 35.02% 4.3% 16.3% ELA 45% Math 45%

CALIFORNIA 28.15% 5.7% 21.5% ELA 52% Math 48%

California Department of Education DataQuest (http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/). US Census Bureau: State and County Quick Facts (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/). 19 California Department of Education DataQuest (http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/). 20 California Department of Education DataQuest (http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/). 21 Truancy Rate = number of students with 3 or more unexcused absences total enrollment. NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 11

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

INDICATORS OF HEALTH AND FAMILY FUNCTIONING Economic stresses provide a partial explanation for many risk factors that affect the countys 14,300 children and youth. The 2010 Children Now California County Scorecard reports that Lake County children, compared with children in Californias other 57 counties, are in the bottom third of performance on 15 of 25 indicators of child well being, the middle third on 6 indicators, and the top third on only 4 indicators. These findings are detailed in Table 6 below.
Table 6. Children Now 2010 Scorecard22 INDICATOR 1. Children who report very good to excellent health 2. Children who have health insurance 3. Children who see a dentist regularly 4. Newborns who are breastfed exclusively while in the hospital 5. Children with asthma that does not require an Emergency Room visit 6. Middle and high school students who are not at risk for depression 7. Children who are in a healthy weight zone 8. Children who live within walking distance of park or playground 9. Schools that have a school nurse or health center 10. Adolescents who feel connected to an adult 11. Elementary/middle students supervised by an adult after school 12. Elementary and middle school students who feel safe in their school 13. High students who feel safe/have not been victimized at school 14. Children who are safe on and around roads 15. Children with no maltreatment within 6 months of initial report 16. Adolescents who are substance-free 17. Children and youth who are safe from homicide 18. Youth who are arrested but not for violent crimes 19. Women who receive prenatal care by the end of the first trimester 20. Young children who are read to often 21. 3- and 4-year-olds who are enrolled in preschool 22. Children who are not truant 23. Children who feel connected to their school 24. 4th-graders who meet or exceed state standards in English 25. 8th-graders who are enrolled in Algebra 26. 10th-graders who pass the English portion of the CAHSEE
RANKING AND PERCENT
BOTTOM MID TOP

TREND -9% -8% +19% -16% NA +2%


no change

62% 82% 84% 48% 95% 64% 68% 63% 0% 71% 45% 68% 30% 80% 100% 50% 100% 92% 71% 76% NA 59% 39% 53% 71% 74%

-19% NA +1% -10% +5% + 43% +5% +11% -11%


no change

+1%
no change

-24% NA -8% +30% +61% +272% 12%

At 9.5/1,000, substantiated reports of child abuse in Lake County occurred in 2009 at about the same rate as the statewide rate of 9.1/1,000, while the 2009 foster care rate of 13.8/1,000 was higher than all but 1 of Californias 58 counties and nearly double the statewide rate of 6.0/1,000.23 The 2007 Lake County Child Care Needs Assessment reported a net child care gap of 2,361 spaces, with 4,525 children needing care and only 2,137 spaces (47% of the demand) available, excluding after school programs. Child care, especially for younger children, consumes significant amounts of family income. To be affordable, child care should cost no more than 10-13% of family income. Working families making $36,895 (the 2009 median household income) who have two children in child care can easily spend up to $1,000 per month on child care for two children. For a fullyemployed single parent making $8 per hour or $16,640/year (California minimum wage), child care
22 23

Children Now 2010 County Scorecard (http://www.childrennow.org). KidsCount Data Center (http://datacenter.kidscount.org/). 2009 data from California Department of Social Services & University of California at Berkeley, Child Welfare Dynamic Report System. NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 12

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

can account for up to 40% of annual income for full-time licensed care for one preschool child. Unsubsidized child care plus housing can consume the entire income of a minimum wage worker.24 MORTALITY, MORBIDITY, AND HEALTH CARE Like many rural communities, Lake County suffers from a lack of access to health care. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundations County Health Rankings place Lake County lower than all but five other California counties. The rankings are based on a model of population health that emphasizes the many factors that, if improved, can help make communities healthier places to live, learn, work, and play. These include: mortality, morbidity, health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and the physical environment.25 In 2002, the US Health Resources and Services Administration designated Lake County a Medically Underserved Area (MUA). There are also 8 designated Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) for primary health care in the county.26 In 2007-2009, Lake Countys overall age-adjusted death rate of 833.2 per 100,000 population was well above the statewide rate of 647.2 and higher than all but 4 of Californias 58 counties. Diseases of the heart (25%) and cancer (22%) are the leading causes of death, followed by respiratory disease (8%), accidents (6%), and cerebrovascular diseases (6%).27 The county death rate due to cancer (175.9/100,000) is higher than all but 10 counties and 14% higher than the statewide rate of 154. Lake Countys rates of death and statewide rankings for specific diseases are shown below.
Table 7. Lake County deaths by cause, 2007-2009 (Note that higher rankings equate to higher death rates) 28 RANK ORDER 52 7 48 33 11 27 19 51 46 52 56 55 56 CAUSE OF DEATH Lung Cancer Breast Cancer All Cancers Colorectal Cancer Prostate Cancer Diabetes Alzheimers Disease Coronary Heart Disease Cerebrovascular Disease Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis Accidents Drug-Induced Deaths LAKE COUNTY AGEADJUSTED DEATH RATE 55.1 15.5 175.9 14.6 6.8 16.9 27.3 149.3 44.9 56.0 22.3 65.7 32.0 CALIFORNIA AGEADJUSTED DEATH RATE 37.2 21.2 158.6 13.7 21.7 20.3 26.2 128.0 38.4 37.1 10.8 28.7 10.7

According to the Council on Graduate Medical Education, the national commission that publishes physician supply requirements, an appropriate range for overall physician supply is 145-185 patientcare physicians per 100,000 population. With 78 patient-care physicians, 53 of whom are primary care physicians, active in Lake County in 2008, the county had 118 patient-care physicians per 100,000 population. Using the population figure of 64,784, this equates to an approximate ratio of 830 persons per licensed physician (compared with 390 statewide) and 1,228 persons per primary
24 25

California Child Care Portfolio 2009 (www.rrnetwork.org). Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health, 2011 County Health Rankings: (http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/california/lake). 26 Health Resources and Services Administration, US Dept. of Health and Human Services (http://hpsafind.hrsa.gov/HPSASearch.aspx). 27 California Department of Public Health, 2009 Death Records (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/data/statistics/Pages/DeathStatisticalDataTables.aspx). 28 California Department of Public Health (www.cdph.ca.gov/pubsforms/Pubs/OHIRProfiles2011.pdf). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 13

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

care physician, compared with 847 statewide (including practicing physicians specializing in general practice medicine, family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology).29 Lake County organizations work together through a Health Leadership Network to coordinate and improve health care delivery in the county. Core members include: Adventist Health St. Helena, Clearlake Campus Easter Seals of Northern California First Five Lake County Lake County Department of Health Services Lake County Department of Social Services Lake County Office of Education, Healthy Start Lake County Tribal Health Consortium, Inc. Lake Family Resource Center Lakeside Health Center/Mendocino Community Health Clinics Redwood Childrens Services, Inc. Sutter Lakeside Hospital There are two hospitals in Lake County, both of which are Critical Access Hospitals: Sutter Lakeside Hospital in Lakeport and St. Helena Hospital in Clearlake. Lake County also has several clinics, many of which are operated by these hospitals: Lakeside Health Center, a Federally-Qualified Health Center (FQHC), in Lakeport Lake County Tribal Health an FQHC Look-Alike (Lakeport) Sutter Lakeside Hospital Family Medical Clinic (Lakeport) Sutter Lakeside Hospital Medical Clinic (Upper Lake) St. Helena Hospital Family Health Center (Clearlake) St. Helena Hospital Family Dental Clinic (Clearlake) St. Helena Hospital Family Health Center (Middletown) St. Helena Hospital Family Health Center (Kelseyville) St. Helena Hospital Medical Clinic (Hidden Valley Lake) Planned Parenthood (Clearlake) Veterans Affairs Health Care Clinic (Clearlake) Mental health services are provided by the county mental health department, the county office of education, non-profit providers, and five of the clinics listed above.30 With a population that is older and poorer, and with less employer-based health insurance coverage, a larger segment of a rural countys population is dependent upon public programs such as MediCal, Medicare, and Healthy Families. The cost of health care, including dental and mental health services, creates a barrier for people who are not covered by some form of health insurance, which includes many residents who are in small businesses or self-employed. Data collected through the 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) found 13% of the county population uninsured (compared with 14.5% statewide), although only 3% of children 0-18 and 4% of seniors over the age of 60 lacked coverage. As of May 2011, 26.7% reported that they had been uninsured for at least part of the past year and Medi-Cal enrollment in the county stood at 17,124 beneficiaries (26%
29

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health, 2011 County Health Rankings: (http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/california/lake). 30 Lakeside Health Center, Lake Country Tribal Health, St. Helena Family Health Center in Clearlake, St. Helena Family Health Center in Kelseyville, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care Clinic in Clearlake. NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 14

