The Rockefeller Foundation

Annual Report

1913-14

TEE RO-.-K'.r.'.'.I £E

7- 1935
LIBRARY

The Rockefeller Foundation
61 Broadway, New York
© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

^«1
\we

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

July 6, 1915.
>

To the Trustees of the Rockefeller Foundation:
Gentlemen:— I have the honor to transmit to you herewith a report on the activities of the Rockefeller Foundation and on its financial operations from May 14,1913, the date on which its charter was received from the Legislature of the State of New York, to December 31, 1914, a period of eighteen months and a half. The following persons named in the act of incorporation became, by the formal acceptance of the Charter, May 22, 1913, the first Board of Trustees: John D. Rockefeller, of New York. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., of New York. Frederick T. Gates, of Montclair, N, J. Harry Pratt Judson, of Chicago, 111. Simon Flexner, of New York. Starr J. Murphy, of Montclair, N. J. Jerome D. Greene, of New York. Wickliffe Rose, of Washington, D. C. Charles 0. Heydt, of Montclair, N. J. To the foregoing number have been added by election the following Trustees: Charles W. Eliot, of Cambridge, Mass.1 A. Barton Hepburn, of New York.8
G

Appended hereto are the detailed reports of the Secretary and the Treasurer of the Rockefeller Foundation and of the Director General of the International Health Commission,

JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, JR.,
President.

1 9

Elected January 21, 1914. Elected March 18, 1914.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

To the President of the Rockefeller Foundation: Sir:—
I have the honor to submit herewith my report as Secretary of the Rockefeller Foundation for the period May 14, 1913, to December 31, 1914.

Respectfully submitted,

JEROME D. GREENE,
Secretary.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

CONTENTS
SECRETARY'S REPORT: PAGE
Charter and Organization 7 Principal Funds * 9 International Health Commission . . . . n Investigation of Industrial Relations . . . . 16 Mental Hygiene 21 War Relief 23
Promotion of Cooperation in Missions . . . . 29

Medical Work in China

31

APPENDIX:
I. Officers, Members and Committees: Rockefeller Foundation, 1913 . . . Rockefeller Foundation, 1914 . . International Health Commission, 1913 International Health Commission, 1914 . . . . 37 38 39 40 41 43 49 SB 65 75 86 87 93

Investigation of Industrial Relations . . 40

China Medical Board II. Constitution III. By-Laws IV. Letters of Gift V. Proposed Federal Charter VI. Appropriations VII. Belgian Relief Shipments VIII. Memorandum on Medical Work in China TREASURER'S REPORTS 1913 AND 1914 . . . .
© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

CHARTER AND ORGANIZATION

The Rockefeller Foundation was chartered under the laws of the State of New York on May 14, 1913, the date on which the Act of Incorporation, passed by the Legislature without opposition April 24, 1913, was approved by the Governor.1 The text of the Charter follows:—

AN ACT
To incorporate The Rockefeller Foundation. The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows: Section i. John D. Rockefeller, John D. Rockefeller, Junior, Frederick T. Gates, Harry Pratt Judson, Simon Flexner, Starr J. Murphy, Jerome D. Greene, WicklifFe Rose, and Charles 0. Heydt, together with such persons asthey may associate with themselves, and their successors, are hereby constituted a body corporate by the name of The Rockefeller Foundation, for the purpose of receiving and maintaining a fund or funds and applying the income and principal thereof to promote the well-being of mankind throughout the world. It shall be within the purposes of said corporation to use as means to that end research, publication, the establishment and maintenance of charitable, benevolent, religious, missionary and public educational activities, agencies and institutions, and the aid of any such activities, agencies and institutions already established and any other means and agencies which from time to time shall seem expedient to its members or trustees.
Chap. 4.88, Laws of 1913. For an account of the efforts to secure incorporation by Act of Congress, see Appendix V, page 65. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation
1

8

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

2. The corporation hereby formed shall have power to take and hold by bequest, devise, gift, purchase or lease, either absolutely or in trust for any of its purposes, any property, real or personal, without limitation as to amount or value, except such limitation, if any, as the legislature shall hereafter specifically impose; to convey such property and to invest and reinvest any principal, and deal with and expend the income and principal of the corporation in such manner as in the judgment of the trustees will best promote its objects. It shall have all the power and be subject to all the restrictions which now pertain by law to membership corporations created by special law so far as the same are applicable thereto and are not inconsistent with the provisions of this act. The persons named in the first section of this act, or a majority of them, shall hold a meeting and organize the corporation and adopt a constitution and by-laws not inconsistent with the constitution and laws of this state. The constitution shall prescribe the manner of selection of members, the number of members who shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at meetings of the corporation, the number of trustees by whom the business and affairs of the corporation shall be managed, the qualifications, powers, and the manner of selection of the trustees and officers of the corporation, the manner of amending the constitution and bylaws of the corporation, and any other provisions for the management and disposition of the property and regulation of the affairs of the corporation which may be deemed expedient. 3. No officer, member or employee of this corporation shall receive or be lawfully entitled to receive any pecuniary profit from the operations thereof except reasonable compensation for services in effecting one or more of its purposes, or as a proper beneficiary of its strictly charitable purposes. 4. This act shall take effect immediately.
© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

FUNDS RECEIVED

9

The Charter was duly accepted by the Trustees at their first meeting, held in Room 1409, 26 Broadway, New York City, on May 22,1913. All the incorporators were present, except Mr. John D. Rockefeller, who sent a letter expressing his confidence in the Trustees and his personal regard for them. At the same meeting a Constitution1 and By-Laws2 were adopted, and the following officers were elected: President, John Davison Rockefeller, Jr.; Secretary, Jerome Davis Greene; Treasurer, Louis Guerineau Myers.
FUNDS RECEIVED

At the same meeting the Foundation came into the possession of the first funds to be entrusted to it, in the form of securities amounting in par value to Three million two hundred thousand dollars ($3,200,000), previously given by Mr. Rockefeller in trust to John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Starr J. Murphy, Edward L. Ballard and Jerome D. Greene, Trustees, for purposes identical with those of the Foundation, on the understanding that if the Foundation should become incorporated, the funds should be turned over to it. By subsequent gifts of securities, as of the dates indicated below, Mr. Rockefeller increased the funds of the Foundation to the sura of One hundred million dollars ($xco,ooo,° ooo), Mrs. John D. Rockefeller also gave to
1 8

Appendix II, page 43. Appendix III, page 49. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

see Appendix. JOHN D. oo $48.1913. Cleveland. The several gifts received by the Foundation are enumerated below:1 FROM MR. in trust.00* 65. ROCKEFELLER June 7.178.1914. primarily for certain specified charities.00 Nov. Jr. in securities and accrued income March 6. Income payable at Foundation's discretion to Euclid Avenue Baptist Church.10 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the Foundation. Trustees. 29.00 8. 1913.00 FROM MRS.028. in bonds. LAURA S. ROCKEFELLER May 29. Starr J.46* $100. securities amounting in par value to Forty-eight thousand dollars (#48. Greene. Ohio Dec. 1913.000. Murphy. Edward L.000. Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York $ 8.000.200.000.00 21. 1913. 9. 1913.. in securities and accrued income Total # 3. Rockefeller.000. ii. Income payable to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York Total 1 24.569.569. Income payable^at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Home of Northern Ohio * 8. Ballard and Jerome D.00 For the letters of gift and lists of securities. The values marked * are market values at the time of giftj others are par values. through Messrs.000.1913.54* 10.052. John D.402. page 55.00 Sept. par value June 4.1913. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000. in securities and accrued income June 27.000.000).

physicians.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 11 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION The first meetings of the Rockefeller Foundation. were devoted to the discussion of the policies and lines of work which were likely to present the largest probability of permanent and far-reaching usefulness. partial arrest of physical. county and municipal officers are eager to cooperate in all helpful ways. after its legal organization had been completed. mental and normal growth. accordingly. afforded the surest prospect of such usefulness. the immediate purposes and general aims of which were set forth in the following resolutions: Whereas the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. state boards of health. has found more than two million people in the Southern States to be infected with the disease. to establish the International Health Commission. There was a general agreement that the advancement of public health through medical research and education. organized in 1909 for the eradication of hookworm disease in the United States. involving vast suffering. and that. It was. includingthe demonstration of known methods of treating and preventing disease. and noticeable decrease in economic efficiency over vast regions. following © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . great loss of life. decided at the meeting of June 27. 1913. has found that the people. has ascertained that the diagnosis of the disease can be made with ease and certainty and that it can be readily cured and easily prevented. and Whereas the Commission has treated or caused to be treated more than Eve hundred thousand persons.

and be it further Resolved. inhabited. by more than a thousand million people. and that where it is most severe little or nothing is being done toward its arrest or prevention. that the International Health Commission be authorized to adopt such policies and to employ such agencies as it may deem best adapted for the conduct of the work. as they may associate with themselves. that the infection is being spread by emigration. that this disease has probably been an important factor in retarding the economic. and Whereas the Commission has ascertained by diligent and extensive inquiry that hookworm disease prevails in a belt of territory encircling the earth for thirty degrees on each side of the equator. an intelligent public interest is awakened in hygiene and in modem scientific medicine and in practical measures for permanent public sanitation. that the infection in some nations rises to nearly ninety per cent of the entire population. therefore be it Resolved. consisting of the members for the time being of the Executive Committee of this Foundation and such other persons. and to this ends be it Resolved* that this work be entrusted to a special committee to be called the International Health Commission. social. intellectual and moral progress of mankind. and so far as practicable to follow up the treatment and cure of this disease with the establishment of agencies for the promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine. that this Foundation is prepared to extend to other countries and peoples the work of eradicating hookworm disease as opportunity offers. members of the Foundation or otherwise. according to current estimates.12 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the treatment and cure of this disease. and also to adopt rules and regulations for its © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

C. John A. D. namety the initiation of measures for the eradication of hookworm disease in foreign countries. Mr. Rose © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the President and the Secretary of the Foundation serving ex officio as Chairman and Recording Secretary respectively. Wickliffe Rose. and shall present for approval its budget for the following year. A full report of the operations of the International Health Commission from the time of its establishment to December 13. that at each annual meeting of the Foundation. with a view to the inauguration of the work under the auspices of the several local governments. with the offices of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. and Resolved. Mr. Administrative Secretary of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission for the Eradication of Hookworm Disease. It discloses remarkable progress toward the fulfilment of the immediate object of the Commission. The offices of the Commission were located at Washington. and Dr.. is issued as a separate document. the International Health Commission shall report to the Foundation in detail its operations and expenditures. was appointed Director-General of the International Health Commission. Ferrell was appointed Assistant Director-General.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 13 own government and for the expenditure of such funds as shall be placed at its disposal. A visit by the Director-General to England in the summer of 1913 resulted in a cordial invitation from the Colonial authorities to visit the tropical colonies of Great Britain. 1914.

A plan of work was adopted for St. St. Trinidad. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Ceylon and the Malay States. As a direct consequence of these visits and of the hospitable reception given to the Commission's offer of cooperation. a very substantial achievement has already been made. In spite of the fact that a large amount of time has necessarily been given to preliminary conferences. Lucia. In Ceylon the Government and the Planters' Association inaugurated an experimental demonstration on a small scale. Costa Rica and Guatemala. Egypt. 37.14 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION promptly responded to this invitation by visits to the British West Indies. In the Malay States the consensus of opinion favored the establishment of a commission to inquire into the relative importance of hookworm disease and malaria in accounting for the physical debility of the people.902 persons having been examined. but was deferred on account of the war. and since the period under review a special commission has been appointed to make a study of this problem. the entire cost being met locally. in accordance with the suggestions of Mr. Antigua. In addition to the work undertaken in the British colonies.* Vincent. Nicaragua. surveys and the work of organization. the Commission has responded favorably to invitations from several Central American countries. Grenada and Egypt. Rose. plans were adopted and work begun in British Guiana. and work has been inaugurated in Panama.

But more significant than the number of persons treated has been the establishment of relations of cooperation and mutual confidence between the Commission and the governments and physicians of the communities visited. and at the same time of preventing soil pollution—the only way of preventing the recurrence of the disease. In addition to carrying on its work in foreign countries. This program did not contemplate com. but aimed rather at a comprehensive demonstration in each st^te. it was decided that on account of the very close © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Just before the close of the year under review. the International Health Commission has also undertaken to complete the program of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission for the eradication of hookworm disease in the Southern states. up to December 31. This demonstration is now entering its final stage with the inauguration of the so-called intensive community work whereby. plete eradication under the supervision of the Sanitary Commission.425 persons treated in all the foreign areas. 1914. and secondly of the method of treating and preventing it. it is hoped to show convincingly the possibility of treating every infected person. first of the presence of the disease.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 15 and 19. in a limited number of typical communities in each state. and the resulting stimulation of interest on the part of the common people. whereby the principle of self-help has been steadily maintained.

Chairman. Victor Morawetz. 1915. Professor J. "to consider further the desirability of establishing an Institute for Economic Re© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .16 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION relation necessarily existing between the various activities of the Foundation. consisting of Professor Edwin F. Harry A. Wheeler. INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS At some of the earlier meetings of the Foundation there was informal discussion of the desirability of establishing some organization for the study of social and economic questions. of the University of Virginia. Professor Thomas W. Laurence Laughlin. A number of leading economists were consulted and upon their unanimously favoring the establishment of such an organization. Page. Dean of the Graduate School of Business Administration in Harvard University. Accordingly. arrangements were made whereby the International Health Commission will. Mr. of New York City. a committee was appointed. of Chicago. and especially in view of the relatively large share of attention already given by the Foundation to matters pertaining to public health. before May i. of the University of Chicago. it was important that the offices of the International Health Commission should be in close proximity to those of the Foundation. Gay. and Mr. give up its offices in Washington and occupy quarters assigned to it in the new offices of the Foundation.

if continued and adequately maintained.. After a discussion in which the advantages of a separate organization for economic research and * the possible objections thereto were considered at length. 1914. to make a selection of such problems of economic importance as would in their judgment be advantageously studied through such an agency. the opinion prevailed that no action should be taken at present. with a view to discovering whether such studies. unanimously recommending that studies be initiated and be carried on for a year in some chosen field. would offer a sufficient prospect of fruitful results to justify the establishment of a more permanent bureau or institute. 1914. while the fifth recommended a more limited and concrete problem. L.INVESTIGATION OP INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS " 17 search. and to present an estimate of the approximate Cost of initiating and carrying on the work to be first proposed. under date of August 4.Profitsharing." This Committee reported. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . an Investigation of Industrial Relations had been instituted under the direction of Mr. W. Four of the Committee recommended the subject of Prices as lying at the threshold of a great many important economic problems. such as . especially in view of the fact that since the question of establishing an Institute for Economic Research had been under consideration. This report was considered by the Trustees of the Foundation on October 21. to recommend a method of organization. Mackenzie King.

it must inevitably be on the basis of accurate and well-diffused tinforma* tion in regard to all ascertainable factors in industrial strife and industrial progress. but rather of assembling in a purely objective way. They did believe. and the successful or promising experiments that had been made. It seemed to the Trustees. especially in view of the industrial conflict in Colorado. that the Foundation could do no greater service than by instituting a careful and thorough inquiry into the causes of industrial unrest and maladjustment. much less that it could be found by the isolated efforts of any one agency. that if progress was to be made. however. the Rockefeller Foundation is deliberately attempting to grapple with what it believes to be the most © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . as illustrating both the evils inherent in modern industrial conditions. not of passing judgment upon the merits of any particular controversy. The Trustees of the Foundation were not so sanguine as to hope that any royal road to industrial peace could be found. and with scientific accuracy. but both were actuated by the desire to study the causes of social and industrial unrest. As was said in the public announcement of the Rockefeller Foundation's Investigation of Industrial Relations: "In facing the problem of Industrial Relations. with the object.18 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The two projects were by no* means identical in method or scope. the experience of this and other countries.

and institutions interested in social reform. W. that Act. but also of universities and Governments throughout the world. Mr. Within the field of industrial relations Mr.0 Mr. King was the author of the Canadian Industrial Disputes Investigation Act. he had had a large experience in the settlement of industrial disputes. both before and after the passage of. and by his own constructive contribution to the betterment of labor conditions. and has been devoting his first months to © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to undertake this great' task. and as Deputy Minister and Minister of Labor in Canada. King began his services on October i? 1914. at the same time. by actual contact with labor disputes. but they afford no excuse for inaction. and that the literature on the subject. and for counselling patience in the matter of results. " The first essential in undertaking any research is to find men whose training and experience is such as to offer the greatest possible assurance of productive work. the most urgent question of modern times. and the tried experience of the world. and.INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS complicated. The Foundation is not baffled at the outset by the knowledge that the task hitherto has seemed well nigh hopeless. is so vast as to be overwhelming. of industrial organizations. and it is precisely for this reason that the investigation has been instituted. These may be reasons for a gradual approach. of individuals. and impartially and persistently pursued in the spirit and with the facilities which the Foundation affords. It is hoped that an investigation instituted on the scale. Mackenzie King seemed to be singularly qualified by academic training. L. will gradually win for itself the cooperation. not alone of employers and^ workingmen.

and in which may be found the best prospect of fruitful and beneficial study leading to constructive improvement. in November and December. which was then in session. he will be able. The greater part of the questions asked were embodied in two questionnaires. King's hope that when he has completed his survey .20 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION a careful study of the best possible approach to his subject. This study has included a broad survey of the whole field of industrial relations. organization. A large number of questions were addressed by the Commission to the President and the Secretary of the Rockefeller Foundation. covering the history. with accompanying exhibits. the answers to which. a field so wide as to touch at one point or another almost all conceivable human relations.and prepared a graphic exhibition of his field of study. to select certain lines of inquiry in which a better knowledge of facts is peculiarly needed. in the form of a pamphlet entitled: "Information © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . It is Mr. in consultation with the best authorities throughout the world and in cooperation with established agencies working toward the same end. were published by the Foundation and presented to the Commission. financial resources and activities of the Foundation and its Trustees. 1914. The announcement by the Foundation that it had undertaken the Investigation of Industrial Relations was made the subject of special inquiry by the United States Commission on Industrial Relations.

It has been established beyond any doubt that © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .MENTAL HYGIENE 21 Furnished by the Rockefeller Foundation in Response to Questionnaires Submitted by United States Commission on Industrial Relations. has been that of mental hygiene. and during the month of January the Commission held public hearings in New York City. MENTAL HYGIENE One of the important subjects considered by the Trustees. The Foundation on its side was enabled to put before the Commission and the public a plain statement of the policies governing the Foundation and the work actually accomplished. but it is proper to state that while much attention was given by the questions of the Commission to certain doubts and fears as to the powers of large foundations. it was apparent that supposed dangers of abuse rather than results or tendencies to be found in the acts of the Foundation and its associated Boards seemed to be the object of chief concern. for the confidence and support of public opinion. to which several of the officers and members of the Foundation were summoned as witnesses. and it is to be hoped that these statements pro-0 vided an even more certain basis than had existed before. within the general field of public health." Other questions were asked and answered by correspondence. it will not be set forth here. As the testimony presented at these hearings will be embodied in the report of the Commission.

The Trustees of the Foundation consequently decided to give attention to the subject of mental hygiene. in the hope of determining in what ways they could best contribute to the discovery of needed facts and to the diffusion of the most reliable information by which this important field of public health is to be governed. The recognition of this fact has been a great gain. Thomas W. Salmon. On the other hand. when attempts have been made to determine the precise bearing of these factors on the public health and on social and economic conditions. there has been a tendency to adopt hasty conclusions as to public policy. That Committee had already performed a remarkable service in awakening public opinion in different © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Accordingly. proceeding again as in the case of the Investigation of Industrial Relations. who had been detached from the government service for the last two years to act as Scientific Secretary of the National Committee for Mental Hygiene. of the United States Public Health Service. which conclusions could be justified only by a more accurate knowledge of pathology and of vital statistics than even the best authorities now possess. They were fortunate in securing Dr.22 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION mental defect and mental disease are factors of great social and economic importance. they sought a man whose training and experience conspicuously fitted him to be their adviser in this important field.

custody and treatment of the insane. the duty of the Foundation. It seemed to the Trustees of the Foundation that at this time no greater service could be rendered. than to aid the activities of the Committee for Mental Hygiene. Salmon was appointed a member of the staff of the Foundation. with the understanding that his services for the next two years would be at the disposal of the National Committee for" Mental Hygiene. Dr. on December 30. and primarily for the promotion of State surveys. the result of which has been the diffusion of more rational ideas as to the nature of insanity as a disease that is to a large extent both preventable and curable. within the field of mental hygiene. WAR RELIEF At the meetings of the Executive Committee and of the Trustees of the Foundation following the outbreak of the war. on the basis of existing information. in the face of the disaster which was 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .WAR RELIEF 23 parts of the country to the importance of mental hygiene and in setting up. and in many instances the adoption of more humane and beneficial methods of treatment. more intelligent and humane standards for legislation bearing on the commitment. 1914. Salmon. Accordingly. The Committee has already conducted or aided a number of surveys of institutions for the insane in different States and communities. under the direction of Dr.

and in all parts of the United © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . On August 13. 1914. whose services had been accepted by the medical corps of the French army.24 • THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION overwhelming Europe and exercising a more or less paralyzing effect upon the normal life and intercourse of all nations. to the places where it was most needed. An appropriation was also made to the American Red Cross as a contribution toward the cost of sending physicians and nurses i to Europe. was made the subject of earnest and prolonged consideration. and especially the inhabitants of Belgium. a member of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. two products of modern research with which the studies of the Institute had been associated. an appropriation was made to enable Dr. The world had already been informed of the imminent danger of starvation to which the people of Belgium were exposed. At the meeting of the Trustees on October 21. in a purely humanitarian spirit. Alexis Carrel. and the latter took immediate steps to discover the most practicable measures for bringing prompt relief. resolutions were adopted expressing the sense of the Board that it was urgently desirable that the Rockefeller Foundation should avail itself of such opportunities as might be presented for the relief of non-combatant sufferers from the war in Europe. to meet the urgent need for anti-meningitis serum and anti-dysentery serum. The matter was referred to the Executive Committee.

an outgrowth of an informal committee of Americans. States for the assembling of food supplies and their transportation to Belgium. The Commission for Relief in Belgium. the most convenient port. For this reason it seemed to the Executive Committee that the greatest service the Rockefeller Foundation" could render would be to provide a depot to which gifts in kind from all parts of the country could be sent. The Commission for Relief in Belgium had'not at that time completed its organization of an agency in the Urjited. which had been organized to facilitate the return of American travelers in Europe at the outbreak of the war. Accordingly. had laid the foundations for an efficient organization. and then distributed through Belgium with the sanction of the belligerent powers and the active cooperation of both the German military authorities and the civilian agencies organized for that purpose by the Belgians themselves. whereby the latter Committee exercised the function of soliciting gifts of money and supplies. while the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .-and from which they could be trans-shipped to Belgium. a plan of cooperation was entered into with the Belgian Relief Committee of New York. whereby food supplies contributed from different parts of the world could be assembled at Rotterdam.WAR RELIEF 25 States the generous desires of the American people found expression in offers of help and inquiries as to the best ways of making their help available.

the "Neches.500 tons. so that its re- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the "Agamemnon. November 2. also chartered by the Commission for Relief in Belgium.35.830 tons.644 bushels on the S." chartered by the Commission for Relief in Belgium and dispatched December 23. and the "Massapequa" for a second voyage. 1914. while the Belgian Relief Committee of New York supplied the cargo for the "Agamemnon" and the second voyage of the "Massapequa. The total cost of the food supplies thus given by the Foundation was $981. December 12.800 tons. The Commission for Relief in Belgium having large funds at its disposal which were applicable solely to the cost of transportation. the Foundation supplied 280." 2. the Foundation was subsequently reimbursed for the cost of chartering and loading vessels.S. to provide the necessary depot in New York arid the ships for ocean transportation to Belgium. this offer being limited to supplies received before December 31. December 4. December 31.153. Under this arrangement the following ships were chartered and dispatched by the Rockefeller Foundation and consigned to the Commission for Relief in Belgium: the "Massapequa." In addition.000 bushels of wheat for the " Ferrona.26 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Foundation offered to pay all freight charges when necessary." 5. "Industry." 3. and 23." dispatched January i. Of these ships the "Massapequa" and the "Neches" were loaded with a cargo purchased by the Foundation.

on November 6.WAR RELIEF 27 sources for war relief could be available for supplies. while feeling amply justified by the information available in sending food to Belgium at the earliest possible moment. A table giving the dates of shipments. and was maintained there until 0 February 6. cargoes. will be found in the Appendix (page 86). when its services were no longer required. 10 Bridge Street. so that the Rockefeller Foundation very gladly relinquished in favor of the Commission the function of chartering ships and attending to the details of transportation. Meanwhile the Executive Committee. For the purpose of attending to these details. with head offices in New York City. at No. During December the Commission for Relief in Belgium completed the organization of its American branch. the cost of cargoes so far as met by the Foundation. a temporary office was opened by the Foundation. determined to send a Commission to Europe to inquire generally into the need of relief measures in all the countries con- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . in proximity to the office of the Belgian Relief Committee. and other expenses. Evidence that the effect of the Rockefeller Foundation's large participation in the sending of food to the Belgians was to stimulate rather than to check the generosity of other donors was afforded by the large increase in contributions received by the Belgian Relief Committee of New York.

Wickliffe Rose. rich and poor alike. were dependent upon supplies of food from other countries. a full report on relief in Belgium was transmitted to the Foundation. that the problem of individual relief. Jr. and its essential features were made public. and Mr. they proceeded to Rotterdam and made a thorough survey of the organization and workings of relief in Holland and Belgium. Manager of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. In general the report showed that nearly the entire population of Belgium.28 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION cerned. who was generously given leave of absence by the latter organization. was being attacked with energy. and after a preliminary conference with the American Ambassador and the Commission for Relief in Belgium at the latter's headquarters in London. upon a scale unprecedented in the history of humanitarian efforts of this kind. Mr. The Commission was composed of Mr. The Commission sailed for Europe on November n. public spirit and intelligence by those concerned. On January i. Director-General of the International Health Commission.. so that all who were contributing in the United States and other countries for the relief of the Belgians could be assured that their contributions were being economically and effectively spent for the relief of a people who would otherwise have been forced to the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Bicknell. 1915. Henry James. Ernest P. National Director of the American Red Cross.

An appropriation at the rate of $20. on behalf of representatives of several of the leading foreign missionary boards of the United 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and its recommendations as to the further participation of the Foundation in war relief have been presented for the consideration of the Trustees. PROMOTION OF COOPERATION IN CHRISTIAN MISSIONS At the meeting of the Executive Committee on April 16. A smaller contribution than that involved in the shipment of food supplies and the investigations of the War Relief Commission. The Commission is continuing its work by visiting the theatre of war in Poland and Servia. there was presented through Mr. but one of special significance. for a period of three months. John D. 1914. in view of the importance attached to education and research by the Boards established by Mr.COOPERATION IN CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 29 most desperate extremes of famine. and has subsequently been renewed for a second period of three months. Mott of the International Committee of the Young Men's Christian Association. John R. Rockefeller.000 a year was made effective for this purpose in November. was a contribution to provide moderate stipends for those professors of scientific subjects in the University of Louvain who had been obliged to abandon their own laboratories and had been provided with opportunities of continuing their scientific work in England.

Education. and other activities related to the Annual Conference of North American Foreign Mission Boards. a comprehensive missionary research library. The principal objects in view were the provision of a common headquarters in New York for such united foreign missionary interests as the Committee of Reference and Counsel of the Foreign Mission Boards of North America. by helping to establish a convenient headquarters. and by otherwise aiding in certain cooperative features of their work.30 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION States abatement setting forth in detail a program of cooperation and coordination in foreign missionary work. The Church on the Mission Field. but rather. The Rockefeller Foundation was not asked to enlarge the resources of any one of the participating missionary boards for its own evangelistic work. the Board of Missionary Preparation. the special meetings. such as those on Survey and Occupation. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and requesting the Rockefeller Foundation to make a contribution towardfthe carrying out of this program. the Student Volunteer movement as the recruiting society for all the Boards. through which many of the cooperative activities of these boards could be promoted. the Home Base Committee. the North American section of the Continuation Committee of the Edinburgh Conference and its special committees. and the general promotion of coordination and cooperation among the missionary forces of the world.

a more fraternal and a more efficient conception of their function. MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA During the autumn and winter of 1913 the Trustees became convinced that the crisis in the political and economic development of China rendered the present a most favorable time for the advancement of education in that 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . payable in diminishing annual instalments through a period of ten years. and the training of missionaries at home. to realize a broader. gives every indication that the purposes in view are° being fulfilled. The use actually made of these quarters. The nineteenth floor of the building at No. In response to this application the Rockefeller Foundation pledged to the Committee of Reference and Council a sum not exceeding $25. to give assistance to the missionary boards in an effort. 25 Madison Avenue was secured as headquarters for the work and was thoroughly equipped during the past year.000 to meet the expense of equipping suitable offices for the various interboard and interdenominational foreign missionary activities above mentioned. as reported by the Sub-Committee on Headquarters and Budget of the Committee of Reference and Counsel. and a further appropriation of a sum not to exceed $425.MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA a 31 such as the coordination of educational effort in the foreign field.000. initiated by themselves.

1914. were invited. Peabody. In order that the Trustees might be guided by the best available advice. There was abundant testimony. a conference was held in New York City. Government officials and other competent advisers.32 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION country. and spent four months in a very thorough study of existing medical schools. to which a number of the executive officers of the principal missionary boards employing medical missionaries. The result of that conference was that the Trustees determined to send a Commission to China to study the needs of the country in regard to medical education and public health. The Commission met in Peking about May i. D. page 87. and several medical missionaries and other residents of China who happened to be in this country. of the Harvard Medical School and the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital of Boston. including public and personal hygiene. Greene. Chairman. and in conference with missionaries. 1914. President of the University of Chicago. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and Francis W. based chiefly upon the experience of Christian missionaries. on January 19. in regard to the best means of reinforcing and adding to the important work *See Appendix VIII. United States Consul General at Hankow. as well as the treatment of disease. 1914. Roger S. that one of the greatest needs of China was that of the benefits of modern medicine.* In February.. the following Commission was appointed: Harry Pratt Judson. M. hospitals and dispensaries in China.

Greene was appointed Resident Director in China. The result of this consideration was the establishment of the China Medical Board of the Rockefeller Foundation. for the purpose of considering the report in detail. subject to such modification as experience should show to be necessary. and Dr. Executive Secretary of the General Education Board. Sage Secretary. which were formally adopted as a working program. 1914. During the short period following the establishment of the China Medical c Board. Wallace Buttrick. A fifth month was devoted to the preparation of an elaborate report of the observations. Eben C. for the purpose of carrying out the recommendations of the Commission. 1914. Roger S. findings and recommendations of the Commission. and of the most cordial cooperation with the missionary boards and other agencies which have already carried on medical work in China. An adjourned meeting was held November 5. its officers have been engaged in preliminary conferences looking toward the initiation of its work in China on the basis of the fullest possible utilization of existing institutions and equipment. and its report was presented to the Trustees at their meeting of October 21. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . was appointed Director of the China Medical Board. and Mr. The President of the Foundation was elected Chairman of the Board. Dr.MEDICAL WORK IN^CHINA 33 already done in the field of medical education and public health.

84 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Appended hereto will be found lists of the officers. Rockefeller. and Mrs. John D. and the Treasurer's Statement for the years 1913 and 1914. a complete list of appropriations made to December 31. Secretary. Respectfully submitted. JEROME D. members and committees of the Rockefeller Foundation and its subsidiary organizations. GREENE. the Constitution and By-Laws of the Foundation. the several letters of gift received from Mr. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .1914. the text of the proposed Federal Charter.

APPENDIX 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Frederick Taylor Gates To serve until the annual meeting of IQI5 Harry Pratt Judson Starr Jocelyn Murphy Simon Flexner WicklifTe Rose To sens until the annual meeting of 1914 Jerome Davis Greene Charles Otto Heydt 37 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Chairman £tarr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Nominating Committee Starr Jocelyn Murphy Wickliffe Rose Members To serve until the annual meeting of 1916 John Davison Rockefeller John Davison Rockefeller.. MEMBERS and COMMITTEES THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 1913 President JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. JR.. Jr. Chairman Simon Flexner Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Charles Otto Heydt Finance Committee John Davison Rockefeller. Jr. Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE v Treasurer LOUIS GUERINEAU MYERS Assistant Treasurer HARRY POTTER FISH Executive Committee John Davison Rockefeller.APPENDIX I OFFICERS. Jr.

JR..38 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 1914 Presideni JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. Frederick Taylor Gates To serve until the annual meeting ofxoij Harry Pratt Judson Simon Flexner Starr Jocelyn Murphy 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .1914} Executive Committee John Davison Rockefeller. Jr. Chairman Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Nominating Committee Frederick Taylor Gates Harry Pratt Judson Starr Jocelyn Murphy Members To serve until the annual meeting of 101? Charles William Eliot Wickliffe Rose Jerome Davis Greene Alonzo Barton Hepburn Charles Otto Heydt To serve until the annual meeting of 1016 John Davison Rockefeller John Davison Rockefeller. 1014) Assistant Treasurer LEFFERTS MASON DASHIELL (Appointed March 18. Jr. Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE Treasurer LOUIS GUERINEAU MYERS Assistant Treasurer HARRY POTTER FISH (Resigned March 18. Chairman Simon Flexner Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Charles Otto Heydt Finance Committee John Davison Rockefeller. Jr..

. Recording Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE Director WlCKLIFFE ROSE Assistant Director JOHN ATKINSON FERRELL Executive Committff John Davison Rockefeller.THE INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 39 THE INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 1913 Chairman JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. JR. Jr. and the following: Wickliffe Rose To serve until the annual meeting of iffij Frederick Taylor Gates To scree wiiil tlte annual tneeting of 1916 William Henry Welch Walter Hines Page To sent until the annual meeting 0/1917 Charles William Eliot David Franklin Houston William Crawford Gorgas 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Chairman Simon Flexner Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Charles Otto Heydt Members The members of the Executive Committee of the Rockefeller Foundation. ex ojjitio.

1I Wh. Walter Hawthorne Rowan Director fo. and the following: To sene unlit the annual meeting of 10x5 Frederick Taylor Gates To serve until the annual meeting ofioitS William Henry Welch Walter Hines Page Wlckliffe Rose To serve until the ettnual meeting of 1017 Charles William Eliot David Franklin Houston William Crawford Gorgas FIELD STAFF Director for the East Dr. Henry Rose Carter. the West Indies Dr.„„. Hector Haldbrook Howard Substitute Director for Trinidad Dr. Benjamin Earl Washburn Director for Nicaragua Dr. Louis Schapiro Director for Guatemala Dr.. Dr.. Joseph H. ex-officio. JR. Platt Walker Covington INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Director William Lyon Mackenzie King 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . . (Resigned) r. Recording Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE Dirfctor General WlCKLIFFE ROSE Assistant Director General JOHN ATKINSON FERRELL Director of Surveys and Exhibits ERNEST CHRISTOPHER MEYER Members The members of the Executive Committee of the Rockefeller Foundation. „ J D .40 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 1914 Chairman JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. Daniel Murrah Molloy Substitute Director Dr. Director for Costa Rica Dr. Victor George Heiser Director for Latin America _ T J .„.te Director for Panama Dn Lewis Wenddl Hackett Director for Costa Rica Dr.. Jr.

Chairman WALLACE BUTTRICK Director ROGER SHERMAN GREENE Resident Director in China EBEN CHARLES SAGE Secretary To serve until ike annual meeting of 1916 Harry Pratt Judson Frederick Taylor Gates Francis Weld Peabody Starr Jocelyn Murphy To serve until the annual meeting of IQI? William Henry Welch Jerome Davis Greene John Davison Rockefeller. Wickliffe Rose To serve until the annual meeting of 1918 John R. Jr.CHINA MEDICAL BOARD 41 CHINA MEDICAL BOARD JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. JR. Mott Wallace Buttrick Simon Flexner Frank J. Goodnow 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

John D. Simon Flexner. equal numerically. viz. New members. the members of the second class until the second annual meeting. and the members of the third class until the third annual meeting. Frederick T. Any member may withdraw from the Corporation by a notice in writing to the President or Secretary. Harry Pratt Judson. Gates. The members shall be at all times divided into three classes. Jerome D. by vote of a majority of the members of the Corporation attending such meeting. Starr J. be divided into three classes. being Chapter 488 of the laws of 1913 of the State of New York. At 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and such additional members as they or their successors shall see fit to associate with them. Rockefeller. or as soon thereafter as may be convenient. either at the annual meeting of the Corporation or at a special meeting duly called for that purpose. shall be elected by ballot. whether as successors to those named in the Act of Incorporation or otherwise. Heydt. Murphy.. as nearly as may be. John D. Wickliffe Rose. Greene. Rockefeller. and in every case the member shall hold office after the expiration of his term until his successor shall be chosen. Junior. the members of the first class to hold their membership and office until the first annual meeting.CONSTITUTION 43 APPENDIX II CONSTITUTION OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ARTICLE I Members HE members of the Corporation shall consist of the •*• persons named in the first section of the Act to incorporate The Rockefeller Foundation. and Charles O. and the original members shall at their first meeting. together with such persons as they may associate with themselves. and their successors.

If and when the number of members shall be less than nine.44 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION each annual meeting the successors to those members whose terms of office then expire shall be chosen for the term of three years and until their successors shall be chosen. incapacity to act. his successor shall be chosen to serve for the remainderof his term and until his successor shall be chosen. until the number shall be not less than nine. All the powers of the Corporation shall be exercised by its members. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and the election of any person as a member of the Corporation shall constitute him a trustee. but no act of the Corporation shall be void because at the time such act shall be done the members of the Corporation shall be less than nine. ARTICLE III Trustees The number of trustees by whom the business and affairs of the Corporation shall be managed shall be the same as the number of members. subject to the provisions of this Constitution and the By-Laws to be adopted. In case any member shall by death. and all of the members of the Corporation shall be its trustees. in addition to the powers specified in this Constitution and in such By-Laws. cease to be a member during his term. delegate to other officers or to committees of their own number such powers as they may see fit. the members remaining shall have power to add. ARTICLE II Quorum A majority of the members of the Corporation shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at meetings of the Corporation. and they may. or otherwise. resignation. and shall add to their number. by general resolution.

together with such other officers as may be determined by the By-Laws. ex-officio. All the officers. but in no case beyond the time when their respective successors shall be elected and accept office. in default of election at such meeting. except as herein otherwise provided. He shall appoint all committees unless otherwise ordered by the Corporation. These officers shall have the duties and exercise the powers assigned to them by this Constitution or by the By-Laws. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . In his absence. and it may choose such other officers as the By-Laws shall from time to time provide. In the absence or disability of the President he may by written instrument appoint a member of the Corporation to discharge such of his functions as he may assign to such appointee. At each annual meeting of the Corporation or. Secretary and Treasurer. or by resolutions adopted pursuant to the authority of this Constitution or the By-Laws. The President. He shall preside at all meetings of the Corporation at which he shall be present. He shall sign for the Corporation all deeds and other agreements and formal instruments. then at an adjournment thereof. Secretary and Treasurer. the members of the Corporation present shall appoint one of their own number to preside. the Corporation shall elect by ballot a President. ARTICLE V President The President shall sustain an executive and advisory relation to the work and policies of the Corporation similar to that usually sustained by the chairman or president of commercial bodies. whether elected or appointed.CONSTITUTION 45 ARTICLE IV Officers The officers of the Corporation shall consist of a President. shall be a member of all committees. or at any meeting duly called for that purpose. shall hold office at the pleasure of the Corporation.

46 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION- ARTICLE VI Treasurer The Treasurer. He shall be the medium of communication with the Corporation. He shall give notice of and attend all meetings of the Corporation. He shall not pay any money except in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws. or the authority of the Executive Committee. and other books. subject to such regulations as may from time to time be prescribed by the Corporation. He shall keep proper books of account. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . He shall be ex-officio a member of all committees except as herein otherwise provided. and shall also have the disbursement of its money. He shall have the custody of the corporate seal* He shall keep the records of all committees of which he is a member. shall have the custody of the funds and securities of the Corporation. showing at all times the amount of funds belonging to the Corporation. Immediately upon the election and appointment of members he shall give notice to them of their election or appointment. which shall be at all times open to the inspection of the members of the Corporation. and attesting the same. ARTICLE VII Secretary The Secretary shall conduct the correspondence of the Corporation except as otherwise provided in the By-Laws or by resolution of the Corporation. At each meeting he shall present an account showing in detail the receipts of the property belonging to the Corporation and of all disbursements thereof since his last report. taking minutes of the proceedings and transcribing them in a book provided for that purpose. or as provided by resolution of the members of the Corporation. including all bonds. deeds and other papers and documents relating to such property.

and the names and places of residence of the persons who have been admitted to membership in the Corporation during such year. or by a majority of the Trustees. . appropriations or expenditures have been made. At this meeting the Trustees of the Corporation shall present a report. other than Mr. stated meetings of the Corporation shall be held on the Wednesday next preceding the fourth Thursday of May and October in each year. and where and how invested. and the purposes. such absence. appropriated or expended during the year immediately preceding such date. All meetings shall be held at such time and place in the City of New York. John D. shall ipso facto 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . showing the whole amount of real and personal property owned by the Corporation. shall be absent from three consecutive stated meetings. Rockefeller. the^ amount and nature of the property acquired during the year immediately preceding the date of the report. The President or any three members of the Corporation may call a special meeting of the Corporation by not less than five days' written notice given by the President or the Secretary. which report shall be filed with the records of the Corporation and an abstract thereof entered in the minutes of the proceedings of the annual meeting. or elsewhere. of the Corporation in the City of New York. and the manner of the acquisition. objects or persons to and for which such applications. unexcused. where located. as the Corporation shall from time to time order or direct. If any member of the Corporation. In the absence of such direction. verified by the President and Treasurer.CONSTITUTION 47 ARTICLE VIII Meetings The annual meeting of the Corporation shall be held on the Wednesday next preceding the fourth Thursday of January in each year. or the members calling such meeting. the amount applied. the meetings shall be held at the office. In addition to the annual meeting.