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

of the population).31 As of April 2011, 1,491 children were enrolled in the Healthy Families insurance program.32 NUTRITION AND FOOD SECURITY The 2009 CHIS found that 33% of Lake County residents were not able to afford enough food, meaning they were not food secure, and 14% of Lake County respondents were receiving food stamps (compared with 13.4% statewide).33 Since then, food stamp enrollment has risen to 4,751 households, 19% of all households in the county. Note, however, that California Food Policy Advocates estimates that 33% of eligible California households are not enrolled in the food stamp program.34 Although the reasons eligible people do not apply for food stamps are not well understood, several factors are likely: the stigma associated with utilizing food stamps, misunderstandings about eligibility requirements, and concerns about immigration and other legal issues. At mild and moderate levels, food insecurity contributes to anxiety and worry, and often results in adjusting the household budget to forego other basic needs in order to make sure that family members are fed. Very low food security results in the disruption of eating patterns and reduced food intake. According to Children Now, only 68% of county children are in the healthy weight zone.35 School physical fitness testing found that only 22% of 5th graders, 29% of 7th graders, and 38% of 9th graders met all six of the tested fitness criteria (e.g., aerobic capacity, body composition, abdominal strength, trunk extensor strength, upper body strength, and flexibility).36 Ironically, poverty and food insecurity are associated with increased obesity, due in part to the fact that cheaper and more readily available food is often of lower quality, more processed, and less nutritious. Based on Body Mass Index, 34% of Lake County adults are overweight and an additional 30% are obese (compared with 34% and 23% respectively statewide).37 Lake County has a total of 50,309 adults, 3,421 (6.8%) of whom have diabetes.38 On the 2009 CHIS, 10.5% of county residents reported that they had been diagnosed with diabetes (compared with 8.5% statewide).39 The Lake County Tribal Health Consortium reports a diabetes prevalence rate of 12.1% among its Native American Indian patients. Only two-thirds of Lake County adults meet physical activity guidelines.40 In 2006, economic costs associated with overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity cost Lake County an estimated $78 million due to direct health care costs, workers compensation, absenteeism and presentee-ism (not being productive at work).41
31

California Department of Health Care Services, Research and Analytical Studies Section (RASS: http://www.dhcs.ca.gov/dataandstats/statistics/Pages/RASS_Default.aspx). 32 California Managed Risk Medical Board (MRMIB: http://www.mrmib.ca.gov/MRMIB/HFPReports1.shtml). 33 California Health Interview Survey (2009). 34 California Food Policy Advocates (2010). Improving Access to Food for Low-Income Families: The Food Stamp Program (www.preventioninstitute.org). 35 Children Now 2010 County Scorecard (http://www.childrennow.org). 36 California Department of Education DataQuest (http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/). 37 California Health Interview Survey, 2009 (http://www.chis.ucla.edu). 38 California Diabetes Program, Diabetes in California Counties, 2009 (http://www.caldiabetes.org/content_display.cfm?contentID=1160). 39 California Health Interview Survey, 2009 (http://www.chis.ucla.edu). 40 Find the Best.com (http://county-food.findthebest.com/detail/201/Lake). 41 California Center for Public Health Advocacy (2006). The Economic Costs of Overweight, Obesity, and Physical Inactivity Among California Adults (http://www.publichealthadvocacy.org/costofobesity.html). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 15

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Among children, 64% reported eating 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily, 16% reported drinking two or more sodas or other sugary drinks the previous day, and more than half reported eating fast foods at least once during the previous week.42 Research has shown that the availability of fast food and energy-dense foods (those containing more calories per volume) is greater in lower-income and minority neighborhoods, and that residents in these neighborhoods are more likely to be overweight or obese and have higher rates of diabetes.43 The Home and School Retail Food Environment Index (HSRFEI) is an indicator of the density of food outlets that are less likely to carry healthy foods, such as fresh produce, relative to those that are more likely to have such healthy options available. Communities with a higher HSRFEI number have less healthy food environments, while those with a lower index number have healthier food environments. According to a study reported by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, Lake Countys HSRFEI of 6.2 is slightly lower than the statewide rating of 7.9 but well above the 3.5 rating in neighboring Mendocino County. 44 Although local residents are demonstrating an increasing interest in developing strong localized economies that produce healthy food for local use, this interest is hampered by insufficient local production, which is the greatest gap in the local food system. Other gaps and barriers include: Individual food securityminimal understanding of nutrition and food security and limited access to fresh local produce. Market coordinationlocal production designed for export to other areas, while local markets import food grown in other areas, resulting in undeveloped relationships between local producers, buyers, and consumers. Market analysts say that a single bite of food has traveled, on average, 1,500 miles before it is eaten. Community food securityschool and business policies that inhibit purchasing from local producers, and a workforce that therefore does not consider production for local use a viable economic option. Most of the food sold in Lake County is trucked in from other areas, and food supplies would be unlikely to last for more than a week if deliveries were disrupted. HOUSING In July 2011, the median purchase price of a house in Lake County was $118,890, down 16% from the July 2010 median of $140,770.45 Each year, Lake Countys maximum affordable housing cost falls far below actual local Fair Market Rents (FMR). For 2011, the FMR for a two-bedroom apartment is $908. In order to afford this level of rent and utilities, without paying more than 30% of income on housing, a household must earn $36,320 annually. Assuming a 40-hour workweek, 52 weeks per year, this level of income translates into a Housing Wage of $17.46/hour. However, a minimum wage worker in Lake County currently earns only $8/hour. At this level of income, affordable rent is only $407/month, just over half the FMR. In order to afford the FMR for a twobedroom apartment, a household must include 2.2 minimum wage earners working 40 hours per week year-round, or one wage earner working 87 hours per week at minimum wage. The estimated
42 43

California Health Interview Survey (2009). California Center for Public Health Advocacy (2006). The Economic Costs of Overweight, Obesity, and Physical Inactivity Among California Adults (http://www.publichealthadvocacy.org/costofobesity.html). 44 UCLA Center for Health Policy Research: Babey SH, Wolstein J, and Diamant AL (July 2011). Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Soda and Fast Food. UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. (www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/pubs/files/foodenvpbjuly2011.pdf). 45 California Association of Realtors, Current Sales and Price Statistics (http://www.car.org/marketdata/data/countysalesactivity/). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 16

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average wage for a Lake County renter is $9.05 an hour. In order to afford the FMR for a twobedroom apartment at this wage, the average renter must work 77 hours per week. Or, working 40 hours per week year-round, a household must include 1.9 workers earning the mean renter wage in order to make the two-bedroom FMR affordable. Monthly Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments for an individual are $845 in Lake County. If SSI represents an individuals sole source of income, $254 in monthly rent is affordable, while the FMR for a studio apartment is $595 and a one-bedroom apartment is $697.46 By contrast, in 2008 the Family Economic Self-Sufficiency Standard established Lake Countys self-sufficiency wage for a single adult at $9.36/hour ($1,647/month). (Although this report has not been updated since 2008, the self-sufficiency wage is still higher than the current average renter wage of $9.05/hour.)47 As a result of these discrepancies, many county residents live in substandard housing in remote country areas far from service. Although some people may be living an alternative life style by choice and have adapted systems for their needs, others are living without utilities or running water because they cannot afford a home with these basic amenities. HOMELESSLESS During the 2009-2010 school year, 670 homeless children were identified through the countys school-based McKinney-Vento program, about 7% of the total county enrollment. A comprehensive count of homelessness in the community has not been conducted. However, the community survey conducted by NCO in developing this Community Action Plan identified housing and homelessness among the top five priority needs in the county. CRIME, DELINQUENCY, AND YOUTH ASSETS The 2010 Annual Statistical Report from the Lake County Sheriffs Office cites 48,625 incidents during the year reflecting a total of 5,602 cases, a 3% decrease from the number of cases reported in 2009. Of the total 2010 cases reported, 951 (17.0%) were property crimes, 557 (9.9%) were drug and alcohol crimes, 413 (7.4%) were violent crimes, 36 (0.6%) were sex crimes, and the remaining cases included traffic and misdemeanor citations and miscellaneous service calls. Figure 4 below depicts trends in reported cases over the past six years, from 2005-2010.48
Figure 4

According to the Lake County Sheriffs Office, there are an estimated 200 gang members residing
46

National Low Income Housing Coalition, Out of Reach 2011 Lake County (http://www.nlihc.org/oor/oor2011/data.cfm?getstate=on&getcounty=on&county=203&state=CA). 47 Insight Center for Community Economic Dev. (http://www.insightcced.org/communities/cfess/ca-sss.html). 48 Lake County Office of the Sheriff (http://www.lakesheriff.com/resources/crimestats.htm). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 17

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in Lake County. A recent enforcement sweep coordinated by the Lake County Gang Task Force resulted in five arrests and the seizure of controlled substances and weapons. Agencies contributing to the operation included the Lake County Sheriffs Office, the Lakeport Police Department, the Clearlake Police Department, the Lake County Probation Department, and the US Marshals Service. The operation targeted approximately 30 gang members and conducted 20 probation and parole searches.49 The Lake County Gang Task Forces mission is to gather intelligence on criminal street gangs, street gang members, and their associates and to conduct anti-gang law enforcement. The California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS) measures both internal and external youth assets and protective factors and is administered in alternate years in the countys larger school districts. Compiled district data from 2008-2009 show that only 28% of 9th and 35% of 11th graders scored high in external assets (protective factors) in the school environment, while 65% and 69%, respectively, scored high in assets in the community environment.
TABLE 8. 2008-2009 CHKS DATA FOR 9TH AND 11TH GRADERS50 INDICATORS Student Assets and Resiliency: Percent of students who Scored high in external assets in the school environment Scored high in external assets in the community environment Scored high on the school connectedness scale Felt sad and hopeless every day for 2 weeks and stopped doing usual activities School Safety: Percent of students who Felt very safe at school Have been in a fight at school Have belonged to a gang 9TH GRADE LAKE CO. CALIF. 28% 65% 41% 36% 14% 26% 12% 29% 62% 42% 32% 17% 22% 10% 11TH GRADE LAKE CO. CALIF. 35% 69% 44% 38% 16% 16% 9% 34% 65% 42% 33% 18% 16% 9%

The low level of student assets may be related to the fact that the countys juvenile arrest rate (9,235/100,000 in 2008) is 4th highest in the state. In 2010, Lake County reported 566 juvenile arrests, from a total juvenile population of 7,276. Between 2001 and 2007, the number of juvenile arrests increased by 83%, from 309 in 2001 to 566 in 2007. Of the 2010 arrests, 30 (5.3%) were for violent crimes, 142 (25%) were for other assaults, 98 (17.3%) were for property crimes, 72 (12.7%) were for drug abuse violations and drunkenness, and 43 (7.6%) were for vandalism.51 Substance Abuse Substance abuse is one of the most far-reaching problems in Lake Countythe countys two largest industries are said to be wine and cannabis.52 Lake Countys rugged terrain provides an effective cover for clandestine marijuana cultivation and the production and sale of methamphetamines. Outside elements frequently take advantage of the countys remote wilderness areas to establish commercial operations. Many residents have themselves turned to these illegal activities to supplement low incomes, creating patterns of multigenerational substance abuse and leaving children caught in conflict between home and school values. In 2010, Californias Campaign Against Marijuana Production (CAMP) reported seizing 374,958 plants in Lake County, third highest in the state.53 According to the Lake County Sheriff's Office, arrests for drug offenses have
49 50

Lake County Office of the Sheriff (http://www.lakesheriff.com/resources/crimestats.htm). California Healthy Kids Survey, 2007-2009 (http://chks.wested.org/reports). 51 US Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, FBI Arrest Statistics (http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/ezaucr/asp/ucr_display.asp). 52 Legal Realism (http://legalruralism.blogspot.com). 53 California Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General (http://ag.ca.gov/crime.php). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 18

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decreased since 2005, from 715 to 557 in 2010. In 2010, 232 (42%) of the drug offense arrests were for public intoxication, 121 (22%) were for being under the influence of a controlled substance, 72 (13%) were for marijuana cultivation, and 61 (11%) were for being in possession of a controlled substance.54 In 2009, 69 people were victims of alcohol-related motor vehicle accidents in Lake County, representing a rate that is 17th highest among the states 58 counties.55 Alcohol and drug treatment services are a cost-effective approach to this debilitating social problem. Taxpayers save $7 for every $1 spent on treatment, both through increased productivity and through reduced health care, criminal justice, and social services costs.56 Lake Countys Alcohol and Other Drug Services (AODS) is a division of the Lake County Department of Mental Health Services and provides alcohol and drug abuse prevention, diversion, and treatment services directly and through contracts with local provider agencies. During the 2009-2010 fiscal year, AODS reported that 29.5% of their clients completed treatment, while 52% left treatment before completion while making unsatisfactory progress.57 Overall, admission rates to treatment facilities in Lake County have decreased slightly since 2000. In 2000 there were about 1,122 admissions per 100,000 compared to 1,078 admissions per 100,000 in 2008. Nevertheless, Lake Countys admission rate was higher than the state overall each year. Admissions due to methamphetamine use accounted for 29% of all admissions in 2008. Admissions due to alcohol use accounted for roughly 25% of admissions, marijuana for 39% of admissions, heroin for 1% of admissions, and crack/cocaine for 2%. Admission rates were highest among Native American Indians and African Americans, 2,587 and 2,425 per 100,000 in 2008, respectively. These rates were more than double the rates of every other race/ethnicity group. By age, the highest rate of admissions was for 25 to 34 year olds, with a rate of 2,949 per 100,000 in 2008. The next highest rate was for 18 to 24 year olds with a rate of 1,722 per 100,000, followed by those 17 years and younger at a rate of 1,579 per 100,000.58 In terms of alcohol availability, the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) reports that there were 80 wholesale and off-sale and 228 retail/on-sale alcohol licenses as of June 2011, equal to 1 off-sale outlet for every 810 residents and 1 on-sale outlet for every 284 residents.59 This is well above the density allowed by ABC policy, which has limited the number of retail alcohol licenses since 1939. At present, the ratio is 1 on-sale general license for each 2,000 persons in a county and 1 off-sale general license for each 2,500 persons.60 If Lake County conformed to ABC policy, there would be only 26 off-sale and 32 on-sale alcohol licenses in the county. All of these factors conspire to nurture a widespread culture of acceptance of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use in Lake County. CHKS data show that county rates for most AOD indicators are dismal when compared with other school districts throughout the state. Alcohol is the drug of choice for Lake County youth, as the difference in the rates of alcohol and marijuana use demonstrate. The table
54

Lake County Office of the Sheriff, Crime Statistics by Community, 2010 ((http://www.lakesheriff.com/resources/crimestats.htm). 55 California Office of Traffic Safety (http://www.ots.ca.gov/media_and_research/Rankings/default.asp). 56 National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA): http://archives.drugabuse.gov/NIDA_Notes/NNVol10N2/CAStudy.html. 57 California Outcomes Measurement System as reported by Lake County Tribal Health Consortium (http://www.lcthc.com/human_services.shtml). 58 Center for Applied Research Solutions, Indicators of Alcohol and Other Drug Risk and Consequences for California Counties: Lake County, 2010 (www.ca-cpi.org/docs/County_Data_Files/Lake_10.pdf). 59 California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, Alcoholic Beverage Licenses as of June 30, 2011 (http://www.abc.ca.gov/datport/SubscrMenu.asp). 60 California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, Frequently Asked Questions (http://www.abc.ca.gov/questions/licenses_faq.html). NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 19

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below compares Lake County with statewide CHKS results.


TABLE 9. 2008-2009 CHKS DATA ON SUBSTANCE USE AND PERCEPTION OF HARM BY 9TH AND 11TH GRADERS61 INDICATORS 9TH GRADE LAKE CO. CALIFORNI
A

11TH GRADE LAKE CALIFORNIA CO. 36% 19% 13% 40% 23% 22% 29% 76% 69%

Current use: Percent of students who at least once during past 30 days Had at least one drink of alcohol 42% 27% 43% Smoked marijuana 22% 13% 27% Used tobacco 14% 9% 16% Any AOD use 42% 31% 47% High Risk Patterns: Percent of students who Had 5 or more drinks in a couple of hours 29% 15% 30% Ever drunk or high on school property 22% 15% 28% Ever driven after drinking 30% 23% 23% Perception of Harm: Percent of students who perceive as of Great or Moderate Harm Frequent alcohol use (5+ drinks 1-2x per week) 68% 73% 77% Frequent marijuana use (1-2x per week) 65% 71% 50%

TRANSPORTATION Lake County contains many physical barriers to mobility, but the most prominent barrier is Clear Lake, which lies in the center of the county and occupies 5% of the total land area. Highway 20, on the north shore of the lake, is the main east/west travel route, connecting Lake County with US Highway 101 to the west and Interstate 5 to the east. Highway 29 branches southward along the west side of Clear Lake down to Napa County, and Highway 53 connects Highways 20 and 29 on the east side of the lake. Even in the Cities of Clearlake and Lakeport, streets revert to unpaved, unlit, unmarked roads just blocks from the town centers. Public transportation routes are limited and service ends at 6 pm. Lake Transit Authority (LTA) provides valuable linkages with its fixed route, deviated-fixed route, and paratransit services. These include routes connecting to Ukiah in Mendocino County and seven regional routes connecting the larger Lake County communities. LTA also provides Flex-Stop and other help for the disabled and elderly. However, services are limited with respect to frequency, service coverage, and service span. Geographically, service is focused primarily in Lakeport and Clearlake, and LTA services are not provided in several smaller communities. Reliance on personal vehicles is problematic for a significant number of county residents. Statewide, about 17% of home renters do not have a vehicle available to them. By comparison, Lake County renters with no vehicle access range from a low of 6.8% in Kelseyville to 20% in Clearlake Oaks, 21.7% in the City of Lakeport, 23% in North Lakeport, and 29.6% in the City of Clearlake.62 B. Community resources and services, other than CSBG, which are available in the
agencys service area to ameliorate the causes of poverty.