ARTICLE X Amendments This Constitution may be altered or amended by a majority vote of the members present at any duly called meeting of the Corporation. provided that written notice has been sent to every member of the Corporation at least ten days in advance of the date of meeting. Any member of the Corporation may by writing or telegram appoint any other member of the Corporation to act as his proxy at any one or more specified meetings of the Corporation. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . stating specifically the proposed amendment. ARTICLE IX Committees The Corporation may by By-Laws provide for such committees and may delegate to such committees such power as it shall deem wise.48 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ' be deemed a resignation of membership of the Corporation. and the vacancy so caused shall be filled as herein provided.

The Executive Committee shall be elected by the Corporation at the annual meeting by ballot. notes or other forms of investment held by the Corporation. it may deem proper for its own government and for the transaction of business of which it may have charge. This Committee shall have power to make investments and to change the same. The President and Secretary shall not be ex-officio members of this Committee. from time to time. all the members of this Committee shall be consulted when this is reasonably practicable. fo making investments or changes of investments. or any rights or privileges that may accrue thereon. except those specifically vested in the Finance Committee as herein provided. and may from time to time sell any part of the bonds. reporting its action to the Corporation at the next meeting. The Executive Committee may fill vacancies in its own number or in the Finance Committee in the interim of the Corporation meetings. shares. ARTICLE II There shall be a Finance Committee consisting of three members of the Corporation.BY-LAWS 49 APPENDIX III BY-LAWS OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ARTICLE I HpHERE shall be a standing committee of three mem-•• bers of the Corporation who with the President and Secretary shall be the Executive Committee. to be elected by the Corporation at the annual meeting by ballot. The Committee shall elect its Chairman and shall make such rules and regulations as. It shall direct and control the purchase of all supplies and the audit of all bills. but 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . This Committee shall have and may exercise all the powers of the Corporation when the Corporation is not in session. which are not herewith otherwise provided for. A quorum for the transaction of business shall consist of three members.

50 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the Committee shall be deemed to be in continuous session. and such other officers as may be deemed necessary. ARTICLE IV The Corporation at any stated meeting. The same person may be appointed to hold two or more of said offices. The Committee shall elect its Chairman and shall make such rules and regulations as from time to time it may deem proper for its own government and for the transaction of business of which it may have charge. and also regarding members or officers to be chosen to fill vacancies which may occur during the year. and shall have such powers and be subject to such restrictions as shall be set forth in the resolution appointing them. a cashier. and may act without formal notice of meeting. the Executive Committee may by resolution appoint one or more assistant treasurers. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . It shall be the duty of this Committee to make recommendations regarding members. All such officers shall hold office at the pleasure of the Corporation. to be elected by the Corporation each year at the October meeting by ballot. one or more* assistant secretaries. ARTICLE III There shall be a Nominating Committee consisting of three members of the Corporation. The President and the Secretary shall not be ex-officio members of this Committee. and the joint action of any two members shall be valid and binding. or at any special meeting called for that purpose or when the Corporation is not in session. It shall keep regular minutes of its meetings and shall make report to the members of the Corporation of all investments and changes of investments made by it. officers and elective committees who are to be elected at the annual meeting next ensuing. but in no case beyond the time when their respective successors shall be elected and accept office.

which voucher shall be signed by the Secretary or by such of the Assistant Secretaries as shall be designated by resolution of the Corporation or the Executive Committee. The securities of the Corporation shall be deposited in some suitable safe deposit vault or vaults approved by the Executive Committee. A current expense account of not to exceed Five thousand dollars ($5. who shall be bonded at the expense of the Corporation for such sum as the Executive Committee shall fix. No bills shall be paid except those which have been incurred pursuant to a resolution of the Corporation or under the authority of the Executive Committee. Treasurer. and such bills shall be paid only on a voucher approving the same for payment and referring to the specific resolution or authorization pursuant to which they were respectively incurred. Assistant Treasurer. Access to the vaults may be had and the contents thereof may be withdrawn by members of the Corporation. the Treasurer. which shall be subject to draft upon the signature of the Cashier of the Corporation.000) on deposit at any one time may be opened with such depository as may be designated by the Executive Committee.BY-LAWS 51 ARTICLE V The Treasurer shall deposit the funds of the Corporation m such banks or trust companies as may from time to time be designated by the Executive Committee. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Such deposits of funds shall be made subject to draft only on the signatures of any two of the following officers: President. provided that there shall always be two of the foregoing present. and such member of the Corporation as the President shall designate in writing for that purpose. the Assistant Treasurer and such of the Assistant Secretaries as shall be designated for that purpose by resolution of the Corporation or the Executive Committee.

viz. Treasurer and Assistant Treasurer and members of the Finance Committee shall have authority to execute under seal such form of transfer and assignment as may be customary or necessary to constitute a regular transfer. passed by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all those who shall at the time be members of the Foundation at a special meeting held on not less than thirty days' notice given in writing to each member of the Foundation which shall state that 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with full power of substitution. whether general or special.: President. ARTICLE VII Notices All notices required by these By-Laws. ARTICLE VIII No part of the principal of the funds of the Foundation shall be distributed except pursuant to a resolution. appointing such person or persons as they shall deem proper to represent and vote the stock owned by the Corporation at any and all meetings of stockholders. of any stocks or other registered securities standing in the Corporation's name. And a Corporation transferring any such stocks. Either the President or the Treasurer may execute and deliver on behalf of the Corporation from time to time proxies on any and all stock owned by the Corporation.52 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ARTICLE VI Any two of the following pet-sons. and to alter and rescind such appointments at such time and as often as they see fit. or otherwise. for the purpose of the Corporation. shall be in writing and shall be either personally delivered or mailed to the members of the Corporation at their addresses as entered in the office of the Secretary of the Corporation. Secretary. or other registered securities pursuant to a form of transfer or assignment so executed shall be fully protected and shall be under no duty to inquire whether or not the Finance Committee has taken action in respect thereof.

provided that written notice has been sent to every member of the Corporation at least ten (10) days in advance of the date of meeting.BY-LAWS 53 the meeting is called for the purpose of considering a resolution to authorize the distribution of the whole or some part of the principal of its funds. ARTICLE IX Amendments These articles may be altered or amended by a majority vote of the members present at any duly called meeting of the Corporation. stating specifically the proposed amendment. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

200. January 6. Three million two hundred thousand dollars ($3.LETTERS OF GIFT 55 APPENDIX IV LETTERS OF GIFT.000) par value First Mortgage Gold Bonds were given by him to John D. Rockefeller. either by act of Congress or by act of the legislature of any State. namely: to "apply the income and such portion or the whole of the principal as they may deem proper to such charitable use or uses as they may from time to time select and in such proportions respectively as they may determine. 1913. John D. Trustees. in the prevention and relief of suffering and in the promotion by eleemosynary and philanthropic means of any and ail of the elements of human progress. or. Jr. said trustees shall forthwith convey the said trust property. to my son. a corporation having as its objects to promote the wellbeing and to advance the civilization of the peoples of the United States and its territories and possessions and of foreign lands. if I shall not be living. or otherwise pursuant to law. if living. to said corporation. the statement of the objects and the other provisions of the act or instrument incorporating said corporation being satisfactory to me. in the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge. Jerome D. Murphy. Ballard. this trust shall 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Junior. Rockefeller. Greene and Edward L. Rockefeller. and upon said transfer. John D. including any unappropriated income therefrom. I By a Deed of Trust created by Mr. Starr J. for the following purpose.. or having broad general objects substantially the same as those above stated. or so much thereof as shall then remain in the hands of the trustees." out subject to the condition that "In case there shall be created during said period.

Junior. dated January 6. May 20th. 1913. Rockefeller. John D. 1913. "Jerome D." The provisions of the Act to Incorporate the Rockefeller Foundation as passed by the Legislature of the State of New York. as follows: "Messrs. I do hereby certify that The Rockefeller Foundation as incorporated by the statute above named has broad general objects substantially the same as those stated in the Deed of Trust from me to you. (Signed) John D. known as Chapter 488 of the Laws of 1913. 1913. Mr. on behalf of the Trustees above mentioned. May 14. Ballard. were formally approved by Mr. "Gentlemen:— "The Rockefeller Foundation having been incorporated by an Act of Legislature of the State of New York. Rockefeller. Murphy. Murphy. and the trustees shall be released from all further liability by reason of this trust. entitled An Act to Incorporate The Rockefeller Foundation. Greene. 1913. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and "Edward L. formally transferred the bonds in their possession to the Rockefeller Foundation. "Very truly yours. "Starr J. Rockefeller in accordance with the terms of the Deed of Trust above mentioned." At the meeting of the Rockefeller Foundation May 22. Starr J. John D. thus establishing the first funds for the uses of the Foundation.. and that the statement of the objects and the other provisions of said act incorporating The Rockefeller Foundation are satisfactory to me.56 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION terminate.

and the principal as well as the income may be used in your discretion for any of the corporate purposes of the Foundation. New York City. based on the market prices of June 4th. Rockefeller's subsequent gifts were communicated by the following letters:— II June 14. 1913. It is more convenient for me to provide funds for the Foundation by a gift of these specific securities rather than by a gift of cash. John D. ROCKEFELLER. (Signed) JOHN D. but are at liberty to dispose of them or any of them and change the form of investment whenever in your judgment it seems wise to do so. of Twenty-one million. Very truly yours. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .028. The Rockefeller Foundation. This gift is made for the general corporate purposes of the Foundation. of a total value. 1913.LETTERS OF GIFT 57 Mr. Gentlemen:— I hereby give you the stocks and bonds shown in the accompanying statement. and I believe the securities have intrinsic and permanent value which would justify you in retaining them as investments. twenty-eight dollars and fifty-four cents ($21. fifty-two thousand. 26 Broadway. but in order to relieve you from any uncertainty or embarrassment with regard to them I desire to state specifically that you are under no obligation to retain any of these investments.052.54).

Cleveland. and I believe the securities have intrinsic and permanent value which would justify you in retaining them as an investment. and the principal as well as the income may be used in your discretion for any of the corporate purposes of the Foundation. of a total value. New York City. Enclosure. based on the market prices of June 4th. This gift is made for the general corporate purposes of the Foundation. The Rockefeller Foundation. It is more convenient for me to provide funds for the Foundation by a gift of these specific securities rather than by a gift of cash. (Signed) JOHN D. 1913.178. Gentlemen:— I hereby give you the stocks shown m the accompanying statement. Ohio. ROCKEFELLER. 1913. in order to relieve you from any uncertainty or embarrassment with regard to them I desire to state specifically that you are under no obligation to retain any of these investments. but.402. Very truly yours.00). four hundred and two dollars (#10. June 27th. No. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 26 Broadway. of about Ten million. one hundred seventy-eight thousand. but are at liberty to dispose of them or any of them and change the form of investment whenever in your judgment it seems wise to do so.58 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION III Forest Hill.

such balance shall be transferred to the general unrestricted income of the Foundation. of. Very truly. 1914. but you are at liberty to dispose of any or all of them and to change the form of investment whenever in your judgment it seems wise to do so. ROCKEFELLER. Gentlemen:— I hereby give you.000. five hundred sixty-nine thousand.000 which I have not thus designated during that fiscal year. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the securities shown in the accompanying statement. of a total value at the market price of March i. One hundred million dollars ($100. five hundred sixty-nine dollars. forty-six cents ($65.569. Sixty-five million. If at the close of any fiscal year there shall remain any balance of the $2. making with the amounts heretofore given by me to the Rockefeller Foundation. 26 Broadway. 1914.569.LETTERS OF GIFT IV 59 March 6th.46).000.000. It is a condition of this gift that from the income of the Foundation the sum of Two million dollars ($2. . In my opinion the great majority of these securities have intrinsic and permanent value which would justify you in retaining them. or so much thereof as I shall designate. New York City. Subject to the foregoing provision. annually.ooo). less the interest accrued and the dividends declared thereon to date.000). (Signed) JOHN D. the principal as well as the income of this gift may be used in your discretion for any of the corporate purposes of the Foundation. The Rockefeller Foundation. to be used as the Foundation shall see fit. shall be applied during my lifetime to such specific objects within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as I may from time to time direct.

numbers 619272 to 19279 inclusive. The Rockefeller Foundation. John D. the Foundation may then determine to what object the income of the fund shall 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . These gifts were communicated by the following letters: I 26 Broadway. due 1934.000) from Mrs. 26 Broadway. If three months after the Foundation has advised her in writing of its purpose to discontinue the further payment of income to the beneficiary last designated by her she shall not have appointed in writing another beneficiary. it is to pay it to such other object within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as she shall designate.60 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION GIFTS FROM MRS. I herewith hand you ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. New York City. £19255 to 19256 inclusive. JOHN D. Should it at any time during Mrs. ROCKEFELLER The Foundation has received gifts of securities amounting in par value to Forty-eight thousand dollars (#48. June 7th. Convertible Gold Bonds. the income to be paid as it accrues to the Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York so long as in the judgment of the Foundation it is wise so to do. Gentlemen:— At the request of Mrs. New York. John D. Rockefeller (Laura Spelman Rockefeller).) Rockefeller. Rockefeller's life discontinue paying the income to that Society. 1913. (Mrs. Laura S. or if after her death the Foundation shall determine that it is not wise to continue to apply the income to the Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York or such other object as she has designated.

the income to be paid as it accrues to The Baptist Home of Northern Ohio. Gentlemen:— I herewith hand you ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. it is to pay it to such other object within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as I shall designate. numbers 12617. 12645 anc^ 10120. Series A. of Cleveland. and may also in its discretion dispose of the principal. in its discretion. The Rockefeller Foundation. 12620. (Signed) STARR J. 12619. 1913. II 26 Broadway. but the bonds and their proceeds shall be kept upon its books as a separate fund. 12642. If three months after the Foundation has advised me in writing of its purpose to discontinue the further payment of income to the beneficiary last designated by me I shall not have appointed in writing another beneficiary. 12644. for the support and maintenance of the Residents of the Home so long as in the judgment of the Foundation it is wise so to do. Very truly yours. MURPHY. New York City. to sell these bonds and reinvest the proceeds and to change the investment from time to time as it deems wise. 12643. New York. Should it at any time during my life discontinue paying the income to that society.LETTERS OF GIFT 81 thereafter be applied. Convertible Gold Bonds. 26 Broadway. or if after my death the Foundation shall determine that it is not wise to continue to apply the income to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The Foundation is to have the power. Ohio. 12656. September nth. due 1934. 12618.

or such other object 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The Rockefeller Foundation. the Foundation may then determine to what object the income of the fund shall thereafter be applied. in its discretion. If three months after the Foundation has advised me in writing of its purpose to discontinue the further payment of income to the beneficiary last designated by me I shall not have appointed in writing another beneficiary. ROCKEFELLER. 1913. A-977I-73. Ohio. 26 Broadway. New York City. or if after my death the Foundation shall determine that it is not wise to continue to apply the income to the Euclid Avenue Baptist Church of Cleveland. 8-19308. Very truly yours. Convertible Gold Bonds. numbers 8-18143-49.. B-i92i6. it is to pay it to such other object within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as I shall designate. Should it at any time during my life discontinue paying the income to that Church. (Signed) LAURA S. Ohio. due 1934. so long as in the judgment of the Foundation it is wise so to do. but the bonds and their proceeds shall be kept upon its boeks as a separate fund. A-3892-95. 8-23711. A-9269-8o. HI November 29th. A-9557.62 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The Baptist Home of Northern Ohio or such other object as I have designated. the income to be paid as it accrues to the Euclid Avenue Baptist Church of Cleveland. The Foundation is to have the power. and may also in its discretion dispose of the principal. Gentlemen:— I herewith hand you thirty Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. to sell these bonds and reinvest the proceeds and to change the investment from time to time as it deems wise.

The Foundation is to have the power. but such change shall not be merely for the purpose of increasing the income of the fund. IV. Gentlemen:— Mrs. Very truly yours. (Signed) LAURA S. Rockefeller heretofore delivered to the Equitable Trust Company of New York. and is not to be hypothecated for any purpose whatever. to sell these bonds and reinvest the proceeds and to change the investment from time to time as it deems wise. The Society is to have the right to alter the form of investment. ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. December 9th. you are to receive and retain the proceeds of these bonds and the new securities in which the proceeds shall be invested. The Rockefeller Foundation. Convertible Gold Bonds of the par value of One thousand dollars each. New York City. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . New York. ROCKEFELLER. The income only is to be available for the uses of the Society. and to be applied for maintenance purposes. In case of such change of investment. provided that in the judgment of its trustees this is necessary for the safety of the fund. 1913. The principal of the trust is not to be liable for the debts of the corporation. and may also in its discretion dispose of the principal. in its discretion. on the following trust:— "These are given to you in trust to hold and collect the income and to pay the same as collected to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York for the support of the residents of the Home.LETTERS OF GIFT C3 as I have designated. John D. the Foundation may then determine to what object the income of the fund shall thereafter he applied. 26 Broadway.

Steeves. "In case the Baptist Home Society of the City of New York shall be dissolved or its operations shall be discontinued. "The Equitable Trust Company of New York. "Mrs. consented to the substitution of The Rockefeller Foundation in place of your Company as Trustee of the trusts under which she has heretofore delivered to you ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. 37 Wall Street. Laura S. John F. (Signed) STARR J. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . being bonds. December 2nd. numbers 4942-5. Rockefeller. Jacob Hayes. Yours very truly. "THE BAPTIST HOME SOCIETY. Will you kindly send me." Subsequently Mrs." I understand these bonds have been delivered to you by the Equitable Trust Company. Secretary. and oblige. President. "Very truly yours. "Mrs. and the officers of the Society wrote a letter to the Equitable Trust Company as follows:— New York. to be used for the erection of buildings on the foreign field.64 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The income is not to be anticipated. but is to be collected and applied only as it accrues. "Gentlemen:— "The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York has. Convertible Gold Bonds in trust for this Society. and this was consented to by the Trustees of the Baptist Home Society of the City of New York. 12611-16. Rockefeller expressed a desire to substitute the Rockefeller Foundation as Trustee in place of the Equitable Trust Company. MURPHY. It was understood that the income should be paid to the beneficiaries free from any charges on the part of the Trustee. 1913. Rockefeller's representative. We hereby request you to deliver the same to the Rockefeller Foundation. at the request of Mrs. these securities and their proceeds are to become the property of and to be delivered to the Woman's Foreign Baptist Mission Society of Boston. a certified copy of the resolution accepting this trust. New York City. as Mrs.

that the Foundation should not necessarily be perpetual. 6ist Congress. but that it should be subject to termination and to the distribution of its funds at some period in the future. however. its purposes were described at length by Mr. (Hearing on S. Starr J. The publication of the terms of the proposed charter was followed by wide public discussion. a bill providing for a Federal charter was drawn up on lines similar to those of the General Education Board's charter. 6888. As a result of the consideration of these suggestions. In that year. all gifts or property received by 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . March n. and on March 2. that the control of the Foundation should be more specifically vested in Congress. 2675. 1910. 1910.6ist Congress).) The bill was favorably reported. it was introduced in the United States Senate (S. 2nd session. impose such limitations upon the objects of the Corporation as the public interest might demand. and. finally. At a hearing held by the Committee on the District of Columbia. 6888. and a report of the hearing was printed. the bill was redrawn and introduced in 1911 (S. and the following amendments were urged: That there should be some limitation on the power of members of the Corporation to elect their successors. the significant changes being as follows: (i) Congress might.PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 65 APPENDIX V * THE PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The idea of establishing such a body as the Rockefeller Foundation had been discussed and various plans considered for some time previous to 1910. that there should be a limit to the amount of money that could be heaped up for purposes subject to so broad a definition as that given by the charter. at any time. 62nd Congress). to which the bill had been referred. Murphy.

the Speaker of the House of Representatives. as well as the income. (2) The income of the Corporation not to be accumulated or added to the principal. while not regarded as necessary by the incorporators. with the consent of two-thirds of the members of the Corporation. exclusive of increases in the value of property subsequent to its receipt. (5) To make it clear that the charter did not attempt to exempt from taxation property that would otherwise be taxable under the laws of any state in which it might be held. the principal. a clause was added clearly limiting to the United States or any Territory or District thereof the provisions of the exempting clause.68 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the Corporation to be held subject to this provision.000. The total amount of property specifically limited to ^106. The foregoing changes. (4) The self-perpetuating clause modified by the provision that the election of new members of the Corporation should be subject to disapproval within sixty days by a majority of the following persons: The President of the United States. and the University of Chicago.000. but to be currently applied to the purposes for which the Corporation was created. (3) After the expiration of fifty years from the receipt of any property the Corporation might distribute. for the general purposes of the Foundation. Yale University. Johns Hopkins University. and the Presidents of the following institutions: Harvard University. Columbia University. subject only to such reasonable delay as may be necessary in the wise administration of the fund. such distribution to take place after one hundred years from the time the property was received. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. in view of the fact that Congress could at any time amend or terminate the charter if it should appear that the suggested limitations were needed. if Congress should so direct. the President of the Senate.

1258). to advance the consideration of the bill until in 1912 it was re-introduced in the House of Representatives (H. No effort was made. 21532) in a form identical with S. No further effort was made to obtain a charter by act of Congress. by eleemosynary and philanthropic means. and in the section relating to the membership of the Corporation (Sec. however. the bill was unanimously reported by the Judiciary Committee of the House (H. 8) the minimum number of members was increased from five to nine with the additional provision that no gifts should be made when the number of members should for any cause be less than nine. 2675. 1913 (S. which was accomplished without opposition in any quarter. and was passed by a majority of more than two-thirds (152 to 65) on January 20. February 19. of any and all the elements of human progress". some of them actually failing to pass and going over to the incoming Congress. Report No. 11. After passing the House the bill went to the Senate.PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 67 were nevertheless cordially accepted as not likely to interfere with any of the purposes of the Foundation. in the form in which it was passed by the House of Representatives is printed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 529. 3) the House bill amended the phrase "and in the promotion of any and all the elements of human progress" to read "and in the promotion. Report No. Thus modified. 1913. 1912). 1913. on May 14. made it impossible for the bill to come to a vote. with the following exceptions: In the statement of the purposes of the Foundation (Sec. where it was favorably reported by the Judiciary Committee. Apr. and steps were then taken to secure incorporation under the laws of the State of New York. R. Its position on the calendar in the closing weeks of the 62nd Congress and at a time when a number of the great public supply bills were being obstructed in their passage. The proposed Federal Charter.

That the object of the said corporation shall be to promote the well-being and to advance the civilization of the peoples of the United States and its Territories and possessions and of foreign lands in the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge. Starr J. constituted a body corporate of the District of Columbia. 3. Harry Pratt Judson.532 As Introduced by Mr. devises. the portions in italics embodying the important changes from the original Senate bill (S. Edwin A. 21. A BILL TO INCORPORATE THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 62nd Congress. SEC.68 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION below. save as hereinafter provided. March 8. That John D. 1912. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled. however. Rockefeller. Frederick T. or property at any time received or held by said corporation shall be received and held subject to the terms of this proviso and to the terms and limitations which may be imposed by any Act of Congress hereafter passed with reference thereto. Simon Flexner. 2. and any and all gifts. Peters. of any and all of the elements of human progress: Provided. That the name of such body corporate shall be "The Rockefeller Foundation. and in the promotion. in the prevention and relief of suffering." and by that name it shall have perpetual succession. bequests. by eleemosynary and philanthropic means. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and their successors. That the Congress of the United States nay at any time impose such limitations upon the objects of the said corporation as it may deem the public interest demands. John D. Gates. Murphy. R. 6888). Alderman. H. Heydt. Junior. Rockefeller. together with such persons as they may associate with themselves. 2nd Session. be. and they hereby are. Wickliffe Rose and Charles O. SEC.

exclusive of increases in the value of -property subsequent to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to donate to any individual. or purchase. and equip buildings and other structures necessary or convenient for said objects. maintain. 5. association. convey. and in general to do and perform all things necessary or convenient for the promotion of the object of the corporation. 4.PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 69 SEC. or to aid others. including that which is held absolutely as well as that which is held in trust. enlarge. to establish. sell. documents. and any of them. hire. and endow institutions. and convey real estate necessary or convenient for the said corporate objects. real or personal. and reports containing the same. That the said corporation shall further havepower to have and use a common seal and to alter and change the same at its pleasure. assistants. and to acquire. to collect statistics and information. shall not exceed the value of one hundred million dollars. or corporation engaged in similar work money or property. transfer. bequest. improve. to take or receive. and furnish all necessary or convenient apparatus and other accessories. and to publish and distribute books. devise. make. or lease the same for its corporate purposes. or corporations. maintain. however. which shall at any time be held by the said corporation hereby constituted. whether individuals. or devise by which the said corporation shall have received the same. and to hold. and other agencies for carrying on said objects. SEC. lecturers. That for the promotion of such objects the said corporation shall have power to establish. to purchase. Provided. to accept and administer any trust of money. hold. That the total amount of property held at any one time. or any of them. associations. whether by gift. and agents. grant. any real or personal estate. subject to the terms of any gift. to employ and aid others to employ teachers. grant. grant. to sue and be sued in any court of the United States or other court of competent jurisdiction. and to erect. and endow. or of real or personal estate for any purpose within the object of the corporation as aforesaid. bequest.

the terms and conditions upon which money. or corporation for any of the said purposes for which the said corporation is hereby incorporated. or donation of any or all property of the said corporation. or any part thereof. The enumeration of special powers in this Act shall be deemed to be by way of amplification and not by way of limitation of the general powers hereby granted. That the income of the property of the said corporation shall not be accumulated or added to the principal. Sec. subject to the provisions of this Act. at a special meeting held on not less than thirty days' notice. devise. for the purchase. transfer.70 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION its receipt by said corporation. for the casting of votes by its members or trustees by proxy. Sec* 7. but shall be currently applied to the purposes for which the corpo~ ration is created. in furtherance of the objects of said corporation. the said corporation may distribute the principal. assignment. real estate. or personal estate shall be acquired or received by the said corporations and for the grant. society. which shall state that the meeting is called for the purpose oj considering a resolution to authorize the distribution of the whole or some part of the principal of said funds. to prescribe. whether by deed. grant. to any individual. officers. given in writing. That at any lime after the expiration of fifty years from the receipt by the said corporation of any property. subject only to such reasonable delay as may be necessary in the wise administration of the fund. 6. for the investment and control of its funds. for the election of its trustees. or bequest. real or personal. and otherwise generally for the management of the property and the transaction of the business of the corporation. for the admission or exclusion of its members. or transfer of its property. by by-laws or otherwise. as well as the income thereof. and after 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to make by-laws. management. and agents. provided such action shall be authorized by a resolution passed by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all those who shall at the time be members of the corporation. sale.

as may be prescribed by the by-laws of the corporation: Provided. that no member of the said corporation shall. however. That if and when the number of members shall be less then nine. from the thirtieth day of June next after the enactment of this law. the members remaining shall have power to add. the members of the first class to hold their membership and office until the expiration of one year. grants. equal numerically as nearly as may be. or corporation shall be made when the number of members is less than nine. the members of the second class until the expiration of two years. and the members of the third class until the expiration of three years. or as soon thereafter as shall be convenient. That in case any 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and shall add. that each member of the corporation shall hold his membership for a term of three years and until his successor shall be chosen: Provided. That no act of the corporation shall be void because at the time such act shall be done the number of the members of the corporation shall be less than nine. except that no gift to any individual. association. That the members shall be at all times divided into three classes. by reason of such membership or his trusteeship. and all gifts. or bequests to the corporation shall be taken and held subject to the provisions of this section. be divided into three classes. to their number until the number shall be not less than nine: And provided. That the members of the corporation shall be not less than nine in number and not more than twenty-five. be personally liable for any of its debts or obligations. institution.PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 71 the expiration of one hundred years from the date of its receipt by said corporation the said corporation shall distribute the principal in furtherance of the objects of said corporation if so directed to do by the Congress of the United States. devises. that all the members of the corporation shall be its trustees. and that the original members shall at their first meeting. and that in every case the member shall hold office after the expiration of his term until his successor shall be chosen: And provided further. SEC. 8.

New Haven. the trustees. Illinois. Yale University. shall be exempt from taxation by the United States or any Territory or District thereof. Chicago. the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. ii. resignation. Connecticut. the President of the Senate. p. SEC. If such election shall be disapproved by a majority of the persons above named. SEC.72 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION member shall. trustee. and committees may be held in such other places as the by-laws may from time to time designate. written notice thereof shall be mailed by said corporation to each of the following-named persons at his official postoffice address. Columbia University. but it shall become effective if and when it shall be approved by such majority. 10. Massachusetts. Sec. or employee of said corporation shall receive any pecuniary benefit from the operations thereof. used. but offices may be maintained and meetings of the corporation. the Speaker of the House of Representatives. cease to be a member during his term. iz. incapacity to act. or invested for its purposes as aforesaid. member. or to produce income to be used for such purposes. it shall be void. Cambridge. Johns Hopkins University. or otherwise. or at the expiration of sixty days from the mailing of such notices if it shall not have been disapproved by such majority. by death. New York. namely: The President of the United States. Maryland. That the principal office of the corporation shall be located in the District of Columbia. Baltimore. That the successors to the incorporators named here" in and the additional members of the corporation and their successors shall be elected by the members of the corporation for the time being. his successor may be chosen to serve for the remainder of such term and until his successor shall be chosen. New York City. namely: Harvard University. except reasonable compensation 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . SEC. That no officer. but before such election shall become effective. That all personal property and funds of the corporation held. and the University of Chicago. and the presidents of the following institutions.

PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER

73

for services in effecting one or more of the purposes of the corporation. SEC. 13, That the corporation shall annually file with the Secretary of the Interior of the United States a report in writing, stating in detail the property, real and personal, held by the corporation, and the expenditure or other use or disposition of the same or of the income thereof during the preceding year. SEC. 14. That this charter shall be subject to alteration, amendment, or repeal at the pleasure of the Congress of the United States.
Sec. 75. That this Act shall take effect immediately on its passage.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

EXPENDITURES

75

APPENDIX VI EXPENDITURES

I
DIRECT EXPENDITURES BY THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION
ON ACCOUNT OF APPROPRIATIONS

May 29,1913, to January /»1914
Administration Expenses: Traveling Secretary's office Treasurer's office International Health Commission $65.20 68.60 56.80 $ 180.60 9,230.70 $9,411.20

January j, 1914, to January /, 1915
Administration Expenses: Traveling Secretary's office Treasurer's office International Health Commission Investigation of Industrial Relations China Medical Commission: Conference Commission China Medical Board Purchase of Bird Refuge in Louisiana Research in Governmental Problems War Relief 81,489.64 35,162.32 36,651.96 2,618.96 224,886.95 10,000.00 994,613.06 $1,421,031.81 § 780.19 1,122.68 11,828.82 8 13,731.69 133,237.06 6,292.13

'.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

76

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION
If

APPROPRIATIONS TO OTHER AGENCIES The following appropriations have been made by the Rockefeller Foundation from the time of its establishment to December 31, 1914:—
1913 Dec. 5,1913—To the American Red Cross as a contribution toward the acquisition of a site in the District of Columbia and the erection thereon of a memorial to commemorate the services of the women of the United States in caring for the sick and wounded in the Civil War, the building to serve as a permanent headquarters, upon condition that the entire sum needed, namely, $700,000, be raised

$100,000.

Dec. 20,1913—Through the Bureau of Social Hygiene a sum not exceeding $720 a month during the year 1914 as a contribution toward the support of the diagnostic laboratory and clinics for venereal diseases maintained by the Department of Health of the City of New York Total appropriations in 1913 Reserved for payments due in future Payments in 1913
1914 Jan. 21,1914—To the American Academy in Rome an appropriation of $10,000 a year fora period often years, beginning January I, 1914, for the general purposes of the Academy

8,640. 108,640. 8,640. $100,000.

100,000. 10,000.

To the American Red Cross for the relief of suffering in Bulgaria

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

EXPENDITURES

«

77

Jan. 29,1914—To theTohoku Kyushu Saigai Kyusaikai of Japan (Relief Society for the Calamities in the Northeastern Districts and Kyushu) April 16, 1914—To the Committee of Reference and Counsel of the Annual Foreign Missions Conference of North America for the carrying out of a program of cooperation and coordination in the foreign missionary work of the principal American Mission Boards a pledge of May 27, 1914—To the Bureau of Municipal Research for carrying on its work in New York City for the remainder of the current calendar year To the American Association for the Conservation of Vision, or to such organization as should represent the merger of that Association with the New York Committee for the Prevention of Blindness, a sum of #5,000 a year for five years, upon condition that the contribution of the Rockefeller Foundation in any year shall be payable only upon the execution of other pledges to the amount of at least Ten thousand dollars (#10,000) so as to assure a budget of not less than Fifteen thousand dollars($ 15,000) a year To Wellesley College toward a fund of Two million dollars ($2,000,000) for buildings and endowment, on condition that the full amount be subscribed in good and responsible pledges on or before January i, 1915.. Aug. 13,1914—To the American Red Cross as a contribution toward the cost of sending physicians and nurses to Europe under the auspices of the American Red Cross....

10,000.

450,000.

30,000.

25,000.

750,000.

10,000.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

78

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

To the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, as a contribution to help the Association in its work of providing pensions for dependent widows with families, a sum of $20,000 a year for a period not to exceed ten years 200,000. Sept. 25, 1914—To the New York Milk Committee as a special gift toward the expenses of the current year in view of the serious diminution in the receipts of the Committee from sources usually depended upon Oct. 21, 1914—To the Bureau of Municipal Research of New York City, for studies relating to the State Government preparatory to the Constitutional Convention of 1915 Dec. 3,1914—To the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor as a special contribution in view of the unusual amount of distress in the city, due to the war and the industrial depression To the Charity Organization Society as a special contribution in view of the unusual amount of distress in the city, due to the war and the industrial depression To the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities as a special contribution in view of the unusual amount of distress in the city, due to the war and the industrial depression Total Appropriations in 1914 Reserved for Payments due in future Payments in 1914 Paid on account 1913 Appropriations Total Payments 1914.

5,000.

10,000.

25,000.

10,000.

10,000.

$1,645,000.00 1,471,120.47 * 73*879.53 8,640.00 $182,519.53

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

EXPENDITURES
III

79

FOUNDER'S REQUISITIONS.
Under this heading are recorded gifts for objects within the corporate purposes of the Foundation, designated by Mr. John D. Rockefeller, in accordance with the terms of his letter of gift, dated March 6, 19x4.* May 4, 1914—To Mr. Charles W. Bowring, Treasurer, for expenditure, under the direction of the New York General Committee on the Newfoundland Sealing Disaster, for the relief of the families dependent on the men of the S.S. Southern Cross and the S.S. Newfoundland, who recently perished or were disabled at sea To Mr. B. H. Fancher, Treasurer, International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations, 124 East 28th Street, New York City, as a contribution to its foreign work for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1914, payment to be made on or about June 24. Should the International Committee carry out the plan for adding ten new workers at an additional cost of $20,000, after having raised the budget of $438,900 for work already undertaken, and raise $17,500 additional, the Foundation will make a further contribution of $2,500, payable at any time during the year, when notified of the raising of regular budget of $438,900 and the additional $17,500 To Mr. Thomas S. McLane, Treasurer, The New York Milk Committee, 105 East 422nd Street, New York City, as a contribution toward their work for the present fiscal year
1

$ 1,000.

32>S°°*

4,000,

See page 59

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

80

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

To the Baptist Union of Western Canada, Room 345, Somerset Building, Winnipeg, Canada, as a contribution toward their Baptist missionary work for the current fiscal year, with the stipulation that no part of Mr. Rockefeller's contribution is to be used in the foreign field To the Society for Italian Immigrants, 129 Broad Street, New York City, for a contribution toward the work of the Society for the fiscal year ending December 3*i I9H To the Boy Scouts of America, 200 Fifth , Avenue, New York City, as a contribution toward their expenses for the fiscal year, beginning March i, 1914—the first payment to be made now, and payments hereafter to be made June I, September i, and December 1,1914. To the Prison Association of New York, 135 East I5th Street, New York City, as a contribution toward the expenses of the current fiscal year To the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, as a contribution to their work for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1914 To the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities, 69 Schermerhprn Street, Brooklyn, N. Y., as a contribution toward the expenses of theirfiscal year, ending April 30,1914 To Mr. Paul M. Warburg, Treasurer, New , York Child Labor Committee, 52 William Street, New York City, as a contribution toward the expenses of their fiscal year 1914 To the National Highways Protective Society, No. i West 34th Street, New York City, as a contribution to the expenses of their current fiscal year

10,000.

750.

5,000.

500.

6,000.

2,000.

300-

250.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

EXPENDITURES

81

To Mr. V. Event Macy, for the purpose of meeting the cost of salary, traveling and other expenses of one trained agent to work among the poor children of Westchester County, New York, the work to be done under the auspices of the State Charities Aid Association, acting through local committees .................. , ____ 900. To Mr. V. Event Macy, for the purpose of paying the expenses of an additional eugenic investigator in Westchester County for one year ................... 675 . May 5, 1914—To Dr. Charles B. Davenport, Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, New York, for the purpose of providing field workers in eugenics, the institutions or the State paying the maintenance and expenses of the workers in the field. 1 ,350. May 12, 1914—To W. K. Brice, Treasurer, Public Education Association, for the general purposes of the Association ..... 2,500. May 14, 1914—To the Laymen's Missionary Movement as a contribution toward the work of the Movement for the fiscal year May 15, 1914—To the National Child Labor Committee as a contribution for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1914 .......... To the Cleveland School of Art as a contribution toward the current expenses for the fiscal year ending August 3 1, 1914 ..... June 3, 1914—To the Baptist Ministers* Home Society of New York as a contribution toward the work of the Society for the fiscal year, 1914 ....................... To the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America as a contribution toward the work of the Council for the fiscal year, 1914 .................................

1,500. ° 700.

200.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

18. at Freeville. 2.14—To the State Charities Aid Association as a contribution toward the work of the Association for the fiscal year ending September 30. McWilliams.1914—To the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research for land. 10. buildings. Treasurer. Daniel W.000. 10.000.000.000.000. 1914—To Mr. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .1914 June 17. Brooklyn Young Men's Christian Association as a contribution toward the cost of land and buildings for the Brooklyn Young Men's Christian Association 6. 1914—To the George Junior Republic Association. 527.315.1914 June 19.27 300. 1914—To the New Jersey Baptist Convention as a contribution toward the work of the Convention for the fiscal year ending October 15.1914—To the Honest Ballot Association of New York City as a contribution toward the expenses of the Association for the current fiscal year Aug. 1. 1914—To Gardiner M. 1914 July 8. as a contribution toward the work of the Association for the fiscal year ending September 30. 2. equipment and additions to endowment June 26.1915 June 30. for the relief of the sufferers from the conflagration at Salem.1914 June 24. Secretary-Treasurer. Salem Fire Relief Fund. New York. 1914—70 the Charity Organization Society as a contribution toward the work of the Society for the fiscal year ending September 30.82 ' THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION June 5. Lane. Mass July 29.000. 150. 1914—To the Girls' Branch of the Public Schools Athletic League in New York City as a contribution toward the work for the year ending June 1.000. 1.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .EXPENDITURES 83 To Mr. Ohio. to September i. 1914—To the Public Schools Athletic League of the City of New York as a contribution toward the work of the League for the present fiscal year Nov. for the following purpose.. 1914—To the International Young Men's Christian Association College at Springfield. September i. 1914—To the Legal Aid Society of New York as a contribution toward the current expenses of the Society for the present fiscal year Sept. Treasurer. Ohio. for meeting the emergency disclosed by the correspondence of September 16. 26.500. .000. 50. -> 1. to be used by the Federation. 1915.000. 2. 4. payable the last day of each month. Rudd. to wit: Thirteen thousand. Williamson. Cleveland. n. 1.000) toward the Repair Fund for the same fiscal year. The Cleveland Federation for Charity and Philanthropy for the support of the Young Women's Christian Association of Cleveland. 1914.1914 Aug.1914 Oct. 3. 2.000. George A. Mass. igiq—To Mr. in its discretion. 500. One thousand dollars ($i . 1914—To The Cleveland Federation for Charity and Philanthropy. 29. James D. Ohio. as a contribution to the current expenses of the College 1. payable as called for Sept.500) toward the budget for the fiscal year. five hundred dollars (#13. Treasurer.000. 1914—To the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society for the general purposes of said Society Sept.000. 9. during the fiscal period ending September 30. The Alta Social Settlement of Cleveland.

30.000. 1. 750. 1914—To the American Female Guardian Society and Home for the Friendless as a contribution toward the expenses of the organization for the current year To the Brooklyn Young Men's Christian Association as a contribution toward the expenses of the Association for the current fiscal year Nov. Jersey City. 200. 1914—To the National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes. 3.. 1914^5 TO Whittier House. 20.84 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Nov. 1914—To the Girls* Branch of the Public Schools Athletic League of the City of New York as an additional contribution toward the current expenses of the present fiscal year on account of the unusual circumstances they are confronted with. 1914—To the Religious Education Association as a contribution toward the current expenses of the Association To the Charity Organization Society Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis as a contribution toward the Red Cross Christmas Seal fund Nov. N. this being an emergency contribution and not to be considered as a precedent in making application another year. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . toward the work of the League for the fiscal year.. 50x5. 17. 1914-7To the Young Men's Christian Association of the City of New York as a contribution toward the General Expense Fund of the Association for the year 1914 Dec. 500. 18.000. as a contribution toward the current expenses for the present fiscal year MOO1.000. J. 5. Nov.