Throughout Lake County there are a broad range of entities, organizations, and groups that work to alleviate suffering and ameliorate the causes of poverty. North Coast Opportunities (NCO)
61 62

California Healthy Kids Survey, 2007-2009 (http://chks.wested.org/reports). Lake County Department of Transportation, Coordinated Public Transit: Human Services Transportation Plan, 2008 (www.dot.ca.gov/hq/MassTrans/Docs-Pdfs/CoordinatedPlng/LAKE.pdf) NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 20

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Community Action is establishing and will maintain strong connections with these organizations, which include: Local Governments and Agencies Board of Supervisors Mental Health Department, which includes Alcohol and Other Drugs Services Department of Social Services, including the Housing Authority First FIVE Lake (Prop 10 Commission Department of Health Services Code Enforcement Lake County Office of Education Clearlake and Lakeport City Councils Tribal governments Non-Profit Agencies California Human Development Corporation, Community Care, serving individuals with HIV/AIDS Easter Seals of Northern California Hospice of Lake County Lake County Co-op Lake County Health Leadership Network Lake County Hunger Task Force Lake Family Resource Center Lakeport Gleaners Legal Services of Northern California, Inc. Northlake Adult Day Center Northlake Community Services Redwood Coast Regional Center Redwood Empire Food Bank Salvation Army, Goodwill Industries, and Society of Vincent de Paul Sutter Wellness Foundation Thrive! Lake County United Way Local Businesses Numerous small businesses donate food, materials, supplies, use of facilities, trainers, and publicity. Other Community Groups Services clubs (Soroptomists, Lions Club, Rotary, Kiwanis, Random Acts of Kindness and Encouragement) Churches and faith-based groups Parents and Community for Kids Senior centers (Highlands Senior Center, Lakeport Senior Center, Live Oaks Senior Center, Lucerne Alpine Senior Center, Middletown Senior Center) NCO also works within the agency to implement programs and deliver services that ameliorate the causes of poverty, as described below.
Volunteer Programs

Volunteer Network and Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)


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Works with more than 500 volunteers in Lake County who volunteer in 45 Lake County organizations. Working with senior centers and other community partners, volunteers provide support, assistance, companionship, and respite for homebound seniors and/or their care providers since 1980. NCO began its focus on disaster preparedness in 2002, with the initiation of Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) trainings in collaboration with local law enforcement and emergency response agencies. More than 2,000 community members have completed the CERT training, which has been offered more than 40 times in Lake and Mendocino County communities. Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) and Volunteer Network volunteers enrich communities by serving as tutors, senior center workers, drivers, disaster preparedness workers, botanical garden staff, museum and library aides, peer counselors, sheriff sub-station staffers, and many other interesting and challenging positions. Volunteers 55 and older (for RSVP) and all ages (for the Volunteer Network) serve without compensation in non-profit and public community organizations. Foster Grandparent Program The Foster Grandparent Program recruits low-income seniors and partners with local schools to give supportive individual attention to children with special needs. In return, low-income seniors receive a small stipend and travel allowance. Approximately 85 Foster Grandparents serve 20 hours a week, working with nearly 340 children in pre-schools, elementary schools, juvenile detention centers, and residential facilities in Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Mendocino, and Sonoma Counties. The Foster Grandparent Program collaborates with public school districts, pre-school programs, Head Start, Juvenile Hall, and others. Community support is received from a variety of professionals who provide monthly in-service training for volunteers.
Child Development Programs

Head Start, Early Head Start, and State Preschools NCO operates 13 Head Start centers, as well as State Preschools and Early Head Start programs, serving a total of 526 children and their families in sites located throughout Lake and Mendocino Counties. Head Start provides comprehensive early education and support services for poor children ages 3 to 5 and their families. Services are focused on the whole child, including early education addressing cognitive, developmental, and socio-emotional needs; medical and dental screenings and referrals; nutrition services; parental involvement; and referrals to social service providers for the entire family. NCO has also helped to establish on-site gardens and nutrition education for children and parents at many Head Start centers. Early Head Start provides comprehensive early education and support services for poor children ages 3 months to 3 years. NCO has received Head Start funding since 1968 and currently administers $6.1 million in Head Start funds each year. In 2008, NCO received the Head Start Gold Certificate of Excellence for its compliance with federal regulations, an honor awarded to fewer than 10% of Head Start programs nationwide. State Preschool programs are braided with Head Start and general child care funds to create fullday/full-year services for low-income families.
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Rural Communities Child Care (RCCC) Subsidized Child Care Pays childcare costs for low-income parents who are working or going to school. Provides subsidized payments for 865 children in day care and 1,659 children with family day care providers in Lake and Mendocino Counties. Serves children from birth to 13 years. Administers the Centralized Eligibility List that connects eligible families with all subsidized child care options in their county. Manages the Child Care Food Program by providing reimbursements for meals that comply with USDA regulations. Resource and Referral (R&R) Provides free childcare referrals for parents and guardians. Improves the quality of child care through training and technical assistance, providing 200 workshops per year. Delivers support and technical assistance to providers and parents, making more than 50,000 calls to assist parents and providers annually and publishing a quarterly newsletter and community resource directory. Maintains data on licensed child care facilities and unlicensed family child care providers and provides data for child care needs assessments. Administers Trustline, an application and background check service for unlicensed exempt care providers and provides training for applicants. Provides training and on-site monitoring of 100 family child care providers, making an average of 310 visits annually.
Community Action Programs

The focus of NCOs Community Action Agency is to provide innovative solutions to community issues with an emphasis on prevention while working toward family and community self-sufficiency. Programs are designed to address needs specific to local communities while maximizing partnerships and leveraging resources. As the newly-designated Community Action Agency for Lake County, NCO has initiated the following programs and activities: Clearlake Community Food Pantry In October 2011, NCOs Clearlake Community Food Pantry began distributing food items purchased through the Redwood Empire Food Bank to 72 low-income families and individuals in the Clearlake community. NCO is working to secure funding to expand and stabilize the Food Pantry program by securing an appropriate storage and distribution facility and purchasing enough food to expand the Food Pantrys capacity to up to 150 families, with distributions every two weeks. NCO has begun purchasing fresh produce from local farmers for distribution through the Clearlake Community Food Pantry. NCO is coordinating with community partners to conduct outreach and promotion in the community, so that residents are aware of the program, the criteria for participation, and the twicemonthly distribution schedule. NCO ensures that participants meet low-income criteria by requiring
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them to complete family income statements. To provide Food Pantry participants with an opportunity to give back to their community, and to further strengthen the sustainability of the Food Pantry, NCOs Volunteer Network will coordinate volunteer recruitment and volunteer assignments for Food Pantry participants. Lake County Food Distribution Hub NCO is coordinating with the Redwood Empire Food Bank in Santa Rosa and other Lake County food pantries and food banks to arrange delivery of surplus commodities and other foods from Santa Rosa to Lakeport. Leveraging Funds and Serving as Fiscal Agent NCO is developing agreements with Thrive! Lake County, a localization group, and the Health Leadership Network to serve as fiscal agent and/or provide match for their grant-related fundraising efforts. The following section describes programs that NCO is implementing successfully in Mendocino County and will be working to replicate in Lake County. Gardens Project The Gardens Project creates access to local organic produce by organizing and supporting community-supported gardens, partnering with more than 65 low-income neighborhoods, schools, and senior housing developments with existing public gardens or the desire to create new gardens. The Gardens Project works with community gardeners to increase food production, develop new community gardens, and strengthen leadership skills that will lead to lower cost of living and increase health. Community and school gardens contribute to community food security while tackling issues of nutrition and obesity. A USDA grant beginning in September 2011 will develop new gardens and provide leadership training for garden coordinators. Better Education and Nutrition for Student (BEANS) Project BEANS trains teen peer educators to provide interactive nutrition education to students in after school programs in several school districts.
Case Management Programs

Redwood Caregiver Resource Center (RCRC) RCRC helps people cope when a loved one is suffering serious memory or other functional losses resulting from Alzheimers disease or other chronic brain-impairing conditions or injury. RCRC supports the caregivers efforts to keep the impaired individual at home and maintain their quality of their life as long as possible. RCRC assists with care planning, individual and group support, education and training, legal and financial consultations, and respite care. RCRC actively serves 1,500 caregivers who support 1,087 clients in 7 counties: Mendocino, Lake, Humboldt, Del Norte, Solana, Napa and Sonoma. C. The agencys plan for regularly reviewing and revising the Community
Information Profile. In particular, describe how the agency ensures that the most current data and relevant factors are included.

NCO gathered data to develop the Community Information Profile from a variety of primary and
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secondary data sources and assessments. Relationships with agencies throughout the service area provided access to the most recent needs and resource assessments, many of which are conducted on a regular schedule by these agencies. The most relevant local and archival sources used for this Community Information Profile are listed below.
Table 10. Community Information Profile data sources DATA SOURCE Local Data Sources Area Agency on Aging of Lake and Mendocino Counties, 20082009 Area Plan Needs Assessment
(www.co.mendocino.ca.us/hhsa/pdf/adult_aaa_areaPlan_summary.pdf)

CONTENT Senior disability rates Countywide compilation of district data: resiliency, substance abuse, physical fitness, violence Vehicle ownership Community safety indicators Resource and referral program 2011 Community Assessment

California Healthy Kids Survey Report (2008-2009)


(http://chks.wested.org/reports/)

Lake County Department of Transportation, Coordinated Public Transit: Human Services Transportation Plan, 2008
(www.dot.ca.gov/hq/MassTrans/Docs-Pdfs/CoordinatedPlng/LAKE.pdf)

Lake County Office of the Sheriff


(http://www.lakesheriff.com/resources/crimestats.htm)

NCO Rural Communities Child Care NCO Head Start

DATA SOURCE Archival Data and Databases Alcohol Policies Project (http://www.cspinet.org/booze/fas.htm) Associated Press Economic Stress Index
(http://hosted.ap.org/specials/interactives/_national/stress_index/)

CONTENT Fetal Alcoholism Fact Sheet Bankruptcy and foreclosure rates Current Home Sales and Price Statistics The Economic Costs of Overweight, Obesity, and Physical Inactivity Among California Adults. Child care demand and spaces Off-sale alcohol licenses and licensing policies Arrest and incarceration data Academic performance, demographics, physical fitness, enrollment, poverty indicator 2010 participation in free and reduced price meal programs Lake County population estimates and projections Medi-Cal enrollment Crime data, including Campaign Against Marijuana Production data 2011 County Health Status Profiles PAGE 25

California Association of Realtors


(http://www.car.org/marketdata/data/countysalesactivity/)

California Center for Public Health Advocacy (2006). The Economic Costs of Overweight, Obesity, and Physical Inactivity Among California Adults
(http://www.publichealthadvocacy.org/costofobesity.html) California Child Care Portfolio 2009 (www.rrnetwork.org)

California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, Alcoholic Beverage Licenses as of June 30, 2011 (http://www.abc.ca.gov/datport/SubscrMenu.asp) and Frequently Asked Questions (http://www.abc.ca.gov/questions/licenses_faq.html) California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
(http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Juvenile_Justice/Research_and_Statistics/index.html)

California Department of Education/DataQuest


(http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/)

California Department of Education, School Fiscal Services


(Division: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/sh/cw/filesafdc.asp)

California Dept. of Finance, Demographic Research Unit


(http://www.dof.ca.gov/research/demographic/reports/view.php)

California Department of Health Care Services, Research and Analytical Studies Section
(www.dhcs.ca.gov/dataandstats/statistics/Pages/RASS_Default.aspx)

California Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General


(http://ag.ca.gov/crime.php)

California Department of Public Health


(www.cdph.ca.gov/pubsforms/Pubs/OHIRProfiles2011.pdf)

NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

DATA SOURCE California Department of Public Health


(www.cdph.ca.gov/data/statistics/Pages/DeathStatisticalDataTables.aspx)

CONTENT 2009 Death Records California Food Stamp Participation and Benefit Report DFA-256 (July 2011 Diabetes rates Employment and unemployment updates, median housing prices Lake County 2010 Nutritional Profile Health status, behaviors, and conditions; healthcare access and utilization; insurance; demographics; elder health Medi-Cal and Healthy Families enrollment

California Department of Social Services


(www.dss.cahwnet.gov/research/res/pdf/DFA256/2011/DFA256Jul11.pdf)

California Diabetes Program, Diabetes in California Counties, 2009 (http://www.caldiabetes.org/content_display.cfm?contentID=1160) California Employment Development Department, Labor Market Information (http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/) California Food Policy Advocates
(http://www.cfpa.net/2010CountyProfiles/Main.html)

California Health Interview Survey (CHIS)


(http://www.chis.ucla.edu/)

California Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board (MRMIB)


(www.dhcs.ca.gov/dataandstats/statistics/Pages/RASS_Medi-CalBeneficiariesSummaryPivotTableMostRecent24Months.aspx) and (www.mrmib.ca.gov/MRMIB/HFPReports1.shtml)

California Office of Traffic Safety


(http://www.ots.ca.gov/media_and_research/Rankings/default.asp)

Alcohol-related traffic accident data AOD treatment completion Alcohol and drug indicators Lake County 2009-2010 Economic and Demographic Profile 2010 California County Scorecard Of Children's Well-Being Fast food restaurants California Family Economic SelfSufficiency Standard by County 2009 data from California Department of Social Services & UC Berkeley, Child Welfare Dynamic Report System LTA routes Tribal listing and tribal data Cannabis economy Economic benefit of AOD treatment Out of Reach 2011, Lake County Foreclosures and bankruptcies

California Outcomes Measurement System as reported by Lake County Tribal Health Consortium (www.lcthc.com/human_services.shtml) Center for Applied Research Solutions, Indicators of Alcohol and Other Drug Risk and Consequences for California Counties: Lake County, 2010 (www.ca-cpi.org/docs/County_Data_Files/Lake_10.pdf) Center for Economic Development, California State University, Chico (www.cedcal.com/assets/09-10-Profile-PDFs/Lake-County-2009-10.pdf) Children Now (http://www.childrennow.org) Find the Best.com (http://county-food.findthebest.com/detail/201/Lake) Insight Center for Community Economic Development
(http://www.insightcced.org/communities/cfess/ca-sss.html)

Kids Count Data Center (http://datacenter.kidscount.org/) Lake County Department of Transportation, Coordinated Public Transit: Human Services Transportation Plan, 2008
(www.dot.ca.gov/hq/MassTrans/Docs-Pdfs/CoordinatedPlng/LAKE.pdf)

Lake County Tribal Health Consortium, Needs Assessment


(http://www.lcthc.com/human_services.shtml) Legal Realism (http://legalruralism.blogspot.com)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)


(http://archives.drugabuse.gov/NIDA_Notes/NNVol10N2/CAStudy.html) National Low Income Housing Coalition (www.nlihc.org)

Realty Trac, Foreclosure Rate Heat Map


(http://www.realtytrac.com/trendcenter/ca-trend.html)

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and University of Wisconsin 2011 County Health Rankings Population Health Institute, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/california/lake) UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (July 2011). Food Home and School Retail Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Environment Index Soda and Fast Food. UCLA Center for Health Policy Research
(www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/pubs/files/foodenvpbjuly2011.pdf) US Census 2010 (http://factfinder2.census.gov), 2009 American Community Survey (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/), and 2009 Small Area Income/Poverty Estimates (www.census.gov/cgi-bin/saipe/saipe.cgi)

Demographics, population estimates, and poverty data

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State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

DATA SOURCE USDA Food Desert Locator


(http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/fooddesert/fooddesert.html)

CONTENT Food desert data MUPs and HPSAs by State and County. FBI Arrest Statistics

US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration
(http://hpsafind.hrsa.gov/HPSASearch.aspx)

US Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention


(http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/ezaucr/asp/ucr_display.asp)

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2. Needs Assessment: Describes local poverty-related needs, with further identification and prioritization of the eligible activities to be funded by CSBG. It also serves as the basis for the agencys goals, problem statement(s), and program delivery strategy(s). The Needs Assessment should analyze the demographic and economic conditions and other poverty-related factors identified in your Community Information Profile. Attach the agencys Needs Assessment, which must include corresponding heading (i.e., Needs Assessment), sequence, and description of:

Community Needs Assessment Prior to completing this Community Action Plan, NCO conducted a needs assessment survey that was completed by 62 individuals. The survey first asked respondents to indicate the type of organization they represented: 31% represented nonprofits; other sectors with a large number of respondents included county agencies (19%) and schools (12%). The most frequent group served or type of work conducted by respondents was children and youth (33%), followed by community development (19%), business development (17%), and economic development (15%). Responses in the Other category ranged from family violence, to mentoring, to spiritual development, to legal research, and more. Figure 5 below shows the percentage of respondents by sector.
Figure 5

All of the 47 respondents that reported on their service area said that they provide services in Lake County, with 28 (60%) providing services countywide, 10 (21%) serving a specific part of the county, and 9 (19%) serving other Northern California counties as well as Lake County. In response to a question asking respondents to select the top five most pressing concerns confronting Lake County residents, the following issues were those identified most frequently: Unemployment (86%) and underemployment (42%) Alcohol and drug use (76%) Availability of services (24%), access to health care (22%), and transportation (40%) Food security and hunger (51%) and nutrition (27%) Housing (31%) and homelessness (22%)
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Finally, the survey asked respondents to provide suggestions for addressing the concerns they identified. NCO received an impressive number of responses to this question, ranging from the general to the very specific, from countywide strategies to programs for individual communities, and from solutions to further descriptions of needs. Selected responses are shown in Table 11 below and a complete summary is provided in Attachment A. NCO also convened a Creative Thinker Workshop to develop creative and alternative strategies for addressing the issues identified through the survey. The workshop was attended by more than 50 participants, including community leaders as well as NCO Board and staff representatives. A facilitator presented each of the five identified issues separately, asking participants to suggest all possible ideas, and then asked the group how the issues might be addressed through collaborative approaches. Selected responses from this event are also shown in Table 11 below; a complete listing of responses and suggestions is provided in Attachment B.
Comment from Creative Thinker Workshop All of these issues can be addressed via a social development approach that gets at root causes and develops effective multi-level strategies and outcomes designed to shift our culture toward health and well-being. Institutionalization of effective strategies and policies across multiple entities with opportunities for continued feedback, input, and evaluation is essential for long-term success.
Table 11. Selected ideas and suggestions from community survey and Creative Thinker Workshop TOPIC Access and availability of services COMMUNITY SURVEY Build on the current transit schedule to have more access and availability Build light rail around the lake Have health and wellness experts provide free information at schools Affordable and reliable internet access Support for adult day care programs and caregivers Equal access to preschool Provide senior centers with technology to access public meetings, distance learning, and services Provide volunteer credit for donated inkind hours that can be exchanged for use of senior center services Encourage child care sharing CREATIVE THINKER WORKSHOP Reestablish a health clinic in Clearlake Create mobile healthcare services and solar-powered health care ferries Open gym time for youth and adults Reestablish child passenger safety program Hand out prescriptions/food bags at clinics for diabetic and obese patients Advocate for national health care system Provide taxi or fund transportation to medical appointments Have on-call doctor/nurse available Provide translation at the time of visit Create a centralized agency listing Use the lake for transportation Include LTA in Community Action Agency brainstorming meetings

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TOPIC Alcohol and drug use

COMMUNITY SURVEY Strict rules for medical marijuana Resource officers for schools Help people obtain SSI benefits Cut out drug lord operations Drug use education, especially abuse of prescription meds Reach children at very early ages and enlighten them as to what a good/normal home environment should bethat angry/absent adults are not the norm, hunger is not the norm, and its okay to speak with teachers about their needs and fears

Food security, hunger, and nutrition

Develop food pantries with no strings Require fast food establishments to list calorie and fat content Collaborate to develop approaches such as community kitchens Expand existing programs to make more food available Teach people how to plant gardens and utilize home grown foods Create a cafeteria in Clearlake Senior Center that truly provides healthful, low-cost prepared foods for the whole community Shelter and support program for the homeless Acknowledge the homelessness issue Raise awareness of hardships/needs of low-income residents Increase federally-sponsored lowincome housing Build a supportive complex including transitional housing with case management services Develop a Fair Housing Agency that can assist people with housing and rental issues (i.e., landlord/tenant disputes, housing law, etc.)