Total Payments on Founder's Requisitions $858. Payments on Account of Appropriations to Other Agencies.940. to January I. 1913.411. 1915 $2. May 29.421. 1914—To the International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations as an emergency subscription toward the work on the Home field of the Associations 250.5x9.53 282.519. 30.EXPENDITURES 85 Dec.940. Rockefeller's pledges. 18.81 *Not including amounts due in future under terms of Mr. 15.20 1914 1.53 III.000.01 II.27 Total Expenditures.443. 1014—To the Parks and Playgrounds Association of the City of New York as a contribution toward the work of the Association for the present fiscal year Dec.031. 1913 100. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Direct Expenditures.571.902. 1913 $ 9.000.430. Founder's Req uisitions 1914* 858.81 $1.27 RECAPITULATION I.00 I9M 182.

3.906. Old Clothing 555 Cs.181. 23 7500 Wheat 280.69 8120.008.650 Donated Beef not and separated Tongues 19.146. Industry) §9.78 '§322.775.644 bus.000 Lard 44. Jams and Rolled Oats 831 .185.038.000.13 $442.146.000 Lent Us 165.000 New §79.649 Peas 613.62 8986.896. 31 3529 Flour 6.707.360.911.972 Beans 593. Canned Beef. Small quantities of Rice.15 168.896.000 Bacon 55.022 Agamemnon Dec.74 $45.606 Rice 1.000 Salt 90.95 199. 8322.707.000 Sugar 17.000 Relief Rice 1.458 *Expenses Massapequa Dec. 3119.95 §79. 2 3527 Bacon 126.914.178.87 Bacon 100.230 8397.631 Coffee 40.224.767.29 (23.444.000 Milk 63.78 81.399.000 Committee Massapequa Coffee 44.407.001.200 Sugar and Cocoa 6.46 §9. OT BAEUHO TOMB Massapequa Nov.46 » Administratio Q Expens es Amount refun ded by (Commission for Relief in Belgium for expenses of ships Amount paid by Belgian Relief Fund for cargo forwarded per Massape:qua Net amc unt expended by the Rockefeller Foundation. BELGIAN RELIEF SHIPMENTS DATS TOTAL SHIP CABQO CABOO TOTALS las.90 Belgian 96.248.000 Committee Beans 250.000 Salmon 7.000 Purchased Condensed Milk 150.772.000 Salt 80.S.495 $320.07 Ferrona Dec.95 Clothing 425 Cs.90 Coffee 110.107.556 Belgian* two Relief Beans 145.88 BELGIAN RELIEF SHIPMENTS APPENDIX VII. on S.707.94 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .40 Hannah 183 Flour 392.97 Flour 6.911.960 voyages Peas 448.09 $1. 12 5830 Flour 11.57 79. .000 Neches Dec.000 bu.000 Sane Turned over to Commission 2500 25882 83.360 86.195.007. NET COST OF CARGO EXPENSES «.270 Beans 277.12 $252.37 .232. 4 2800 Flour 4.321.

(2) Secure map and mark every medical station. native contributions. educational qualifications. was presented to the Trustees of the Rockefeller Foundation and accepted by them as a tentative plan for the guidance of the Trustees and of the Commission in their study of medical needs in China: January 29. before the appointment of the China Medical Commission. (1) Secure immediately from the United States mission boards name. 1914. (3) Get full data as to hospitals. secure similar data from English and other foreign boards. capacity. equipment. annual cost to missionary boards. (4) Mark these hospitals and index them on the same map as above. if any. and similarly mark on same map. At convenience. staff. Mastery of existing data as complete as possible: (a) Data Available in the United States. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with list of current needs and estimate of cost. operating medically in China. to be modified as experience and further knowledge shall suggest: Step I. prepared by Mr. and statistics of annual work of every medical missionary in China. statistics of work. Gates. Frederick T.M E D I C A L W O R K IN C H I N A 87 APPENDIX VIII MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA The following memorandum. location. their cost. (b) English and European Data. male and female. AIM—WE GRADUAL AND ORDERLY DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE AND EFFICIENT SYSTEM OF MEDICINE IN CHINA METHOD—The following is suggested as a working plan.

Send a carefully chosen and thoroughly qualified man to China at once to make and currently report a survey of current medical work and education. The field chosen should offer the best combination of such qualifications as the following: (1) It should be as central as possible to all practitioners of scientific medicine in China* native and foreign. best equipped.S3 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION (c) Data in China. which will give us an authentic bird Veye view of the situation of medicine in all departments. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . their distribution. our second step will be to choose that medical district or province which seems best to lend itself to our purposes. (5) He will visit also as many hospitals as possible and as many medical missionaries and report on same. (2) It should be easily and cheaply approachable by rail and water transportation. and needs. (3) The difficulties of dissection and how they may be more effectually overcome. enabling us to check up the data secured at home with the reports of this expert. (4) He will visit the seven union medical schools commanded by the Chinese Medical Association. and report in detail on the character and promise of each. also the Harvard and the Yale Schools. (6) He will examine in each section the local schools. viewed as preparatory schools for medical students. its excellencies. and report their deficiencies and needs. (2) Attitude of government toward missionary medical schools and their official recognition. best conducted and most efficient medical school associated with best and largest hospital and available clinical material. and the qualifications required for such recognition. (4) It should have the largest. He will report in detail on:— ^ (i) Chinese government medical schools. character. (3) It should have the largest number of practitioners in its immediate vicinity. With the data thus secured. its deficiencies and its needs. Step II.

Let these give series of lectures first in this. with their 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and chosen our particular section and center as per II. (7) It should be located in a large center of both Chinese and European intelligence and wealth. where practicable. It would be disappointing if Peking were found inadequate and unsuitable. Step III. on the best practicable basis simultaneously with the help given the outlying medical stations. in hospitals. we are ready to take several important steps simultaneously. (2) Put the medical school. or be able to secure. and mainly by recruits. these steps will have to be taken simultaneously. in clinical material.— This reinforcement and uplift of medical stations to be limited in area to the proper local field of the chosen medical school. later perhaps in other schools in missionary lands—a world tour series of lectures occupying perhaps a year for each—and thus to keep the school abreast each year with the freshest and most inspiring new discoveries. see that at least two qualified practitioners are connected with eyery hospital. (6) It should have immediately tributary the largest number and best equipped missionary and government schools. best qualified technicians in the various branches of medicine. (10) If possible. Indeed. also all necessary surgical equipment for scientific work and proper sanitation. Having now secured our data as per I. in men.MEDICAL WORK IN C H I N A 89 (5) It should be union or undenominational. secure qualified trained nurses for each hospital. alt other things being equal. it should be near the seat of the central government. in equipment. (3) Send from the United States on a systematic plan and periodically. facilities for dissection. (9) It should have. each equipped with latest advances in his department. or be able to secure. for no one of them can reach ijts maximum efficiency without the others concurrently: (1) Partly by concentration. official government recognition. (8) It should have.

even genius. (c) The whole body of practising physicians poured annually through the college will bring to the medical school annually an immense fund of practical information and afford the most valuable guide in practical instruction. and local nuclei trained in new technique. exceptions to be made only for^sufficient reasons.. excellence in teaching. (e) From this large concourse of annual students. will afford the most delightful recreation possible to a rightly constituted man. <?. better skill. (4) Within the chosen territory. certain men by force of talent. skill or attainment. skill. (d) This large body of practising physicians constantly in attendance will compel a very high. as will be seen in the development of scheme.». from loneliness to stimulating companionship. a spirit of corporate achievement. apply and use the latest medical science. The change of employment from toil and worry to study later knowledge. will stand out far preeminent. there will emerge from time to time men of talent. (b) The physician will keep up with. (g) It should be the conscious duty of every man to select one or more of the most promising Chinese boys 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . give the favored region the best body of practising physicians on earth. Among the advantages of this requirement are the following: (a) Physicians in China are greatly overworked. will come at length to have a corporate lik. in no long time. and if continued will. thus mingling together annually for higher skill and attainment. require every medical practitioner on foreign pay to spend at least three months of every year at this central medical school. (f) These men. an esprit de corps. the foundation and basis of the whole system.90 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION appropriate demonstrations. pay his extra expenses so incurred. This is nowhere in the world done by any body of practising physicians. which will animate and inspire every member. Every condition of physical and mental refreshment is here met. indeed the highest attainable. This is to be the unique central and indis-t pensable condition of any work in China. From these a corps of teachers can gradually be built up of the very highest excellence.

every man. in connection with large hospitals. In so far as practicable the Foundation will assist selected schools to meet the requirements. always. every institution. it provides for the education of an annually increasing supply of scientific Chinese physicians. It provides that the practitioners shall. so trained and so charged. and through a careful local selection of fit students annually. and fit. for scientific medicine and bring him to the central medical school. (3) That within the chosen area the plan organizes into one present organic whole. This brings us to another simultaneous factor in our system. constantly stimulated by western experts. that it subordinates all to one center of enlightenment and power in which all denominations unite. by three months' study annually in this center. in method. him properly . (6) Concurrently with these steps. (2) That as such unit. It is on this side of scientific study and preparation that the Foundation will come into relation with the missionary schools. that provision is made for the best instruction in this center. without loss or waste. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and finally through a system of schools made fit. with a great central medical school having a full complement of outlying stations. efficient in spirit. and preparatory schools. are to be made active agents in making the present schools and colleges in their respective spheres of influence efficient preparatory schools for Chinese medical students. it covers a single large province only. General Remarkf It will be observed— (1) That this plan is a unit with simultaneous interplay of necessary parts. practitioners. (5) These medicalmissionaries. the work and growth of many decades. hospitals. of course. every item of equipment now existing for medical work. or see that others fit. in extent of instruction.MEDICAL W O R K IN CHINA 01 under his control. every^ dollar. keep themselves and the school up to the highest pitch of enthusiasm and efficiency. the Foundation will establish proper nurses* training schools for men and women.

It will awaken enthusiasm at home. and power will quickly render the system self-supporting on Chinese soil. whether in America or Europe. we may extend it to other similar centers. We should enter into definite and detailed contractual relations with the boards. and we may confidently hope that the resulting skill. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . for today no land. has any system of medicine at all comparable in efficiency or. or it will perhaps extend itself.92 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Sup IV» As the system proves practicable and efficient. The plan also utilizes to the full through generous cooperation with the missionary boards the whole power of Christian sentiment in this and other lands and enlists this sentiment in greater practical service. efficiency. This plan promises also the largest economic advantages. and China will be in a fair way ultimately to lead the world in medicine. using their organization and agencies helpfully and sympathetically and joining with them in choice of a local agency of control. Already far more than half the whole expense is borne abroad. it will command confidence abroad. even though the initial expenditure may be considerable. promise.

TREASURER'S REPORT 1913 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

29 602.00 §35. GENERAL BALANCE STATEMENT ASSETS INVESTMENTS: General Fund (Exhibit E) Special Funds CASH $35.41 797.416.967.069. 1913.985.396.94 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION THE ROCKEFELLER To the Members of THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION.34 48.26 INCOME RECEIVABLE ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 189.30 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .96 Total Assets $35.119.000.34 608. Gentlemen: Herewith are submitted statements giving the financial statistics to December 31.167.416.384.

922. INCOME. of The Rockefeller Foundation from its beginning.000. 1913.30 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Unappropriated balance $34..82 149.30 1.00 236.40 $35.966.177.100.60 48. on May 22. 1913 FUNDS AND OBLIGATIONS GENERAL FUND: Original Donations (Exhibit A) Reserve (Exhibit A) SPECIAL FUND: Gift of Mrs.679.430.TREASURER'S REPORT—1913 95 FOUNDATION December 31.. AS OF DECEMBER 31.909.78 $34. Rockefeller (Exhibit B) UNPAID APPROPRIATIONS (Exhibit D).662.384.374. Laura S.

the book value of all remaining at the original figure.496% A dividend of 3722 and 625. as above.00 1 share Galena-Signal Oil Company Preferred Stock 144... 1st 4s 75. by order of the Finance Committee.00 900. Treasurer.000 Morris & Essex RR Co.000 New York Connecting Ry. Chicago & St.. GeneraUs 83. 368. 420.649 Standard Oil Company (Kentucky) Capital Stock 403.028 Swan & Finch Company Capital Stock 183.339 Galena-Signal Oil Preferred Stock 142. Cincinnati. authorized the investment of all moneys collectively (except when otherwise specified by donors) instead of by separate funds.00 438. entitled Exhibits "A" to "E" inclusive.00 1 share Solar Refining Company Capital Stock 220.000 Cleveland. MYERS.920 to the Foundation has..00 1 share Standard Oil Company (Kansas) Capital Stock.78 $1.690 Borne-Scrymser Company Capital Stock 281.008 Colonial Oil Company Capital Stock 90. Co. as heretofore.891 Solar Refining Company Capital Stock 220.00 982.00 The following securities were bougftf: 1 share Galena-Signal Oil Company Common Stock @$186. 1st 4^s 93.00 11.86 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Changes in Investments During 1913 Were as Follows: Sold and Redeemed at a profit of $257. Louis Ry. A special distribution of 30% by the Solar Refining Company yielding $148. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Refunding 4s 87% 176. 1st & Refunding 3^s 82. which give various financial details in reference to the Foundation. G. 358.00 980.00 505. L.000 Western Maryland Ry.625% 250. There follow five statements.000 Sunday Creek Company 5% bond at 100% 983383rds of one share 606.75% 200. by resolution.00 834. The resulting fraction of a share is the one sold.00 $300.00 779.00 1 share The Continental Oil Company Capital Stock 192.000 Illinois Central RR Co.847 The Continental Oil Company Capital Stock 192.00 1 share Standard Oil Company (Kentucky) Capital Stock.00 768. The Finance Committee has. Co.575 Standard Oil Company (Kansas) Capital Stock.795 Chesebrough Manufacturing Company Capital Stock 650.00 693.264/983383rds shares Solar Refining Company Capital Stock has been received and added to those already held.381 % 32. been credited to the Reserve.980 Galena-Signal Oil Common Stock @ $181.893 Washington Oil Company Capital Stock 27. Respectfully submitted. Co.185 Standard Oil Company (Nebraska) Capital Stock 296..00 667.

000.78 Special distribution Solar Refining Co 148.82 RESERVE: Gains on securities sold and redeemed $ 257.82.1913.00 848.552. Greene. Starr J.177. from Messrs.972.00 securities and accrued interest and dividends Mr.1913.000 Colorado Industrial Co.552.78 Total $34. 5% Bonds ~ 7o 848.00 Gift of November 29.TREASURER'S REPORT—1913 97 EXHIBIT "A" Statement Showing Conditions of Various Funds Held by The Rockefeller Foundation as of December 31. Ohio) 24.00 Invested in $60..60 $34. on Gift of June 7.000. in bonds $ 3. / Rockefeller.402. ROCKEFELLER: Gift of June 7. 1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York) $ 8.1913 (Income payable to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York) 8.00 250. John D. LAURA S.00 Total $34.60 EXHIBIT "B" SPECIAL FUNDS OF MRS.374. Trustees.579. Jr.1913. 1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to the Baptist Home of Northern Ohio). INCOME ACCOUNT Six months'interest to August 1.000.60 Investments in general investment schedule (Exhibit "E") 834. John D.552. 1913.579.051.552.000.430.000. 1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to Euclid Avenue Baptist Church.178.579. in securities and 21.00 Mr. 8.579.00 Gift of December 9.00 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .00 $149.19J3 Amount sent The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York 250. Rockefeller's Gift of June 4.60 $34.200. Rockefeller's gift of June 27.000. Murphy and Jerome D.000.00 Gift of September 11.920. 1913 PRINCIPAL or GENERAL FUND OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Amount received May 29. Cleveland. in accrued dividends 10.

863. Foundation Expenses: Traveling Treasurer's Office Secretary's Office $65.1913 APPROPRIATIONS PAYMENTS American Red Cross 3100.674.00 8100.70 Totals Unpaid Appropriations $346.90 EXHIBIT "D" Statement Showing All Appropriations from General Funds Made in Accordance with Resolutions Passed at Meetings of The Foundation from its Beginning on May 22.230.30 8346.29 Office Expenses 2.98 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION EXHIBIT "C" Statement Showing Receipts and Disbursements of Income of The Rockefeller Foundation from May 22.230.447.140.600.447.00.000.60 $100. 1913.70 236.640..230.00 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .74 On Deposit 608.1913. Appropriation to American Red Cross.50 International Health Commission: Salaries S3.00 $1. Grand ChenierTract in Louisiana Bird Refuge 212.90 §1.90 180.140.140.26 Traveling Expenses 1.84 9.831.653.20 56.26 1.242.242.29 Investments in General Schedule 539.909.000.00 3109.41 Income Receivable 189. to December 31..000.242.000.31 Office Equipment 1.00 International Health Commission 26.337.80 58.396. 1913 RECEIPTS: Income to date DISBURSEMENTS. to December 31.447.00 9.70 Balance: In hands of Director General 602.00 §346.70 $1.00 Bureau of Social Hygiene 8.376.526.069.

1st Mtg Norfolk & Western Ry. May Nov.R. 1st Consol Sunday Creek Co. Oct. Louis.000. Cin.000 1934 2.000 00 6. 1st Consol Northern Pacific Ry. Gen.100 00 65. 1st. Chicago & St.024. 4" 4 4 4 Qi 3^ 4 4J4 5 4 4 6 V M M O 82 75 zyz 4 5 78 9193 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .R. 99 97 81.R. 1st Mtg.500 1997 5. 83 625 G f« W fS at New York Connecting R.R. Oct. Louis Ry. July July Oct.460 00 2550 00 1 7«o 00 29.000 2000 176. June Aug.R.158 76 17. 1st DATE OF AMOUNT MATURITY July 1948 $ 6.R.115 00 11. Refunding.91 PJ > CO 91 102 89 97 80 85 87.000000 1949 2. Consol Pitts. Chic. 1st Coll.600. Representing Both Principal.*.R. 96 90 90.000 1940 6.000 1953 250. Omaha Div.880 00 54. Deb ®/9i Central Pacific 30 years Gtd.Louisville & Nashville R.000 1937 3. 1st & Refunding New York. . Aug. Dec. Paul Ry. COHT 4 Denver & Rio Grande R.580 00 3. by So.400 1945 § 56.R.200.R.000 00 960000 OO 1. .100 00 261. D Rutland R. Trust Wabash R..000 1989 30.000 1966 1. Div.R.000 1941 25.000 1990 73. 1913.000 1952 1. • 4 Chicago. .000 1955 300.005 00 5. 1915 £ 600 1929 § 2. 1st Consol. Coll. 78.723. Jan. Nov..812 60 33250 00 233.00 167 250 00 1. Julv Jan.000 1941 45. Unified.000 00 144. Refunding. 100 95 94 91 93. . Louis R.000 July Aug.EXHIBIT "E" Schedule of Securities of the Rockefeller Foundation on December 31. Jan. Oct.453 65 6. Milwaukee & St. Pennsylvania R. 4 Illinois Central R. 4 4 5 Colorado Industrial Co. Chicago & St. & St. St.R. Magnolia Petroleum Company 1st Morris & Essex R.000 1936 6. & Land Grant.000 PRICE % CASH PRICE $ 5. L.000 1993 200. Cm.000 1937 35.500 1948 £ 2. Jan Mar. Mtg Cleve.320 00 22.000 1944 82. Long Island R.700. and Income Temporarily Invested BONDS NAME RATE % 4 Baltimore & Ohio R. Pac. Prior Lien Ry. Trust.032. Ser.800 00 5. 65 90.200. 1st 5 Canadian Pacific Ry. Con. May Nov.260 00 814..960 00 29.000 1996 6.. 1st Western Maryland Ry.500 00 63.

391. 72.982.00 35.024. Chicago & St.500.547.00 §21. Topeka & Santa Fe Ryi Common .376.00 178.000 1.333.000.733. Claflin Company Common Consolidated Gas Company Cuban American Sugar Co.481 12.20 2.514.140.632.000 600 10.23 H F F a w » O o w PI *i H d z O O 20.20 2! TOTAL SECURITIES BELONGING TO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION $36.23 670. Louis R. Preferred Manhattan Ry.220.976.200.00 1. Common New York.119. Eureka Pipe Line Company Galena-Signal Oil Co.00 1.087.719. 361. 670. Company Capital National Lead Company Preferred New York Chicago & St.00 61.900.300.937 4.60 587.00 1.482 1.016 421. 78.00 63.00 53.265.00 462.400 100 400 600 40 100 8 1.025.R.422 4.234 29.775 128. Pipe Lines Standard Oil Co.12 1.3333 140. Common South West Penn.13 1.442 14.00 44.750. (Kansas) Standard Oil Co.00 246.050.907 2. Interest and dividends accrued at the date of purchase or donation being allowed for.00 31. 55.95 79.480. 190.193 20.25 $ 146.416. 60.287.775 104.044.00 2. H. Louis R. 100.000.964 8. (Nebraska) Swan & Finch Company Washington Oil Company (par $10) Miscellaneous Stocks: Atchison.000 451 20.815 1.53 270. 95. 103.34 NOTE:—All securities are valued at the price at which they were purchased or at the value assigned to them when they were donated.842 9.600.919.00 5. 30.R.093.365.00 S 6. 200. 110. 88.600.774 PRICE % CASH PRICE <a O Th0 Colonial Oil Company Crescent Pipe Line Company (par §50) Cumberland Pipe Line Company .007 160.966 2. (Kentucky) Standard Oil Co.482.000.00 4.20 130..00 918.325.800. Preferred Galena-Signal Oil Co. . 2nd Preferred Pressed Steel Car Company Preferred The Provident Loan Society Certificates (Par $5. 185.00 1.75 100.EXHIBIT "W-Continved STOCKS NAME Oil Company Stocks: 20 40 RATE % NUMBER or SHARES 495 690 619 7.875.000) United States Rubber Company 1st Preferred 12 12 6 40 8 13 10 10 20 46 20 30 6 40 6 6 6 7 7 7 6 7 6 8 295.13 3.695 4.070. 190.00 200.959.12 894.00 145.413. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .062. 70. 275.420.478 2.488.70 89.00 10.JB.877.

TREASURER'S REPORT 1914 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

833.088.321.015.556.321.56 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Gentlemen: Herewith are submitted statements giving the financial statistics fiscal year ending December 31.15 1.054.960.054.34 73.146.59 1.34 224.541. GENERAL BALANCE STATEMENT ASSETS INVESTMENTS: General Fund (Exhibit H) Special Funds ASSETS ACQUIRED THROUGH APPROPRIATIONS OF INCOME: Grand Chenier Tract— Bird Refuge in Louisiana ACCRUED INCOME ON GENERAL INVESTMENTS ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CASH ON DEPOSIT 604.00 $103.63 174.95 5105.102 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION THE ROCKEFELLER To the Members of THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION. 1914.27 $103.000.764.886.

Laura S. 1914 FUNDS AND OBLIGATIONS GENERAL FUND: Original donations (Exhibit A) Reserve (Exhibit A) $100.079.764.079.48 §105.146..1914. Rockefeller (ExhibitB) INCOME: Appropriated for purchase of assets Jn suspense Special contribution (Exhibit D).000. D.00 224.395.00 $ 73.000.95 80.TREASURER'S REPORT—1914 103 FOUNDATION December 31.00 320.886.000. ROCKEFELLER'S DESIGNATIONS.000. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR PAYMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF MR.00 80.73 SPECIAL FUNDS: Gift of Mr.35 2.56 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ..000. of The Rockefeller Foundation and its subsidiary organizations for the AS OF DECEMBER 31.895.320.500.00 500.01 1.263.00 48. J. Rockefeller (ExhibitC) $ Gift of Mrs.73 100.000.00 4.04 784. NOT YET MATURED: (Exhibit D) UNPAID FOUNDATION APPROPRIATIONS: (Exhibit E) UNAPPROPRIATED INCOME 25.338.769.305.

General 4s 93.45 8 44. due 1915 100.901.000.9626 272.0971 228. mentis 200. $400.104 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Changes in Investments During the Year 1914 Were as Follows: Sold and Redeemed at a gain of $170. Scrymser Co.674 277. Milwaukee & St. 67.64 220.000 Chicago.115.000.00 24.000 Chicago.00 1. 442 shares Continental Oil Co. Central Lines EquJpGAIN $ 4. 13.8559 98038 345.60 170.97 9.96 1. 30 shares New York Transit Company 937 shares Northern Pipe Line 695 shares South West Penn.45 8215. City Corporate Stock 6% Notes 1.000 N. Preferred 145 shares Borne.82714 97. Pipe Lines 331 shares Swan & Finch Co.00 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .671.062 600. Burlington & Quincy.653 337.69 276. Net Gain 100 100.505.000.6935 148. 1.32 13.000 New York City Corporate Stock Notes 6%.00 515. Y.217. Paul General Mortgage 4^s 103. Y.538. 79.925.000 Sunday Creek Collateral Trust 6s 60 shares American Shipbuilding Co. due 1916 100.0^1.8963 100.000 N.790.10 669.375.505.95 S215.00 214.603.000 Chicago.39 8215.139.000.50 4.00 67.600 shares Wabash RR Preferred 5. 787 shares Crescent Pipe Line Company 65 shares Eureka PipeLineCo.67 1.000 International Navigation 1 st Sinking Fund 6s @ 100 36.505.760. 214.00 646.52 157.75 18.710 shares Union Tank LineCo.926..667 120.959 57.5 600. Paul Debenture of 1909 4s 91.03 $19.846 293.000 New York City Two Year Revenue Bonds 6s.92 17. S 257.45 Bought: $ 400 Ashland Power Co. 1 st Mtge 6s ©100.968.296. Milwaukee & St.700 shares Wabash RR Common 16.91 1.00 * 935.000.23 7.088 .

The Protective Committee for the St.7625 91.000 shares Northern Pacific Ry 91.33 500 shares Great Northern Ry. As a special fund this account is shown separately in Exhibit "B. as long as the Foundation shall deem it wise.051.05 53.1402 117. with whom the bonds were deposited.00 100. Treasurer. Louis & San Francisco Company. This has been credited to the cost of $716. Consolidated Mortgage 5% bonds. and January 1st. John D. reducing value to $198.00 390. which have been in default since their receipt.38146 367. to the amount of $202. thus reducing the book value of same to $1. has not been treated as income. due 1917 @100.400 (Total 8603. 1914.000 New York City Three Year Revenue Bonds 6s.169. MtgeGold4s 83.066.039 499.000.00 1.6439 90. which give the various financial details in reference to the Foundation.000 Southern Pacific Branch Railway Co.28.168.750. have purchased the coupons maturing July 1st. G.00 100.50 84.4^s 93.140. 6s 117.160.000. Preferred 106.000 Northern Pacific Ry.00 1. Respectfully submitted.400 have since been credited with a payment of $4. Under date of December 16. 1915.908. the income of which is to be paid to the Baptist Home for the Aged of New York City.20 450. Rockefeller conveyed to the Foundation $26.100 shares Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Common 82. The $520.72.000 par value Canada Southern Ry.5 94. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .00 504. MYERS.762. have^been deposited with the Farmers' Loan & Trust Company as depositary for the Protective Committee for this issue.997. Cons.6 375.025.000 New York Central Lines Equipment Trust of 1913 Gold 4>& 99.000 Pere Marquette RR Consolidated 4% Bonds.28) as a distribution of the proceeds of the sale of Euclid Heights Realty Company property." There follow eight statements. and a participation certificate in mortgages on property formerly owned by the Euclid Heights Realty Company. Mr.TREASURER'S REPORT—1914 106 $ 94.030.500.03 During the year the Foundation has received from the Cleveland Trust Company $401.000 (par value) Euclid Heights Realty Company Bonds. The $80.000 of this issue owned by the Foundation. 1914. Louis & San Francisco Refunding 4% bonds (now in default).000 received for the coupons belonging to the $2.000 New York City 4M% Corporate Stock. entitled Exhibits "A" to "H" inclusive.466. but is carried in "Suspense" pending the outcome of the receivership of the St. $ 94.000 Washington Railway & Elec. The Mortgages of $202. L. due 1964 94. Refunding & Imp.370.

in securities and accrued dividends 66.000.000. John D.028.320. Rockefeller's gift of June 27. mention of their principal..00 348. in securities and accrued dividends 10.73 principal referred to above.000.108 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Statement Showing Condition of Various Funds Held by The Rockefeller Foundation as of December 31. The endowments being of a special character. in securities and accrued interest and dividends 21.00 $100.000. 8. John D.73 §100.320. income.200.00 flnvested in $60.73 schedule (Exhibit H) 1100. 1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to the Baptist Home of Northern Ohio).00 INCOME ACCOUNT Twelve months' interest on above gifts Amount sent to the various Societies as above £3.241.000.00 320.73 "Investments in general investment $100.000.070. In addition to the 5100.00 * NOTE:—The Investment Schedule (Exhibit H) covers.1913.1913 (Income payable at Foundation's .61.54 Mr.00 Mr.000.000.00 Mr. in bonds $ 3. Rockefeller's gift of March 6.73 148.159.1914.569. Trustees.569. representing Income temporarily Invested.178. ROCKEFELLER: Gift of June 7. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .920.73 8100.00 3.052.320.1913.079.079. Rockefeller. 1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to Euclid Avenue Baptist Church.73 EXHIBIT "B" SPECIAL FUNDS OF MRS.402. or appropriations is made only in the General Balance Statement on page 103.discretion to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York) 8.320.079. Rockefeller's gift of June 4.000.000.00 Gift of November 29. Murphy and Jerome D. Ohio) 24.00 Gift of December 9. Starr J. from Messrs. 1913.320. securities amounting to $2.1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York) $ 8.00 Gift of September 11.079. Greene.46 RESERVE: Gains on securities sold and redeemed $ Special distribution Solar Refining Company 171.695.000 Colorado Industrial Company 5% Bonds @ 80% 48.000. LAURA S. 1914 EXHIBIT "A" PRINCIPAL OF GENERAL FUND OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Amount received May 29. Jr. Cleveland. •f NOTE:—The securities referred to above are not Included In the Investment Schedule (Exhibit H).079.

00 invested in 325. 80.731. ROCKEFELLER: Gift of December 15.651.831.. mention of their principal.643.924. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000 Canada Southern Ry.162.000.".00 EXHIBIT "D" Statement Showing Receipts and Disbursements of The Rockefeller Foundation Income from General Funds for Year 1914 (SPECIAL FUNDS SHOWN BY EXHIBITS "B" AND "C" ARE NOT INCLUDED HEREIN) RECEIPTS Balance January 1. and January.19 Secretary's office 1.75 Total income available for disbursement during year $6.489.70 Income for year 1914.906.45 * NOTE:—The securities referred to above are not included in the Investment Schedule (Exhibit H).986.817.000. St.45 Proceeds sale of July.828.835. $1.13 Mr.000. as to which there is no restriction $3.1914.64 Commission 36.000. 1914.00 Contribution for Belgian Relief work from Miss Olivia Cutting 500.337.95 AMOUNTS CARRIED FORWARD 350.1914 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to the Baptist Home for the Aged of New York City) 825.1914.383.122.62 Total income for 1914 5.68 Treasurer's office 11.00 DISBURSEMENTS DIRECT EXPENDITURES BY THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ON ACCOUNT OF APPROPRIATIONS: ADMINISTRATION EXPENSES! Traveling S 780.65 86.000.568. 1915.t TREASURER'S REPORT—1014 107 EXHIBIT "C" SPECIAL FUND OF MR.000 for period March 6 to December 31.652. or appropriations fa made only in the General Balance Statement on page 103. JOHN D.32 836. coupons belonging to $2. Company Consolidated 5s @ 100% 25.82 0 813. income. Louis and San Francisco Refunding 4s now in default (carried in suspense).. Rockefeller's proportion of "Reservation" of $2. set aside 1.984.000.484. The endowments being of a special character.69 APPROPRIATIONS EXPENDED BY FOUNDATION SUBSIDIARY ORGANIZATIONS: China Medical Commission: Conference §1.

000..00 Aha Social Settlement of Cleveland 4.000.00 48.96 Grand Chenier Tract.000.984.000.000.00 AMOUNTS CARRIED FORWARD S55.00 10.00 25.34 16.031.383.06 1.421.00 American Academy in Rome Association for Improving Conditions of Poor Brooklyn Bureau of Charities Bureau of Municipal Research Bureau of Social Hygiene .45 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .651.00 §1.986.603.00 10.618.00 War Relief. ROCKEFELLER'S DESIGNATIONS: 10.46 PAYMENTS MADE TO UNAFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS: ON ACCOUNT OF FOUNDATION APPROPRIATIONS: American Red Cross 20. La.984.000.00 35. 850.108 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AMOUNTS BROUGHT FORWARD.00 182.06 Investigation of Industrial Relations 5.00 6.879.986.640.000.613. 994.500. for Bird Refuge 224.00 American Female Guardian and Home for the Friendless 600. Japan ON ACCOUNT OF MR.53 10.65 China Medical Board 2.519.292.53 American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 60.000.95 International Health Commission 133.886.81 $6.237.00 8.000.000. Cooperation and Efficiency in Foreign Missionary Work Charity Organization Society New York Milk Committee Relief Society for the Calamities in ( the Northeastern Districts and Kyushu.000.13 Research in Governmental Problems 10.

M.00 New Jersey Baptist Convention 1.00 Eugenic Field Workers (State institutions) 1.00 Boy Scouts of America. Mass 2..TREASURER'S REPORT—1914 109 AMOUNTS BEOUGHT FORWARD $65.00 Legal Aid Society of New York 1. A.45 Baptist Ministers* Home Society of New York.603.986. 6. 47.551.C..986.Y. C..00 National League on Urban Conditions among Negroes 1... on Prevention of Tuberculosis 500. Ass'tions..00 Honest Ballot Association of N.000..000.000.000.000.00 $1.00 $1.984. M..00 AMOUNTS CARRIED FORWARD 0148..551.00 Cleveland School of Arts.00 Baptist Union of Western Canada 10.00 Layman's Missionary Movement 5.00 International Y.00 Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America. 500.000.500. 500.000.00 International Committee of Y.SOO. 700..Y.00 National Highways Protective Society 250. C.500.00 National Child Labor Commission 1.OO Newfoundland Sealing Disaster Sufferers 3.00 Charity Organization Soc.. C.46 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . College.000. Springfield.34 $6.000.984.00 Charity Organization Society.500.000.000.C 1.000.34 $6. 5.000.000.00 Brooklyn Bureau of Charities 2.603.350.00 Girls'Branch of the Public School League of N. M.00 George Junior Republic Association 2.00 Cleveland Federation of Charity and Philanth'py 2.. A 1.00 Brooklyn Y. 200.

Rockefeller's Reservation. C.600.. M.00 Y. N. M.624.16 4.236.36 Amount credited to Suspense 80.986.984.00 Undisbursed Income .34 $6.00 Westchester Poor: Special Agent 900.000. New York 160.00 Prison Association of New York 600.45 NOTE:—Above balance is divided as follows: Amount to credit of Mr.00 State Charities Aid Association 2.960.. Rec.45 New York Association for Improving Conditions of Poor $6..110 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AMOUNTS BROUGHT FORWARD $148. 4.986..00 WhJttier House..695.00 $1.00 New York Child Labor Committee 300.84 $6.61 On Deposit 1.27 BALANCE.000..000. $174.46 $6.316.984. New York City 600.097.659..00 Religious Education Association 760.00 Y..064.00 1858.00 Park and Playground Association 250. New York City 3.241. $ 784.641.000. Acts.000.986.895.53 2.00 Westchester Poor: Eugenic Investigator 676.500.04 170. 627.603. Brooklyn.49 Total 84.551.000.524. A.00 Public Education Ass'tion 2.306.00 Amount credited to Special Contributions 500. J 1. Pble. C..984..00 The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.940.59 Acts.27 Salem Relief Fund 10.000.00 Public School Athletic League.00 Society for Italian Immigrants 760.492. A...49284 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000.65 Income Receivable Investments in General Schedule 604. 3.00 New York Milk Committee 4.064.

TREASURER'S REPORT—1614

ill

EXHIBIT WE" Statement Showing All Appropriations from General Funds Made in Accordance with Resolutions Passed at Meetings of The Foundation from its Beginning on May 22, 1913, to December 31, 1914
APPROPRIATIONS TO BE EXPENDED UNDER DIRECTION OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNAMOUNTS DATION: APPROPRIATED PAYMENTS China Medical Board .................. $609,118.96 $ 2,618.98 China Commission____. ............... 36,651.96 36,661.96 Grand ChenierTract, Louisiana,Bird Refuge 225,386.96 224,886.95
Investigation of Industrial Relations ..... 20,292.13 5,292.13

International Health Commission ........ 482,578.37 Scientific Research in Governmental Problems .............................. 50,000.00 War Relief ........................... 1,018,261.46 APPROPRIATIONS MADE TO UNAFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS : American Academy in Rome ............ American Association for Conservation of Vision .............................
Association for Improving Condition of

142,467.76 10,000.00 994,613.06

100,000.00 25,000.00

10,000.00

the Poor ........................... 225,000.00 25,000.00 American Red Cross ................... 120,000.00 120,000.00 Bureau of Municipal Research .......... 40,000.00 35,000.00 Bureau of Social Hygiene ............... 8,640.00 8,640,00 Brooklyn Bureau of Charities ........... 10,000.00 10,000.00 Charity Organization Society ........... 10,000.00 10,000.00 Foreign Missionary Work (Cooperation and Efficiency in) ..................... $450,000.00 Less Amount Lapsed.... 1,120.47 448,879.53 48,879.63 New York Milk Committee ............. 5,000.00 6,000.00 Relief Society for the Calamities in the Northeastern Districts and Kyushu, Japan ............................ 10,000.00 10,000.00 Wellesley College......................750,000.00 _ Totals ....................... $4,094,809.36 $1,699,050.35 Unpaid Appropriations ................. §2,395,759.01 $4,094,809.36 $4,094,809.36

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

J12

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION EXHIBIT "F"

Financial Statements of Subsidiary Organizations of the Rockefeller Foundation for the Year 1914
INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Balance of Appropriation Unexpended January 1,1914.. $ 15,769.30 Appropriated March 18,1914 50,000.00 Appropriated September 25,1914 100,000.00 $165,769.30 DISBURSEMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT EXPENSE: Office Salaries $19,694.03 General Office Expense 3,545.18 Traveling Expense... 4,936.87 Rent 2,967.36 Library 260.93 Office Furnishings.... 1,781.53 Director's Assistant in Egypt and Ceylon 2,500.00535,685.90 Motion Pictures of Clinics and FieldWork 1,260.48 Printing and mailing Circulars in connection with Survey of Foreign Medical Missionaries. 60.47 Hookworm Charts 250.00 Panama-Pacific Exposition 6,07651 S 43,333.06 WEST INDIES: Field Director's Salary (from Sept., 1914) Field Director's Traveling (from Sept.1914) Field Director's Report, on account British Guiana Trinidad Antigua Grenada St. Lucia St. Vincent

$1,333.32 318.86 1,652.18

7.63 9,711.36 9,134.67 3,780.08 7,003.76 4,742.30 4,335.18 38,707.33 40,367.14

- *

CENTRAL AMERICA: Field Director's Salary 6,533.27 Field Director's Traveling Expenses 1,309.76 7,843.03 AMOUHT« CARRIED FORWARD $7,843.03 $83,700.20 $165,769.30

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

TREASURER'S REPORT—1914

113

AMOUNTS BaoucHT FORWARD ..,, $7,843.03 $83,700.20 $165,769.30 Panama 9,817.41 Costa Rica 9,174.60 Guatemala 186,63 Nicaragua 375.00 19,552.64 27,395.57 EAST: Field Director's Salary Egypt 2,499,99 19,641.30

22,141.29 8133,237.06 32,532.24 $165,769.30 $165,769.30

Balance of Appropriation Unexpended

EXHIBIT "G"

Financial Statements of Subsidiary Organizations of The Rockefeller Foundation for the Year 1914
CHINA MEDICAL COMMISSION
Conference Expenses $ 1,489.64 Visit to England of Representative 1,519.93 Commission Expenses: Salaries $17,938.31 Traveling Expenses 14,221.32 Other Expenses: Equipment $195.50 Printing Report 579.14 774.64 32,934.27 Miscellaneous Expenses: Cable Messages 99.05 Exchange for Drafts on Letters of Credit 599.07 Cost of Express Traveler's Checks 10.00 708.12 $36,651.96 CHINA MEDICAL BOARD Salaries Traveling Expenses Other Expenses: Equipment $1,660.33 23.00 35.63 °

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Salaries Traveling Expenses Other Expenses

1,618.96 =
4,068.25 455.10 768.78 5,292.13

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

EXHIBIT "H"

Schedule of Securities of The Rockefeller Foundation on December 3is 1914, Representing Both Principal, and Income Temporarily Invested BONDS
H

NAME
American Agricultural Chem. 1st Mtg. Conv Ashland Power Company 1st Mtg Atlantic & Birmingham Railway 1st Mtg Baltimore & Ohio Il.R. 1st Mtg T.

RATE %

DATE OP MATURITY

AMOUNT $500,000 8,000 677,000 6,000 £ 500 $2,000 551,000 854,000 1,305,000 1,000,000 300,000 30,000 500,000 600,000 50,000 80,000 600,000 73,000 700,000 600,000

PRICK %

CASH PRICE
1 505,000 00 8,000.00 609,300 00 5,460 00 2,650.00 1,780 00 358,150 00 462,620.00 1,109,250.00 935,000 00 189,000 00 29,100.00 515,000.00 546,376.00 47,600.00 81,600.00 486,000 00 65,700.00 587,250.00 475,000 00

H o o

Oct 1928 Jan. 192S Jan. 1934 July 1948 5 July 1915 Central Pacific Ry. 30 yr. Gtd. by So, Pac &A Aug. 1929 3 Chicago & Alton R.R. Refunding Oct. 1949 Chicago & Alton Ry. 1st Mtg. Lien SM July 1960 5 Chicago City & Connecting Rys. Coll. Trust Jan. 1927 4 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R.R. Gen. Mtg Mar. 1958 4 Chicago & Eastern 111. R.R. Refdg. & Imp July 1955 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Gen. Ry. Mtg. Ser. A.. . . 4 May 1989 Chicago, Milwaukee & St, Paul Gen. Ry. Mtg. Ser. C.. . . 4J-6 May 1989 4 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Debenture July 1934 4 Chicago & North Western Railway Extension Aug. 15, '26 Chicago & North Western Railway Skg. Fund Debenture 5 May 1933 5 Feb 1927 Cleveland, Cin., Chic. & St. Louis Ry., St. Louis Div. Coll.Tr. 4 Nov. 1990 Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Ry. Gen. Mtg. 4 June 1993 Cleveland Short Line 1st Mtg. Gtd. L.S.&M.S 4^ April 1961

5 5 5 4

101. 100.

97. 103. 91.0625

90. 91. 102. 89. 66. 53. 85. 93.6 63.

95.

H w O 21

§ § u >

102. 97 90. 83.89 95

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

4 Interborough Rapid Transit 1st 5 International Mercantile Marine Mtg. & Coll. Tr. Gold-. . 4Y2 International Navigation Co. 1st Skg. Fund 5 Lake Erie & Western R.R. 2nd Mtg 6 Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry. 1st Mtg 3% Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry, Debenture 4 Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry, Debenture 4 Long Island R.R. Refunding 4 Louisville 82 Nashville R.R. Unified 4 Magnolia Petroleum Company 1st 6

Colorado Industrial Co. Conv Denver & Rio Grande R.R. 1st Consol Erie R.R. Conv. Series "B" Euclid Heights Realty Co. (Cleve. Trust Co. Receipt fo bonds) ." . .' Cleveland Trust Co. Participation Ctf. in certain mtgs. on property formerly owned by Euclid Heights Realty Co

6 4 4

Aug. 1934 Jan. 1936 April 1953

2,000,000 6,000 1,065,000 716,000

80. 85. 75.

1,600,000.00 6,100.00 798,750.00 1,997.72 198,370.00 HJ 261,000.00 £ 960,000.00 S 2,030,600.00 w 978,750.00 g 100,000.00 g 805,620.00 id 701,040.00 on 2,459,160.00 w 1,800.00 w 5,580.00 3 3,200,000.00 % 1,113,000.00 H 1,318,800.00 1 144,812.50 S 250,000.00 K 463,503.96 94,500.00 14,000.00 67,000.00 94,000.00 33,250.00 K 5

Liq. to

Mutual Fuel Gas Co. 1st Mtg

Missouri, Kansas & Texas Ry. Gen. Skg. Fund . . Missouri Pacific Ry. 40-year Collateral Morris & Essex 1st R.R, Mtg, & Refunding


VA 5
4^

New York, Chicago & St, Louis R.R. 1st Mtg

N. Y. Central Lines Equip. Tr. of 1913 Gold New York City Corporate Stock New York City Corporate Stock Notes New York City Two-Year Revenue Bonds New York City Three-Year Revenue Bonds

4M 6' 6 6 4

Nov. 1955 Jan. 1966 Oct. 1922 Feb. 1929 July 1941 June 1997 Sept. 1928 May 1931 Mar, 1949 July 1940 Jan. 1937 Jan. 1936 Mar. 1945 Dec. 2000 Nov. 1947 36M ea. yr. Jan. '16-28 Mar. 1964 Sept. 1915 Sept. 1916 Sept. 1917 Oct. 1937

Liq. to 202,400 300,000 87. 1,000,000 96. 3,692,000 55. 1,305,000 75. 100,000 100. 926,000 87. 762,000 92. 2,673,000 92. 2,000 90. 6,000 80. 3,200,000 100. 1,325,000 84. 2,198,000 60. 175,000 82.75 250,000 100. 468,000 99.039 100,000 94.6 14,000 00. 67,000 00. . 94,000 00. 36,000 95.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

EXHIBIT "H"-Coniinwd NAME New York, Chicago & St. Louis R.R. Deb ,
New York Connecting R.R. 1st Mtg Norfolk & Western R.R. 1st Consol. Mtg

RATE DATE OF % MATURITY
4 4M

AMOUNT 1,303,000 260,000 6,600 390,000 5,600 61,925 £ 2,400 $620,000 1,000,000 500,000 66,000 600,000 26,000 2,000,000 450,000 455,000 100,000 81,000 117,000 3,000 45,000 460,000 1,032,000 4,039,000 140,000 434,000

PRICE %
87. 93.38146 91 91 5761 93. 100 99. 63 97. 95. 97. 103. 81. 76. 60. 77. 117.1402 98 106. 65. 83.5 78.9193 69. 100. 80.

CASH PRICB 1,133,610.00 233,453.65 6,005 00 357,160.00 6,115.00 51,925 00 11,880.00 327,600 00 970,000.00 476,000.00 64,320.00 616,000,00 22,600 00 1,520,000.00 270,000.00 350,360 00 117,140.20 63,180 00 114,660.00 3,180 00 29,260 00 376,750.00 814,168.76 2,786,910 00 140,000.00 347500.00 $35,803,606.79

May Aug. Oct Northern Pacific Ry. Refunding & Imp , 4V£ July Northern Pacific Ry. Prior Lien Ry, and Land Grant. . . , C Jan. 6 Ohio Fuel Supply Co. Debenture Mar. 4 Pennsylvania R.R. Consolidated May 4 Pere Marquette R.R. Consol Jan. 5 Philadelphia Co. Convertible Debenture May 5 Philadelphia Co, Gold Convertible Aug. 4 Pittsburgh^ Cin., Chic. & St. L. Ry, Con. Ser. "D" Nov. 4U Aug. Pittsburgh, Cin., Chic. & St. L. Ry. Con. Ser. "I" 4x4 July Rutland R.R. 1st Consolidated . . 4 St. Louis & S<m Francisco R.R. Refunding July St. Louis & San Francisco, New Orleans, Texas & Mexico 1st 5 Mar. 5 Seaboard Air Line Ry. Adjustment Oct. 6 Southern Pacific Branch Ry. 1st Mortgage April 5 July Sunday Creek Co. Coll. Trust, 5 Wabash R.R. 2nd Mortgage Feb. 6 Wabash R.R. Detroit & Ohio Ext. 1st July 3U Oct. Wabash R.R. Omaha Division 1st 4 Washington Railway & Electric Cons. Mtg. Gold Dec. Western Maryland Ry. 1st 4 Oct. 5 Western Pacific Ry. 1st Sept. Wheeling & Lake Erie R.R., Lake Erie Div. 1st 5 Oct. Wheeling & Lake Erie R.R. 1st Consol Mar. 4 TOTAL BONDS...

y*

1931 1963 1996 2047 1997 1927 1943 1951 1922 1919 1945 1963
1941 1951 1940 1949 1937 1944

H B S § O

11 O

c
o
2!

1939 1941 1941 1951 1962 1933 1926 1949

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

STOCKS
NAME Oil Company Stock?: Cheseborough Manufacturing Co. Consol. The Colonial Oil Company Crescent Pipe Line Company (par §60) Eureka Pipe Line Company Galena Signal Oil Co, Preferred Galena Signal Oil Co. Common Indiana Pipe Line Co, (Par ISO) National Transit Co. (Par |25) New York Transit Co Northern Pipe Line Company Solar Refining Company Southern Pipe Line Company Standard Oil Company Standard Oil Company Standard Oil Company South West Penn. Pipe (Kentucky) (Nebraska) (Ohio) Lines , ., RATE % NUMBER OF SHARES PRICE % CASH PRICE

20 16 40 i2 6 5 24 8 12 20 12 20 10 10 24 16 20 24 12
6 40

, ,

,

Washington Oil Company (Par $10)

350 49,693 690 619 7,000 14,120 2,481 12,357 4,193 20,842 24,845 126,481 12,392 9,000 4,984 24,845 4,966 7,434 2,482 8,696 8,000 903 24,105 1,774

295. 160. 670. 100. 190. 60. 72. 361.33 140. 190. 125.111 41. 300. 110. 185.007 229.6556 276.016 140. S09 270. 420. 160. 200. 70. 30.

$

103,250.00 7,950,880.00 462,300.00 61,900.00 1,330,000.00 847,200.00 178,632.00 4,464,995.69 587,024,13 3,969,976.12 3,108,385.28 5,185,721.00 3,717,600.00 990,000.00 918,376.00 6,703,308.88 1,365,733.13 1,044,547.23 670,140.00 3,652,320.00 1,280,000.00 180,600.00 1,687,350.00 63,220.00

w > a
VI

» w
M "0 O ft H

TOTAL On. COMPANY STOCKS

§49,603,468.36

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

EXHIBIT "H"-C(Mt&«*«* NAME
Miscellaneous Stocks; American Shipbuilding Co. Preferred American Shipbuilding Co. Common Central National Bank of Cleveland , Chehalis & Pacific Land Company Chicago City & Connecting Ry. Preferred Participation Certificates Chicago City & Connecting Ry. Common Participation Certificates ..,..,,.,. Cleveland Steel Company Cleveland Trust Company Colorado & Southern Ry Company 1st Preferred Consolidated Gas Company , Wm. Cramp & Sons, Ship & Engine Building Co Cuban-American Sugar Company Preferred Erie Railroad Company 1st Preferred Great Lakes Towing Company Common Great Lakes Towing Company Preferred , Great Northern Ry. Preferred , International Agricultural Corp. Preferred International Agricultural Corp. Common International Mercantile Marine Co. Preferred International Mercantile Marine Co. Common International Paper Company Common RATB %

NUMBER OF SHARES
9,467 14,972 21,100

PRICE %

CASH PJMCB $ 803,845.00 524,020.00 2,009,908.33 79,611.10
10,000.00 1,212,856.88 315,540.00 35,774.92

6 8

85. 35.

600 220

95.95
159.22 45.45

2^

17,530 10,518

69. 3875
30.

ffi H » O O W
H

8
10
6 7
,

451 286

2,500 2,121 7,000 20,000

98.6222 100.
238 195

79.32

246,555.56 212,100.00
68,123.77 378,000.00 2,600,000.00 9,720.00 53,265.00 1,688,200.00 14,400.00 135,500.05 53,025.00 340,350.00 62,876.00 64,152.00 49,809.00 3,200.00

E
JS

54.

*i

648 600
36,700 1,200 1,527

130.

15

88 775

7 7

46. 12. 30. 5. 11. 3. 8.

5

I

500

88.7361 106.05

i

M

11,345 12,576 5,832 16,603

400

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

H. H. Kohlsaat Company , Manhattan Railway Company Missouri Pacific Ry. Co National Lead Company Preferred National Lead Company Common New York, Chicago & St. Louis R.R. Common New York, Chicago & St. Louis R.R. 2nd Preferred Northern Pacific Railway Company Ohio Fuel Supply Company (Par §25) Otis Steel Company Preferred Otis Steel Company Common Pope Manufacturing Company Common Pope Manufacturing Company Preferred Pressed Steel Car Company, Preferred Provident Loan Society Certificates (Par 35000) St. Louis & San Francisco R.R. 2nd Preferred Seaboard Air Line Ry. Common Superior Savings & Trust Company (Cleveland, 0.) Tilden Iron Mining Company U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co. Preferred U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co. Common. U. S. Rubber Company 1st Preferred U. S. Steel Corporation Common Woman's Hotel Company (Dividend Scrip $750)

7
7 3

8 7

7 6

12

,

8 2

1,900 10,000 2,000 1,400 73,500 100 400 1,000 4,154 140 329 354 280 500 40 6,000 4,300 3,400 300 1,780 4,987 8,100 300 200 691 300

50. 128.776 26. 104. 60. 65. 78.70 91.7626 41. 90. 20. 4. 15. 89.75 100. 7. 54. 21. 297.8333 27.35 44.444 10. 101.2313 85. 100. 80. 80.

95,000.00 1,287,750.00 52,000.00 145,600.00 3,675,000.00 5,600.00 31,480.00 91,762.60 170,314.00 12,600.00 6,580.00 1,416.00 4,200.00 44,876.00 200,000.00 ' 42,000.00 232,200.00 71,400.00 89,350.00 48,683.46 221,644.22 81,000.00 30,369.40 13,000.00 59,100.00 24,000.00 600.00 §17,708,266.19 $103,015,321 .34

» w fa
CO

M > w c!

<o

M If*

TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS TOTAL SECURITIES BELONGING TO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

*NoiE.—The securities representing Special Funds Exhibits B and C atts not Included in the above. NoTBi—All securities are valued at the price at which they were purchased or at the value assigned to them when they were donated, Interest and dividends accrued at the date of purchase or donation being allowed for.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

N. S. A. 1913—December 31. 1914 Offices of the Commission 61 Broadway. New York.(Publication No. Y.. 2) THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION % I N T E R N A T I O N A L HEALTH COMMISSION FIRST ANNUAL REPORT June 27. U. /p/5 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . January.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

D. Meyer. D. Houston Frederick T. Director for the East * Members of the Executive Committee. Heydt* Simon Flexner* David F. D. Gates Starr J. D. M. Gorgas Walter H. QREENE* Recording Secretary Charles W. M. Ferrell. H. Director of Surveys and Exhibits J. ROCKEFELLER. Director for the West Indies Victor G. M. Page William H. M. JR. White. Welch ADMINISTRATIVE WickliflFe Rose Director-General STAFF John A. Murphy* William C. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . D. Assistant Director-General Ernst C. Eliot Charles 0. Heiser. Director for Latin America H. Howard.* Chairman WlCKLIFFE ROSE Director-General JEROME D. Ph. H.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION MEMBERS JOHN D.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

To the President of the Rockefeller Foundation: Sir:— I have the honor to submit herewith my report as Director-General of the International Health Commission for the period June 27. to December 31. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Director-General. 1914. 1913. WICKLIFFE ROSE. Respectfully submitted.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

a permanent institution. the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. mental and moral growth. has ascertained that the diagnosis of the disease can be made with ease and certainty and that it can be readily cured and easily pre- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rockefeller with one hundred million dollars. John D. 1913. endowed by Mr. has found more than two million people in the Southern States to be infected with the disease. adopted the following resolution: WHEREAS. involving vast suffering. A. composed of five men. S.CHAPTER I GENERAL SUMMARY The International Health Commission was created June 27. Its object is the "promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine. and chartered by the State of New York. U. are members of the Commission ex officio. great loss of life. and noticeable decrease in economic efficiency over vast regions. Funds for its maintenance are provided by the Rockefeller Foundation. The Executive Committee of the Foundation. organized in 1909 for the eradication of hookworm disease in the United States. and WHEREAS. residents of New York City. the Commission has treated or caused to be treated more than five hundred thousand persons. by the Rockefeller Foundation. partial arrest of physical. in creating the Commission." with the world as its field. The Foundation.

the Commission has ascertained by diligent and extensive inquiry that hookworm disease prevails in a belt of territory encircling the earth for thirty degrees on each side of the equator. and be it further 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and that where it is most severe little or nothing is being done toward its arrest or prevention. that this work be entrusted to a special committee to be called the International Health Commission. inhabited. county and municipal officers are eager to cooperate in all helpful ways. therefore be it RESOLVED. that this disease has probably been an important factor in retarding the economic. that the infection is being spread by emigration. and to this end be it RESOLVED. an intelligent public interest is awakened in hygiene and in modern scientific medicine and in practical measures for permanent public sanitation. as they may associate with themselves. and so far as practicable to follow up the treatment and cure of this disease with the establishment of agencies for the promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine. by more than a thousand million people. social. members of the Foundation or otherwise. that this Foundation is prepared to extend to other countries and peoples the work of eradicating hookworm disease as opportunity offers. and that. following the treatment and cure of this disease. and WHEREAS. intellectual and moral progress of mankind.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION vented. according to current estimates. state boards of health. physicians. consisting of the members for the time being of the Executive Committee of this Foundation and such other persons. has found that the people. that the infection in some nations rises to nearly ninety per cent of the entire population.

The Commission opened offices in Washington.. Ferrell. and also to adopt rules and regulations for its own government and for the expenditure of such funds as shall be placed at its disposal. Murphy. the International Health Commission shall report to the Foundation in detail its operations and expenditures. Houston. and RESOLVED. Rockefeller. and shall present for approval its budget for the following year.. Jr. was appointed Assistant Director-General. Greene. Chairman. William C. Walter H. that at each annual meeting of the Foundation.GENERAL SUMMARY RESOLVED. Gorgas. Wickliffe Rose. Jr. Jerome D. Greene. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . in connection with the offices of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission.. John A. Wickliife Rose. Recording Secretary. M. Rockefeller. Jerome D. Officers of the Commission were elected as follows: John D. Charles 0. C. Eliot. Welch. Gates.. and the work of preliminary organization began. his term of service to begin July i. David F. D. D. 1913. the following persons were made members of the International Health Commission: John D. Page. Charles W. Heydt. Simon Flexner. Director-General. Pursuant to this resolution. that the International Health Commission be authorized to adopt such policies and to employ such agencies as it may deem best adapted for the conduct of the work. Starr J.. Frederick T. and William H.

000.600. of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. Of the 1.* In many countries infection is extremely prevalent. The infection belts the globe in a zone about 66° wide.10 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION I WHAT THE COMMISSION HAS UNDERTAKEN TO DO The resolution creating the Commission assigned to it two tasks: (i) "to extend to other countries the work of eradicating hookworm disease as opportunity should offer". 39 per cent were found to be infected. Of 548.000^ live in countries where the infection is prevalent.000. Practically all countries within this zone are infected.992 rural children microscopically examined in the Southern states." In keeping with this definition of purpose the Commission has directed its initial efforts to the first and more immediate task of extending to foreign countries work for the relief and control of uncinariasis or hookworm disease." pages 3 and following. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6. about 900. "Hookworm Infection in Foreign Countries. and (2)" so far as practicable to follow up the treatment and cure of this disease with the establishment of agencies for the promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine.. extending roughly from parallel 36° north to parallel 30° south.000 people inhabiting the globe. Reports received by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission *See Publication No. The relief and control of this one disease is an undertaking of enormous magnitude.

and (3) setting in operation and making effective such sanitary measures as will 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .GENERAL SUMMARY 11 in 1911. 90 per cent are infected. that there is an extremely heavy infection in some parts of India and among the coolies on many estates in Malaya and Fiji which import their labor from India. (2) microscopically examining the people and curing those who are found infected. that in Egypt the infection of the laboring population is approximately 50 per cent. the infection in many parts of the Yangtse Valley running as high as 70 to 76 per cent among the farming population. that in Dutch Guiana the infection on many plantations runs as high as 90 per cent. 6. the infection among the coolies on sugar estates being even greater.000 feet above. The relief and control of the disease in a given country involves: (i) making a survey to determine the geographic distribution and the approximate degree of infection. that of the population of British Guiana. estimate: that of the population of Colombia living between sea level and 3. that the southern two-thirds of the Chinese Empire is involved. that on many plantations in Ceylon the infection runs as high as 90 per cent. 50 per cent are infected. and summarized in its Publication No. that 50 per cent of the Indian coolies on sugar and tea estates in Natal are infected.

The accomplishment of this result will require the operation of permanent agencies working over long periods of time. The attitude assumed by the International Health Commission toward this work is that assumed by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in its cooperation with the Southern States. With this in mind one may get some comprehension of what is involved in an effort to extend this work to the whole infected zone. Dr. and one which no outside agency should do if it could. with its 900. The International Health Commission has not undertaken to eradicate uncinariasis in any country. "The Eradication of Ankylostoraiasis: Methods and Administrative Measures as Illustrated by the Campaign in British Guiana. Howard's report of the work being done in British Guiana* gives a definite conception of what is required for the relief and control of the disease in a small area. namely:that the bringing of this disease under control in any country is a work which no outside agency working independently could do if it would. I. In this spirit the Commission has accepted the invitation of eleven *See Publication No. that if the infection is to be stamped out in any area the country in which it exists rnust assume the responsibility." 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .12 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION put a stop to soil-pollution.000.000 people. and that the Commission may be of service in so far as it may cooperate with the Governments of foreign countries in organizing and making effective their own agencies.

June 27. the Director-General was authorized to go in person or to send a representative to British dependencies and to Latin-American countries for the purpose of preliminary investigation and conference. J. It is prepared to extend this cooperation to other countries as conditions invite.1913. Page. Three such journeys were made: (i) to England. H. Mr. To England:—The Commission's first step in the direction of cooperation with foreign countries was a visit to England for conference with British medical authorities and the British Government. This visit had been arranged by the American Ambassador in London. I. and (3) to Egypt and British dependencies in the Far East.GENERAL SUMMARY 13 foreign countries during the current year to cooperate in the relief and control of this disease. Dr. of the United States Public Health Service. Walter H. represented the Commission on similar journeys to countries in Central America. (2) to the British West Indies. himself a member of the Inter- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . White. II PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATIONS AND CONFERENCES At the first meeting of the International Health Commission. Travel on these missions consumed most of the time of the Director-General during the first twelve months of the Commission's existence.

SurgeonGeneral of British Guiana. . A series of conferences followed. physicians. Dr. Godfrey.the most important of which was at a dinner given by Mr. -> Sandwith told of his experience with uncinariasis in Egypt. where more than 50 per cent of the working population of the Delta are infected. Secretary of State for India. Page.14 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION national Health Commission and keenly interested in what it was proposing to do. and government officials whose advice and suggestions were of great value. told of the bringing 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and explained that the International Health Commission is prepared to extend the work to other countries where the infection is prevalent and where conditions seem to invite such extension. at the Marlborough Club. Balfour described conditions as he had seen them in the Soudan. 1913. described in detail the methods by which the results exhibited had been accomplished. * Dr. The Director-General exhibited by means of lantern-slides the work which had been done by the cooperation of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission with the Southern States for the relief and control of hookworm disease. and a group of scientists. Dr. on August 13. the Right Honorable Lewis Harcourtv Secretary of State for the Colonies. The Director-General arrived in London on August 10. Among those present were Lord Crewe.

Dr. the Malay States. The following consented to serve as members of the English Advisory Committee: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with headquarters at the Colonial Office. Shipley. Sir Thomas Robinson. As a result of a series of t* conferences held at the Colonial Office it was agreed that there should be an English Advisory Committee. offering all the facilities of his office. The Secretary of State for the Colonies addressed a communication to the British Colonies endorsing c the Commission and its work and accrediting its representatives to the Governments of those countries. Harcourt. -and others contributed details bearing on sanitary requirements or picturing conditions in India. Australia. Lord Crewe spoke in similar spirit for India. Ceylon. in London.• GENERAL SUMMARY 15 of a heavy infection to the sugar estates of that country by the importation of coolie laborers from India. It was agreed that the Commission's first work in foreign countries should be in the British West Indies. and assuring the Commission of the hearty cooperation of the local governments. and the Fiji Islands. It remained only to work out details. gave the Commission an urgent invitation to visit the Colonies. Sir Thomas Barlow. Mr. Finally. after speaking in most generous terms of the work done in the States.

Representing the Indian Government.S. and to discuss with physicians and government authorities working plans for the extension of the service to the colonies in which the infection was found to be prevalent and in which conditions seemed to favor cooperation for its relief and control.R. H. Secretary of the Committee. M. DR. 1913. Director of the Tropical Diseases Bureau. visiting Barbados.C. B. Representing the Egyptian Government. O. G.M.M. Lucia. ' DR. Chairman. S U R G E O N .M. READ.G.M. McCALLUM. J.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION RIGHT HONORABLE VISCOUNT BRYCE. o. A. MR. and December. and Antigua. of the Colonial Office. GRINDLE. MR. COWELL. v. St.G. British Guiana. of the Colonial Office.. MR. HALDANE. to study the local conditions bearing on the problem of relief and control. the Director-General made a journey to the British West Indies. 2. ROBINSON. E. PROFESSOR J. G. The purpose of this journey was to make a preliminary investigation of the conditions of infection. To the British West Indies:—During the months of October.G. November.36 . SIR F.R. F. SlR H.G E N E R A L SIR R. R. G.. SIR DAVID SEMPLE. K. H. Agent-General for Queensland. G. MAJOR SIR T.. F.C. Trinidad. of the Colonial Office. SHIPLEY. S. HODGSON. A.C. Grenada. St. HAVELOCK CHARLES. c. Vincent. In each of the coun- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . K. BAGSHAWE.S.

He made extensive journeys over the Islands. of the London School of Tropical Medicine. To the East:—In March. visited hospitals. F. the British High Commissioner. accompanied him on his journey as far as Ceylon. and made clinical examination of the inmates of prisons. was making public health the chief feature of his administration and was centering attention especially on Egypt's four endemic scourges:— 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Of the seven colonies visited uncinariasis was found to be prevalent in six. He inspected children in the schools. 1914. By invitation of the Commission. poor-houses. returning to the United States by way of the Philippines and Japan. Lord Kitchener. he proceeded to Egypt. Ceylon.GENERAL SUMMARY 17 tries visited the Commission's representative was received most cordially and was given every facility for carrying out the purpose of his mission. and asylums for the insane. and the Federated Malay States. Sandwith. Dr. and examined large numbers of coolies on estates. In Egypt the Commission's representatives were given a most cordial reception. and tentative plans were agreed upon providing for the extension of the service to each of these infected countries. 3. M. After conference with the English Advisory Committee in London. the DirectorGeneral sailed again for England on his way to the East.

18 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION uncinariasis. He expressed himself as eager to have the cooperation of the Commission. and estate managers in both the up-country and the low-country 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . pellagra. 17). in Cairo. and gave assurances that any effective plan for the improvement of health conditions in Egypt would have the active su pport of the Government* Three weeks of observation in Egyptian hospitals and in the field tended to confirm the estimate that more than half the farming population of the Delta harbor Uncinaria. and conferred with physicians. inspected children in the schools. the Department of Health. The Commission's representatives made journeys afield covering a large portion of the infected area. A working plan providing for the cooperation of the Commission and the Government in making a demonstration in one province was formulated and adopted. made clinical examination of large numbers of coolies on tea and rubber estates. planters. and ophthalmia. and the Planters' Association united in extending every facility for the observation of conditions in that Island. bilharziasis. They visited hospitals. Many of these were extremely severe cases. At the Church Mission hospital. about 600 patients from all parts of Egypt were seen under treatment for uncinariasis at one time (See Fig. In Ceylon the Government.

GENERAL SUMMARY 19 sections of the infected area. the Commission's representative submitted a tentative working plan providing 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . There can be no mistaking the prevalence and the disabling effects of uricinariasis in Ceylon. the climate is warm and moist and the ground is well shaded by the rubber trees. the Principal Civil Medical Officer. and the coolies of all ages work with bare feet and bare legs in contact with the polluted soil. Conditions on the rubber estates tend to increase the infection. As a result of these conditions the anaemias on some of the rubber estates visited are as extreme as they were on the coffee estates in Porto Rico when the Porto Rico Anaemia Commission began its work in 1904. At the request of the Government. the habit of the coolies is to befoul the soil about the lines and on the estates. On many rubber estates in the low-country districts local physicians have estimated that 90 per cent of the coolies are infected. Some microscopic examinations were made at the Ratnapura Hospital to check the results of clinical diagnosis. the lines are not provided with latrines. and this estimate would seem to be not excessive. and the Planters' Association. The laborers on these estates are Tamils brought over from India. and most of them are infected before they reach Ceylon. The coolies are massed in lines.

000 coolies on cocoanut and rubber estates. the areas were selected. In Malaya the Commission's representative was given opportunity to extend his observations from Panang to Singapore. Ceylon is a highly prosperous country. On the outbreak of the European war this work was suspended. planters. and had on hand at this time an accumulated surplus medical fund which the Government proposed to use for this purpose. It was not considered necessary for the Commission to contribute funds toward the maintenance of the work. and conferred with physicians. Official records which had been prepared for his coming were placed in his hands. examined clinically about 2. -There is much difference of opinion among the physicians in Malaya as to the importance of uncinariasis as a menace to health and working efficiency in that country. An officer was appointed to have charge of the work. and Government officials in the Straits Settlements and the Federated Malay States. inspected coolie lines. That uncinariasis is prevalent in Malaya there is abundant evidence. Most of the laborers on the large estates 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and microscopists were put under training for the work.20 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION for a demonstration on a small scale to be carried out on a selected group of estates. with medical officers he visited Government and estate hospitals.

But the clinical examination at Port Swettenham of 796 Tamils just arrived from India would indicate that the medical examination in India of intended immigrants to the Federated Malay States weeds out all the severe cases. so that those reaching the estates in Malaya are. The indications are that on many of the rubber estates the infection increases and that severe anaemias result. The anaemia of uncinariasis is not to be distinguished from the anaemia of malaria. In view of this uncertainty. and given the field with a free hand. physically fit. supplied with necessary funds and equipment. But the disabling disease of first importance on these rubber estates is malaria. so far as gross clinical symptoms go. and that to this end a scientific commission should be appointed. it was agreed in conference at Government House that the first effort should be directed toward ascertaining the facts.GENERAL SUMMARY 21 are Tamils brought over from Southern India. and the indications are that a large percentage of these are infected before leaving India. This proposal has been approved by the Colonial Office and by the International Health 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The two diseases are so complicated that it is extremely difficult to determine whether or not uncinariasis on these estates is a sufficient menace to health to justify special effort for its relief and control.

In each of these countries he conferred with physicians. In each of these countries uncinariasis was found to be prevalent. and the organization of the uncinariasis commission is now under way. and Government officials. Guatemala. Victor G. has accepted a position with the International Health Commission as Director of its work for the East. who on leave of absence accepted a position with the Commission for one year as Director of the Commission's work in Latin-American countries. Dr. planters. and made preliminary investigations similar to those made in the West Indies and in the East. To Central America:—On all journeys for preliminary investigation and conference in Central American countries the Commission was represented by Dr. Joseph H. He visited Panama. Costa Rica. and Nicaragua.22 I N T E R N A T I O N A L HEALTH COMMISSI C J^ Commission. In the Philippines the Commission's representative had opportunity for a brief but rather comprehensive survey of the remarkable work which has been done in these Islands by the Department of Public Health during the brief period of American occupation. of the United States Public Health Service. Heiser. under whose direction this work has been done. As a result of this visit. White. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4.

GENERAL SUMMARY 23 In some areas in these countries. reminding one of its effects on the white people in the Southern States or on the jibaros in Porto Rico. the disease is producing severe anaemias. These invitations have been accepted and funds for starting work on a small scale have been appropriated. Grenada. St. Lucia. where there is a heavy infection among the white or the Indian population. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and Egypt. Panama. Costa Rica. Trinidad. and to create a scientific commission to study the relative importance of uncinariasis as a disabling disease in Malaya and other countries in the East. Work is well under way in Panama and Costa Rica. Guatemala. Vincent. Nicaragua. In each of these four countries the Government has invited the Commission to cooperate in the work of relief and control. Antigua. and preliminary arrangements have been made for its opening in the other two countries. Ill ORGANIZATION OF WORK AND WORKING AGENCIES Following these journeys for preliminary investigation of local conditions and for conference with local authorities. definite steps were taken to organize work and working agencies for the 0 relief and control of uncinariasis in British Guiana. St.

the infection can be brought under final control only by means of permanent agencies working over long periods of time. nurses. When the effective working unit for these conditions has been ascertained this unit can be multiplied at will. without waste of funds. The International Health Commission does not undertake to eradicate uncinariasis in any country. seeks to do this in such a way as to aid in building up permanent public health agencies for the control of this disease and all other diseases. By beginning operations on a small scale opportunity is given.24 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION I. Work begins on small scale:—The plan of work adopted for each country makes provision for beginning operations on a small scale. therefore. On opening work in a new country it becomes necessary also to train a local staff of microscopists. The Commission. The opening of work in each new country must be in the nature of an experiment. to try out agencies and methods until they have become adjusted to local conditions. This has distinct advantages. Work under authority and direction of Government:—In each country where this work is in progress it is being done under the authority and direction of Government. 2. while cooperating with Governments in the work of immediate relief. This is regarded as fundamental. and caretakers for 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

In Egypt conditions seem to make it necessary to administer treatment to all of the patients under hospital conditions. it is proposed in due course to cover the whole of this territory. Sharqia Province. women patients. and for 100 in-patients. 3. The general principles of administration and the main lines of work undertaken are common to all. Three prevailing types of working organizations:—Effort to adjust the work in each country to local conditions has given rise to a certain degree of diversity in agencies employed and in methods of work pursued. The staff 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . There are three prevailing types: one in Egypt. and one in the West Indies.646. and blood. in which provision is made for its own staff. When it has become standardized. the service itself is the best training-school for its own employes. The single working unit is the traveling hospital camp under tents. urine. with a population of about 879. and the training of employes goes hand in hand with the enlargement of the work. was selected as the territorial unit of operations for the first demonstration. one in Central America. This was the determining factor in the organization of the work.GENERAL SUMMARY 25 the service. and a small separate enclosure or harem is reserved for. A laboratory is provided for the microscopic examination of fseces.

as carried out in the Southern States. by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. and in the capital town of the Province a group of house hospitals. The personnel consists of: (i) a State Director. four small traveling hospitals. In Central America the determining factor in the organization of the work has been the dispensary method of treatment. the scheme provides for making a survey of the Province to determine the degree of infection. The plan of work designed to cover the whole province provides for one large traveling hospital. The organization and the equipment are relatively simple. a watchman. MacCallan. The whole of this working organization is under the direct supervision of Dr. and for making a sanitary survey to locate the danger-points about the villages from which the infection is spread. (2) under him a staff of Field Directors. a gate-keeper. a cook. and (3) with each Field Director one or more microscopists. of the Government Depart. a water-carrier. A.* ment of Public Health. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . each capable of dealing with a hundred patients at a time. two male and one female attendants. and a messenger-boy. In addition to this hospital accommodation for the treatment of patients. a clerk. each capable of accommodating 30 in-patients.26 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION required to operate this unit consists of two doctors.

and conducts a continuous campaign of education. Under the direct supervision of the State Director is a staff of Field Directors. Diagnosis is by microscopic examination of the faeces. This working organization. each in charge of a circuit of dispensaries. who have immediate charge of the work in the field. In this district he locates a convenient number of dispensary points. To these dispensaries the people come for free examination and treatment. under the department of health. the organizing and directing head of the work for the relief and control of uncinariasis in his country. and is responsible for the efficiency of the service. operates the dispensaries. and through this department to theInternational Health Commission. He reports quarterly to the Government department of health. and visits each of these dispensaries at stated times.GENERAL SUMMARY 27 The State Director is a Government official. an officer of the Government department of health. makes the infection survey and the sanitary survey. the presence of infection being determined by finding eggs of the parasite in the patient's stool. The field director is given as many microscopists as are needed to do the work. He is. To each Field Director is assigned a district. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . They constitute an ambulant service. and is clothed with the powers and responsibilities belonging to such position.

houses. villages. recording name. well-defined area containing a population of about 15. This was first tried out in British Guiana. age. i of the International Health Commission. as nearly as practicable. The plan of operation for this unit area comprises two undertakings. see Publication No. streams. For a detailed account of the demonstration in British Guiana. and the organization of work and working agency which proved its efficiency in this demonstration is coming to be the prevailing type for the West Indies. The scheme for treating the infected requires: mapping the territory. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The success of that experiment made it a demonstration. numbering the houses in which the people live. taking a census of the population. sex.28 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION In the West Indies the determining factor in the organization has been the purpose to approximate. locating roads. complete relief and control of uncinariasis within a given area. each with its own agency: the agency for the maintenance of which the International Health Commission contributes funds undertakes to treat until cured all persons within the area who are found infected.000. The single territorial unit of operations under this plan is a small. and the Government with its sanitary organization undertakes to make effective such sanitary measures as will prevent reinfection.

and continuing microscopic examination of each patient under treatment after each weekly course of medicine until a cure is effected. each with an understudy.—that is.—in charge. IV WORK WHICH THESE ORGANIZATIONS ARE DOING I. Treating the infected:—In all these countries the work is organized with a view to centering first effort on measures of relief. who gives his whole time to the work. As it becomes desirable to enlarge the work. and three office employes. a clerk. and post-office address. making microscopic examination of the entire population. three microscopists. The staff required to operate this scheme for the one area consists of a doctor.—called field director. on 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the Government sanitary staff is putting into operation a system of latrines designed to put a stop to soil-pollution. putting under treatment all persons found infected with Uncinaria. the units of operation may be multiplied at will by increasing the funds and training the required staff. While this force is engaged in treating the infected population of this area. six or eight nurses.GENERAL SUMMARY 29 race. The whole working organization is under the direct supervision of the Surgeon-General or of the State Director.

W. but the experience of the Anaemia Commission in Porto Rico and the larger experience of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in the Southern States demonstrate that in any effective plan of operation the treatment of the people is the easier entering wedge. and on some estates was doubled. By treating the people who came voluntarily to the dispensaries the general average of the haemoglobin index. C. of St. To quote the late Dr. Systematic treatment is justifiable if only as a means of relieving suffering and inefficiency. (2) the attempt to prevent new infections. which in the end bring permanent relief. Of these the first is the more important and easier.30 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION treating the people who are found infected. Vincent: "The measures for the prevention of hookworm disease fall into two groups: (i) the attempt to suppress or dimmish the existing human infection. as 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .— (a) by avoiding the pollution of the soil and water. By treatment alone the working efficiency of the laborers on coffee plantations in Porto Rico was increased from 30 to 50 per cent. The measures of the second group are necessary. but will be unavailing in the absence of the first/' Perhaps one should not go so far as to say that measures of immediate relief of the infected are more important than measures of sanitary control. and (b) by guarding individuals from infection. Branch.

GENERAL SUMMARY 31 estimated for the total population over a large area where the test was made. On many large rubber estates in Malaya. the disease would be under control. The work. and what it means to them as a menace to health and working efficiency. it teaches them how they get it and how they may prevent it.09 in 1904 to 72. As a result of this educational work in British Guiana the villages are now voluntarily contributing toward the maintenance of the inspectors employed by Government to carry out the sanitary measures required to prevent contamination of the soil. and thus enlists their interest in carrying out the" sanitary measures which are necessary for the control of the infection. Treatment also tends to lessen the spread of infection by curing the carriers. little or no anaemia can be detected—the result of systematically sending to hospital for treatment all cases showing clinical symptoms. was raised from 43. teaches the people by demonstration what the disease is. where the infection is prevalent. If all the carriers were cured and kept cured for the space of a year.22 in 1914. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . But the chief advantage to be derived from systematic treatment of the people on a large scale as a first step toward final control is that this is a most effective means of popular education. and where soil-pollution is general. if properly conducted.

Infection survey:—Effort is being made in each country concerned to carry out a survey to determine the geographic distribution of the infection. as the instructing and moving to action of a much larger number of people. it gives a definite measure of progress in the work of control. as the relief of 19. ** In most of the countries the infection survey is conducted in connection with the other regular work and calls for no special provision to carry it out. it gives the people an incentive and basis for helpful cooperation.425 persons have been treated. The significance of this result is to be stated not primarily in medical terms. where doubt existed as to the prevalence and seriousness of uncinariasis.82 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Within the brief period during which the work has been in operation in these countries 19. and to estimate the degree of infection for each infected area. and by making a similar survey from time to time. For every person successfully treated becomes the effective teacher of a circle of friends and neighbors. Dr. Eric Marshall was employed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 2. The survey is based on microscopic examination of stools? The information thus gained has a threefold value: it locates and defines the problem which the Government has to face in attacking the disease. In Antigua. but in educational terms.425 people.

Dr. In Egypt the survey has been completed for Sharqia Province and shows that not less than 56 per cent of the male population are infected. 3. In addition to the examination of stools. in Panama (including Panama City) 54 per cent. and Panama. Lucia about 68 per cent. a number of blood examinations have been made with a view to determining roughly the degree of anaemia which the infection is producing. Egypt. The examinations in the other countries show the percentage of infection for the areas surveyed as follows: in St. Hsemoglobin test:—In connection with the0 work in Antigua. In Antigua. and in Costa Rica 83 per cent. shows an infection of 57 per cent. blood tests were made to determine the degree of anaemia which the infection was producing. in Grenada 54 per cent. Marshall made blood examinations to determine the haemoglobin percentage in 259 infected cases and 15 uninfected cases.—in the interior of Panama 63 per cent. based on an examination of the total population in Peters* Hall District. The survey in British Guiana. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The survey located the infection and defined the areas in which it is now proposed to institute measures for the control of the infection.GENERAL SUMMARY 33 to make a systematic survey of the Island before inaugurating work for the relief and control of the disease.

and three cases to 10 per cent. while some of these cases drop to 60 per cent.256 infected cases and of 706 *See summary for Antigua.t In Egypt Dr. Of the 813 cases. Of the non-infected cases. show a haemoglobin index ranging from 10 per cent to 70 per cent. with three cases dropping to 10 per cent. in 246 cases the index is 70 per cent or above. MacCallan made blood examination of 6. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The record of results indicates that uncinariasis is producing a greater degree of anaemia among the Indian and mixed population of Panama than among the blacks of Antigua. and in 44 cases it reaches 90 per cent. with 15 cases running as low as 10 per cent. to exhibit the contrast in another form: of the infected cases only 72 per cent show an index as high as 80 per cent.* In Panama Dr. tSee summary for Panama. Or. none shows a haemoglobin index below 80 per cent. in 191 cases it runs as high as 80 per cent.34 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION The record of results indicates that the degree of anaemia being produced by uncinariasis among the negro population of that island is relatively slight.examined 522. 50 per cent. Of the 259 infected cases examined only 13 cases show a haemoglobin index as low as 60 per cent. however. or about 56 per cent. Hackett made haemoglobin tests of 813 infected cases. 40 per cent.