Housing and homelessness

CREATIVE THINKER WORKSHOP Develop surrogate parent/grandparent programs Provide rehab, classes, and mentoring for inmates Develop space for year-round physical activity Ban billboards that promote AOD Increase funding for SROs Approach wineries for education funding MASK: Mothers Against Stoned Kids Establish youth drop-in centers Offer young adult life skills program Offer a youth leadership program Fund mentoring programs/life coaching Activate court diversion program Create a matrix of Lake County options Increase availability of meat products Support and explore possibilities of food banks/food pantries Develop community/school gardens Fund senior center garden managers Participate in Food Roundtable Meetings Educate people about the importance of a local foods system Have a local bank support farmer loans FFA and the ROP programs Use the volunteer gleaners Build a campaign with local farmers and businesses to sell local produce Restore home economics classes Expand safe houses for students Work with banks to use vacant houses Build a YMCA Continue Habitat for Humanity Sweat Equity Home-Ownership program Hand out tents to the homeless Explore possibility of homeless living on public land Share stories from the homeless Educate homeless people on resources and services available CAA to generate a list of available resources and services in the community

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TOPIC Unemployment and underemployment

COMMUNITY SURVEY Keep jobs local and shop local Dont raise college tuition Fund charters and alternative schools Stop teaching to the testeducate the whole child, including music and arts Modify curricula to incorporate real world experience and critical thinking Provide job training and experience to unemployed youth and adults by repairing county infrastructure Educate about job opportunities other than marijuana cultivation! Create a local living economy and microbusinesses Seek 5 high profit, high margin businesses that can employ at least 100-200 employees each Utilize the incubator business model Integrate environmental sciences and field practices in the core disciplines. Provide literacy tutoring in the senior centers and the jail Start a reading/writing/arithmetic school for community service workers (in lieu of jail time)

CREATIVE THINKER WORKSHOP Alleviate taxes on small business owners Promote time banking Increase EITC returns Increase organizational commitment to local food purchase Educate people about local resources Develop Spanish/English resource listing Create a social entrepreneur university Expand high school career path program Expand ROP program to include viticulture horticulture, health care, volunteerism Mentor younger farmers Provide incentives for businesses to accept apprentices Utilize the high school community service hours for community benefit Develop junior achievement programs Create microbusinesses for students, such as a bakery Develop an urban car share program Connect Lake County Transit with MTA Develop a community bulletin board

A. Assessment of existing resources providing the minimum services listed in Government Code section 12745(f). These services shall include, but shall not be limited to, all of the following:

i. A service to help the poor complete the various required application forms, and
when necessary and possible, to help them gather verification of the contents of completed applications.

NCO assists individuals with information and referral, through Rural Communities Child Care and other programs; offers Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) tax return preparation assistance; and works with other community agencies and organizations to ensure people get the assistance they need to complete various applications. ii.A service to explain program requirements and client responsibilities in
programs serving the poor.

NCO works with various agencies and organizations to ensure that people get the assistance they need to understand requirements and responsibilities. iii. A service to provide transportation, when necessary and possible. The rural isolated nature of Lake County contains many barriers to mobility (including walkability issues). NCO will work with Lake Transit Authority and other agencies to improve and enhance transportation options and promote walking and biking. iv. A service that does all things necessary to make the programs accessible to
the poor, so that they may become self-sufficient.

This is accomplished through program development, client feedback, and partnering and
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collaboration with other agencies. B. Specific information about how much and how effective assistance is being provided to
deal with the problems and causes of poverty. (Government Code 12754(a))

NCO conducts program evaluations, including periodic client surveys and surveys of agencies and other community members, to inform program planning and development. The Community Action Agencys past and current approaches to the problems and causes of poverty have included the following strategies and activities, which are implemented in Mendocino County. Where appropriate and when resources are available, successful strategies will be implemented in Lake County as well. Through the Gardens Project, NCO develops and supports school and community gardens, including Head Start gardens, to increase access to fresh local produce, generate opportunities to increase physical activity, deliver nutrition education, and stimulate income patching activities. Through the Better Education And Nutrition for Students (BEANS) Project, NCO works with high school youth to offer cooking and nutrition classes for students in after school programs, lowincome families served by family resource centers, and residents in other community venues. NCO works in partnership with other organizations to develop job creation programs and opportunities, such as the Solar For All California project that provides free solar installations on low-income homes. Working with local economic development agencies, including the Workforce Development Agency and its One-Stop Career Center in Lakeport and the Employment Development Department, develop creative financing approaches to support local businesses and services. C. Establishment of priorities among projects, activities, and areas for the best and most
efficient use of CSBG resources. (Government Code 12754(a))

Based on survey responses, suggestions developed by Creative Thinker Workshop participants, and alignment with established priorities, NCO has identified a number of potential projects for implementation, with a primary focus on developing and supporting programs that help low-income people to provide for themselves by growing their own food and learning how to provide nutritious meals for their families using locally-grown fruits and vegetables. Strategies in support of these goals are outlined below. Develop and support local food pantries. Support and expand community and school gardens. Strengthen networking and advocacy with local agencies, organizations, and businesses to increase purchase and promotion of locally-produced foods. Create a community education campaign focused on individual and community food security, health and nutritious eating, and benefits of local purchasing. Work with community partners to strategize and support development of local food industries, such as business incubators, food processing facilities, etc. Work with community partners to promote and create opportunities for participation in job training programs that result in an increase in marketable job skills. These may include green jobs training programs (e.g., solar energy, water conservation), organic gardening, or similar topics. Partners may include city governments; the Workforce Investment Board, family resource centers; and community groups interested in job development and retention.
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Coordinate with school districts to support after school programming. Coordinate with family resource centers, senior centers, banks and credit unions, and community volunteers to offer tax preparation assistance to low-income families. Work with local partners to advocate for development of low-income housing units. Partner with the Lake County Hunger Task Force, Lake County Food Roundtable, family resource centers, and local school districts to plan and deliver nutrition education and cooking classes to lowincome children and parents. Work with Thrive! Lake County (a localization group), Lake County Farmers Finest, local governments, and others to advocate for institutional policies that support local economies. Work with Chambers of Commerce, Thrive! Lake County, Lake County Food Roundtable, Lake County Farm Bureau, local farmers, and Lake County Farmers Finest to promote local food production and buy local campaigns. Work with partner organizations to convene local government, community-based organizations, and residents, to discuss new ways to serve vulnerable groups. Continue to recruit, train, support, and recognize volunteers for NCO programs (e.g., Foster Grandparents, Retired and Senior Volunteers, etc.) and other community programs. Continue to partner and collaborate with a wide range of agencies, faith-based organizations, and community groups to develop and strengthen programs that help families and communities to build their capacity for self-sufficiency. Continue to offer fiscal sponsorship in support of local projects, as appropriate. Work to create and strengthen the social networks that empower people to have healthy, secure, and fulfilling lives. D. Process the agency utilizes to collect applicable information as part of the needs
assessment. In particular, describe how the agency ensures that the needs assessment reflects the current priorities of the low-income population in the service area, beyond the legal requirement for a local public hearing of the community action plan.

In addition to the required public hearing, NCO obtains information from community members, including representatives of the low-income population, through community surveys. In order to insure low-income people are included in these surveys, NCO collects surveys in places where groups of low-income people can be found, such as food banks, Head Start Centers, County social services and public health offices, and homeless shelters. In addition, surveys are done through email and distributed by hand in front of grocery stores, laundromats, and other venues. Input is also gathered at various meetings of community organizations, agencies, and committees. E. The agencys plan for periodically reviewing and revising the needs assessment. NCO will update the Community Information Profile, including reviewing recent data and local needs assessments. NCOs relationships with agencies throughout its service area will ensure that the organization has access to the most recent data from assessments that are conducted on a regular schedule by these agencies. Reviewing each assessment as it is released provides NCO with access to the information that is necessary to revise the Community Information Profile on a biannual basis. If it is determined that additional surveys are needed, they are conducted as part of developing the Community Action Plan.