256 infected cases. and (2) to locate the danger-points about the Egyptian village from which the infection is spread. or nearly 70 per cent. Preventive measures:—The organization in each of the eleven countries is conducting a sanitary survey to determine the existing conditions responsible for the presence and spread of uncinariasis in the infected areas. is to lay the basis for a system of sanitary measures designed to bring the disease under control. 4. only 54.\ GENERAL SUMMARY \3* \ cases taken at random from schools and ophthalX mic hospitals. In Egypt. show an index as low as 50 per cent. 489 cases give an index as low as 20 per cent. 4. and 246 cases drop to 10 per cent. where the absence of ground-itch has given rise to doubt as to whether the infection is transmitted chiefly through the skin or by the mouth. show a haemoglobin index ranging from 10 per cent to 50 per cent.336. Of the 6. The final purpose of the survey in Egypt.* The anaemia which uncinariasis is producing among the fellahin in Egypt seems to be more severe than in Panama or in Antigua. this survey has for its object: (i) to ascertain0 how the infection is transmitted among the fellahin. as in all the other countries. pages 71 and 72. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . or less than 8 per cent. In interpreting the results of these haemoglobin tests one must take into account bilharziasis in Egypt and malaria in Panama. *See summary for Egypt. Of the 706 cases taken at random without regard to infection.

gives treatment without cost to all persons found infected. proceeds under the law to have the conditions remedied. The work of sanitation is being carried out in the areas in which the work of treatment is in progress. in this area. An appropriation of $11. the purpose being to approximate as nearly as practicable 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . serves also as a sanitary force in administering this law. because of its thoroughness and because of what it promises for the future. and. makes an infection survey to determine the degree of infection. inspects privy conditions at the homes and about public places. As already stated. who desire treatment. the one working organization selects an area for operations. wherever unsatisfactory privy conditions are found. In other words. The sanitary work which is being done jn British Guiana is especially significant.000 per year has been made. the first work undertaken in this Colony was undertaken frankly as an experiment. and is now available for the purpose of making this law effective.36/ / INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION / In Costa Rica the Government has enacted a " y law requiring the construction and maintenance of privies which provide for the disposal of the night-soil in such manner as to protect the soil from contamination. The organization which conducts the work of examining and treating the people.

the populations of which comprise East Indians. so that the soil in these villages is now protected from contamination. the educational effect of the whole work has been such that the villages are now voluntarily contributing toward the maintenance of a system of sanitary inspection to keep their condition up to the standard that has been set. The service is now being extended to other areas on the same basis. It was understood that the Commission would supply funds for examining and treating the people and that the Government would undertake to prevent reinfection. better still. with the local Government undertaking to prevent reinfection. Portuguese. Negroes. The plan of work here adopted providing for intensive work in welldefined areas. has some advantages that are worthy of special note: the work is definite and thorough and gives one a sense of accomplishment that closely approximates completeness. And. The area in which the demonstration has been carried out contains a number of free villages.GENERAL SUMMARY 37 complete relief and control of uncinariasis within a given area. and thus gives one 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . These people have been brought to provide and to use latrines. the sanitary work keeps pace with the work of treatment and cure. The demonstration has been as thoroughgoing in its work of sanitation as in that of treatment. and mixed breeds.

they get specimens of the patients' stools and exhibit the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The field directors carry the work out among the people. They tell the story of this disease in varied graphic forms and in terms so simple that the common man. may see and understand. In the Southern States the schools and the public press were enlisted and large use was made of pamphlets. photographs.38 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION a sense of results that are lasting. and circular letters. They use typical cases as object-lessons. and objects. but among the natives in many of the tropical countries the story must be presented in more direct and concrete terms. leaflets. and to train and enlarge its sanitary force gradually as the work is extended from area to area. Educating the people:—This whole work is essentially educational: it is teaching the people by demonstration. it enables the Government to begin a definite sanitary work on the basis of an almost insignificant expenditure. though he be illiterate. they point out the gross clinical symptoms in these cases (and these the people soon learn to recognize). 5. These agencies are not being neglected in the foreign field. Here the field directors rely more upon telling the story by word of mouth. and as they tell Jt they illustrate its details by means of lanternslides. and as the people are educated to the point of more and more helpful cooperation.

squirming embryos that live by teeming thousands in the soil that has been befouled by an infected person. the people cooperate helpfully. both to the patient and to his friends and neighbors. they show the parasites that have been expelled by the treatment administered. They learn to recognize the disease by its clinical picture. and they see how the infection is spread and how it may be prevented. The recovery that follows treatment and cure tells its own story. that they have subscribed the neces- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . A recent communication from British Guiana says: ° "It is gratifying to report that the authorities of the various villages of Areas A and B in the Peters' Hall District have so thoroughly realized the benefit obtained from the expulsion of hookworm. and the eggs by which infection is demonstrated. and by means of the microscope they exhibit the living. they have seen the parasite that causes it. The disease thus lends itself so readily to simple demonstration that the people —even native populations of tropical countries— easily understand its whole story.GENERAL SUMMARY 39 eggs of the parasite under the microscope. and have so carefully realized the principles of reinfection. and the necessity of its prevention. As a result of thiseducational work. in both the work of treatment and that of prevention. and are ready to infect any person with whose bare skin they come into contact.

40 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION sary amount to maintain a Sanitary Inspector to devote his full time to their District. This one is simple and tangible.. and its best result is in securing the helpful cooperation of the people in the work of bringing this disease and all other preventable diseases under control. Having seen this one disease brought under control and having had the worth of the effort brought home to him. he knows its simple treatment and its one simple preventive measure. this whole work is essentially educational. he knows its whole story. he is prepared to give heed when spoken to about the control of diseases that are less simple and less tangible. the common man can easily understand what it is. for the sake of emphasis." The relief and control of this one disease is an object-lesson in the relief and control of disease in general. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . then. and what it means to him as a menace to his health and to his earning power. To repeat.

and for extending the operations and increasing the budget as the results seemed to justify. complete eradication of the disease within a selected area. this area to include free villages as well as plantations. It was proposed to approximate. with a limited budget. Up to this time no attempt had been made toward relief or control of the disease in the villages.CHAPTER II SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES AND ' RESULTS BY TERRITORIAL UNITS BRITISH GUIANA I. Inauguration of work:—The work in British Guiana was the first to be opened in foreign countries with the cooperation of the International Health Commission. Successful operations against uncinariasis on the sugar estates had already been conducted by the local government under the direction of the Surgeon-General. The Surgeon-General designated Dr. as nearly as practicable. Ferguson to have 43. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Plans were adopted for beginning operations on a small scale. The Commission was invited to cooperate in trying out an experiment which had not been possible with the means available.

This was divided. B. under a budget prepared by Dr. assigned the mission to Dr. This called for a contribution of $7. requested the Commission to lend one of its substitute directors to aid in conducting operations. who arrived in British Guiana. February 13. and C. is the most scattered and . is more scattered and more distant from Georgetown. having 3.832 inhabitants. the most populous. A scheme for conducting the work was then drawn up by Dr. Ferguson. for the sake of convenience. March 9. H.984 inhabitants. The Surgeon-General and Dr. The Peters' Hall District. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . near Georgetown. Area B. with 2. lying on the east bank of the Demerara River. The Commission. into three areas. Area A. 1914. Ferguson.244. occupies the smallest territory. and is nearest to Georgetown. in granting the request. distant of the three.562 inhabitants.42 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION immediate supervision of the work. with 3. known as A. Operations were started first in Area B.70 by the International Health Commission. Ferguson. was chosen for the preliminary operations. 1914. and adopted by the Commission. while Area C. H. thinking that the experience of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in the Southern States would be of value in beginning work in British Guiana. Howard.

These provided #4. With the experience gained in the campaign in Area B. submitted to the Commission upon the return of Dr. and it was for this reason that this campaign has been extended over a period of several months.BRITISH GUIANA 43 2. It was to have been completed December 3?. The work in Area B was started in the latter part of March. was dealt with. In Areas A and C the weekly large dose of thymol was the method of treatment adopted. and for extending it to Areas A and C. and this method will be adhered to in future work. Activities and results:—In the beginning. the work was rapidly extended to embrace the whole of Area B. during the experimental stage of the work. and adopted on August 13. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1914. In this area the daily dose often grains was used in the treatment of those infected. 1914.00 quarterly for continuing the work in Area B. 1914. budgets were prepared.566. On December 31. Howard to the United States. it was found that there still remained more than 200 cases not yet cured by the daily dose. only one village—Agricola—with a population of 1. and for the sake of economy these were put upon the weekly large dose of thymol for more speedy cure. When the results of the campaign in this village indicated that the methods employed were feasible.330. 1914.

3. the following resolution was unanimously adopted by a mass meeting of the residents: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . on the eve of Dr.in progress. Enumeration of the entire population in this area.1914. a relocation of streets. 5. Treatment of all found infected with uncinariasis. until a cure is effected.44 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Operations in Area C were started in September. which delayed the beginning of treatment until November. Operation within a definite area. Howard's return to the United States. 1914. All treatments are given in the homes of the people. 4. Careful re-examination of every patient under treatment after each weekly course of medicine. under the supervision of nurses employed for this purpose. All work in this colony has been conducted under what is termed the intensive method. Representative citizens of the District deernecf the campaign to be so effective and beneficial that on June 29. 2. Examination of the entire population. 1914. and other improvements. which requires: 1. In Area A there was an interruption to the campaign owing to radical sanitary work .

BRITISH G U I A N A 45 "WHEREAS. County of Demerara.. 975.1914 3. and Colony of British Guiana..5% Remaining under treatment. .. beg to record our warmest appreciation of the efforts of the Rockefeller International Health Commission in our midst for the purpose of eradicating these dangerous parasites.1% 4.903. being fully convinced of the disastrous effects of the Hookworm (Ankylostome) when found in the human system. we.701. Demerara River. and C. or 100% 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . io>378 Not located and examined 897 Number examined 9*481 Number infected 5*562 Number removed from areas of operation 659 Number remaining for treatment 4>9°3 Cured to December 31. B. up to December 31. or . entire district. Howard to convey to Headquarters our profound gratitude for their benevolent endeavors in this direction." The following is a brief summary of the work accomplished in Areas A. the inhabitants of the Peters' Hall District on the East Bank. or 4..8% Refused or abandoned treatment and remaining within the district as foci of infection 219. 1914: RECAPITULATION Census. and ask Dr.5% Died during campaign: death not connected with thymol administration 8. "We further beg to offer our unstinted cooperation and support with the hope that abundant success will be the ultimate result. or 75. or 19.

... The continuation of the 975 under treatment in the district will not materially increase this expenditure...05 This is a per capita cost for those examined of approximately $........ The following is a more detailed report of the results of the campaign in Peters' Hall District up to December 31.. $1445...274..... 7..720..10 Total ..91... Howard during inauguration of campaign ....... .......... 1914: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ............46 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Total Expenditures to December 31... 1914 For supervision by Dr....... $8..95 Exenditures as rendered from Field xpe Di irector ..

% Death not connected with thymol administration. 10378 897 9481 5562 659 040 465 356 3206 1918 191 A1 41 78 2756 1913 184 *tA |4 Number examined Nusaber infected . . . . . Number under treatment . . . . t As the Intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of the areas of operation. . . Before treatment After one or more treatments IH » ••J &&Q Number remaining in district not treated Number refusing treatment . . . . . . 3519 173S 284 OOQ Number removing from areas f . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation VNVI1 90 57 1 r< 0 . . . . who represented themselves as residents to secure treatment. . . Number not treated on medical grounds Number abandoning treatment . Number cured Number died | 316 219 11 147 61 975 3701 g 56 150 no 72 W K 9 78 3 1 69 2 148 1509 579 777 1 56 243 1415 7 * These were mainly transients. those removing are eliminated from the local campaign. . .TOTAL AREA A 3984 AREA B 3562 AREAC 2832 Census Number in census not traced or located in examinations'* . . and parties residing outside the areas. .

150 57 1 635 70 14 56 24 10 333 261 22 5 17 3 3 25 210 1 72 646 386 27 0 18 13 1 12 67 278 1 63 336 243 14 3 11 6 6 54 168 1 Number under treatment Number cured £6 248 1415 . . 7 24 59 480 2 11 43 279 2 *These were mainly transients and parties residing outside the area. . who represented themselves as residents to secure treatment. •fAs the intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of the area of operation. . $Death not connected with thymol administration. . . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .Peters' Hall District Area B TOTAL FOR AGRICOLA ECCLES BAGOTSTOWN AREA B PETERS' HALL PROVIDENCE PASTURE Census ' Number in census not traced or located in examinations* Number examined . . . . . those removing are eliminated from the local campaign. . . . . Number not treated on medical grounds Number abandoning treatment . Number refusing treatment . 3562 1330 343 782 101 681 393 58 10 48 11 718 389 356 3206 1918 120 1210 Number infected 191 ' 41 Number remaining in district not treated .

tAa the Intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of the area of operation. Number examined Number infected Number removing from areaf . 82 2 80 41 4 2 2 i * — 1 — 36 o w ua ia O o? K O h SX "S 80 2 78 56 1 T & g 1129 o 2832 189 359 ij W {it 0 3 310 5 305 191 16 g 10 Q — si o ffi 399 28 — 28 29 1 ' 76 2756 1913 184 74 110 12 244 148 7 3 4 5 — 5 4 132 13 176 !24 4 1 3 13 — 13 1 106 11 348 223 21 10 11 G — mi IS 1 6 „ Q 829 116 42 74 13 386 281 14 10 i— i 4 1 2 — 2 — K o cl J^ 72 1 69 2 148 1509 22 1 20 1 104 587 11 _ 11 27 229 52 > 5 1 — 196 6 5 164 Number under treatment Number cured . Before treatment After one or more treatments . Number not treated on medical Number abandoning treatment . who represented themselves as residents to secure treatment. . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . 7 42 17 *There were mainly transients and parties residing outside the area. . . those removing are eliminated ' from the local campaign. Number remaining in district not treated Number refusing treatment . not connected with thymol administration. . *o O al 3 o 256 a u K M H Z X W £ § IX. . . .Peters' Hall District Area C " ' Census Number in census not traced or located i n examinations* .

. . . . ' . . . . . . 3984 Number examined . . who represented themselves as residents to secure treatment. Number Infected . . . 9 78 3 579 777 1 irt w fc p H « 24 251 192 36 324 349 3 4 23 o J\ Number under treatment Number cured 55 o w *These were mainly transients and parties residing outside the areas. those removing arc eliminated from the local campaign. . .Peters' Hall District Area A LA PENIAREA A TENCE FOR TOTAL ALEXANDER VlLLE MEADOW HOUSTON FRONT BANK 520 53 467 277 41 84 7 27 9 15 3 —• 208 1 74 4 70 40 5 2 3 3 - Census . . not connected with thymol administration. . Number in census not traced or located in examinations* . Number removing from areaf After one or more treatments Number remaining in district not treated: Number not treated on medical grounds Number abandoning treatment 465 3519 1731 284 228 1486 244 1242 578 111 1904 164 1740 836 127 H y. . .. . . •fAs the intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of the area of operation. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . r* 85 26 24 . . = 90 107 20 36 . . . .

says: "All the work recorded in this report has been carried on without interfering with the people's daily work. Extending the work:—Plans have been laid for extending the work to the west bank of the Demerara River. B.96 for these areas were adopted November 30. he says that on June 30. Preventive measures: — From the standpoint of sanitation. three and one-half months after the beginning of the work.BRITISH GUIANA 51 The field director in his report of November 18. and C." Since then some few more have been added. Work is expected to begin early in January. and have so carefully realized the principles of reinfection. "87 per cent of all the lots in the whole of Area B and Meadow Bank village had pit closets. 4." As to preventive sanitary measures.074. that they have subscribed the necessary amount to maintain a Sanitary Inspector to devote his full time to their district. which has likewise been divided into Areas A. 1915. 1914. Budgets providing $7. and the necessity of its prevention. in commenting on the campaign in Peters' Hall District. the work in British Guiana 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1914. "It is gratifying to report that the local authorities of the various villages of Areas A and B in the Peters' Hall District. have so thoroughly realized the benefit obtained from the expulsion of hookworm." 3.

only a small expenditure is required to provide the necessary sanitary force for inspection. One of the great advantages of an intensive campaign such as was waged in British Guiana is that. As the work is extended from area to area. since the area operated in at first is small. It was originally suggested that the International Health Commission supply the funds needed for treating and curing the disease and the local government undertake to prevent reinfection. The government appointed for this purpose a staff of native sanitary inspectors. trained in the sanitary institute of Georgetown. These subordinate inspectors are under the direct supervision of a chief sanitary inspector. it is possible for the government to add to this force as the public becomes more enlightened and more interested in preventive measures. brought out from England.52 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION promises exceptionally favorable results. but they are probably more effectively enforced than is the case in many other countries. it is to be a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The supervision of the subordinate sanitary officers is strict and consequently the service rendered is effective. In every respect the work of sanitation has kept pace with that of treatment and cure. The sanitary laws and regulations of British Guiana are not materially different from those in existence in other colonies.

He began work about August i. 2.ANTIGUA 53 continuous and not a spasmodic effort. The results of his work are summarized as follows: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . It provided $3. ANTIGUA 1. and the Director-General of the International Health Commission. and concluded November 27. and adopted April 16. and it promises results of the most definite and lasting value. Governor of Antigua. Eric Marshall was appointed by the British Colonial Office to conduct this investigation. Results to date:—Dr. with the understanding that measures for its control would be considered if the investigation showed the infection to be a menace to the health and efficiency of the people. Hesketh Bell.774. A budget was prepared. the Commission was invited to contribute funds for conducting a systematic investigation into the prevalence of uncinariasis in Antigua. Organization of work:—Following a conference between Sir H.25 for this investigation. 1914. 1914. submitted to the Commission.

. Industrial School . . ' . .0 PERCENTAGEOF INFECTION INSTITUTIONS Prison Poor House (Males) . . Central Plain . 13 17 21 1839 INFECTED 36 84 156 0 0 0 0 276 INFECTED PERCENTAGE or INFECTION o 6.0 0. . Five Islands and Galley Bay Total for Estates .0 0. . Falmouth . Grand total for Estates and Institutions EXAMINED 70 39 57 35 247 48 158 221 875 1839 18 I 5 13 60 22 11 6 136 276 25.0 0.0 N *» 2714 412 15.1 32. Urfins Johnson Point .71 15. Microscopic Examinations for Uncinariasis ESTATE DISTRICTS Lime Stone Area . . . .7 37. . Local cases Bishop Matthews School Total for Institutions . . . English Harbour .5 15. .INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION (j).0 00 15. . .7 2.1 24 2 45. " " (Females) .5 12. EXAMINED 647 689 486 20 46 .1 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .5 8. .0 0. . . Lunatic Asylum . Volcanic Area .8 69 2. Total for Estates .

000 90 No.93% 12. . .23 1. .33 15 No. 1 6 14 69 1.0% 7. PERCENTAGE BY HAEMOGLOBIN SCALE WITHIN 10% LIMIT 90% plus 80% " Total . . . .66% 15. 1 39 3 7 80 15 15 12.5% 76. 2to3 " " " 3to4 4to6 " " " Total examined . . OF Total Counts of Red Cells per Cubic Millimetre WHOLE 1 to 2 million per cmm. 1. .66 93.770. Public Institutions Matthews School .75 21. C. 80 Highest Eosinophilia recorded 39% 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . .07% 10. Total . . Centra} Plain . .77 1.ANTIGUA Blood Examinations Haemoglobin Examination of 259 Infected Cases PERCENTAGE BY HAEMOGLOBIN SCALE WITHIN 10% LIMIT 90% plus 80% " 70% " 60% " 60% " 40% " 30% " Total .11% 6. 90.16% 8. . Volcanic Area . ETC. Lowest per cmm. OF AVERAGE CASES EOSINOEXAM'D PHILIA Differential Blood Counts DISTRICTS.99 56. NUMBER OF CASES PERCENTAGE OF CASES EACH 10% OF EACH 10% OF SCALE SCALE 44 147 55 4 4 2 3 16.7% 9. . . .54 .15 259 NUMBER OF CASES PERCENTAGE OF CASES EACH 10% OF EACH 10% OF SCALE SCALE 1 14 Haemoglobin Examination of Fifteen Uninfected Cases 6. OF PERSONS P.54 1. .9% Total differential counts . .6% Number of total counts. Lime Stone Area .

Marshall has recommended that laws be passed for the compulsory examination and treatment of all inhabitants. and the construction and maintenance of suitable latrines for the prevention of reinfection." As a result of the survey work. Under certain.58 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 3. Marshall draws the following conclusions from his preliminary survey: "i. owing to its distribution. It is of vital importance to a large percentage of the labouring population. Inauguration of work:—The plan for work in this island was drawn up by Surgeon-General 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . At the present time. disclosing an infection of approximately 15 per cent. plans are being prepared providing for systematic work for the relief and control of the infection in the infected areas. It is the cause of much sickness at the present time. "6. TRINIDAD I . In certain districts a large percentage of the population are suffering from ankylostomiasis. The legislature will meet in February. Dr. "2. "3. It is in some districts of considerable economic importance to the planters. "4. it can be readily dealt with by an intensive campaign. and will consider at that time the passage of such laws. conditions it might become a menace to the health of the whole island. "5. Extending the work:—Dr.

1914. Dodd. 664 had no latrines. R. with San Fernando as the headquarters and central laboratory. Results:—Colonel J. These treatments generally produce cures. Clare. Of 1636 premises inspected. He arrived in Trinidad early in August. It was adopted on February 27.. 1914. The following table indurates the types of latrines in use: *It is the custom to administer from one to three treatments. 1914. Consequently. For determining positively which cases have been cured. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 2. a microscopic re-examination is required from two to eight weeks after treatment. Princes Town. Sanitary survey:—A partial sanitary survey has been made in the localities where work has been carried on. was appointed Medical Officer in Charge..TRINIDAD S7 H.55 was made available for carrying on the work. June 13. L. The following is a summary of the. The sum of $12. and submitted to the International Health Commission. and LaBrea. for all of the laboratories combined: Number of persons examined Number of persons treated Number of persons cured 4528 1635 270* ° 3. D. Actual work was started August nth. Branch laboratories have been established at Couva. M. Often this re-examination is not feasible. through December 31.978. D. The operations are conducted under the general supervision of the Surgeon-General. work accomplished from August u. approved by the English Advisory Committee. H. the number of persons recorded as cured is reduced. P.

however. Branch is in charge of measures against uncinariasis in this colony.145. with the following results: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Arrangements are being made to lend this assistance. ST.94.S3 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Trenches Cesspits Pails Shed only No latrines Total 96 679 129 68 664 1636 4. Results to date:—A preliminary investigation into the distribution and prevalence of the infection was conducted up to December 31. was adopted April 16. 1914. LUCIA 1. Extending the work:—The difficulty of securing trained medical officers from England during recent months has retarded the development of the work in this island. have invited the Commission to delegate from its staff of substitute directors men to fill the vacancies temporarily. 2. Inauguration of work:—Dr. 1914. The authorities. until English medical officers are available. S. providing $6. The budget. and serves under the general direction of an Advisory Committee appointed by the Island Government.

c. Crown Lands b. Extending the work:—A new budget. owing to the fact that Dr. VINCENT The budget. This intensive work is scheduled to begin January i. Dr.76.609. for the improvement of sanitation in St. Vincent in 1914. Director for the West Indies. Babonneau and Gros Isle Cul de Sac Valley a. Lucia. 1915. 4. " (rural) . Cyril H. providing $5. that every effort will be made to secure the enactment and enforcement of the regulations suggested by Dr. Forestier . Durrant is Director in Charge. The plan of campaign was formulated by the Administrator. d. 1914. Preventive measures:—The Administrator reported December n. LUCIA EXAMINED Castries (town) . No work was done in St. providing $1.590.ST. Howard. was authorized April 16. ST. Ferrands . Douglas Young.1914. Esq.10 has been adopted for carrying on an intensive campaign of eradication in the Cul de Sac valley. Durrant was not 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . Roseau Valley and beyond Total 211 221 55 £0 22 12 96 40 43 750 59 INFECTED 97 147 45 41 19 12 82 33 36 512 TREATED 97 147 45 41 19 12 82 33 36 512 3. Soucis .

. Results:—The report through December 31. Up to the close of the year a survey had been conducted through the schools. . Gouyave. 1914. Angus MacDonald was appointed Director and assumed his duties August 28th. and St. . Head Office Institutions Total 223 192 226 240 624 INFECTED 153 94 115 140 312 TREATED 116 161 150 189 143 399 1158 1505 814 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and other preliminary arrangements were made.72 for conducting work on this island. Actual work was started December • ist. was adopted April 16.038.60 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION relieved from Hospital duties. Gouvave Birrhgrovc St. gives the following results: (/). literature was distributed and addresses were delivered.. Dominic's. Examinations and Treatments EXAMINED Mount Moritz . . . with branches at Mount Moritz. Dominic's . Dr. Inauguration of work:—A budget. GRENADA i. 1914. the support of influential persons was sought and obtained. Head offices were established at Marine Villa. 2. no successor being available. providing $9. Birchgrove. .

and 64 per cent of the black population in another. Drinking of polluted water is general. chiefly anaemia. Blood Examinations TOTAL NUMBER PERCENTAGE EOSINOPHILES Mean 9. "4. "5. AH classes (practically). "7. both white and black. but other causes of these conditions are probably operative. A definite amount of debility." *Range from I to 30. The blood examination carried out in the laboratory of the Commission has revealed infection by the malarial parasites in different areas. . "8. . and the result of treatment must be awaited before definite conclusions can be drawn. With improved methods of examination.GRENADA 61 (2). "3. The mode of infection is from the soil (mainly). MacDonald draws the following conclusions from his work to date: <*•> There is a high rate of hookworm infection 'i. Hookworm infection . especially in the more highly infected districts. . "6. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . in Grenada. which also complicates diagnosis and treatment of ankylostomiasis and makes difficult any correct allocation of morbid conditions to the causative disease. and the resulting dysenteric diseases complicate and are complicated by ankylostomiasis. all ages. there is no doubt the infection will be shown to be even higher than this.37* 10. Present methods of examination indicate an infection of ankylostomiasis to the amount of 74 per cent of the white peasant settlers in one district. both sexes. . Not infected 100 44 51 5 Dr. Dwarfism and infantilism are found amongst those infected. .5 8.3. . cardiac dilatation and chronic dyspepsia prevails.4 7. "2. are infected.5 Blood examinations .

JAMAICA Upon hearing of the measures conducted in adjacent colonies for the relief and control of uncinariasis. 1914. beginning January i. Area B. 3. and cure with sanitary improvements designed to prevent reinfection. known respectively as Area A and Area B. Moritz Centre.62 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 3. Preventive measures:—The local Government has been petitioned to pass laws providing for the construction and maintenance of sanitary latrines. expressed a desire through the Colonial Office in London. David has a population of approximately 3. and the area at Mt.260. Moritz Centre. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the Government of Jamaica on April 3. Dr. on the intensive plan.069. MacDonald has planned to extend the work.557. treatment. and one at Mt. with a view to considering cooperative plans for its control. If such laws are enacted. MacDonald will be able to supplement his work of examination. Extending the work:—Dr. 4. 3. Area A at St. that the Commission be asked to send a representative to consider cooperation in relief measures in that island. 1915. David. For this purpose three areas have been selected: two at St. The invitation has been accepted and the Director for the West Indies will visit that island in February. for the purpose of investigating the prevalence of the infection.

D. The Government of Panama thereupon asked the Commission to lend assistance for conducting operations in that Republic. The work of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commissic(n in the Southern States was outlined by the Director-General and the method proposed by the International Health Commission of cooperating with local governments elsewhere along similar lines was presented. submitted to the Commission. 1914. 1914. Hackett. It was agreed that the work be carried on as a subdivision of the National Department of Health. W. and arrived in Panama May 14. and adopted July i. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The dinner was attended by diplomatic representatives of the various Central and South American governments. on the evening of February 15.1914. a preliminary annual budget was prepared. C. Following a series of conferences between the Government officials and Dr. L. Dr. The invitation was accepted April 28. April ist. 1914. in Washington. Inauguration of work:—The participation of the International Health Commission in relief measures against uncinariasis in Panama had its inception at a dinner at the Pan-American Building.PANAMA PANAMA 63 I. Hackett was appointed Director. In accordance with plans agreed upon a Director was ap-" pointed to have immediate charge of the work.

Preliminary operations were begun in the City of Panama. with the special addition for the Panama work of a record of (4) blood examinations. and (3) sanitary survey. and Bocas del Toro. The dispensary plan followed by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in the Southern States was adopted. The following is a summary of results accomplished through December 31. and attending to various routine matters connected with the inauguration of the campaign. Arraijan. conducting preliminary surveys. 1914. This plan has three main features: (r) examinations and treatments.50 for conducting the work. Capira.038. conferring with the Government officials. villages in the interior. -- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . (2) infection survey. as well as the medicine needed for treatment. Results:—The first weeks were devoted to securing supplies from the States. and subsequently extended to Chorrera. Actual work was started about July isth. 2. The Republic of Panama is furnishing offices and other facilities.64 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION This provided $15.

Capira .4 82. 4 INTE RIOR Chorrera . . Arraijan .8 69. Panama . . Examinations and Treatments DISTRICT Panama . Bocas . . . fNote that the infection 13 much lighter In Panama City than in the interior villages of ArraUan and Capira. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . . figures are not representative of the country at large. Capira . EXAMINED 928 812 582 987 INFECTED 218 639 511 830 709 2689 218 2907 TREATED 215 562 494 677 614 2347 215 2562 INTBRIOR Chorrera . 2012 4393 928 6321 (2). PROVINCE Panama . Injection Survey (Children 6 to 18 Years) DISTRICT Panama PROVINCE Panama . Bocas del Toro . Totals for Interior only Totals for Panama City *Grand totals . where the infection is lighter than in the interior. Panama . .0 42. Panama . . EXAMINED INFECTED 196 321 196 316 297 1130 196 1326 PERCENTAGE OFlNF.4 93.ECTION 804 390 210 340 695 1635 804 2439 24. Arraijan . .4 54-. Bocas del Toro .PANAMA (/).3 93. Bocas Totals for Interior only Totals for Panama City fGrand Totals . owing to the inclusion of Panama City. Panama .1 24. Panama . Panama .

. Panama . One pit privy in town. . Bocas . . INTERIOR Chorrera . Blood Examination HAEMOGLOBIN PERCENTAGE DISTRICT PROVINCE £ O £ o 2 23 2 9 36 SS CO 3 I Panama . . No privies of any type. __^ Seven pit privies in town. Bocas del Toro Totals . 8 public and 3 private in construction. Arraijan . Bocas del Toro Panama. INTE RIOR Chorrera. Panama. . . . > . 1 Panama. Arraijan Capira . . Sanitary Survey DISTRICT Panama PROVINCE Panama REMARKS ON SANITATION Every house connected with a sewer (in city limits). . . public privies wanted by people. Night-soil removal and disposal in ocean (imperfectly carried out by a few only).60 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION (5). (4). Bocas . Panama . . Capira . Panama . . . Panama . • * t * !t^ »Q £ i£ 5 55 43 28 0 9 0 6 15 2 70 20 •* 41' 65 14 59 174 184 172 299 269 1 1 22 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation 90-100% 0 . Government planning to introduce sanitation. .

and the sum of $*4>589-$o was appropriated for the work. The Director had to complete in Retail working arrangements with the Government.COSTA R I C A 67 3. This plan was approved by the Commission on July i. 1914. White. was appointed temporarily as Director to have charge of the work. representing the Commission.. he had to make preliminary surveys and to select the areas for first attack. 1914. Active operations began on September 23. 1914. J. Activities and results:—The first weeks were devoted to organization. Henry R. COSTA RICA I. Dr. Stations to which the people were invited to come for free examination and treatment were opened at Puntarenas. a tentative working plan was formulated and agreed upon. and Dr. Inauguration of work:—Invitation by the Republic of Costa Rica to the International Health Commission to cooperate with that country in work for the relief and control of uncinariasis was extended on April 14. Jr. the Government Department of Health. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Carter. Extending the work:—It is planned to extend the dispensary work from village to village until the whole country has been covered. 2. In conference between the President of Costa Rica. he had to procure equipment and to select his local staff. H.

Totals . *See footnote page 57.000 to be used in making this law effective. . . Preventive measures:—The sanitary code of Costa Rica requires that the people provide and use latrines to prevent contamination of the soil. Miramar . 1914. INFECTED PERCENTAGE OF INFECTION 966 883 91. INFECTED TREATED CURED* 2317 1260 191 644 4412 1510 1097 179 655 3341 3341 179 An infection survey among children 6 to 18 years of age gave the following percentage of infection: EXAMINED Total for country . On August 31.4 3. 1914. Reports up to December 31. The organization which administers the treatment undertakes also to inspect latrine accommodations and where conditions are found unsatisfactory to proceed under the law to have them remedied. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . exhibit the following summary of results: EXAMINED Puntarenas Esparta Chomes . Chomes. The work of sanitation is being carried out . decree was issued by the Government making available the sum of $11.6S INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Esparta. and Miramar.in the areas in which the people are being examined and treated.

This institution now has a special ward for uncinariasis and has 400 to 600 patients at one time under treatment for this disease. Ferguson. Under instructions from the Director-General of the Department of Health. The Government Department of Public Health had instituted measures for the relief and control of the disease prior to the visit of the representative of the International Health Commission. Egypt is divided into 14 provinces. Sandwith began the systematic treatment of uncinariasis at the Kasr el Ainy Hospital as early as 1887.EGYPT 69 EGYPT i. M. Inauguration of work:—Dr. Todd. For sixteen years the Church Mission Hospital in Cairo has been treating patients who come to it in increasing numbers from all parts of Egypt. Conditions in Egypt seem to make 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . This plan proposed the Province as the unit of organization and of work. The Commission was asked to cooperate in making these operations more extensive and to make the demonstration more complete than was possible on the basis of local funds. F. the local uncinariasis committee. Sharqia Province was selected as the territory within which to begin operations. Day. and Hastings. formulated a plan of operations for one year. consisting of Doctors Looss. in April. 1914.

To these hospitals the people come for free examination and treatment. 2. Cases are being treated also in the Murad Pasha Hospital at El Deir. The plan provides also for an infection survey and a sanitary survey to be conducted as a special investigation. one-half of this sum to be supplied by the Egyptian Government. The original plan for this Province provides for one large and four small traveling tent hospitals. Activities and results:—The results may be briefly summarized under the heads of hospital work and survey work. this expenditure to be shared equally by the Government and the Commission.70 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION it necessary to administer treatment to all patients under hospital conditions.000. The budget calls for an annual expenditure of £12. Hospital work:—The work had been started with the opening of hospitals at Qaliub and Qalama in Qaliubia Province. In this Province hospitals have been opened at Belbeis and at Minia el Qamh. a.000. The amount was reduced after the outbreak of the war in Europe to £9. On August loth these two hospitals were closed and operations were transferred to Sharqia Province. The results for the five hospitals are exhibited in the following table: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and one-half by the Commission. and in the chief town of the Province a group of improvised house hospitals each accommodating about 30 patients.

« w § s CO O O Qaliub Qalama EIDeir Belbeis Minia el Qamh I ) . O ^ 1—( J Qaliub . Qaliubia . and Cures CO 09 00 0} to & O O 3 (4 o O Is Sg O W I B Qaliubia.EGYPT 71 (j). 1 Deir . Treatments. . aliubia. Blood Examinations HAEMOGLOBIN PERCENTAGE PROVINCE Qaliubia . DISTRICT ) . . s (JL. . Sharqia . . M Q w M O S 3 a! a o< . Examinations. Sharqia Minia el Qamh Total 117 18 50 tf £ ^ -^ ? r-( •* 10 CO t^ <N ^ 98 268 496 666 392 83 6 19 31 79 136 178 57 -> 66 131 237 455 442 50 1 o ^ ? o ^ cp $ f w s 61 70 185 464 699 647 155 9 ?46 9AR 615 1276 195fi 1559 345 16 6256 Total number of soecimens taken *See footnote. galama [ Qaliubia . page 57 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Sharqia Belbeis . 5222 1973 2126 1686 139 138 688 561 518 459 2175 1503 1432 1383 267 226 3820 2675 2180 2013 514 467 5541 11905 6712 Total (2). Sharqia . aliubia.

8 59.3 41.2 49. These are summarized below: Among Free Population Prevalence of Uncinariasis PROVINCE Zagazig Minia el Qamh Belbeis . .256 INFECTED 759 PER CENT.556 900.057 1.082 606 546 514 622 364 3.1 . Survey work:—Sharqia was the first province in which a systematic investigation was made of the prevalence of uncinariasis.486 110.1 . 60. KafrSaqr Total . 232.2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .6 1.164 106.4 57. 100-91 90-81 80-71 70-61 60-51 fiCMl 40-31 30-21 20-11 10-1 24.0 56.4 .022 140.834 165. and (2) of the prisoners incarcerated in the jail at Zagazig.72 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION b.2 42. Hehia .396 124. 5. Separate surveys were made (i) of the free population of the province.411 Percentage of Haemoglobin Examinations made of the blood of 706 Egyptians from schools and ophthalmic hospitals gave the following results: PERCENTAGE OF HAEMOGLOBIN NUMBER EXAMINED •-. POPULATION .096 868 939 868 6.2 66. 1 2 Total 706 PERCENTAGE OF WHOLE . 172 296 184 40 10 1 .08 1.000 EXAMINED 1. Faqus .9 26.

2.3 7. to April . Sharqia: Minia el Qamh. to Nov. to Nov Belbeis: Sept.256 INFECTED 28 7 0 56 22 63 177 PER CENT.0 6. Kafr Saqr Total . Qaliubia. .646 900. is indicated below: DISTRICT Zagazig Minia el Qamh Belbeis .9 1089 832' Prevalence of Pellagra c* The percentage of persons who gave clinical evidence of being afflicted with pellagra.6 0. Faqus .096 868 939 866 6. to Nov.082 2. as determined by microscopic examination of the urne: PROVINCE Qaliubia: Nov.02 70. .824 165.2 1.4 2. Hehia . 232.396 124.9 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .684 110.000 EXAMINED 1. . NUMBER INNUMBER FBCTED WITH PERCENTAGE EXAMINED BlLHARZIA INFECTED 701 1833 263 310 769 101 719 590 44.164 106.4 66.EGYPT 73 Prevalence of Bilharziasis The following table indicates the percentage of bilharziasis among uncinariasis patients.22 41. May to Aug.9 3S.2 0. Qaliubia: Sept.022 140. among those examined for uncinariasis. Sept.057 1. POPULATION .

. Total .0 95 40 90 5 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .2 80 55 90 15 90 74. Hehia Kafr Saqr Total .7 90 95 45 68.1 23. .4 80 64. . . EXAMINED 78 73 49 52 35 341 54 INFECTED PERCENTAGE 1 7 5 13 12 9. Kafr Saqr Faqus . . .Average High. . .5 77 5 79 6 78 8 71 4 74 5 Prevalence of Pellagra DISTRICT Minia el Qamh . .0 30 62.0 12.0 57.0 35 80 60.0 25. .5 92 38 Prevalence of Bilharztasis (Based entirely upon patients' statements. 60. • EXAMINED INFECTED PERCENTAGE 78 73 49 54 52 35 341 11 11 6 6 12 9 55 14.74 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION (2). . . . .6 50 90 30 40 58.2 90 40 90 70. not upon microscopic examination of the urine) DISTRICT Minia e l Qamh .7 16.Low. . Belbeis Hehia Kafr Saqr . . .0 85 40 60.5 . Faqus Total 78 73 49 54 52 35 341 46 61 38 43 41 25 254 58 9 83. Minia ei Qamh Belbeis .1 15. .Average est est est est 66.1 DISTRICT Zagazig . . .Low. Hehia Kafr Saqr Total . Haemoglobin Percentage INFECTED NON-INFECTED High. .0 80 5 66. . . . . . Among Prisoners in Zagazig Prison Prevalence of Unctnariasis EXAMINED INFECTED PERCENTAGE DISTRICT Minia el Qamh .0 65.0 10 63. . Hehia .2 11.

0 0 2 .2 42.EGYPT 75 A comparison of uncinariasis infection among prisoners from certain districts with that among the free population of the same districts: DISTRICT Mtnia el Qamh . .3 75 21.4 57.5 « 24 7.5 70 20.3 567 AMONG PRISONERS EXAMINED PERCENTAGE 1 .5 341 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .4 SURVEY OF SHARQIA PROVINCE 60.5 12 2.2 Hehia KafrSaqr .3 49.2 15 4.8 23.2 2 . .8 66.0 2. Faqus A comparison of haemoglobin percentages from among the free population with those from among prisoners: PERCENTAGE OF n/EMOGLOBIN 100-91 90-81 SO-71 70-61 60-51 5(M1 40-31 30-21 20-11 10-1 Total .4 133 224 39.8 91 16.9 83.5 67 11.0 5 . . .0 59.5 79.3 8 1 .5 77.9 24.9 85 60 17. AMONG FREE ADULTS EXAMINED PERCENTAGE 0 .1 . ZAGAZIG PRISON 68.8 71.6 78. .0 33 5.

78 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 3. GENERAL SUMMARY The following tables give a summary of results accomplished up to December 31. 1914. Extending the work:—The European war. treated. both in the work of relief and in the survey work. in the survey work for locating the infection. by reducing the revenues of the Egyptian Government. Table (3) gives the grand total of all persons examined. Table" (2) shows the number of persons examined. The work in Egypt will be extended from village to village. respectively. and from province to province. Table (i) shows the number of persons who were examined. has seriously retarded the development of the work in Egypt. but the lack of funds has limited the number to two. The hospitals established at Minia el Qamh and Belbeis in Sharqia rrovince will be continued until the number of patients presenting themselves for treatment has been materially reduced. in the work of relieving sufferers. It was hoped to operate at least six hospitals in each province simultaneously. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . as rapidly as the results justify and the available funds will permit. At present this number is greater than can be accommodated. but not treated. and cured.

6 75.6 » • * • • » •* 19425 4981 25.4 94S1 6582 58. . Percentage Treated . .1 54. Cured* Percentage Cured0 *See footnote page 57.1 68.3 5541 82. .5 4528 1635 • • • * 1605 5321 4412 814 2907 3341 54.5 831 14.2 1636 512 100.1 4 • » • 36. VINCENT TRINIDAD < 5 3 ANTIGUA GRENADA BRITISH GUIANA TOTAL £' 760 612 I 5 « S 3 11905 6712 56.(j).0 100. Examinations and Treatments ST.7 1168 2562 3341 88.0 379 5. .0 270 16.1 100. 37902 21483 56.0 3701 79.6 4676 84.6 90.3 8 tt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .9 CO e M 25 W o Examined Infected Percentage Infected .

1 67. Grand Totals EXAMINED INFECTED 21483 4077 . COUNTRY Antigua Eevot Totals Infection Survey* EXAMINED 2714 6423 9137 INFECTED 3665 4077 PERCENTAGE INFECTED 15. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 37902 9137 47039 *Jncludes persons of all ages.6 54.6 412 (5).3 In administering treatIn infection surveys . .78 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION (2).0 44. not those of school age only. 25660 PERCENTAGE INFECTED 56 6 44.

CHAPTER III ILLUSTRATIONS 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

.

.

Photograph Excised Here UK. Typical cases uncniariasis. Egypt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4.

Photograph Excised Here Fig. Typical cases uncinariaais. 5. Egypt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

s».ist Indian oitiu-n.UK-. Cowiniiu'lil Mrdic..'. (U) \'illa«f Councilinen.ij. \Viw. (Ml Ur.iti.') Trot man.1!) Ur. Ollicoi.i.iii Consul. wi\i!iliH-st K. (i> anil 71 \V. |''I']«IIM)II. Assl.Asst. Howard. (lu) liist disiwnsary.iiiiw.«li (iiii. l!iiU«li I'tiii. (I. Millett.\i>titr>. OiH-uiiiB woik. Iv. Inxprrlor. ('ntlins.\VilliiKi-. l. (U1) Maliaimoo.in. J. 1!)14.iiui. Htili.Photograph Excised Here 1'if.il. lirst palieiit. (i.illi utul Vi. Ann'nV.ist I lull.ist ludi. Cioilfivy).iry Insnnlni.tl Oflierij (I) Dl. \V. U. Hell. (L'l Ur. AU'd. [l> ]lr.nl. K A. K. Sniconn-ttiMU't. ('. IJ. UnctcriolOHist: I'll Mr. Miciosrouisls.\Kiicol. 11..-isor (u Dr. IJpmmirvi. (ID) L. . I1'. J. (JivKtw. (111 Ik-nl.s> 1'ionn't. tjup. C'liu-f UuclonolDfjist tsuav. Siinit. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Staff for the relief and control of unrinarinsis in British Guiana 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 7.Photograph Excised Here Fi£.

S.Photograph Excised Here Severe cnsr of uncinnrinsip. FiK. A Portuguese British Guiana 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

i(t. ('iin-(J(.ut tnmlilo as result of unrtiian.vc KiiiHiClui.-r (irnttn.Photograph Excised Here I-IL-. ll. !l.-.nl MM pro In-.i»:js Thr<v w.-ks .Jilc to run t " f\IU\\ 111^ JMUlJ%t(| llll|>IO\l'l!U']lt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .ini.-nt \\js .

i-.11 nirni.Photograph Excised Here rm ju. wricnoi »blr to suiui.isi iniJiiins.iphilN iiiuU i 111.-lM. Jltili.iM. \\iauu JIKI lUflctiiiiiirn.iu.i 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . InniroviiiK r..

II. Typical cases uncinariasis. W. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Grenada. B.Photograph Excised Here Fug. I. Moritz. Ml.

Photograph Excised Here FIR. Group of typical cases of uncinarlasia. Costa Rica 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 12.

Mt. Grenada. Girl with hat on had been treated and cured 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . W. Moritz. B. Caws of uncinariasis. 13.Photograph Excised Here Fig. I.

lislalc ISicn Vrmif. M. \V. C. t. Imlian coolk-s. Trinidad. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .Photograph Excised Here .nutnbcr o( uiiivniic sores. Infection sovere.irm. I . Sjn Kcmando.

B. Lucia. I. Group of cases of uncinariasis. at Rosseau.Photograph Excised Here Fig. barracks on sugar estate. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 15. \V. St.

Photograph Excised Here Kis. Vincent. B. Cases of unriiiariasis. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . \V. K>. I. St.

-loup of cast's of uncincinnsis.£% J'jg. Clmrclt Mission llospltn). J7. $$«'•* A< (. Caitn.\y Photograph Excised Here 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .u inont on <l. JS iii.iikAliout fit HI niidiT in-.

The latter included items for the purchase of thymol. The $14. the development of the library and the printing and distribution of publications. and salaries of directors of field work up to the time these were charged to special budgets.000 represents expenditures for traveling purposes. of which about $5.731.CHAPTER IV FINANCIAL STATEMENT The statement of expenditures presented on the following page shows that the Commission expended a total of #157.15 used for the hookworm campaign in the field was expended partly outoof special budgets adopted for work in foreign countries and partly directly out of the Commission's central office budget.038. On an annual basis this would represent approximately $20.000 for current expenses.930. $3. The $109. and $30. field equipment. travel expenses of directors in going to and in returning from the field.08 during the eighteen months from July i. to December 31. 1913. and the preparation and display of exhibits by the Department of Surveys and Exhibits.15 being for property in the form of furniture and equipment.79 was devoted to administrative work. Of this amount $34. 1914.113. Q7 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .14 used for educational and informational work was devoted to the collection of material.64 for current expenses.108.579.

.79 I.14 j III.73i. For Work in the Field 109. For Educational and Informational Surveys . Payments from special budgets for field worfcj 78. tTo and from field.930.86 14.561. #17. 3. 1914 GRAND TOTAL EXPENDITURES • *iS7.21 (14) Field equipment and supplies 742. For property—furnishing.08 (2) Salaries (temporary).844.84 417.47 9»39°-°9 1.98 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Genera] Statement of Expenditures for the Eighteen-Month Period from July i..79 Office expenses 2.968..108. equipment.579-iS 1.355.995. For current expenses $30..12 847.113. Printing t 189.41 (4 Traveling expenses..07 (3) Rent 4*138. For Mministratwe Work r.9) Exhibits (10) Library — (11) Publications-printing. 6.417. ^Amounts forwarded.36 (13) Thymol* 15. postage Work 2*030.501. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .36 (19) Egyptg 19.66 (20) British Advisory Committee 2.15 II.446.84 (18) British Guiana 9.65 (6 Postage .822.8-i 2. 1..86 (16) Centra! America 17. ^Equivalent in England pounds.711.80 2. to December 31.88 (15) Traveling expensesf.006.30 (12) Salaries.038.86%.64 (1) Salaries (permanent)..64 (17) West Indies^ 28.36 *To be ultimately charged to the field office by which used or distributed at cost.008. 259.. Payments from Central Office 30..476. Field Directors 13.°8 34. 1913.466. $4.

I ¥ •* * " .^e s T •*• M «• j '•V " . -ft * 1 ^ »* »**. 1*' 1) ^ i Vt K. 4 T f. •• . ?*. > : A < 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

« . 4. „ .w / : ' - Rockefeller Foundation Annual Report AUTHOR 1913-1914 1st edition ^HX.'swt1^ '•*?-rfS-M'*j»*ift*..*fritf^a«»* .^.'.!fc«*('»*«i. H 1 .. .-^!Mstw/iJ. . 's .»|J.jjjifljj (SVsH* .««»~*^*lwv^ < s i j-> .^ V.<... J.W».i..j .tt^^u i. :2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . .3 1913 00052 754 s^»MM*rtMs'sfS.

Annual Report 1913-1914 Second Edition 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

^"i:a..T:.Jfounbation ^LffSl . ' sifls": V"1T7t''iT:'"ii'''i:'. .•as^ssi^i-<j5Sj^aS-.g ^a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ..^ii' t "1j . _^U!^ U4"'J 5^.Ziir:JMSfc^3ii sg^jifes^U..-a . JTT--I-^M..T^jp-y.. 'j. » -Jij. .':'.^.^=£iA"_ siBStSSSSSai1... i -i i^ "^ j. .

-*~IL- ' •'••.! - ^^M^S^^S 5^ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .V .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

The Rockefeller Foundation Annual Report 1913-14 Second Edition The Rockefeller Foundation 61 Broadway. New York 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

1914. 1914. C.1 A. ROCKEFELLER. of New York.8 Appended hereto are the detailed reports of the Secretary and the Treasurer of the Rockefeller Foundation and of the Director General of the International Health Commission. Simon Flexner. Barton Hepburn. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rockefeller. of New York. Jr. Harry Pratt Judson. of Cambridge. J. by the formal acceptance of the Charter. Starr J. May 22. JR. the date on which its charter was received from the Legislature of the State of New York. JOHN D. Elected March 18. Gates.1915.1914. J. of New York. 111. To the foregoing number have been added by election the following Trustees: Charles W. fohn D. of Montclair. a period of eighteen months and a half. 1913. the first Board of Trustees: [ohn D. N. Charles 0. of Montclair.July 6. Heydt. N. WicklifFe Rose. N. Rockefeller. J. ? rederick T. The following persons named in the act of incorporation became. of Montclair. To the Trustees of the Rockefeller Foundation: Gentlemen:— I have the honor to transmit to you herewith a report on the activities of the Rockefeller Foundation and on its financial operations from May 14. Jerome D. President. to December 31. of Washington. Murphy. Eliot.. of New York. 1 8 Elected January 21. Greene. of Chicago. Mass. D. of New York.1913..

REPORTS OF THE TREASURER. 159 . II . 16 2. 129 . Letters of Gift V. . China Medical Board II. . 162 . 1914 .CONTENTS REPORT OF THE SECRETARY: Charter and Organization Funds Received International Health Commission Investigation of Industrial Relations Mental Hygiene PAGE 7 9 . 1913 . Appropriations VII. International Health Commission.T. Medical Work in China REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION . 35 . . Officers. 1913 International Health Commission. . 214 INDEX 215 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Gates 208 VIII. Belgian Relief Shipments .1 23 . War Relief Promotion of Cooperation in Missions . Constitution III. . . By-Laws IV. . . 1914 Investigation of Industrial Relations . 1913 AND 1914 . Rockefeller Foundation. . . . . . APPENDIX: I. 161 . .160 . .162 163 165 -171 177 187 197 Medical Work in China: Memorandum by F. Proposed Federal Charter VI. . Members and Committees: Rockefeller Foundation. 29 31 .

1914. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Respectfully yours.To the President of the Rockefeller Foundation: Sir:— I have the honor to submit herewith my report as Secretary of the Rockefeller Foundation for the period May 14. to December 31. GREENE. Secretary. JEROME D. 1913.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

CHARTER AND ORGANIZATION The Rockefeller Foundation was chartered under the laws of the State of New York on May 14.1 The text of the Charter follows:— AN ACT To incorporate The Rockefeller Foundation. John D. religious. Starr J. for the purpose of receiving and maintaining a fund or funds and applying the income and principal thereof to promote the well-being of mankind throughout the world. and the aid of any such activities. are hereby constituted a body corporate by the name of The Rockefeller Foundation. Chap. page 187. 1 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . John D. represented in Senate and Assembly. Junior. Wickliffe Rose. agencies and institutions already established and any other means and agencies which from time to time shall seem expedient to its members or trustees. was approved by the Governor. Jerome D. and their successors. benevolent. see Appendix V. publication. missionary and public educational activities. passed by the Legislature without opposition April 24. Rockefeller. 1913. Rockefeller. Greene. Murphy. do enact as follows: Section I. It shall be within the purposes of said corporation to use as means to that end research. Heydt. together with such persons as they may associate with themselves. The People of the State of New York. agencies and institutions. Harry Pratt Judson. Frederick T. Gates. Simon Flexner. For an account of the efforts to secure incorporation by Act of Congress. the date on which the Act of Incorporation. Laws of 1913. and Charles O. the establishment and maintenance of charitable. 1913. 488.

without limitation as to amount or value. except such limitation. 3. powers. gift.8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 2. the manner of amending the constitution and bylaws of the corporation. the number of trustees by whom the business and affairs of the corporation shall be managed. either absolutely or in trust for any of its purposes. member or employee of this corporation shall receive or be lawfully entitled to receive any pecuniary profit from the operations thereof except reasonable compensation for services in effecting one or more of its purposes. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and any other provisions for the management and disposition of the property and regulation of the affairs of the corporation which may be deemed expedient. shall hold a meeting and organize the corporation and adopt a constitution and by-laws not inconsistent with the constitution and laws of this state. 4. The persons named in the first section of this act. or a majority of them. as the legislature shall hereafter specifically impose. This act shall take effect immediately. if any. and the manner of selection of the trustees and officers of the corporation. devise. No officer. purchase or lease. and deal with and expend the income and principal of the corporation in such manner as in the judgment of the trustees will best promote its objects. real or personal. or as a proper beneficiary of its strictly charitable purposes. The corporation hereby formed shall have power to take and hold by bequest. It shall have all the power and be subject to all the restrictions which now pertain by law to membership corporations created by special law so far as the same are applicable thereto and are not inconsistent with the provisions of this act. any property. the qualifications. to convey such property and to invest and reinvest any principal. the number of members who shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at meetings of the corporation. The constitution shall prescribe the manner of selection of members.

who sent a letter expressing his confidence in the Trustees and his personal regard for them. All the incorporators were present.. previously given by Mr. Mrs..FUNDS RECEIVED The Charter was duly accepted by the Trustees at their first meeting. the funds should be turned over to it. as of the dates indicated below. Treasurer. on the understanding that if the Foundation should become incorporated. FUNDS RECEIVED At the same meeting the Foundation came into the possession of the first funds to be entrusted to it. for purposes* identical with those of the Foundation. Secretary.ooo). page 165. By subsequent gifts of securities. 26 Broadway. held in Room 1409. Mr. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .1913. on May 22. Murphy. in the form of securities amounting in par value to Three million two hundred thousand dollars ($3. Rockefeller also gave to 1 fl Appendix II. Rockefeller. Edward L. Rockefeller increased the funds of the Foundation to the sum of One hundred million dollars ($100. John D. Appendix III. Jr. New York City. Jerome Davis Greene. except Mr. page 171. Ballard and Jerome D. Rockefeller. and the following officers were elected: President. Jr. Rockefeller in trust to John D. John Davison Rockefeller. John D.200. Greene. Starr J. Louis Guerineau Myers. At the same meeting a Constitution1 and By-Laws2 were adopted.000).000. Trustees.

in securities and accrued income Total $ 3. Jr.00 8.000. Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York $ 8..00 21. page . Greene.569. Starr J.028.1913.000.000. ROCKEFELLER June 7. Edward L. n. in securities and accrued income March 6. in trust. 1913.00 FROM LAURA S.00 24. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .569.200. Rockefeller.54* 10.052. 29. Total 1 8. ROCKEFELLER May 29..00 For the letters of gift and lists of securities. 1913.402. Income payable at Foundation's discretion to Euclid Avenue Baptist Church.000). in securities and accrued income June 27. through Messrs. par value June 4. Ohio Dec. in bonds. Ballard and Jerome D. primarily for certain specified charities. Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Home of Northern Ohio Nov.46* $100. Murphy. 1913. The several gifts received by the Foundation are enumerated below:1 FROM JOHN D. securities amounting in par value to Forty-eight thousand dollars (#48.ooo/x> Sept. Cleveland.1914.000.10 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the Foundation. others are par values.000.00* 65. Income payable to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York. John D..55* The values marked * are maiket values at the time of gift.1913. Trustees.1913.000. see Appendix. 1913. 9.178..000. oo $48.

1913. accordingly. has found that the people. and that.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 11 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION The first meetings of the Rockefeller Foundation. There was a general agreement that the advancement of public health through medical research and education. great loss of life. It was. after its legal organization had been completed. mental . the immediate purposes and general aims of which were set forth in the following resolutions: Whereas the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. has ascertained that the diagnosis of the disease can be made with ease and certainty and that it can be readily cured and easily prevented. and Whereas the Commission has treated or caused to be treated more than five hundred thousand persons. and normal growth. decided at the meeting of June 27. organized in 1909 for the eradication of hookworm disease in the United States. were devoted to the discussion of the policies and lines of work which were likely to present the largest probability of permanent and far-reaching usefulness. involving vast suffering. has found more than two million people in the Southern States to be infected with the disease. and noticeable decrease in economic efficiency over vast regions. following 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . partial arrest of physical. afforded the surest prospect of such usefulness. county and municipal officers are eager to cooperate in all helpful ways. to establish the International Health Commission. physicians. state boards of health. including the demonstration of known methods of treating and preventing disease.

the work. and so far as practicable to follow up the treatment and cure of this disease with the establishment of agencies for the promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine. that this Foundation is prepared to extend to other countries and peoples the work of eradicating hookworm disease as opportunity offers. consisting of the members for the time being *of the Executive Committee of this Foundation and such other persons. that this disease has probably been an important factor in retarding the economic. intellectual and moral progress of mankind. and also to adopt rules and regulations for its 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . inhabited. that this work be entrusted to a special committee to be called the International Health Commission. members of the Foundation or otherwise. and be it further Resolved. as they may associate with themselves. that the International Health Commission be authorized to adopt such policies and to employ such agencies as it may deem best adapted for the conduct of .12 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the treatment and cure of this disease. therefore be it Resolved. that the infection is being spread by emigration. according to current estimates. and Whereas the Commission has ascertained by diligent and extensive inquiry that hookworm disease prevails in a belt of territory encircling the earth for thirty degrees on each side of the equator. by more than a thousand million people. that the infection in some nations rises to nearly ninety per cent of the entire population. social. an intelligent public interest is awakened in hygiene and in modern scientific medicine and in practical measures for permanent public sanitation. and to this end. be it Resolved. and that where it is most severe little or nothing is being done toward its arrest or prevention.

is issued as a separate document. Ferrell was appointed Assistant Director-General. D.. John A. namely the initiation of measures for the eradication of hookworm disease in foreign countries. the International Health Commission shall report to the Foundation in detail its operations and expenditures. with a view to the inauguration of the work under the auspices of the several local governments. Wickliffe Rose. and Dr. The offices of the Commission were located at Washington. C. was appointed Director-General of the International Health Commission. the President and the Secretary of the Foundation serving ex officio as Chairman and Recording Secretary respectively. It discloses remarkable progress toward the fulfilment of the immediate object of the Commission. A visit by the Director-General to England in the summer of 1913 resulted in a cordial invitation from the Colonial authorities to visit the tropical colonies of Great Britain. A full report of the operations of the International Health Commission from the time of its establishment to December 13.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 13 own government and for the expenditure of such funds as shall be placed at its disposal. and shall present for approval its budget for the following year. Mr. Rose 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Mr. Administrative Secretary of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission for the Eradication of Hookworm Disease. and Resolved^ that at each annual meeting of the Foundation. with the offices of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. 1914.

in accordance with the suggestions of Mr. In addition to the work undertaken in the British colonies. Costa Rica and Guatemala. In Ceylon the Government and the Planters' Association inaugurated an experimental demonstration on a small scale. In the Malay States the consensus of opinion favored the establishment of a commission to inquire into the relative importance of hookworm disease and malaria in accounting for the physical debility of the people. Grenada and Egypt. Egypt. and work has been-inaugurated in Panama. Nicaragua. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Ceylon and the Malay States. the Commission has responded favorably to invitations from several Central American countries. Rose. St. Antigua.902 persons having been examined. plans were adopted and work begun in British Guiana. the entire cost being met locally. In spite of the fact that a large amount of time has necessarily been given to preliminary conferences. 37.14 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION promptly responded to this invitation by visits to the British West Indies. surveys and the work of organization. but was deferred on account of the war. As a direct consequence of these visits and of the hospitable reception given to the Commission's offer of cooperation. Vincent. A plan of work was adopted for St. and since the period under review a special commission has been appointed to make a study of this problem. a very substantial achievement has already been made. Lucia. Trinidad.

whereby the principle of self-help has been steadily maintained. and the resulting stimulation of interest on the part of the common people. This demonstration is now entering its final stage with the inauguration of the so-called intensive community work whereby. it was decided that on account of the very close © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the International Health Commission has also undertaken to complete the program of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission for the eradication of hookworm disease in the Southern states. first of the presence of the disease. Just before the close of the year under review. up to December 31.425 persons treated in all the foreign areas. This program did not contemplate complete eradication under the supervision of the Sanitary Commission. But more significant than the number of persons treated has been the establishment of relations of cooperation and mutual confidence between the Commission and the governments and physicians of the communities visited. in a limited number of° typical communities in each state. and secondly of the method of treating and preventing it. 1914. and at the same time of preventing soil pollution—the only way of preventing the recurrence of the disease. it is hoped to show convincingly the possibility of treating every infected person.INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 16 and 19. but aimed rather at a comprehensive demonstration in each state. In addition to carrying on its work in foreign countries.

Professor Thomas W. before May i. Laurence Laughlin. "to consider further the desirability of establishing an Institute for Economic Re- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Accordingly. a committee was appointed. INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS At some of the earlier meetings of the Foundation there was informal discussion of the desirability of establishing some organization for the study of social and economic questions. Victor Morawetz. give up its offices in Washington and occupy quarters assigned to it in the new offices of the Foundation. Mr. Wheeler. Gay. Dean of the Graduate School of Business Administration in Harvard University. Chairman. and especially in view of the relatively large share of attention already given by the Foundation to matters pertaining to public health. of the University of Virginia. arrangements were made whereby the International Health Commission will. Professor J. 1915. of the University of Chicago. of New York City. A number of leading economists were consulted and upon their unanimously favoring the establishment of such an organization. Harry A. Page. of Chicago. and Mr.JO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION relation necessarily existing between the various activities of the Foundation. consisting of Professor Edwin F. it was important that the offices of the International Health Commission should be in close proximity to those of the Foundation.

especially in view of the fact that since the question of establishing an Institute for Economic Research had been under consideration. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . unanimously recommending that studies be initiated and be carried on for a year in some chosen field. with a view to discovering whether such studies. the opinion prevailed that no action should be taken at present. such as Profitsharing. an Investigation of Industrial Relations had been instituted under the direction of Mr.INVESTIGATION OV INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 17 search. if continued and adequately maintained. would offer a sufficient prospect of fruitful results to justify the establishment of a more permanent bureau or institute. Mackenzie King. After a discussion in which the advantages of a separate organization for economic research and o the possible objections thereto were considered at length. L." This Committee reported. and to present an estimate of the approximate cost of initiating and carrying on the work to be first proposed. This report was considered by the Trustees of the Foundation on October 21. 1914. to recommend a method of organization. W. under date of August 4. 1914. while the fifth recommended a more limited and concrete problem. to make a selection of such problems of economic importance as would in their judgment be advantageously studied through such an agency. Four of the Committee recommended the subject of Prices as lying at the threshold of a great many important economic problems.

that the Foundation could do no greater service than by instituting a careful and thorough inquiry into the causes of industrial unrest and maladjustment. not of passing judgment upon the merits of any particular controversy.18 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The two projects were by 110 means identical in method or scope. it must inevitably be on the basis of accurate and well-diffused information in regard to all ascertainable factors in industrial strife and industrial progress. The Trustees of the Foundation were not so sanguine as to hope that any royal road to industrial peace could be found. however. They did believe. but rather of assembling in a purely objective way. as illustrating both the evils inherent in modern industrial conditions. but both were actuated by the desire to study the causes of social and industrial unrest. especially in view of the industrial conflict in Colorado. the Rockefeller Foundation is deliberately attempting to grapple with what it believes to be the most 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . much less that it could be found by the isolated efforts of any one agency. As was said in the public announcement of the Rockefeller Foundation's Investigation of Industrial Relations: *"In facing the problem of Industrial Relations. and the successful or promising experiments that had been made. the experience of this and other countries. It seemed to the Trustees. with the object. and with scientific accuracy. that if progress was to be made.

but they^ afford no excuse for inaction. and has been devoting his first months to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . both before and after the passage of that Act. and the tried experience of the world. and that the literature on the subject. at the same time. and impartially and persistently pursued in the spirit and with the facilities which the Foundation affords. L. Within the field of industrial relations Mr. King began his services on October i." The first essential in undertakingany research is to find men whose training and experience is such as to offer the greatest possible assuranceof productive work. of industrial organi. The Foundation is not baffled at the outset by the knowledge that the task hitherto has seemed well nigh hopeless. but also of universities and Governments throughout the world. will gradually win for itself the cooperation. King was the author of the Canadian Industrial Disputes Investigation Act.' zations. Mr. and as Deputy Minister and Minister of Labor in Canada. of individuals. and by his own constructive contribution to the betterment of labor conditions. and. he had had a large experience in the settlement of industrial disputes. to undertake this great task. and it is precisely for this reason that the investigation has been instituted. Mackenzie King seemed to be singularly qualified by academic training. It is hoped that an investigation instituted on the scale. These may be reasons for a gradual approach. is so vast as to be overwhelming. by actual contact with labor disputes. and for counselling patience in the matter of results. 1914.INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 19 complicated. W. and institutions interested in social reform.^ Mr. the most urgent question of modern times. ^not alone of employers and workingmen.

The greater part of the questions asked were embodied in two questionnaires. with accompanying exhibits. to select certain lines of inquiry in which a better knowledge of facts is peculiarly needed. which was then in session. It is Mr. in consultation with the best authorities throughout the world and in cooperation with established agencies working toward the same end. and in which may be found the best prospect of fruitful and beneficial study leading to constructive improvement. financial resources and activities of the Foundation and its Trustees. the answers to which.20 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION a careful study of the best possible approach to his subject. were published by the Foundation and presented to the Commission. This study has included a broad survey of the whole field of industrial relations. in the form of a pamphlet entitled: " Information 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The announcement by the Foundation that it had undertaken the Investigation of Industrial Relations was made the subject of special inquiry by the United States Commission on Industrial Relations. a field so wide as to touch at one point or another almost all conceivable human relations. organization. King's hope that when he has completed his survey and prepared a graphic exhibition of his field of study. 1914. A large number of questions were addressed by the Commission to the President and the Secretary of the Rockefeller Foundation. he will be able. in November and December. covering the history.

within the general field of public health. The Foundation on its side was enabled to put before the Commission and the public a plain statement of the policies governing the Foundation and the work actually accomplished. and during the month of January the Commission held public hearings in New York City. MENTAL HYGIENE One of the important subjects considered by the Trustees. for the confidence and support of public opinion. it was apparent that supposed dangers of abuse rather than results or tendencies to be found in the acts of the Foundation and its associated Boards seemed to be the object of chief concern. it will not be set forth here.MENTAL HYGIENE 21 Furnished by the Rockefeller Foundation in Response to Questionnaires Submitted by United States Commission on Industrial Relations. and it is to be hoped that these statements pro-0 vided an even more certain basis than had existed before. has been that of mental hygiene. It has been established beyond any doubt that 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to which several of the officers and members of the Foundation were summoned as witnesses. As the testimony presented at these hearings will be embodied in the report of the Commission." Other questions were asked and answered by correspondence. but it is proper to state that while much attention was given by the questions of the Commission to certain doubts and fears as to the powers of large foundations.

22 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION mental defect and mental disease are factors of great social and economic importance. when attempts have been made to determine the precise bearing of these factors on the public health and on social and economic conditions. The Trustees of the Foundation consequently decided to give attention to the subject of mental hygiene. they sought a man whose training and experience conspicuously fitted him to be their adviser in this important field. of the United States Public Health Service. in the hope of determining in what ways they could best contribute to the discovery of needed facts and to the diffusion of the most reliable information by which this important field of public health is to be governed. They were fortunate in securing Dr. proceeding again as in the case of the Investigation of Industrial Relations. The recognition of this fact has been a great gain. Thoma's: W. Salmon. On the other hand. That Committee had already performed a remarkable service in awakening public opinion in different 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . who had been detached from the government service for the last two years to act as Scientific Secretary of the National Committee for Mental Hygiene. which conclusions could be justified only by a more accurate knowledge of pathology and of vital statistics than even the best authorities now possess. Accordingly. there has been a tendency to adopt hasty conclusions as to public policy.

and primarily for the promotion of State surveys. under the direction of Dr.WAR RELIEF 23 parts of the country to the importance of mental hygiene and in setting up. Salmon. in the face of the disaster which was 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . on December 30. custody and treatment of the insane. Accordingly. WAR RELIEF At the meetings of the Executive Committee and of the Trustees of the Foundation following the outbreak of the war. than to aid the activities of the Committee for Mental Hygiene. within the field of mental hygiene. Dr. more intelligent and humane standards for legislation bearing on the commitment. on the basis of existing information. with the understanding that his services for the next two years would be at the disposal of the National Committee for Mental Hygiene. The Committee has already conducted or aided a number of surveys of institutions for the insane in different States and communities. the duty of the Foundation. Salmon was appointed a member of the staff of the Foundation. It seemed to the Trustees of the Foundation that at this time no greater service could be rendered. the result of which has been the diffusion of more rational ideas as to the nature of insanity as a disease that is to a large extent both preventable and curable. and in many instances the adoption of more humane and beneficial methods of treatment. 1914.

Alexis Carrel. a*nd the latter took immediate steps to discover the most practicable measures for bringing prompt relief. The matter was referred to the Executive Committee. On August 13. to the places where it was most needed. and especially the inhabitants of Belgium. was made the subject of earnest and prolonged consideration. in a purely humanitarian spirit. and in all parts of the United 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . At the meeting of the Trustees on October 21. an appropriation was made to enable Dr. An appropriation was also made to the American Red Cross as a contribution toward the cost of sending physicians and nurses to Europe. a member of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.24 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION overwhelming Europe and exercising a more or less paralyzing effect upon the normal life and intercourse of all nations. resolutions were adopted expressing the sense of the Board that it was urgently desirable that the Rockefeller Foundation should avail itself of such opportunities as might be presented for the relief of non-combatant sufferers from the war in Europe. to meet the urgent need for anti-meningitis serum and anti-dysentery serum. The world had already been informed of the imminent danger of starvation to which the people of Belgium were exposed. two products of modern research with which the studies of the Institute had been associated. whose services had been accepted by the medical corps of the French army. 1914.

and then distributed through Belgium with the sanction of the belligerent powers and the active cooperation of both the German military authorities and the civilian agencies organized for that purpose by the Belgians themselves. a plan of cooperation was entered into with the Belgian Relief Committee of New York. Accordingly. and from which they could be trans-shipped to Belgium. For this reason it seemed to the Executive Committee that the greatest service the Rockefeller Foundation could render would be to provide a depot to which gifts in kind from all parts of the country could be sent. had laid the foundations for an efficient organization. while the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .WAR RELIEF 25 States the generous desires of the American people found expression in offers of help and inquiries as to the best ways of making their help available. an outgrowth of an informal committee of Americans. which had been organized to facilitate the return of American travelers in Europe at the outbreak of the war. the most convenient port. The Commission for Relief in Belgium. whereby the latter Committee exercised the function of soliciting gifts of money and supplies. whereby food supplies contributed from different parts of the world could be assembled at Rotterdam. The Commission for Relief in Belgium had not at that time completed its organization of an agency in the United States for the assembling of food supplies and their transportation to Belgium.

this offer being limited to supplies received before December 31.35.153. the Foundation was subsequently reimbursed for the cost of chartering and loading vessels.830 tons. so that its re- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . in Belgium and dispatched December 23." 3. the "Agamemnon." 5. November 2. Of these ships the "Massapequa" and the "Neches" were loaded with a cargo purchased by the Foundation." In addition. The total cost of the food supplies thus given by the Foundation was $981. The Commission for Relief in Belgium having large funds at its disposal which were applicable solely to the cost of transportation." chartered by the Commission for Relief.000 bushels of wheat for the "Ferrona.500 tons." 2.26 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Foundation offered to pay all freight charges when necessary. the "Neches. the Foundation supplied 280. December 12.800 tons.644 bushels on the S. to provide the necessary depot in New York and the ships for ocean transportation to Belgium. also chartered by the Commission for Relief in Belgium." dispatched January i. Under this arrangement the following ships were chartered and dispatched by the Rockefeller Foundation and consigned to the Commission for Relief in Belgium: the "Massapequa. December 4. 1914. and 23. "Industry. and the "Massapequa" for a second voyage.S. December 31. while the Belgian Relief Committee of New York supplied the cargo for the "Agamemnon" and the second voyage of the "Massapequa.

the cost of cargoes so far as met by the Foundation. A table giving the dates of shipments. Evidence that the effect of the Rockefeller Foundation's large participation in the sending of food to the Belgians was to stimulate rather than to check the generosity of other donors was afforded by the large increase in contributions received by the Belgian Relief Committee of New York. and other expenses. in proximity to the office of the Belgian Relief Committee. For the purpose of attending to these details. when its services were no longer required. determined to send a Commission to Europe to inquire generally into the need of relief measures in all the countries con- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . on November 6. a temporary office was opened by the Foundation. and was maintained there until February 6. so that the Rockefeller Foundation very gladly relinquished in favor of the Commission the function of chartering ships and attending to the . will be found in the Appendix (page 214). Meanwhile the Executive Committee. cargoes. During December the Commission for Relief in Belgium completed the organization of its American branch. 10 Bridge Street. at No.details of transportation. with head offices in New York City. while feeling amply justified by the information available in sending food to Belgium at the earliest possible moment.WAR RELIEF 27 sources for war relief could be available for supplies.

Henry James. Mr. In general the report showed that nearly the entire population of Belgium. Director-General of the International Health Commission. Jr. Ernest P. Wickliffe Rose. National Director of the American Red Cross. The Commission sailed for Europe on November u. Manager of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.2S THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION cerned. and its essential features were made public. upon a scale unprecedented in the history of humanitarian efforts of this kind. they proceeded to Rotterdam and made a thorough survey of the organization and workings of relief in Holland and Belgium. so that all who were contributing in the United States and other countries for the relief of the Belgians could be assured that their contributions were being economically and effectively spent for the relief of a people who would otherwise have been forced to the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . rich and poor alike. Bicknell. and after a preliminary conference with the American Ambassador and the Commission for Relief in Belgium at the latter's headquarters in London. were dependent upon supplies of food from other countries.. The Commission was composed of Mr. a full report on relief in Belgium was transmitted to the Foundation. 1915. On January i. public spirit and intelligence by those concerned. that the problem of individual relief. and Mr. was being attacked with energy. who was generously given leave of absence by the latter organization.

A smaller contribution than that involved in the shipment of food supplies and the investigations of the War Relief Commission. there was presented through Mr.000 a year was made effective for this purpose in November. 1914. was a contribution to provide moderate stipends for those professors of scientific subjects in the University of Lou vain who had been obliged to abandon their own laboratories and had been provided with opportunities of continuing their scientific work in England. An appropriation at the rate of $20. for a period of three months. The Commission is continuing its work by visiting the theatre of war in Poland and Serbia.COOPERATION IN CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 29 most desperate extremes of famine. John D. on behalf of representatives of several of the leading foreign missionary boards of the United 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and its recommendations as to the further participation of the Foundation in war relief have been presented for the consideration of the Trustees. but one of special significance. Rockefeller. Mott of the International Committee of the Young Men's Christian Association. PROMOTION OF COOPERATION IN CHRISTIAN MISSIONS At the meeting of the Executive Committee on April 16. in view of the importance attached to education and research by the Boards established by Mr. John R. and has subsequently been renewed for a second period of three months.

the Student Volunteer movement as the recruiting society for all the Boards. by helping to establish a convenient headquarters. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and by otherwise aiding in certain cooperative features of their work. through which many of the cooperative activities of these boards could be promoted. the Home Base Committee. but rather. the Board of Missionary Preparation. The principal objects in view were the provision of a common headquarters in New York for such united foreign missionary interests as the Committee of Reference and Counsel of the Foreign Mission Boards of North America. the North American section of the Continuation Committee of the Edinburgh Conference and its special committees. a comprehensive missionary research library.80 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION States a statement setting forth in detail a program of cooperation and coordination in foreign missionary work. and requesting the Rockefeller Foundation to make a contribution toward the carrying out of this program. The Church on the Mission Field. the special meetings. The Rockefeller Foundation was. and the general promotion of coordination and cooperation among the missionary forces of the world. not asked to enlarge the resources of any one of the participating missionary boards for its own evangelistic work. and other activities related to the Annual Conference of North American Foreign Mission Boards. such as those on Survey and Occupation. Education.

and a further appropriation of a sum not to exceed $425. MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA During the autumn and winter of 1913 the Trustees became convinced that the crisis in the political and economic development of China rendered the present a most favorable time for the advancement of education in that 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to give assistance to the missionary boards in an effort.000 to meet the expense of equipping suitable offices for the various interboard and interdenominational foreign missionary activities above mentioned. to realize a broader. The use actually made of these quarters. 25 Madison Avenue was secured as headquarters for the work and was thoroughly equipped during the past year. initiated by themselves. payable in diminishing annual instalments through a period of ten years.MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA 31 such as the coordination of educational effort in the foreign field. as reported by the Sub-Committee on Headquarters and Budget of the Committee of Reference and Counsel. gives every indication that the purposes in view are being fulfilled. and the training of missionaries at home. In response to this application the Rockefeller Foundation pledged to the Committee of Reference and Council a sum not exceeding $25. a more fraternal and a more efficient conception of their function.000. The nineteenth floor of the building at No.

hospitals and dispensaries in China.32 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION country. and spent four months in a very thorough study of existing medical schools. including public and personal hygiene. The result of that conference was that the Trustees determined to send a Commission to China to study the needs of the country in regard to medical education and public health. Chairman. were invited. Government officials and other competent advisers. based chiefly upon the experience of Christian missionaries. and Francis W. 1914. The Commission met in Peking about May i. In order that the Trustees might be guided by the best available advice. and in conference with missionaries. M. Greene. of the Harvard Medical School and the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital of Boston. page 208. and several medical missionaries and other residents of China who happened to be in this country. on January 19. to which a number of the executive officers of the principal missionary boards employing medical missionaries.. 1914. in regard to the best means of reinforcing and adding to the important work *See Appendix VII. 1914. a conference was held in New York City. the following Commission was appointed: Harry Pratt Judson. There was abundant testimony. that one of the greatest needs of China was that of the benefits of modern medicine. as well as the treatment of disease. President of the University of Chicago. United States Consul General at Hankow. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Peabody. Roger S.* In February. D.

Executive Secretary of the General Education Board. Wallace Buttrick. The President of the Foundation was elected Chairman of the Board. The result of this consideration was the establishment of the China Medical Board of the Rockefeller Foundation. 1914. Sage Secretary. An adjourned meeting was held November 5. its officers have been engaged in preliminary conferences looking toward the initiation of its work in China on the basis of the fullest possible utilization of existing institutions and equipment. 1914. for the purpose of considering the report in detail. and its report was presented to the Trustees at their meeting of October 21. which were formally adopted as a working program. was appointed Director of the China Medical Board. findings and recommendations of the Commission. Dr. and of the most cordial cooperation with the missionary boards and other agencies which have already carried on medical work in China. A fifth month was devoted to the preparation of an elaborate report of the observations. During the short period following the establishment of the China Medical Board. and Dr. Eben C.MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA 33 already done in the field of medical education and public health. for the purpose of carrying out the recommendations of the Commission.Greene was appointed Resident Director in China. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . subject to such modification as experience should show to be necessary. and Mr. Roger S.

members and committees of the Rockefeller Foundation and its subsidiary organizations. GREENE. Rockefeller. John D. and the report of the Treasurer for the years 1913 and 1914. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Secretary. the Constitution and By-Laws of the Foundation.84 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION In the appendix will be found lists of the officers. the text of the proposed Federal Charter. the several letters of gift received from Mr. JEROME D. and Mrs.1914. a complete list of appropriations made to December 31.