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Requirement 2. 2012/2013 STATEWIDE PRIORITY/STRATEGY STATEMENT Government Code Section 12745(e) The department may prescribe statewide priorities among eligible activities or strategies that shall be considered and addressed in the local planning process and described in the community action plan submitted to the state. Each eligible entity shall be authorized to set its own program priorities in conformance to its own determination of local needs. (Government Code 12745(e)) Does the Agency accept the Family Self-Sufficiency Statewide Priority? (If No, answer question 3) 1. What is your agencys definition of Family Self-Sufficiency? Family self-sufficiency is the ability to achieve a standard of living sufficient to provide: decent, safe housing; secure supplies of nutritious food; health care; stable work, with a career path leading to meaningful and gainful employment; access to educational options suitable for each family member, including developmental child care; access to healthy youth development options; a family safety net, including a savings account and money management skills; and sufficient internal and external assets to give back to the community, at times and in ways determined by each individual. 2. Describe the strategies utilized to support and achieve the Family Self-Sufficiency priority. Self-sufficiency is rarely obtained in a single step. It requires strategies that create ladders out of poverty, strategies that provide the assistance, guidance, and time needed for families to become self-sufficient. The starting point is different for every family. Assistance may include education and job training that lead to a living wage job; programs or projects that assist with stabilizing the family environment through life skills training or child development classes; strengthening skills that assist with cutting financial expenses and improving health, such as cooking classes, participating in a community garden, or growing a family vegetable garden; or supplementing family income through home weatherization or water and energy conservation, which leads to reduced utility bills. NCO recognizes that family self-sufficiency is affected by the communitys vitality. NCO works toward community sustainability through partnerships and collaborations to create innovative, sustainable community economic development, strengthening existing organizations and businesses and increasing connections and access to community services as well as program development. 3. If the agency rejects the statewide priority, state the reason(s) for the agencys rejection. NOT APPLICABLE Requirement 3. FEDERAL ASSURANCES
COATES Human Services Reauthorization Act of 1998: Public Law 105-285 In an attachment, with corresponding headings and sequence (i.e., 1. Section 676(b)(1)
NCO LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 2012-2013 PAGE 34

Yes

No

State of California, Department of Community Services and Development CSBG Community Action Plan CSD 410- Vision (01/11)

(A), vii:), identify and provide a narrative description for the agency activities, as applicable, in accordance with the Federal Assurances 676(b)(1)(A) and 676(b)(1)(B).

1. Section 676(b)(1)(A):
To support activities that are designed to assist low-income families and individuals, including families and individuals receiving assistance under part A of Title IV of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), homeless families and individuals, migrant or seasonal farm workers, and elderly low-income individuals and families, and a description of how such activities will enable the families and individuals i. remove obstacles and solve problems that block the achievement of self-sufficiency (including self-sufficiency for families and individuals who are attempting to transition off of a State program carried out under part A of title IV of the Social Security Act);

NCO will collaborate with agencies, organizations, and community groups to assess community needs and refines and develops activities and programs that assist individuals, families, and the community to become and remain more self-sufficient. NCO utilizes a whole person approach addressing mental, emotional, social, and physical needs.
ii. secure and retain meaningful employment;

NCO will collaborate with appropriate workforce and economic development agencies to build strong local economies shaped by the democratic participation of citizens with the goal of obtaining greater self-sufficiency. NCO also works with community groups to foster a climate of consumer support for local producers and refers clients to employment-related services and resources, such as: on-the-job training supported by DSS; AmeriCorps, which trains and places members in service positions; the One-Stop Career Center, which offers employment counseling, vocational testing, and other services; JobZone, a public-private partnership with the Department of Social Services providing one-stop career center-type services in the Clearlake area for welfare-to-work clients; and Lake County Office of Education, which offers General Education Development (GED) preparation classes and the Career Technical Education Program.
iii. attain an adequate education, with particular attention toward improving literacy skills of low-income families, which may include carrying out family literacy initiatives;

NCO will partner with other agencies to develop and refer people to education and family literacy programs. Key Lake County referral partners will include: Lake County Adult Literacy Program Lake County Office of Education and adult schools operated by local school districts Lake County One-Stop Career Center and JobZone Yuba College (Clearlake Campus) and Mendocino College (Lakeport Campus) AmeriCorps

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iv. make better use of available income;

NCO will partner with other agencies to build life skill components into projects and programs to assist families and individuals with asset development by stretching existing dollars, budgeting, claiming Earned Income Tax Credit, and finding new ways of covering basic needs. NCO partners with others to develop projects through collaborative program development and grant writing.
v. obtain and maintain adequate housing and a suitable living environment;

NCO will participate with housing agencies on committees and other projects that work toward addressing housing needs, including accessing assistance with utility costs.
vi. obtain emergency assistance through loans, grants or other means to meet immediate and urgent family and individual needs; and

NCO will participate with agencies on committees and other projects that work toward addressing emergency needs.
vii. achieve greater participation in the affairs of the communities involved, including the development of public and private grassroots partnerships with local law enforcement agencies, local housing authorities, private foundations, and other public and private partners to: a) document best practices based on successful grassroots intervention in urban areas, to develop methodologies for widespread replication; and b) remove obstacles and solve problems that block the achievement of self-sufficiency, (including self-sufficiency for families and individuals who are attempting to transition off a State program carried out under part A of title IV of the Social Security Act.)

NCO will work directly with community members and groups to develop projects to address community issues. These include bringing law enforcement and housing programs together with community members and involving community members as NCO board members. Developing these relationships builds trust and has positive results. Community members become empowered to advocate for themselves through this process. 2. Section 676(b)(1)(B):
To address the needs of youth in low-income communities through youth development programs that support the primary role of the family, give priority to the prevention of youth problems and crime, and promote increased community coordination and collaboration in meeting the needs of youth, and support development and expansion of innovative community-based youth development programs that have demonstrated success in preventing or reducing youth crime, such as i. programs for the establishment of violence-free zones that would involve youth development and intervention models (such as models involving youth mediation, youth mentoring, life skills training, job creation, and entrepreneurship programs);

NCO will work with at-risk youth to deliver food demonstration and nutrition classes; collaborate with partners to provide leadership training and opportunities; and recruit mentors through the Volunteer Network.

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ii. after school childcare programs.

The Lake County Youth Center in Clearlake, near Redbud Park serves both enrolled and drop-in youth and offers recreation, sports, dances, homework help, computer access, and cultural enrichment, and mentoring. Through NCOs Rural Communities Child Care program, NCO supports parents in need of child care as well as child care providers. 3. Section 676(b)(1)(C):
To make more effective use of, and to coordinate with, other programs related to the purposes of this subtitle (including State welfare reform efforts). Attach a narrative description, with corresponding headings (i.e., 1. Section 676(b) (4):), of the agency activities for each of the Federal Assurances listed below: 1. Section 676(b) (4): Will provide, on an emergency basis, for provision of such supplies and services, nutritious foods and related services, as necessary to counteract conditions of starvation and malnutrition among low-income individuals.

NCO is collaborating with existing agencies that provide emergency support services and implementing the Clearlake Community Food Pantry and the Lake County Food Distribution Hub. NCO has also established multiple community gardens and will work with community gleaner groups that provide food to low-income people and to replicate and/or support these programs in Lake County. NCO has also been a key player in making food stamp purchases possible at many local farmers markets.
2. Section 676(b) (5): Entities will coordinate and establish linkages between governmental and other social services programs to assure effective service delivery to lowincome individuals and to avoid duplication of services and a description of how the State and eligible entities will coordinate the provision of employment and training activities, as defined in section 101 of such Act, in the State and in communities with entities providing activities through statewide and local workforce investment system under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

Partnership, collaboration, and stretching community resources are the NCO way of doing business. NCO has a history of creating new programs that grow and develop and are eventually spun off as independent organizations. NCO staff also sit on boards and advisory committees for a wide variety of local programs and organizations and has well-established relationships with safety net service providers throughout the county.
3. Section 676(b) (6): Will ensure coordination between antipoverty programs in each community in the State, and ensure, where appropriate, that the emergency energy crisis intervention programs under title XXVI (relating to low-income home energy assistance) are conducted in such community.

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NCOs primary strategy to ensure coordination with antipoverty programs is extensive networking with other organizations, including both public agencies, and private non-profits. Poverty-focused partners include: the Department of Social Services, the Hunger Task Force, the California Association of Food Banks, WIC, the Homeless Coalition, Healthy Start, and the McKinney-Vento Homeless Student Program.
4. Section 676(b) (9): Entities will to the maximum extent possible, coordinate programs with and form partnerships with other organizations serving low-income residents of the communities and members of the groups served by the State, including religious organizations, charitable groups, and community organizations.

NCO coordinates and collaborates whenever possible, working with unincorporated community groups and granges as well as more traditional 501(c)(3) organizations. NCO also often serves as the fiscal agent for organizations that are not yet incorporated and works through coordination and partnership to leverage core funding and develop programs that meet the changing needs and priorities of the community.
5. Section 676(b) (10): Each eligible entity to establish procedures under which a low-income individual, community organization, or religious organization, or representative of low-income individuals that considers its organization, or low-income individuals, to be inadequately represented on the board (or other mechanism) of the eligible entity to petition for adequate representation.

NCO recognizes and embraces the tripartite board requirement and has a grievance process for people who wish to be heard on issues regarding programs and/or how programs have been delivered.
6. Section 676(b) (12): All eligible entities will not later than fiscal year 2001, participate in the Results Oriented Management and Accountability System (ROMA), or another performance measure system for which the Secretary facilitated development pursuant to section 678E(b), or an alternative system for measuring performance and results that meets the requirements, and a description of outcome measures to be used to measure eligible entity performance in promoting self-sufficiency, family stability, and community revitalization.

NCO utilizes ROMA outcome-based processes and complies with all reporting requirements, including tracking numbers of clients served and services provided.
7. Section 678D(a)(1)(B): Ensure that cost and accounting standards of the Office of Management and Budget apply to a recipient of the funds under this subtitle.