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Report of the Director-General 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

1914. 1913. Director-General. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to December 31.To the President of the Rockefeller Foundation: Sir:— I have the honor to submit herewith my report as Director-General of the International Health Commission for the period June 27. WICKLIFFE ROSE. Respectfully yours.

organized in 1909 for the eradication of hookworm disease in the United States. Its object is the "promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine/' with the world as its field. in creating the Commission. A. adopted the following resolution: WHEREAS. the Commission has treated or caused to be treated more than five hundred thousand persons. involving vast suffering. Funds for its maintenance are provided by the Rockefeller Foundation. The Foundation. and chartered by the State of New York. by the Rockefeller Foundation. 1913.CHAPTER I GENERAL SUMMARY The International Health Commission was created June 27. the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. and WHEREAS. S. has found more ^ than two million people in the Southern States to be infected with the disease. partial arrest of physical. composed of five men. endowed by Mr. and noticeable decrease in economic efficiency over vast regions. U. a permanent institution. Rockefeller with one hundred million dollars. residents of New York City. are members of the Commission ex officio. great loss of life. The Executive Committee of the Foundation.has ascertained that the diagnosis of the disease can be made with ease and certainty and that it can be readily cured and easily pre37 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . mental and moral growth. John D.

an intelligent public interest is awakened in hygiene and in modern scientific medicine and in practical measures for permanent public sanitation. and that. following the treatment and cure of this disease. according to current estimates. and so far as practicable to follow up the treatment and cure of this disease with the establishment of agencies for the promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine. county and municipal officers are eager to cooperate in all helpful ways. that this disease has probably been an important factor in retarding the economic. state boards of health. consisting of the members for the time being of the Executive Committee of this Foundation and such other persons. that this work be entrusted to a special committee to be called the International Health Commission. by more than a thousand million people. and to this end be it RESOLVED. intellectual and moral progress of mankind. and be it further 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . therefore be it RESOLVED. inhabited. and that where it is most severe little or nothing is being done toward its arrest or prevention. members of the Foundation or otherwise. that this Foundation is prepared to extend to other countries and peoples the work of eradicating hookworm disease as opportunity offers. and WHEREAS. as they may associate with themselves. by diligent and extensive inquiry that hookworm disease prevails in a belt of territory encircling the earth for thirty degrees on each side of the equator. the Commission has ascertained . physicians. that the infection is being spread by emigration.88 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION vented. social. that the infection in some nations rises to nearly ninety per cent of the entire population. has found that the people.

Eliot. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . in connection with the offices of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. M.. the International Health Commission shall report to the Foundation in detail its operations and expenditures. and RESOLVED. 1913. Houston. Officers of the Commission were elected as follows: John D. Charles O. and the work of preliminary organization began. and shall present for approval its budget for the following year. Wickliffe Rose. C. was appointed Assistant Director-General. Starr J. Walter H. Wickliffe Rose. Welch. Recording Secretary. Chairman. The Commission opened offices in Washington. Gorgas. William C. the following persons were made members of the International Health Commission: John D. Jerome D. Simon Flexner. Jr. that at each annual meeting ofthe Foundation. that the International Health. Greene. Page. Rockefeller. Jerome D. and William H. Greene.GENERAL SUMMARY 30 RESOLVED. his term of service to begin July i.. Heydt. Rockefeller. Gates. Frederick T. D. Pursuant to this resolution... D. John A. David F. Jr. Murphy. Director-General. Ferrell. and also to adopt rules and regulations for its own government and for the expenditure of such funds as shall be placed at its disposal. Commission be authorized to adopt such policies and to employ such agencies as it may deem best adapted for the conduct of the work. Charles W.

000 live in countries where the infection is prevalent. 39 per cent were found to be infected. The relief and control of this one disease is an undertaking of enormous magnitude." pages 3 and following.992 rural children microscopically examined in the Southern states.000 people inhabiting the globe. The infection belts the globe in a zone about 66° wide. Of the 1.600.000. 6.. of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission.* In many countries infection is extremely prevalent.000. Of 548. Practically all countries withih this zone are infected. Reports received by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission *See Publication No. and (2) " so far as practicable to follow up the treatment and cure of this disease with the establishment of agencies for the promotion of public sanitation and the spread of the knowledge of scientific medicine.** In keeping with this definition of purpose the Commission has directed its initial efforts to the first and more immediate task of extending to foreign countries work for the relief and control of uncinariasis or hookworm disease. "Hookworm Infection in Foreign Countries. about 900.40 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION I WHAT THE COMMISSION HAS UNDERTAKEN TO DO The resolution creating the Commission assigned to it two tasks: (i) "to extend to other countries the work of eradicating hookworm disease as opportunity should offer". extending roughly from parallel 36° north tr parallel 30°south. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

(2) microscopically examining the people and curing those who are found infected.000 feet above. 90 per cent are infected. that in Dutch Guiana the infection on many plantations runs as high as 90 per cent. 50 per cent are infected. The relief and control of the disease in a given country involves: (i) making a survey to determine the geographic distribution and the approximate degree of infection. that of the population of British Guiana.GENERAL SUMMARY 41 in 1911. the infection among the coolies on sugar estates being even greater. that the southern two-thirds of the Chinese Empire is involved. that 50 per cent of the Indian coolies on sugar and tea estates in Natal are infected. that on many plantations in Ceylon the infection runs as high as 90 per cent. estimate: that of the population of Colombia living between sea level and 3. that in Egypt the infection of the laboring population is approximately 50 per cent. the infection in many parts of the Yangtse Valley running as high as 70 to 76 per cent among the farming population. and summarized in its Publication No. 6. and (3) setting in operation and making effective such sanitary measures as will 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . that there is an extremely heavy infection in some parts of India and among the coolies on many estates in Malaya and Fiji which import their labor from India.

000. The attitude assumed by the International Health Commission toward this work is that assumed by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in its cooperation with the Southern States. and that the Commission may be of service in so far as it may cooperate with the Governments of foreign countries in organizing and making effective their own agencies. with its 900. With this in mind one may get some comprehension of what is involved in an effort to extend this work to the whole infected zone. that if the infection is to be stamped out in any area the country in which it exists must assume the responsibility. In this spirit the Commission has accepted the invitation of eleven *See Publication No. namely:that the bringing of this disease under control in any country is a work which no outside agency working independently could do if it would. /. The accomplishment of this result will require the operation of permanent agencies working over long periods of time.000 people. Dr. Howard's report of the work being done in British Guiana* gives a definite conception of what is required for the relief and control of the disease in a small are*a.42 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION put a stop to soil-pollution. "The Eradication of Ankylostomiasis: Methods and Administrative Measures as Illustrated by the Campaign in British Guiana. and one which no outside agency should do if it could." 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The International Health Commission has not undertaken to eradicate uncinariasis in any country.

represented the Commission on similar journeys to countries in Central America. II PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATIONS AND CONFERENCES At the first meeting of the International Health Commission.. To England:—The Commission's first step in the direction of cooperation with foreign countries was a visit to England for conference with British medical authorities and the British Government. and (3) to Egypt and British dependencies in the Far East. H. Page.1913. This visit had been arranged by the American Ambassador in London. J. the Director-General was authorized to go in person or to send a representative to British dependencies and to Latin-American countries for the purpose of preliminary investigation and conference. June 27. (2) to the British West Indies. White. It is prepared to extend this cooperation to other countries as conditions invite. . himself a member of the Inter- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Three such journeys were made: (i) to England. Walter H. Mr.GENERAL SUMMARY 43 foreign countries during the current year to cooperate in the relief and control of this disease. Travel on these missions consumed most of the time of the Director-General during the first twelve months of the Commission's existence. Dr. of the United States Public Health Service. I.

on August 13. physicians. Among those present were Lord Crewe. Balfour described conditions as he had seen them in the Soudan. A series of conferences followed. The Director-General arrived in London on August 10. the most important of which was at a dinner given by Mr. Dr. Page. Godfrey. and a group of scientists.44 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION national Health Commission and keenly interested in what it was proposing to do. and explained that the International Health Commission is prepared to extend the work to other countries where the infection is prevalent and where conditions seem to invite such extension. Secretary of State for India. at the Maryborough Club. 1913. SurgeonGeneral of British Guiana. Dr. Sandwith told of his experience with uncinariasis in Egypt. the Right Honorable Lewis Harcourt. described in detail the methods by which the results exhibited had been accomplished. The Director-General exhibited by means of lantern-slides the work which had been done by the cooperation of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission with the Southern States for the relief and control of hookworm disease. Dr. told of the bringing 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and government officials whose advice and suggestions were of great value. Secretary of State for the Colonies. where more than 50 per cent of the working population of the Delta are infected.

with headquarters at the Colonial Office. Sir Thomas Robinson. and others contributed details bearing on sanitary requirements or picturing conditions in India. Shipley. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . It remained only to work out details. The Secretary of State for the Colonies addressed a communication to the British Colonies endorsing the Commission and its work and accrediting its representatives to the Governments of those countries. after speaking in most generous terms of the work done in the States. Lord Crewe spoke in similar spirit for India. Australia. gave the Commission an urgent invitation to visit the Colonies. Dr. offering all the facilities of his office.GENERAL S U M M A R Y 45 of a heavy infection to the sugar estates of that country by the importation of coolie laborers from India. As a result of a series of conferences held at the Colonial Office it was agreed that there should be an English Advisory Committee. Ceylon. Finally. The following consented to serve as members of the English Advisory Committee. in London. Mr. the Malay States. Sir Thomas Barlow. and the Fiji Islands. It was agreed that the Commission's first work in foreign countries should be in the British West Indies. Harcourt. and assuring the Commission of the hearty cooperation of the local governments.

K. 2.S. British Guiana.M. BAGSHAWE.46 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION RIGHT HONORABLE VISCOUNT BRYCE. DR.G. Director of the Tropical Diseases Bureau. B. McCALLUM. Representing the Indian Government. A. Chairman. K. M. the Director-General made a journey to the British West Indies. To the British West Indies:—During the months of October. St. READ. G.G. SIR DAVID SEMPLE. of the Colonial Office. Grenada. In each of the coun- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .M. Vincent. PROFESSOR J... G. H. G.C. GRINDLE. SIR F.C. visiting Barbados. and Antigua. HAVELOCK CHARLES. E. St. The purpose of this journey was to make a preliminary investigation of the conditions of infection. HALDANE.C. November. J. SHIPLEY. MR. Representing the Egyptian Government. G. F. 1913.R. DR. to study the local conditions bearing on the problem of relief and control. R. O.G..M. MR. MR. MAJOR SraT. Trinidad. of the Colonial Office. S. Secretary of the Committee. SlR H. COWELL. of the Colonial Office. SURGEON-GENERAL SIR R.M.O. Agent-General for Queensland. F.C. Lucia.R. ROBINSON. A.S. and to discuss with physicians and government authorities working plans for the extension of the service to the colonies in which the infection was found to be prevalent and in which conditions seemed to favor cooperation^ for its relief and control.V. HODGSON. H. and December.

By invitation of the Commission. and asylums for the insane. poor-houses. was making public health the chief feature of his administration and was centering attention especially on Egypt's four endemic scourges:— 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . M. After conference with the English Advisory Committee in London. Dr. and tentative plans were agreed upon providing for the extension of the service to each of these infected countries. of the London School of Tropical Medicine. Ceylon. F. returning to the United States by way of the Philippines and Japan. the British High Commissioner. the DirectorGeneral sailed again for England on his way to the East. Of the seven colonies visited uncinariasis was found to be prevalent in six. 3.GENERAL S U M M A R Y 47 tries visited the Commission's representative was received most cordially and was given every facility for carrying out the purpose of his mission. and made clinical examination of the inmates of prisons. Lord Kitchener. He inspected children in the schools. and the Federated Malay States. accompanied him on his journey as far as Ceylon. He made extensive journeys over the Islands. In Egypt the Commission's representatives were given a most cordial reception. 1914. he proceeded to Egypt. To the East:—In March. Sandwith. and examined large numbers of coolies on estates. visited hospitals.

Three weeks of observation in Egyptian hospitals and in the field tended to confirm the estimate that more than half the farming population of the Delta harbor Uncinaria. A working plan providing for the cooperation of the Commission and the Government in making a demonstration in one province was formulated and adopted. and the Planters' Association united in extending every facility for the observation of conditions in that Island. Many of these were extremely severe cases. The Commission's representatives made journeys afield covering a large portion of the infected area. He expressed himself as eager to have the cooperation of the Commission. 17). In Ceylon the Government. and ophthalmia. pellagra. bilharziasis. about 600 patients from all parts of Egypt were seen under treatment for uncinariasis at one time (See Fig. planters. They visited hospitals. inspected children in the schools. the Department of Health. made clinical examination of large numbers of coolies on tea and rubber estates. and estate managers in both the up-country and the low-country 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .48 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION uncinariasis. At the Church Mission hospital. and gave assurances that any effective plan for the improvement of health conditions in Egypt would have the active support of the Government. in Cairo. and conferred with physicians.

Some microscopic examinations were made at the Ratnapura Hospital to check the results of clinical diagnosis. On many rubber estates in the low-country districts local physicians have estimated that 90 per cent of the coolies are infected. The laborers on these estates are Tamils brought over from India. At the request of the Government. the Principal Civil Medical Officer. the climate is warm and moist and the ground is well shaded by the rubber trees. the lines are not provided with latrines. the Commission's representative submitted a tentative working plan providing 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and this estimate would seem to be not excessive. and the coolies of all ages work with bare feet and bare legs in contact with the polluted soil. As a result of these conditions the anaemias on some of the rubber estates visited are as extreme as they were on the coffee estates in Porto Rico when the Porto Rico Anaemia Commission began its work in 1904. the habit of the coolies is to befoul the soil about the lines and on the estates. Conditions on the rubber estates tend to increase the infection. and the Planters' Association. and most of them are infected before they reach Ceylon. The coolies are massed in lines. There can be no mistaking the prevalence and the disabling effects of uncinariasis in Ceylon.GENERAL SUMMARY 49 sections of the infected area.

with medical officers he visited Government and estate hospitals. There is much difference of opinion among the physicians in Malaya as to the importance of uncinariasis as a menace to health and working efficiency in that country. and conferred with physicians. It was not considered necessary for the Commission to contribute funds toward the maintenance of the * work. and had on hand at this time an accumulated surplus medical fund which the Government proposed to use for this purpose. In Malaya the Commission's representative was given opportunity to extend his observations from Panang to Singapore. That uncinariasis is prevalent in Malaya there is abundant evidence. examined clinically about 2. inspected coolie lines. planters.000 coolies on cocoanut and rubber estates. On the outbreak of the European war this work was suspended.60 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION for a demonstration on a small scale to be carried out on a selected group of estates. Official records which had been prepared for his coming were placed in his hands. and Government officials in the Straits Settlements and the Federated Malay States. An officer was appointed to have charge of the work. Ceylon is a highly prosperous country. the areas were selected. Most of the laborers on the large estates 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and microscopists were put under training for the work.

physically fit. The two diseases are so complicated that it is extremely difficult to determine whether or not uncinariasis on these estates is a sufficient menace to health to justify special effort for its relief and control. In view of this uncertainty. so far as gross clinical symptoms go. But the disabling disease of first importance on these rubber estates is malaria. The indications are that on many of the rubber estates the infection increases and that severe anaemias result. and given the field with a free hand. and that to this end a scientific commission should be appointed. so that those reaching the estates in Malaya are. supplied with necessary funds and equipment. it was agreed in conference at Government House that the first effort should be directed toward ascertaining the facts. But the clinical examination at Port Swettenham of 796 Tamils just arrived from India would indicate that the medical examination in India of intended immigrants to the Federated Malay States weeds out all the severe cases. and the indications are that a large percentage of these are infected before leaving India.GENERAL S U M M A R Y 51 are Tamils brought over from Southern India. This proposal has been approved by the Colonial Office and by the International Health 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The anaemia of uncinariasis is not to be distinguished from the anaemia of malaria.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . planters. has accepted a position with the International Health Commission as Director of its work for the East. of the United States Public Health Service. To Central America:—On all journeys for preliminary investigation and conference in Central American countries the Commission was represented by Dr. As a result of this visit. In each of these countries he conferred with physicians. and made preliminary investigations similar to those made in the West Indies and in the East. Victor G. and Nicaragua. Dr. In each of these countries uncinariasis was found to be prevalent. 4.B2 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Commission. who on leave of absence accepted a position with the Commission for one year as Director of the Commission's work in Latin-American countries. Joseph H. In the Philippines the Commission's representative had opportunity for a brief but rather comprehensive survey of the remarkable work which has been done in these Islands by the Department of Public Health during the brief period of American occupation. Costa Rica. White. He visited Panama. under whose direction this work has been done. Heiser. and the organization of the uncinariasis commission is now under way. and Government officials. Guatemala.

definite steps were taken to organize work and working agencies for the relief and control of uncinariasis in British Guiana. Guatemala. Nicaragua. where there is a heavy infection among the white or the Indian population. and Egypt. Vincent. Costa Rica. HI ORGANIZATION OF WORK AND WORKING AGENCIES Following these journeys for preliminary investigation of local conditions and for conference with local authorities. Grenada. St. Lucia. Panama. reminding one of its effects on the white people in the Southern States or on the jibaros in Porto Rico. and to create a scientific commission to study the relative importance of uncinariasis as a disabling disease in Malaya and other countries in the East. Work is well under way in Panama and Costa Rica. In each of these four countries the Government has invited the Commission to cooperate in the work of relief and control. and preliminary arrangements have been made for its opening in the other two countries. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .GENERAL SUMMARY 53 In some areas in these countries. Antigua. St. Trinidad. the disease is producing severe anaemias. These invitations have been accepted and funds for starting work on a small scale have been appropriated.

The Commission. to try out agencies and methods until they have become adjusted to local conditions. Work under authority and direction of Government:—In each country where this work is in progress it is being done under the authority and direction of Government. and caretakers for 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The International Health Commission does not undertake to eradicate uncinariasis in any country. therefore. without waste of funds. nurses. the infection can be brought under final control only by means of permanent agencies working over long periods of time. 2. When the effective working unit for these conditions has been ascertained this unit can be multiplied at will. This has distinct advantages.& INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION i. while cooperating with Governments in the work of immediate relief. Work begins on small scale:—The plan of work adopted for each country makes provision for beginning operations on a small scale. By beginning operations on a small scale opportunity is given. This is regarded as fundamental. On opening work in a new country it becomes necessary also to train a local staff of microscopists. seeks to do this in such a way as to aid in building up permanent public health agencies for the control of this disease and all other diseases. The opening of work in each new country must be in the nature of an experiment.

In Egypt conditions seem to make it necessary to administer treatment to all of the patients under hospital conditions.GENERAL SUMMARY 85 the service. When it has become standardized. and a small separate enclosure or harem is reserved for women patients. and for 100 in-patients. The general principles of administration and the main lines of work undertaken are common to all. urine. and the training of employes goes hand in hand with the enlargement of the work. the service itself is the best training-school for its own employes. The staff 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and blood. with a population of about 879. Sharqia Province. There are three prevailing types: one in Egypt. one in Central America. This was the determining factor in the organization of the work. it. in which provision is made for its own staff.646.is proposed in due course to cover the whole of this territory. A laboratory is provided for the microscopic examination of faeces. and one in the West Indies. 3. was selected as the territorial unit of operations for the first demonstration. The single working unit is the traveling hospital camp under tents. Three prevailing types of working organizations:—Effort to adjust the work in each country to local conditions has given rise to a certain degree of diversity in agencies employed and in methods of work pursued.

and (3) with each Field Director one or more microscopists. a clerk. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The whole of this working organization is under the direct supervision of Dr. MacCallan. and a messenger-boy. The plan of work designed to cover the whole province provides for one large traveling hospital. the scheme provides for making a survey of the Province to determine the degree of infection. The personnel consists of: (i) a State Director. each capable of dealing with a hundred patients at a time. (2) under him a staff of Field Directors. a cook. and for making a sanitary survey to locate the danger-points about the villages from which the infection is spread. A. as carried out in the Southern States by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission. a water-carrier. a gate-keeper. two male and one female attendants. The organization and the equipment are relatively simple. a watchman. and in the capital town of the Province a group of house hospitals. In addition to this hospital accommodation for the treatment of patients. four small traveling hospitals. each capable of accommodating 30 in-patients. of the Government Department of Public Health. In Central America the determining factor in the organization of the work has been the dispensary method of treatment.58 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION required to operate this unit consists of two doctors.

and is clothed with the powers and responsibilities belonging to such position. To these dispensaries the people come for free examination and treatment. He is. makes the infection survey and the sanitary survey. He reports quarterly to the Government department of health. They constitute an ambulant service.GENERAL SUMMARY 67 The State Director is a Government official. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The field director is given as many microscopists as are needed to do the work. Diagnosis is by microscopic examination of the fasces. and conducts a continuous campaign of education. and is responsible for the efficiency of the service. an officer of the Government department of health. To each Field Director is assigned a district. the organizing and directing head of the work for the relief and control of uncinariasis in his country. This working organization operates the dispensaries. Under the direct supervision of the State Director is a staff of Field Directors. the presence of infection being determined by finding eggs of the parasite in the patient's stool. each in charge of a circuit of dispensaries. In this district he locates a convenient number of dispensary points. and through this department to the International Health Commission. and visits each of these dispensaries at stated times. who have immediate charge of the work in the field. under the department of health.

numbering the houses in which the people live. see Publication No. age. i of the International Health Commission. The success of that experiment made it a demonstration. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . For a detailed account of the demonstration in British Guiana. streams. recording name. locating roads. and the Government with its sanitary organization undertakes to make effective such sanitary measures as will prevent reinfection. villages. The plan of operation for this unit area comprises two undertakings. taking a census of the population. The single territorial unit of operations under this plan is a small. houses. as nearly as practicable. complete relief and control of uncinariasis within a given area. The scheme for treating the infected requires: mapping the territory.000. This was first tried out in British Guiana. sex.58 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION In the West Indies the determining factor in the organization has been the purpose to approximate. and the organization of work and working agency which proved its efficiency in this demonstration is coming to be the prevailing type for the West Indies. well-defined area containing a population of about 15. each with its own agency: the agency for the maintenance of which the International Health Commission contributes funds undertakes to treat until cured all persons within the area who are found infected.

and three office employes.—that is. the units of operation may be multiplied at will by increasing the funds and training the required staff. who gives his whole time to the work.—called field director. putting under treatment all persons found infected with Uncinaria. each with an understudy. a clerk. Treating the infected:—-In all these countries the work is organized with a view to centering first effort on measures of relief. The staff required to operate this scheme for the one area consists of a doctor.GENERAL SUMMARY 69 race. IV WORK WHICH THESE ORGANIZATIONS ARE DOING i. As it becomes desirable to enlarge the work. The whole working organization is under the direct supervision of the Surgeon-Gerieral or of the State Director. making microscopic examination of the entire population. and post-office address. the Government sanitary staff is putting into operation a system of latrines designed to put a stop to soil-pollution. and continuing microscopic examination of each patient under treatment after each weekly course of medicine until a cure is effected.—in charge. three microscopists. on 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . six or eight nurses. While this force is engaged in treating the infected population of this area.

and (b) by guarding individuals from infection. and on some estates was doubled. To quote the late Dr. (2) the attempt to prevent new infections. Systematic treatment is justifiable if only as a means of relieving suffering and inefficiency. but the experience of the Anaemia Commission in Porto Rico and the larger experience of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in the Southern States demonstrate that in any effective plan of operation the treatment of the people is the easier entering wedge." Perhaps one should not go so far as to say that measures of immediate relief of the infected are more important than measures of sanitary control. C.— (a) by avoiding the pollution of the soil and water. as 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Branch. By treatment alone the working efficiency of the laborers on coffee plantations in Porto Rico was increased from 30 to 50 per cent. By treating the people who came voluntarily to the dispensaries the general average of the haemoglobin index. of St.60 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION treating the people who are found infected. W. Vincent: "The measures for the prevention of hookworm disease fall into two groups: (i) the attempt to suppress or diminish the existing human infection. which in the end bring permanent relief. Of these the first is the more important and easier. The measures of the second group are necessary. but will be unavailing in the absence of the first.

On many large rubber estates in Malaya. and where soil-pollution is general. The work. little or no anaemia can be detected—the result of systematically sending to hospital for treatment all cases showing clinical symptoms.GENERAL SUMMARY 61 estimated for the total population over a large area where the test was made. where the infection is prevalent. and what it means to them as a menace to health and working efficiency.09 in 1904 to 72. was raised from 43. and thus enlists their interest in carrying out the sanitary measures which are necessary for the control of the infection. teaches the people by demonstration what the disease is. As a result of this educational work in British Guiana the villages are now voluntarily contributing toward the maintenance of the inspectors employed by Government to carry out the sanitary measures required to prevent contamination of the soil. it teaches them how they get it and how they may prevent it. But the chief advantage to be derived from systematic treatment of the people on a large scale as a first step toward final control is that this is a most effective means of popular education.22 in 1914. the disease would be under control. If all the carriers were cured and kept cured for the space of a year. if properly conducted. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Treatment also tends to lessen the spread of infection by curing the carriers.

Dr. has been in operation in these countries 19. In most of the countries the infection survey is conducted in connection with the other regular work and calls for no special provision to carry it out. it gives a definite measure of progress in the work of control. where doubt existed as to the prevalence and seriousness of uncinariasis. The significanceof this result is to be stated not primarily in medical terms. The information thus gained has a threefold value: it locates and defines the problem which the Government has to face in attacking the disease. and by making a similar survey from time to time.425 persons have been treated. The survey is based on microscopic examination of stools. Infection survey:—Effort is being made in each country concerned to carry out a survey to determine the geographic distribution of the infection.425 people. it gives the people an incentive and basis for helpful cooperation. as the relief of 19. In Antigua.62 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Within the brief period during which the work . as the instructing and moving to action of a much larger number of people. For every person successfully treated becomes the effective teacher of a circle of friends and neighbors. and to estimate the degree of infection for each infected area. Eric Marshall was employed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 2. but in educational terms.

The survey in British Guiana. a number of blood examinations have been made with a view to determining roughly the degree of anaemia which the infection is producing.GENERAL SUMMARY 63 to make a systematic survey of the Island before inaugurating work for the relief and control of the disease. Dr. In addition to the examination of stools. Egypt. Lucia about 68 per cent. in Panama (including Panama City) 54 per cent. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . blood tests were made to determine the degree of anaemia which the infection was producing. and in Costa Rica 83 per cent. Marshall made blood examinations to determine the hemoglobin percentage in 259 infected cases and 15 uninfected cases.—in the interior of Panama 63 per cent. in Grenada 54 per cent. based on an examination of the total population in Peters' Hall District. Haemoglobin test:—In connection with the work in Antigua. In Antigua. The survey located the infection and defined the areas in which it is now proposed to institute measures for the control of the infection. 3. The examinations in the other countries show the percentage of infection for the areas surveyed as follows: in St. shows an infection of 57 per cent. and Panama. In Egypt the survey has been completed for Sharqia Province and shows that not less than 56 per cent of the male population are infected.

Of the 813 cases examined 522. with three cases dropping to 10 percent. and three cases to 10 per cent. Of the 259 infected cases examined only 13 cases show a haemoglobin index as low as 60 per cent. Of the non-infected cases. f See summary for Panama. 40 per cent.t In Egypt Dr. with 15 cases running as low as 10 per cent. Hackett made haemoglobin tests of 813 infected cases. in 191 cases it runs as high as 80 per cent. Or.64 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION The record of results indicates that the degree of anaemia being produced by uncinariasis among the negro population of that island is relatively slight. and in 44 cases it reaches 90 per cent. MacCallan made blood examination of 6. show a haemoglobin index ranging from 10 per cent to 70 per cent. 50 per cent. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . none shows a haemoglobin index below 80 per cent.* In Panama Dr.256 infected cases and of 706 *See summaiy for Antigua. The record of results indicates that uncinariasis is producing a greater degree of anaemia among the Indian and mixed population of Panama than among the blacks of Antigua. or about 56 per cent. however. in 246 cases the index is 70 per cent or above. to exhibit the contrast in another form: of the infected cases only 72 per cent show an index as high as 80 per cent. while some of these cases drop to 60 per cent.

*See summary for Egypt. pages joi and 102. Of the 706 cases taken at random without regard to infection. Of the 6. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Preventive measures:—The organization in each of the eleven countries is conducting a sanitary survey to determine the existing conditions responsible for the presence and spread of uncinariasis in the infected areas. or nearly 70 per cent. The final purpose of the survey in Egypt.336. 489 cases give an index as low as 20 per cent. In Egypt.GENERAL S U M M A R Y 65 cases taken at random from schools and ophthalmic hospitals. show an index as low as 50 per cent. is to lay the basis for a system of sanitary measures designed to bring the disease under control. only 54. this survey has for its object: (i) to ascertain how the infection is transmitted among the fellahin. 4.256 infected cases. show a haemoglobin index ranging from 10 per cent to 50 per cent. as in all the other countries. where the absence of ground-itch has given rise to doubt as to whether the infection is transmitted chiefly through the skin or by the mouth. and 246 cases drop to 10 per cent. 4. In interpreting the results of these haemoglobin tests one must take into account bilharziasis in Egypt and malaria in Panama.* The anaemia which uncinariasis is producing among the fellahin in Egypt seems to be more severe than in Panama or in Antigua. and (2) to locate the danger-points about the Egyptian village from which the infection is spread. or less than 8 per cent.

the first work undertaken in this Colony was undertaken frankly as an experiment. proceeds under the law to have the conditions remedied. inspects privy conditions at the homes and about public places. the purpose being to approximate as nearly as practicable 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . because of its thoroughness and because of what it promises for the future. the one working organization selects an area for operations. The work of sanitation is being carried out in the areas in which the work of treatment is in progress. who desire treatment. and is now available for the purpose of making this Jaw effective. serves also as a sanitary force in administering this law. An appropriation of $11. As already stated. The sanitary work which is being done in British Guiana is especially significant.000 per year has been made. and. In other words. wherever unsatisfactory privy conditions are found.66 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION In Costa Rica the Government has enacted a law requiring the construction and maintenance of privies which provide for the disposal of the night-soil in such manner as to protect the soil from contamination. gives treatment without cost to all persons found infected. The organization which conducts the work of examining and treating the people. makes an infection survey to determine the degree of infection in this area.

Portuguese. The demonstration has been as thoroughgoing in its work of sanitation as in that of treatment. The plan of work here ° adopted providing for intensive work in welldefined areas. And. These people have been brought to provide and to use latrines. The area in which the demonstration has been carried out contains a number of free villages. It was understood that the Commission would supply funds for examining and treating the people and that the Government would undertake to prevent reinfection. and mixed breeds. the educational effect of the whole work has been such that the villages are now voluntarily contributing toward the maintenance of a system of sanitary inspection to keep their condition up to the standard that has been set. so that the soil in these villages is now protected from contamination. has some advantages that are worthy of special note: the work is definite and thorough and gives one a sense of accomplishment that closely approximates completeness. the sanitary work keeps pace with the work of treatment and cure. The service is now being extended to other areas on the same basis. and thus gives one 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with the local Government undertaking to prevent reinfection. the populations of which comprise East Indians. better still. Negroes.GENERAL SUMMARY 67 complete relief and control of uncinariasis within a given area.

These agencies are not being neglected in the foreign field. and to train and enlarge its sanitary force gradually as the work is extended from area to area. but among the natives in many of the tropical countries the story must be presented in more direct and concrete terms. Educating the people:—This whole work is essentially educational: it is teaching the people by demonstration. though he be illiterate. and objects.68 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION a sense of results that are lasting. The field directors carry the work out among the people. and circular letters. In the Southern States the schools and the public press were enlisted and large use was made of pamphlets. 5. They tell the story of this disease in varied graphic forms and in terms so simple that the common man. may see and understand. it enables the Government to begin a definite sanitary work on the basis of an almost insignificant expenditure. and as the people are educated to the point of more and more helpful cooperation. leaflets. they get specimens of the patients* stools and exhibit the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Here the field directors rely more upon telling the story by word of mouth. photographs. and as they tell it they illustrate its details by means of lanternslides. they point out the gross clinical symptoms in these cases (and these the people soon learn to recognize). They use typical cases as object-lessons.

they have seen the parasite that causes it. „ A recent communication from British Guiana says: "It is gratifying to report that the authorities of the various villages of Areas A and B in the Peters' Hall District have so thoroughly realized the benefit obtained from the expulsion of hookworm. and the eggs by which infection is demonstrated. and have so carefully realized the principles of reinfection.GENERAL SUMMARY 69 eggs of the parasite under the microscope. The disease thus lends itself so readily to simple demonstration that the people —even native populations of tropical countries— easily understand its whole story. and the necessity of its prevention. both to the patient and to his friends and neighbors. in both the work of treatment and that of prevention. they show the parasites that have been expelled by the treatment administered. that they have subscribed the neces- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . As a result of this educational work. and they see how the infection is spread and how it may be prevented. The recovery that follows treatment and cure tells its own story. They learn to recognize the disease by its clinical picture. the people cooperate helpfully. and by means of the microscope they exhibit the living. squirming embryos that live by teeming thousands in the soil that has been befouled by an infected person. and are ready to infect any person with whose bare skin they come into contact.

he is prepared to give heed when spoken to about the control of diseases that are less simple and less tangible. for the sake of emphasis.70 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION sary amount to maintain a Sanitary Inspector to devote his full time to their District/1 The relief and control of this one disease is an object-lesson in the relief and control of disease in general. he knows its whole story. the common man can easily understand what it is. Having seen this one disease brought under control and having had the worth of the effort brought home to him. and its best result is in securing the helpful cooperation of the people in the work of bringing this disease and all other preventable diseases under control. this whole work is essentially educational. then. and what it means to him as a menace to his health and to his earning power. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . To repeat. This one is simple and tangible. he knows its simple treatment and its one simple preventive measure.

complete eradication of the disease within a selected area. this area to include free villages* as well as plantations. The Surgeon-General designated Dr. Inauguration of work:—The work in British Guiana was the first to be opened in foreign countries with the cooperation of the International Health Commission. Successful operations against uncinariasis on the sugar estates had already been conducted by the local government under the direction of the Surgeon-General. The Commission was invited to cooperate in trying out an experiment which had not been possible with the means available.CHAPTER II SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES AND RESULTS BY TERRITORIAL UNITS BRITISH GUIANA I. Up to this time no attempt had been made toward relief or control of the disease in the villages. It was proposed to approximate. with a limited budget. Ferguson to have 71 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . as nearly as practicable. and for extending the operations and increasing the budget as the results seemed to justify. Plans were adopted for beginning operations on a small scale.

the most populous. B. Howard. under a budget prepared by Dr. into three areas. with 2. The Peters' Hall District. Ferguson. thinking that the experience of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in the Southern States would be of value in beginning worK in British Guiana. with 3. 1914. and is nearest to Georgetown. lying on the east bank of the Demerara River. was chosen for the preliminary operations. while Area C. requested the Commission to lend one of its substitute directors to aid in conducting operations.244. who arrived in British Guiana. is more scattered and more distant from Georgetown. and adopted by the Commission. and C. H. Ferguson. assigned the mission to Dr. This was divided. The Commission. Operations were started first in Area B.984 inhabitants. H. February 13. for the sake of convenience. A scheme for conducting the work was then drawn up by Dr. having 3. is the most scattered and distant of the three. near Georgetown. Area B.832 inhabitants. March 9» 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Ferguson. This called for a contribution of $7.70 by the International Health Commission. occupies the smallest territory. Area A. known as A.72 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION immediate supervision of the work. The Surgeon-General and Dr. in granting the request.562 inhabitants.

during the experimental stage of the work.BRITISH GUIANA 73 2.330. 1914. 1914. and adopted on August 13. 1914. Howard to the United States. 1914. These provided $4. and this method will be adhered to in future work. and it was for this reason that this campaign has been extended over a period of i several months. When the results of the campaign in this village indicated that the methods employed were feasible.566. On December 31. submitted to the Commission upon the return of Dr. only one village—Agricola—with a population of 1. In Areas A and C the weekly large dose of thymol was the method of treatment adopted. With the experience gained in the campaign in Area B. budgets were prepared. It was to have been completed December 31. and for the sake of economy these were put upon the weekly large dose of thymol for more speedy cure.00 quarterly for continuing the work in Area B. the work was rapidly extended to embrace the whole of Area B. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . was dealt with. it was found that there still remained more than 200 cases not yet cured by the daily dose. Activities and results:—-In the beginning. The work in Area B was started in the latter part of March. and for extending it to Areas A and C. In this area the daily dose often grains was used in the treatment of those infected.

which delayed the beginning of treatment until November. Enumeration of the entire population in this area. 2. 3. Operation within a definite area. Careful re-examination of every patient under treatment after each weekly course of'medicine. All treatments are given in the homes of the people. Howard's return to the United States. 1914. Treatment of all found infected with uncinaria sis. which requires: 1. on the eve of Dr. a relocation of streets. until a cure is effected. under the supervision of nurses employed for this purpose. Representative citizens of the District deemed the campaign to be so effective and beneficial that on June 29. 1914. 4. In Area A there was an interruption to the campaign owing to radical sanitary work in progress. the following resolution was unanimously adopted by a mass meeting of the residents: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Examination of the entire population.74 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION f Operations in Area C were started in September. and other improvements. AH work in this colony has been conducted under what is termed the intensive method.1914. 5.

or 19. County of Demerara. or 100% 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .5% Remaining under treatment. . or 75. the inhabitants of the Peters' Hall District on the East Bank. or . we. .BRITISH G U I A N A 75 "WHEREAS.562 Number removed from areas of operation 659 Number remaining for treatment 4*903 * Cured to December 31. 1914: RECAPITULATION Census. and Colony of British Guiana.5% Died during campaign: death not connected with thymol administration 8.8% Refused or abandoned treatment and remaining within the district as foci of infection 219. or 4. B.1914. . up to December 31. "We further beg to offer our unstinted cooperation and support with the hope that abundant success will be the ultimate result. 975.1% 4. . beg to record our warmest appreciation of the efforts of the Rockefeller International Health Commission in our midst for the purpose of eradicating these dangerous parasites. . . Demerara River. entire district 10. being fully convinced of the disastrous effects of the Hookworm (Ankylostome) when found in the human system. 3. Howard to convey to Headquarters our profound gratitude for their benevolent endeavors in this direction. and ask Dr.903. and C.378 Not located and examined 897 Number examined 9*481 Number infected 5.701." The following is a brief summary of the work accomplished in Areas A.

274.10 Total $8.05 This is a per capita cost for those examined of approximately $. The continuation of the 975 under treatment in the district will not materially increase this expenditure.720.1914: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ."76 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Total Expenditures to December j i.445.95 Expenditures as rendered from Field Director 7. Howard during inauguration of campaign £1.91. The following is a more detailed report of the results of the campaign in Peters* Hall District up to December 31. 1914 For supervision by Dr.

Number cured Number died f . . It Number remaining in district not treated Number refusing treatment . . . Before treatment After one or more treatments • • • 3206 3918 191 41 659 Q/15 284 OOQ A60 184 1A.•. Number not treated on medical grounds Number abandoning treatment . $ Death not connected with thymol administration. TOTAL AREA A 3984 AREAS 3562 356 AREA C 2832 Census Number in census not traced or located in examinations* 10378 897 9481 5562 465 3519 1731 76 2756 1913 Number examined Number infected Number removing from areas f . who represented themselves as residents to secure treatment. t As the intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of the areas of operation. and parties residing outstde the areas. . . 316 219 11 147 61 Number under treatment . 975 3701 8 56 90 9 78 3 579 777 1 150 110 en W G 57 1 72 1 69 2 o 56 248 1415 148 1509 7 * These were mainly transients. those removing are eliminated from the local campaign. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . . .

191 41 ISO 57 1 635 70 14 66 24 __ ^ 10 333 261 22 g 17 3 3 25 210 1 72 646 386 27 9 18 13 1 12 67 278 1 53 336 243 14 3 H 0 _ 6 54 168 1 Number under treatment Number cured 56 248 1415 7 24 59 480 2 11 43 279 2 w > r H in n o g S W a O 'These were mainly transients and parties redding outside the area.Peterf Rail District Area B TOTAL FOR AREA B Census Number in census not traced or located in examinations* N|Ht*fw°f i T f i i t i i t i e d. . fAs the Intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of tbe area of operation. . . . . . $Deatfa not connected with thymol administration. . . . 3562 AGRICOLA ECCLES BACOTS. . . . . Before treatment After one or more treatments Number remaining in district not treated . Number not treated on medical grounds . . . Number abandoning treatment .PETERS' PROVIDENCE TOWH HALL PASTURE 782 101 681 393 58 10 48 11 718 389 1330 343 I H O I 356 3206 1918 120 1210 Number infected Number removing from areaf . who represented themselves aa residents to secure treatment. . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . those removing are eliminated from the local campaign.

.14 t— < W a 8 S a a < 189 13 176 124 4 1 3 13 _ 13 % > 3 UO H 2 K « Id O (4 O (-t § M Census Number in census not traced or located i n examinations* . . Number under treatment .Peters' Hall District AreaC a o 4! ^ (. i 106 . Number not treated on medical Number abandoning treatment . . 2832 256 359 11 348 223 21 10 11 3 — o ft.— 6 7 42 __ 1129 310 W 28 — 28 20 1 1 2 — A O w 76 2756 1913 184 74 110 72 1 69 2 148 1509 . . . Number cured Number diedj . Number examined Number infected Number removing from area f . . . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . 5 1 — 196 __ 1 1 g 2 — 17 !--1 j 104 587 . . • Before treatment After one or more treatments . ._ t 27 229 ^^— 5 164 _ *These were mainly transients and parties residing outside the area. . who represented themselves as residents to secure treatment. . 82 2 80 41 4 2 2 1 __ 1 — 36 - On* 11 o 5 JS6 o 399 13 386 281 14 10 4 •I -| ^••^ _ ww H > &S 80 2 78 56 1 I g . Number remaining in district not Number refusing treatment . those removing are eliminated from the local campaign. __. JAs the Intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of the area of operation. JDeath not connected with thymol administration. . 12 244 148 7 3 4 5 — 18 1111 829 116 42 74 22 1 20 1 5 305 191 16 Q 10 g W t** H G o 5 4 132 — .