NCO has a strong accounting department and uses Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, following all federal and state regulations. An annual independent audit verifies compliance with cost and accounting standards.

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8. Section 676(b) (3)(A):

Describe the service delivery system, for services provided or coordinated with funds made available through grants under section 675C(a), targeted to low-income individuals and families in communities within the State.

In October 2011, NCOs Clearlake Community Food Pantry began distributing food items purchased through the Redwood Empire Food Bank to 72 low-income families and individuals in the Clearlake community. NCO is now working to expand and stabilize the Food Pantry program by securing an appropriate storage and distribution facility and purchasing enough food to expand the Food Pantrys capacity to up to 150 families, with distributions every two weeks. To provide Food Pantry participants with an opportunity to give back to their community, and to further strengthen the sustainability of the Food Pantry, NCOs Volunteer Network will coordinate volunteer recruitment and volunteer assignments for Food Pantry participants. NCO is also coordinating with the Redwood Empire Food Bank in Santa Rosa and other Lake County food pantries and food banks to arrange delivery of surplus commodities and other foods from Santa Rosa to Lakeport. Finally, NCO is developing agreements with Thrive! Lake County, a Lake County localization group, and the Health Leadership Network to serve as fiscal agent and/or provide match for their grant-related fundraising efforts. Direct services provided in Mendocino County, demonstrating NCOs service models, include the Gardens Project, nutrition education, and volunteer training. Direct services are included in the job descriptions of NCO staff in each of these programs. Direct services delivered by the Gardens Project include trainings on nutrition, cooking, gardening strategies, and garden start-up for community members and garden leaders; provision of garden inputs such as fertilizer, compost, and fencing; and technical assistance with gardening problems. Nutrition education is provided through the Better Education And Nutrition for Students (BEANS) Program. Through this peer-to-peer program, NCO works with teams of low-income students. Teams are trained in nutrition and cooking, as well as teaching strategies, and then deliver healthy eating demonstrations to students in after school programs. BEANS teams have also provided demonstrations for adults at family resource centers and food banks. The Volunteer Network works with a wide range of community partners to promote volunteer opportunities, recruit volunteers, match volunteers, and provide general volunteer trainings to people who would like to become volunteers. In addition, NCO partners with agencies, community groups, and community members to deliver services.
9. Section 676(b) (3)(B): Provide a description of how linkages will be developed to fill identified gaps in the services, through the provision of information, referrals, case management, and follow-up consultations.

Linkages are developed through a continuum of collaboration and referral efforts with partner agencies.

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10. Section 676(b)(3)(C):

Provide a description of how funds made available through grants under section 675C(a) will be coordinated with other public and private resources.

NCO plans and coordinates its core funding with public and private resources from multiple sources to leverage funding, stabilize programs, and maximize scarce resources. Community Service Block Grant (CSBG) dollars have been used to leverage major grants from federal, state, and foundation funders. Some recent funding that NCO has leveraged with CSBG funds includes the following: A food drive conducted in collaboration with the Unilever Corporation will also provide NCO with a percentage of coupon sales for support of food security programs in Lake County. A food drive being implemented by Sutter Lakeside Hospital will continue throughout the year, with each hospital department coordinating the drive by monthly rotation. Pending funding for Lake County programs includes grant proposals submitted to the Redbud Health Care District, the Walmart State Giving Program, the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program, and the AARP Sustainable Solutions to Hunger Innovations Grant Program. California Department of Public Health ($255,000) for the Better Education And Nutrition for Students (BEANS) Project. USDA Farmers Market Promotion Program ($97,629). MCGROW (Mendocino County Grows new farmers, Renews agricultural skills, Organizes training and capacity building for farmers and market managers, and Works to increase production capacity.) USDA Community Food Project ($300,000). The Gardens Project works with community gardeners to increase food production, develop new community gardens, and strengthen leadership skills that will lead to lower cost of living and increase health. City of Willits ($18,000). In collaboration with the City of Willits through a grant from the Center for Civic Partnership Healthy Cities Program, NCO is working with schools to increase utilization of fresh local produce in school meals. California Department of Food and Agriculture, Specialty Crop Grant Program ($261,000). The Farm2Fork Project will work with local farmers and school districts to get fresh local produce into school meals.

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11. Section 676(b)(3)(D):

Describe how the local entity will use the funds to support innovative community and neighborhood-based initiatives related to the purposes of this subtitle, which may include fatherhood initiatives and other initiatives with the goal of strengthening families and encouraging effective parenting.

Funds are used to support projects that have the greatest chance of impact and that maximize and leverage resources. Many of the projects initiated by NCO involve innovative strategies and innovative partnerships. For example, over the past ten years, NCO/Community Action Agency (CAA) has become a focal point for local food issues, as it has led partners in planning and implementing numerous innovative projects and partnerships to strengthen the local food system.

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Requirement 4. STATE ASSURANCES California Government Code Attach a narrative description, with corresponding headings (i.e., 1. Section 12730(h):), of how your agency is meeting the State Assurances listed below:
1. Section 12730(h): Eligible beneficiaries include: (1) all individuals living in households whose income is at or below poverty income guidelines as defined by the United States OMB; (2) All individuals eligible to receive Temporary Assistance to Needy Families or Supplemental Security Income benefits, and (3) Residents of a target area or members of a target group having a measurably high incidence of poverty.

NCO follows all eligibility guidelines and maintains accurate records of eligibility criteria for each client that receives direct services. Most clients that receive direct support through CSBG dollars are also enrolled through other NCO or community programs. When that is the case the eligibility is documented through that program. However, most of NCOs CSBG funds are focused on collaboration, capacity building, systems change, and community development that enhances the lives of low-income people.
2. Section 12747(a): Community action plans shall provide for the contingency of reduced federal funding. Provide your agencys contingency plan for reduced federal funding. Also, include a description of how your agency will be impacted in the event of reduced CSBG funding.

The 2012-2013 Community Action Plan emphasizes using federal funds to support indirect services to community-based collaborative projects and programs. To the extent that NCO funnels its CSBG funding into indirect services and capacity building, it enables beneficiary agencies to secure funds to operate services. Should CSBG funds be reduced, the NCO Community Action Committee and the Governing Board will convene to review all affected projects and programs. Other appropriate groups, e.g., agency advisory boards and community focus groups, would be invited to assist in this process, with NCOs Governing Board making final decisions.
3. Section 12760: Community Action Agencies shall coordinate plans and activities with other eligible entities funded under Articles 7 (commencing with Section 12765) and 8 (commencing with Section 12770) which serve any part of their communities, so that funds do not duplicate particular services to the same beneficiaries and plans and policies affecting all grantees under this chapter are shaped, to the extent possible, so as to be equitable and beneficial to all grantees and the populations they serve.

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NCO collaborates and coordinates with public and private agencies to develop complementary services and avoid duplication and is committed to utilizing dollars and resources efficiently. The CSBG funding gives NCOs Community Action Director the time and resources to coordinate and collaborate with other service providers, through memberships in collaboratives, planning groups, networks, and via extensive one-to-one contacts.

Requirement 5. DOCUMENTATION OF PUBLIC HEARINGS


Government Code Section 12747(d)

Agencies holding public hearings pursuant to this Article shall identify all testimony presented by the poor, and shall determine whether the concerns expressed by that testimony have been addressed in the Community Action Plan (CAP). If the agency determines that any of the concerns have not been included in the CAP, it shall specify in its response to the CAP information about those concerns and comment as to their validity. (Government Code 12747(d)) This section shall include the following: 1. Attach a narrative description of your agencys public hearing process. Agencies should describe the methods used to invite the local community to the public hearings. Note: Public hearing(s) shall not be held outside of service area(s). 2. One copy of each public notice(s), published in the media to advertise the public hearing. 3. Attach a summary of all testimony presented by the poor and identify the following: Was the testimony addressed in the CAP? (If so, indicate the page). If the testimony was not addressed in the CAP, provide an explanation.
Table 12. Public testimony NAME SECTOR (LOW-INCOME, PRIVATE, PUBLIC) XXX TESTIMONY OR CONCERNS WAS THE CONCERN ADDRESSED IN THE CAP?
PAGE

IF NOT, WHY?

Attach a narrative description of other methods the agency used to gather information on the needs of the community (i.e. surveys, public forums, etc.).

All of the methods used to gather information on community needs have been detailed in earlier sections of this document.

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Requirement 6. MONITORING AND EVALUATION PLAN


Attach a narrative description of the specific method(s) of evaluation, frequency, and monitoring that ensures program and fiscal performance in accordance with the objectives in the agencys Community Action Plan. The monitoring and evaluation plan shall ensure the following:

1.

Data is collected to measure the progress of the agencys goals;

It will be the responsibility of the Community Action Director to collect data and document all work supported by CSBG dollars, including participant numbers and demographics; services provided and units of service; and client satisfaction. The Community Action Committee will periodically review progress to ensure success of the projects and work accomplished through Community Action and propose program revisions as appropriate. 2. Ensure that reports are prepared and submitted to CSD in accordance with contract requirements. The Community Action Director is responsible for ensuring that all program reports are prepared and submitted in a timely manner. The NCO Accounting department is responsible for submitting all fiscal reports. At the time reports are submitted, the Executive Director, Community Action Director, and/or the Chief Financial Officer sign off and approve the reports.

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