. who represented themselves as residents to secure treatment. After one or more treatments Number remaining in district not treated: Number refusing treatment Number not treated on medical grounds Number abandoning treatment Number under treatment dumber cured Number diedj 3984 465 3519 1731 284 228 56 90 9 78 3 579 777 1 1486 244 1242 "«*^ 578 111 85 26 24 24 251 192 T 1904 364 1740 836 127 107 20 36 __±_ 520 S3 467 277 41 34 7 74 4 70 40 VH H O 5 2 3 3 3 4 28 r 33 W > 27 36 324 349 g 15 3 w o o g H — 208 1 *These were mainly transients and parties residing outside the areas. f Aa the Intensive method provides that we deal only with the population of the area of operation.{Death not connected with thymol administration. . .Peters' Hall District Area A LA PENIAREA A TENCE FOR TOTAL ALEXANDER VltLE MEADOW HOUSTON BANK FRONT W SO Census Number in census not traced or located in examinations* . Number examined Number infected Number removing from area t Before treatment . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . those removing are eliminated from the local campaign.

which has likewise been divided into Areas A." 3. the work in British Guiana 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . three and one-half months after the beginning of the work." Since then some few more have been added. Preventive measures: —From the standpoint of sanitation. and the necessity of its prevention. Work is expected to begin early in January. Budgets providing $7. that they have subscribed the necessary amount to maintain a Sanitary Inspector to devote his full time to their district. 4. Extending the work:—Plans have been laid for extending the work to the west bank of the Demerara River." As to preventive sanitary measures. says: "All the work recorded in this report has been carried on without interfering with the people's daily work. "87 per cent of all the lots in the whole of Area B and Meadow Bank village had pit closets. 1914. 1914. he says that on June 30. "It is gratifying to report that the local authorities of the various villages of Areas A and B in the Peters3 Hall District. and C.96 for these areas were adopted November 30. 1915.074. have so thoroughly realized the benefit obtained from the expulsion of hookworm.BRITISH GUIANA SI The field director in his report of November 18. and have so carefully realized the principles of reinfection. B. in commenting on the campaign in Peters' Hall District.

82 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION promises exceptionally favorable results. One of the great advantages of an intensive campaign such as was waged in British Guiana is that. These subordinate inspectors are under the direct supervision of a chief sanitary inspector. brought out from England. The government appointed for this purpose a staff of native sanitary inspectors. it is possible for the government to add to this force as the public becomes more enlightened and more interested in preventive measures. but they are probably more effectively enforced than is the case in many other countries. As the work is extended from area to area. only a small expenditure is required to provide the necessary sanitary force for inspection. trained in the sanitary institute of Georgetown. It was originally suggested that the International Health Commission supply the funds needed for treating and curing the disease and the local government undertake to prevent reinfection. In every respect the work of sanitation has kept pace with that of treatment and cure. The supervision of the subordinate sanitary officers is strict and consequently the service rendered is effective. it is to be a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The sanitary laws and regulations of British Guiana are not materially different from those in existence in other colonies. since the area operated in at first is small.

1914. Governor of Antigua. and it promises results of the most definite and lasting value. with the understanding that measures for its control would be considered if the investigation showed the infection to be a menace to the health and efficiency of the people. and adopted April 16. 2.25 for this investigation. ANTIGUA I. The results of his work are summarized as follows: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . He began work about August i. Results to date:—Dr. 1914. the Commission was invited to contribute funds for conducting a systematic investigation into the prevalence of uncinariasis in Antigua. Eric Marshall was appointed by the British Colonial Office to conduct this investigation. and concluded November 27.774. submitted to the Commission. Hesketh Bell. and the Director-General of the International Health Commission. Organization of work:—Following a conference between Sir H. A budget was prepared.ANTIGUA 83 continuous and not a spasmodic effort. It provided $3.

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION

(/).

Microscopic Examinations for Uncinariasis EXAMINED INFECTED PERCENTAGE OF INFECTION 6.5 12.1 32.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
0.0 15,0

ESTATE DISTRICTS
Lime Stone Area . . Central Plain . . . . Volcanic Area . . . . Falrnouth English Harbour . . . Urjins Johnson Point . . . Five Islands and Galley Bay Total for Estates .

647 689 486 20 46 13 17 21 1839
EXAMINED
70 39 57 35 247 48 158 221 875 1839

36 84 156 0 0 0
0 0 276

INSTITUTIONS
Prison Poor House (Males) . " ;* (Females) . Industrial School . . Hospital Lunatic Asylum . . . Bishop Matthews School Total for Institutions . Total for Estates . . Grand total for Estates and Institutions

INFECTED
18 1 5 13 60 22 11 6

PERCENTAGE OF INFECTION
25.7 2.5 8.7 37.1 24.2 45.8 6.9 2.71 15.5 15.0 15.1

136 276 412

2724

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

ANTIGUA

86

(2). Blood Examinations Haemoglobin Examination of 259 Infected Cases PERCENTAGE BY HAEMOGLOBIN SCALE WITHIN 10% LIMIT 90% plus 80% " 70% " 60% " 50% " 40% " 10% "
Total . . . .

NUMBER OF CASES PERCENTAGE OF CASES EACH 10% OF EACH 10% OF SCALE SCALE 16.99 44 56.75 147 21.23 55 4 1.54 1.54 4 2 .77 1.15 3 259

Haemoglobin Examination of Fifteen Uninfected Cases

PERCENTAGE BY HEMOGLOBIN SCALE WITHIN 10% LIMIT 90% plus 80% " Total . . . .

NUMBER OF CASES PERCENTAGE OF CASES EACH 10% OF EACH 10% OF SCALE SCALE

1 14 15

6.66 93.33

Total Counts of Red Cells per Cubic Millimetre
No. OF PERSONS
P. C. OF

WHOLE
1.11% 6.66% 15.5% 766%

I to 2 million per cmm. 2to3 " " " 3to4 " " " 4 to 5 " " " Total examined .

1 6 14 69 90

Number of total counts, 90. Lowest per cmm. 1,770,000

Differential Blood Counts DISTRICTS, ETC. Lime Stone Area . Central Plain . . Volcanic Area . . Public Institutions Matthews School . Total . . . .
No. OF AVERAGE CASES EOSINOEXAM'D PHIHA 1 15 15 39 3

7
80

8.0% 7.7% 12.93% 12.07% 10 16% 99%

Total differential counts . . . 80 Highest Eosinophilia recorded 39%

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

86

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION

3, Extending the work:—Dr. Marshall draws the following conclusions from his preliminary survey:
"i. In certain districts a large percentage of the population are suffering from ankylostomiasis. "2. It is the cause of much sickness at the present time. "3. Under certain conditions it might become a menace to the health of the whole island. "4. At the present time, owing to its distribution, it can be readily dealt with by an intensive campaign. **5. It is in some districts of considerable economic importance to the planters. "6. It is of vital importance to a large percentage of the labouring population."

As a result of the survey work, disclosing an infection of approximately 15 per cent, plans are being prepared providing for systematic work for the relief and control of the infection in the infected areas. Dr. Marshall has recommended that laws be passed for the compulsory examination and treatment of all inhabitants, and the construction and maintenance of suitable latrines for the prevention of reinfection. The legislature will meet in February, and will consider at that time the passage of such laws.
TRINIDAD

i. Inauguration of work:—The plan for work in this island was drawn up by Surgeon-General

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

TRINIDAD

87

H. L. Clare, approved by the English Advisory Committee, and submitted to the International Health Commission. It was adopted on February 27, 1914. The sum of £12,978.5$ was made available for carrying on the work. The operations are conducted under the general supervision of the Surgeon-General. 2. Results:—Colonel J. R. Dodd, M. D., D. P. H., was appointed Medical Officer in Charge, June 13, 1914. He arrived in Trinidad early in August. Actual work was started August nth, with San Fernando as the headquarters and central laboratory. Branch laboratories have been established at Couva, Princes Town, and LaBrea. The following is a summary of the work accomplished from August 1i, through December 31, 1914, for all of the laboratories combined:
Number of persons examined Number of persons treated Number of persons cured 4528 1635 270*

3. Sanitary survey:—A partial sanitary survey has been made in the localities where work has been carried on. Of 1636 premises inspected, 664 had no latrines. The following table indicates the types of latrines in use:
*It is the custom to administer from one to three treatments. These treatments generally produce cures. _ For determining positively which cases have been cured, a microscopic re-examination is required from two_to eight weeks after treatment. Often this re-examination is not feasible. Consequently, the number of persons recorded as cured is reduced.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

US

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH

COMMISSION

Trenches Cesspits Pails Shed only No latrines Total

96 679 129 68 664 1636

4. Extending the work:—The difficulty of securing trained medical officers from England during recent months has retarded the development of the work in this island. The authorities, however, have invited the Commission to delegate from its staff of substitute directors men to fill the vacancies temporarily, until English medical officers are available. Arrangements are being made to lend this assistance.
ST. LUCIA

1. Inauguration of work:—Dr. S. Branch is in charge of measures against uncinariasis in this colony, and serves under the general direction of an Advisory Committee appointed by the Island Government. The budget, providing $6,145.94, was adopted April 16,1914. 2. Results to date:—A preliminary investigation into the distribution and prevalence of the infection was conducted up to December 1914, with the following results:

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

ST. L U C I A

EXAMINED
Castries (town) . . " (rural) . . Babonneau and Gros Islet Cul de Sac Valley . a. Crown Lands . b. Ferrands . . c. Soucis . . . d. Forestier . . Roseau Valley and beyond Total

INFECTED
97 147 45 41 19 12 82 33 36 512

TREATED
97 147 45 41 19 12

211 221
55 50 22 12 96 40 43

82 33 36

750

512

3. Extending the work:—A new budget, providing $1,609.10 has been adopted for carrying on an intensive campaign of eradication in the Cul de Sac valley. This intensive work is scheduled to begin January i, 1915. 4. Preventive measures:—The Administrator reported December 11, 1914, that every effort will be made to secure the enactment and enforcement of the regulations suggested by Dr. Howard, Director for the West Indies, for the improvement of sanitation in St. Lucia.
ST. VINCENT

The budget, providing $5,590.76, was authorized April 16,1914. Dr. Cyril H. Durrant is Director in Charge. The plan of campaign was formulated by the Administrator, Douglas Young, Esq. No work was done in St. Vincent in 1914, owing to the fact that Dr. Durrant was not

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

90

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION

relieved from Hospital duties, no successor being available.
GRENADA

1. Inauguration of work:—A budget, providing #9,038.72 for conducting work on this island, was adopted April 16, 1914. Dr. Angus MacDonald was appointed Director and assumed his duties August 28th. Up to the close of the year a survey had been conducted through the schools; the support of influential persons was sought and obtained; literature was distributed and addresses were delivered; and other preliminary arrangements were made. Actual work was started December 1st. Head offices were established at Marine Villa, with branches at Mount Moritz, Gouyave, Birchgrove, and St. Dominic's. 2. Results:—The report through December 31, 1914, gives the following results:
(/). Examinations and Treatments EXAMINED Mount Moritz . . . . Birchgrove S t . Dominic's Head Office Institutions Total . . . . INFECTED TREATED

223 192 226 240 624
• » >

153 94 115 140 312
• •*

1605

814

116 161 150 189 143 399 1158

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

GRENADA

91

(2). Blood Examinations
TOTAL NUMBER Blood examinations Hookworm infection . . . . . . . .

PERCENTAGE EOSINOPHILES Mean 9.37* 10.5 84 75

100 44 51

5

Dr. MacDonald draws the following conclusions from his work to date:
**i. There is a high rate of hookworm infection in Grenada. **2. AH classes (practically), both sexes, all ages, are infected. "3. Present methods of examination indicate an infection of ankylostomfasis to the amount of 74 per cent of the white peasant settlers in one district, and 64 per cent of the black population in another. With improved methods of examination, there is no doubt the infection will be shown to be even higher than this. "4. A definite amount of debility, chiefly anasmia, cardiac dilatation and chronic dyspepsia prevails, especially in the more highly infected districts. "5. Dwarfism and infantilism are found amongst those infected, both white and black; but other causes of these conditions are probably operative, and the result of treatment must be awaited before definite conclusions can be drawn. "6. Themodeof infection is from the soil (mainly). "7. Drinking of polluted water is general, and the resulting dysenteric diseases complicate and are complicated by ankylostomiasis. "8. The blood examination carried out in the laboratory of the Commission has revealed infection by the malarial parasites in different areas, which also complicates diagnosis and treatment of ankylostomiasis and makes difficult any correct allocation of morbid conditions to the causative disease,**
"Range from I to 30.3.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

92

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION

3. Extending the work:—Dr. MacDonald has planned to extend the work, beginning January i, 1915, on the intensive plan. For this purpose three areas have been selected: two at St. David, known respectively as Area A and Area B, and one at Mt. Moritz Centre. Area A at St. David has a population of approximately 3,069; Area B, 3,260; and the area at Mt. Moritz Centre, 3,557. 4. Preventive measures:—The local Government has been petitioned to pass laws providing for the construction and maintenance of sanitary latrines. If such laws are enacted, Dr. MacDonald will be able to supplement his work of examination, treatment, and cure with sanitary improvements designed to prevent reinfection.
JAMAICA

Upon hearing of the measures conducted in adjacent colonies for the relief and control of uncinariasis, the Government of Jamaica on April 3, 1914, expressed a desire through the Colonial Office in London, that the Commission be asked to send a representative to consider cooperation in relief measures in that island. The invitation has been accepted and the Director for the West Indies will visit that island in February, for the purpose of investigating the prevalence of the infection, with a view to considering cooperative plans for its control.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

PANAMA

03

PANAMA

i. Inauguration of work:—The participation of the International Health Commission in relief measures against uncinariasis in Panama had its inception at a dinner at the Pan-American Building, in Washington, D. C., on the evening of February 15, 1914. The dinner was attended by diplomatic representatives of the various Central and South American governments. The work of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in the Southern States was outlined by the Director-General and the method proposed by the International Health Commission of cooperating with local governments elsewhere along similar lines was presented. The Government of Panama thereupon asked the Commission to lend assistance for conducting operations in that Republic. The invitation was accepted April 28,1914. It was agreed that the work be carried on as a subdivision of the National Department of Health. In accordance with plans agreed upon a Director was appointed to have immediate charge of the work. Dr. L. W. Hackett was appointed Director, April ist, and arrived in Panama May 14, 1914. Following a series of conferences between the Government officials and Dr. Hackett,, a preliminary annual budget was prepared, submitted to the Commission, and adopted July i, 1914.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

94

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION

This provided £15,038.50 for conducting the work. The Republic of Panama is furnishing offices and other facilities, as well as the medicine needed for treatment. 2. Results:—The first weeks were devoted to securing supplies from the States; conferring with the Government officials; conducting preliminary surveys; and attending to various routine matters connected with the inauguration of the campaign. Actual work was started about July isth. Preliminary operations were begun in the City of Panama; and subsequently extended to Chorrera, Arraijan, Capira, and Bocas del Toro, villages in the interior. The dispensary plan followed by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission in the Southern States was adopted. This plan has three main features: (i) examinations and treatments; (2) infection survey; and (3) sanitary survey; with the special addition for the Panama work of a record of (4) blood examinations. The following is a summary of results accomplished through December 31, 1914.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

PANAMA

95

(j). DISTRICT

Examinations and Treatments
EXAMINED INFECTED TREATED

PROVINCE

Panama . Panama . INTE RIOR Ghorrera . Panama . Arraijan . Panama . Capira . . Panama . Bocas del Toro . . Bocas . . Totals for Interior only Totals for Panama City *Grand totals . . .

928
812 682 987

218
511 709 2689 218 2907

215
562 494 677 614 2347 215 2562

2012 4393 928 5321

(2). Infection Survey (Children 6 to 18 Years)
DISTRICT PROVINCE EXAMINED INFECTED PERCENTAGE OF INFECTION 24.4
82.4 93.3 93.0,, 42.8 69.1 24.4 64.4

Panama . Panama . INTE RIOR Chorrera . Panama . Arraijan . Panama . Capira . . Panama . Bocas del Toro . . Bocas Totals for Interior only Totals for Panama City fGrand Totals . . ,

804
390 210 340 695 1635 804 2439

196
321 196 316 297 1130 196 1326

Theee figures ate not representative of the countty at large, owing to the inclusion of Panama City, where the infection la lighter than in the interior. tNote that the Infection la much lighter in Panama City than in the interior villages of Arraijan and Capita,

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION

(5). DISTRICT Panama PROVINCE
Panama

Sanitary Survey REMARKS ON SANITATION.
Every house connected with a sewer (in city limits). Seven pit privies in town; Government planning to introduce sanitation. No privies of any type; 8 public and 3 private in construction. One pit privy in town; public privies wanted by people. Night-soil removal and disposal in ocean (imperfectly carried out by a few only).

INTERIOR Chorrera . Panama. Arraijan . Panama. Panama. Bocas .

Capira . . Bocas del Toro

(4], Blood Examination
HEMOGLOBIN PERCENTAGE

DISTRICT
Panama . . . .

PROVINCE
Panama . , . . .

6? o

*S

i— 3 I<

0
9 0 Q
15

2 23 2 9 30

sI

CO

2

fc§ *£ $ g 5 43
55
28

20 0 1 1 22

INTE RIOR Chorrera. . . , Panama Arraijan . . . . Panama Capira . . . . Panama Bocas del Toro . Bocas . Totals , .

70

41 65 14 69 174 184 172 299 269

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

90-100%

Dr.. H. and Dr. representing the Commission. Stations to which the people were invited to come for free examination and treatment were opened at Puntarenas. was appointed temporarily as Director to have charge of the work. In conference between the President of Costa Rica. The Director had to complete in detail working arrangements with the Government. 1914. Active operations began on September 23.COSTA R I C A 97 3. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . a tentative working plan was formulated and agreed upon. Activities and results:—The first weeks were devoted to organization.589. White. Inauguration of work:—Invitation by the Republic of Costa Rica to the International Health Commission to cooperate with that country in work for the relief and control of uncinariasis was extended on April 14. COSTA RICA 1. 1914.. Carter. Henry R. the Government Department of Health. This plan was approved by the Commission on July i. J.50 was appropriated for the work. 2. Jr. 1914. he had to make preliminary surveys and to select the areas for first attack. and the sum of $14. he had to procure equipment and to select his local staff. Extending the work:—It is planned to extend the dispensary work from village to village until the whole country has been covered.

1914. Miratnar . decree was issued by the Government making available the sum of $11. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .68 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Esparta. On August 31. exhibit the following summary of results: EXAMINED Puntarenas Esparta Chomes .4 966 883 3. The organization which administers the treatment undertakes also to inspect latrine accommodations and where conditions are found unsatisfactory to proceed under the law to have them remedied. 1914. INFECTED TREATED CUREP* 2317 1260 191 644 4412 1510 1097 179 555 3341 3341 179 An infection survey among children 6 to 18 years of age gave the following percentage of infection: EXAMINED Total for country . Totals . . Reports up to December 31. .000 to be used in making this law effective. INFECTED PERCENTAGE OF INFECTION 91. Preventive measures:—The sanitary code of Costa Rica requires that the people provide and use latrines to prevent contamination of the soil. Chomes. and Miramar. *See footnote page 87. The work of sanitation is being carried out in the areas in which the people are being examined and treated.

For sixteen years the Church Mission Hospital in Cairo has been treating patients who come to it in increasing numbers from all parts of Egypt. Todd. the local uncinariasis committee. Ferguson. consisting of Doctors Looss. This plan proposed the Province as the unit of organization and of work. Under instructions from the Director-General of the Department of Health. and Hastings.EGYPT flO EGYPT i. formulated a plan of operations for one year. Sandwith began the systematic treatment of uncinariasis at the Kasr el Ainy Hospital as early as 1887. in April. Egypt is divided into 14 provinces. The Government Department of Public Health had instituted measures for the relief and control of the disease prior to the visit of the representative of the International Health Commission. This institution now has a special ward for uncinariasis and has 400 to 600 patients at one time under treatment for this disease. Sharqia Province was selected as the territory within which to begin operations. Day. Conditions in Egypt seem to make 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1914. The Commission was asked to cooperate in making these operations more extensive and to make the demonstration more complete than was possible on the basis of local funds. F. Inauguration of work:—Dr. M.

The original plan for this Province provides for one large and four small traveling tent hospitals. this expenditure to be shared equally by the Government and the Commission. one-half of this sum to be supplied by the Egyptian Government. a. Cases are being treated also in the Murad Pasha Hospital at E3 Deir. To these hospitals the people come for free examination and treatment. The budget calls for an annual expenditure of £12. Activities and results:—The results may be briefly summarized under the heads of hospital work and survey work.000. The plan provides also for an infection survey and a sanitary survey to be conducted as a special investigation. Hospital work:—The work had been started with the opening of hospitals at Qaliub and Qalama in Qaliubia Province.000. 2. and one-half by the Commission. and in the chief town of the Province a group of improvised house hospitals each accommodating about 30 patients. In this Province hospitals have been opened at Belbeis and at Minia el Qamh. The amount was reduced after the outbreak of the war in Europe to £9. On August loth these two hospitals were closed and operations were transferred to Sharqia Province.100 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION it necessary to administer treatment to all patients under hospital conditions. The results for the five hospitals are exhibited in the following table: 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

. OF PERSONS INFECTED No. . . . •& £ i£ o o o ^ *r °P * Jo 0? t* . . I Ball tibia . . Qaliubia . Mini a el Qamh ) J . 61 70 Total 246 243 Total number of specimens taken 268 496 666 392 83 96 31 79 136 178 57 131 237 455 442 50 1 185 464 699 547 155 9 615 1276 1956 1559 345 16 6256 footnote. . Qalama . OF PERSONS EXAMINED H U » 1-4 g Q & Qaliubia . El Deir . Belbeis . OF PERSONS TREATED No. Total . Examinations. (2). page 87 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation No. 50 56 Sharqia Minia el Qamh .EGYPT 101 (7). O . 18 19 Sharqia Belbeis . Sharqia . 5222 1973 2126 1686 139 138 688 561 518 459 2175 1503 1432 1383 267 226 3820 2675 2180 2013 514 467 11905 6712 ffitffi5541 920 831 . El Deir . Qali'ub . . Qaliub . Qalama j 117 98 aliubia . OF PERSONS CURED* g 7. . . Blood Examinations HEMOGLOBIN PERCENTAGE PROVINCE DISIRICT feS fcS fc? o o o ^ o i—i 1 ? ? I i-i (N CO Qaliubia . . OF PERSONS RE-EXAMINED | No. . . . Sharqia . ADMITTED TO HOSPITALS No. Treatments* and Cures No. Qaliubia.

2 42. 124.486 Faqus .1 . Separate surveys were made (i) of the free population of the province.096 868 939 868 6. and (2) of the prisoners incarcerated in the jail at Zagazig.9 26. These are summarized below: (i).6 1. 106.256 1.102 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION b.164 Hehia .0 56. 172 296 184 40 10 1 1 2 Total 706 90-81 80-71 70-61 60-51 50-41 30-21 20-11 10-1 40-31- .08 Percentage of Haemoglobin Examinations made of the-blood of 706 Egyptians from schools and ophthalmic hospitals gave the following results: PERCENTAGE OF HAEMOGLOBIN 100-91 NUMBER EXAMINED PERCENTAGE OF WHOLE .396 Belbeis .556 Kafr Saqr 900.022 Qamh 140.2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .4 606 546 514 622 364 3.2 66. Minia el 165.3 41.— . 60.411 57.824 Zagazig . Survey work:—Sharqia was the first province in which a systematic investigation was made of the prevalence of uncinariasis.2 49.082 INFECTED 759 PER CENT.1 .4 . Among Free Population Prevalence of Uncinariasls PROVINCE POPULATION 232.057 1. 110.8 59. 24.000 Total EXAMINED 1. 5.

to Nov.2 . as determined by microscopic examination of the urine: PROVINCE Qaliubia: Nov.9 1089 832 Prevalence of Pellagra The percentage of persons who gave clinical evidence of being afflicted with pellagra.824 Minia el 165. Qaliubia: May to Aug.4 2. . NUMBER EXAMINED NUMBER INFECTED. 140.684 Hehia .BGYPT 103 Prevalence of Bilharziasis The following table indicates the percentage of bilharziasis among undnariasis patients.4 66.2 2. to Nov Belbeis: Sept.22 41.9 38. Sharqia: Minia el Qamh. Sept. .9 177 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . 900.02 70. among those examined for uncinariasis. 1.164 Kafr Saqr .000 EXAMINED 1.082 7 0 56 22 63 0. to Nov. 124. is indicated below: DISTRICT POPULATION Zagazig 232.096 868 939 866 6. to April .3 7.396 Faqus .6 0.256 INFECTED 28 PER CENT.0 6. Belbeis .546 Total . 2. . . Qaliubia: Sept. 110. 106.057 1.022 Qamh . .WITH PERCENTAGE INFECTED BlLHARZlA 701 1833 263 310 769 101 719 590 44.

5 DISTRICT Zagazig .Average High.2 9.1 23.0 62. . . Belbeis Hehia Kafr Saqr .0 12.8 Prevalence of Biiharziasis (Based entirely upon patients' statements.0 85 10 57 2 80 55 63.6 90 30 40 58. . .5 9. . .5 95 40 . Faqus Total . . . .7 90 35 80 40 60. . . . . . .1 Haemoglobin Percentage DISTRICT Zagazig . .8 71 4 74. . Hehia . . Total .0 25. 90 60. .0 30 90 95 45 68. not upon microscopic examination of the urine) EXAMINED 78 Minia e l Qamh . . .7 16.1 15.5 79/6 78. . Belbeis Hehia Kafr Saqr Faqus Total . Minia el Qamh . Among Prisoners in Zagazig Prison Prevalence of Uncinariasis .Average est est est est 66 2 40 90 70.0 60. 54 52 35 341 73 49 Prevalence of Pellagra DISTRICT Minia e l Qamh .5 77. . Minia el Qamh Belbeis . 73 49 Belbeis Hehia 54 52 Faqus 35 Total 341 DISTRICT INFECTED 11 11 6 6 12 9 55 PERCENTAGE 14. . . EXAMINED 78 73 49 54 52 35 341 INFECTED 1 7 5 13 PERCENTAGE 1.Low. NON-INFECTED INFECTED High.9 83.4 80 64.104 I N T E R N A T I O N A L HEALTH COMMISSION (2). .Low.0 5 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Kafr Saqr Faqus .2 11. . . . . . . EXAMINED 78 INFECTED 46 61 38 43 41 25 254 PERCENTAGE 58.0 5 80 66.0 90 15 SO 74 0 90 65. .2 3. .

. Belbels Hehia .0 59.5 70 20. .5 79 6 78. Faqus ZAGAZIG PRISON SURVEY OF SHARQIA PROVINCE 58.4 57.0 8 2.9 83.5 77. .8 66. . KafrSaqr . .3 1 . .8 23. 0 5 133 224 67 91 33 12 0 2 567 .9 60 17. .3 49.2 A comparison of haemoglobin percentages from among the free population with those from among prisoners: PERCENTAGE OF H/EMOGLOBIN AMONG FREE ADULTS EXAMINED PERCENTAGE 100-91 90-81 80-71 70-61 60-51 50-41 40-31 30-21 20-11 10-1 Total .EGYPT 105 A comparison of uncinariasis infection among prisoners from certain districts with that among the free population of the same districts: DISTRICT Zaeazie Minia el Qamh .4 39. .0 .2 15 4.5 .8 71.9 85 24.341 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .5 ' 24 7.3 AMONG PRISONERS EXAMINED PERCENTAGE 1 .4 60.1 .2 42.0 .0 5.2 2 . .8 16.5 11. .3 75 21.5 2.

both in the work of relief and in the survey work. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . treated. 1914. Extending the work:—The European war. At present this number is greater than can be accommodated.106 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 3. in the survey work for locating the infection. It was hoped to operate at least six hospitals in each province simultaneously. as rapidly as the results justify and the available funds will permit. by reducing the revenues of the Egyptian Government. has seriously retarded the development of the work in Egypt. and from province to province. Table (i) shows the number of persons who were examined. The work in Egypt will be extended from village to village. Table (3) gives the grand total of all persons examined. but the lack of funds has limited the number to two. but not treated. The hospitals established at Minia el Qamh and Belbeis in Sharqia Province will be continued until the number of patients presenting themselves for treatment has been materially reduced. Table (2) shows the number of persons examined. and cured. GENERAL SUMMARY The following tables give a summary of results accomplished up to December 31. respectively. in the work of relieving sufferers.

0 270 16.(jr). .$ * * .0 179 5.* •••> 1505 814 54.1 1158 6321 4412 2907 3341 54.0 100. Examined Infected Percentage Infected .3 11905 6712 56.6 75.4 4981 25. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . .1 68. 37902 21483 56. Examinations and Treatments ST. Cured* Percentage Cured* *See footnote page 87.7 2562 3341 88. .6 4676 84.1 4628 750 1636 612 36.9 . Treated .6 9481 6562 58. .1 100.5 831 14. VINCENT GRENADA 5 < ANTIGUA TOTAL CQO s a3 « 10 K H < Q w B a H CO 3 OJ (5 w fc 2! W w Percentage Treated .2 1635 612 100.3 5541 82.0 3701 79.6 19426 90.

Totals . 2714 6423 9137 3665 4077 412 15. .6 54 3 In administering treatIn infection surveys .108 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION (2). . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . 37902 9137 47039 'Includes persons of all ages. . COUNTRY Antigua Ecvot .1 57 0 44 6 (?). not those of school age only. Infection Survey* EXAMINED INFECTED PERCENTAGE INFECTED . . Grand Totals EXAMINED INFECTED 21483 4077 25560 PERCENTAGE INFECTED 56 6 44. . . .

CHAPTER III ILLUSTRATIONS 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Large traveling imdiiariasis hospital. 1. Qaliub. Egypt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .Photograph Excised Here l?.

Patients coins to tents after thymolizjttion. Oaliub. Egypt 112 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Patients taking thymol. 2. Egypt Photograph Excised Here Fie 3.Photograph Excised Here Fig.

Egypt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .Photograph Excised Here Fig. 4. Typical cases uncinariasis.

Egypt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Typical cases uncinariasis.Photograph Excised Here Fig. 5.

(]L>) Maluimioo. Deiiier. (13) Di. (14) \'illag<> Council- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 13H. Opening uork. 0. Sup. Agricola Village.ilthiosc liast liulian ciluen. H H. Meel. (131 first iJis]H'tis«iry r.. April (i. Dr. i. first patient.ua. men. J. British Giu. Howard. Godfrey.uia.Photograph Excised Here Fig. Surgeon-General. nr.

Photograph Excised Here Fig. 7. StafT for the relief and control of imcinariasif. in Britisli Guiana 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

4$^<£fe •^_ \t& FO/> . British Guiana 117 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 8. %_ r ^^P' Photograph Excised Here FI'K. Severe case of uncinarlaaia. A Portuguese.

Photograph Excised Here . British Guiana. Cured case. Jlad severe heart trouble as result of uncinariasig. Three weeks after treatment v/as able to run to show Ins marked improvement 118 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Photograph Excised Here I'ig. Improving rapidly under treatment British Guiana 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . East Indians. 10. were not able to stand.\Vidowand two childien.

I.Photograph Excised Here Fie. Mt. W. Grenada. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . I I . Typical cases uncinariasis. Moritz. B.

Costa Rica 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 12.inia.Photograph Excised Here R.i?ra of undiuiri. Group of lyplral r.

W. Mt. 13. B. Cases of uncinariasis. Girl with hat on had been treated and cured 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Moritz. I. Grenada.V >iKIND >. C/A Photograph Excised Here Fig.

11. larae nninlici o(aiiEink-snres. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Trinidad. U. IndiatH-oolics. San Fernando.Photograph Excised Here I-'IB. I. \V. ICslate Bien Venue. Iiifoctionstwro.

at Rosseau. 15. I. Lucia. VV. Group of casts of uncinariasis. St. B. barracks on sugar estate. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .Photograph Excised Here Fig.

10.Vinoent. \V. I. St. Casi'sof unriiiatiasis.Photograph Excised Here )•'(«. K. ^1^* 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Cliurch Mission Hospital. 17. Cairo.Photograph Excised Here Fig. Group o( cases oi uncinaiiasis. About 000 niidn treatment on day this photograph was made 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

On an annual basis this would represent approximately £20.15 used for the hookworm campaign in the field was expended partly out of special budgets adopted for work in foreign countries and partly directly out of the Commission's central office budget. to December 31.038. The £14. the development of the library and the printing and distribution of publications.579.731. travel expenses of directors in going to and in returning from the field.000 represents expenditures for traveling purposes. of which about £5. 1914.108. and the preparation and display of exhibits by the Department of Surveys and Exhibits.CHAPTER IV FINANCIAL STATEMENT The statement of expenditures presented on the following page shows that the Commission expended a total of £157.64 for current expenses. 127 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and £30.15 being for property in the form of furniture and equipment.113.08 during the eighteen months from July i.930. The latter included items for the purchase of thymol? field equipment.79 was devoted to administrative work. £3.000 for current expenses. The £109. and salaries of directors of field work up to the time these were charged to special budgets. Of this amount £34. 1913.14 used for educational and informational work was devoted to the collection of material.

79 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . (8) Surveys (9) Exhibits (10) Library (i i) Publications-printing.113. 2. fTo and from field.86%.. 1.30 (12) Salaries. 259. For Work in the Field 1.08 34.79 (5) Office expenses 2. For current expenses $30.466. 1914 GRAND TOTAL EXPENDITURES I.14 $1571731.08 (a) Salaries (temporary).15 II.128 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION General Statement of Expenditures for the Eighteen-Month Period from July i.84 (18) British Guiana 9.. Field Directors 13.501..417.69 1.36 (13) Thymol* I5.930.12 847.038.138. postage III..579.36 (19) Egypt! 19.07 (3) Rent 4.84 (6) Postage 417.36 *To be ultimately charged to the field office by which used or distributed at cost. ^Amounts forwarded. to December 31.84 2.86 109.006.844.64 (i) Salaries (permanent)..80 2.355. 1913.15 14. $4.030.64 (17) West Indies^ 28. For Administrative Work 1.86 (16) Central America 17.47&2I (14) Field equipment and supplies 742.41 (4) Traveling expenses 6.446.88 (15) Traveling expensesf.66 (20) British Advisory Committee 2.561.108.65 (7) Printing 189. 3.711. Payments from special budgets for field workj 78. equipment.. ^Equivalent in England pounds.822.47 9>390.995. For property—furnishing. Payments from Central Office 30.008. For Educational and Informational Work. $17.968.

TREASURER'S REPORT 1913 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

130 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION THE ROCKEFELLER To the Members of THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION. GENERAL BALANCE STATEMENT ASSETS INVESTMENTS: General Fund (Exhibit E) Special Funds CASH \ .396.41 797. 1913.00 $35.34 608..069.000.30 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .967. $36.167.29 S02.'.96 •0 INCOME RECEIVABLE ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Total Assets $36.26 189.34 48.966.119. Gentlemen: Herewith are submitted statements giving the financial statistics to December 31.416.416.384.

Rockefeller (ExhibitB) UNPAID APPROPRIATIONS (Exhibit D)...922. 1. 19131 AS OF DECEMBER 31.TREASURER'S REPORT—1913 131 FOUNDATION December 3I91913.40 $35.384. 1913 FUNDS AND OBLIGATIONS GENERAL FUND: Original Donations (Exhibit A) $34. Laura S.00 236.909.60 48.000.579.177.552.374. on May 22.78 $34.430.100.30 . INCOME: Unappropriated balance 149.985.82 Reserve (Exhibit A) SPECIAL FUND: Gift of Mrs. of The Rockefeller Foundation from its beginning.30 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

00 11. authorized the investment of all moneys collectively (except when otherwise specified by donors) instead of by separate funds.00 1 share Standard Oil Company (Kentucky) Capital Stock. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .00 693.00 1 share Standard Oil Company (Kansas) Capital Stock 358.008 Colonial Oil Company Capital Stock 90.00 1 share Solar Refining Company Capital Stock 220. which give various financial details in reference to the Foundation. Co.000 Sunday Creek Company 5% bond at 100% 983383rds of one share 606.575 Standard Oil Company (Kansas) Capital Stock. entitled Exhibits A to E inclusive.847 The Continental Oil Company Capital Stock.00 900. 1st 4^s 93. Refunding 4s 87% 176. by resolution. Chicago & St.00 667.891 Solar Refining Company Capital Stock 220.. 420.00 779.000 Western Maryland Ry..000 Morris & Essex RR Co. L.00 834. Respectfully submitted. A special distribution of 30% by the Solar Refining Company yielding $148. There follow five statements.000 Illinois Central RR Co. The resulting fraction of a share is the one sold.75% 200..000 New York Connecting Ry..496% A dividend ^f 3722 and 625.028 Swan & Finch Company Capital Stock 183. MYERS. Treasurer.00 $300. been credited to the Reserve. Louis Ry.264/983383rds shares Solar Refining Company Capital Stock has been received and added to those already held.625% 250.795 Chesebrough Manufacturing Company Capital Stock 650.00 080. Co. 1st & Refunding 3^s 82.00 505.00 768. Cincinnati. General 4s 83. by order of the Finance Committee.980 Galena-Signal Oil Common Stock ©$181... as above.00 The following securities were bought: 1 share Galena-Signal Oil Company Common Stock @|186.00 982.00 438. G.690 Borae-Scrymser Company Capital Stock 281. 192.339 Galena-Signal Oil Preferred Stock 142. The Finance Committee has.381 % 32. Co. as heretofore.00 1 share The Continental Oil Company Capital Stock 192.893 Washington Oil Company Capital Stock 27.00 1 share Galena-Signal Oil Company Preferred Stock..132 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Changes in Investments During 1913 Were as Follows: Sold and Redeemed at a profit of $257. 1st 4s 75.920 to the Foundation has. 144.649 Standard Oil Company (Kentucky) Capital Stock 403.. the book value of all remaining at the original figure.78 $1...000 Cleveland.185 Standard Oil Company (Nebraska) Capital Stock 296. 358.

78 $34. Ohio) 24. Rockefeller. 8. Rockefeller's gift of June 27.00 Invested in §60.82 Mr.00 $149. in securities and accrued interest and dividends 21.78 148.00 INCOME ACCOUNT Six months'interest to August 1.60 EXHIBIT B SPECIAL FUNDS OF MRS.00 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rockefeller's Gift of June 4. John D.579.00 Gift of September 11.. in securities and accrued dividends 10.60 $ 257.000 Colorado Industrial Co.552. 1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to the Baptist Home of Northern Ohio).on Gift of June 7. 1913. LAURA S.1913 (Income payable to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York) 8. 1913 PRINCIPAL OF GENERAL FUND OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Amount received May 29.430. 1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to Euclid Avenue Baptist Church.1913. ROCKEFELLER: Gift of June 7.051. Greene.374.200.1913.00 848. from Messrs.000.00 250.00 Gift of December 9.579. John D.1913 Amount sent The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York 250.552.000.1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York) $ 8.579. Jr.177.972.552. in bonds $ 3.000. 5% Bonds @ 80% §48.60 834.00 Total $34.402.82 RESERVE: Gains on securities sold and redeemed Special distribution Solar Refining Co Total Investments in general investment schedule (Exhibit E) §34.00 Gift of November 29. Starr J. Trustees.000.000.552.579.000. Murphy and Jerome D. Cleveland.1913.920.60 $34.178.00 Mr.000.TREASURER'S REPORT—1913 133 EXHIBIT A Statement Showing Conditions of Various Funds Held by The Rockefeller Foundation as of December 31.

1913 RECEIPTS: Income to date DISBURSEMENTS: Appropriation to American Red Cross.242.50 $100.600.000.000.230.00 9. Treasurer's Office Secretary's Office $65. to December 31.31 Office Equipment 1.653.447.069.00 Grand Chenier Tract in Louisiana Bird Refuge 212.70 Totals Unpaid Appropriations §346.90 $1.909.90 180.29 Investments in General Schedule 639.41 Income Receivable 189..447.626.84 9.30 8346.863.140.00 $109.831.00 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .90 In EXHIBIT D Statement Showing All Appropriations from General Funds Made in Accordance with Resolutions Passed at Meetings of The Foundation from its Beginning on May 22. 1913.00 International Health Commission 26.000.80 68..70 Balance: hands of Director General 602.447.00 $1.242.29 Office Expenses 2.00 Bureau of Social Hygiene 8.337.230.70 $1.640.230.20 66.1913 APPROPRIATIONS PAYMENTS American Red Cross $100.00 $100.70 236.140.000.1913. Foundation Expenses: Traveling.74 On Deposit 608.140. to December 31.134 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION EXHIBIT C Statement Showing Receipts and Disbursements of Income of The Rockefeller Foundation from May 22.60 International Health Commission: Salaries $3.674.242.376.00 5346.396.26 1.26 Traveling Expenses 1.

1st & Refunding. Gtd.250 00 1.960. 97.R. Paul Ry.R.000 1915 £ 500 1929 $ 2.453 65 5. & St.320 00 22. by So.700. 4" Oct. 1st Coll.000.EXHIBIT E Schedule of Securities of the Rockefeller Foundation on December 31. 90. 83 625 to w c w w w •« o V H 100. and Income Temporarily Invested BONDS NAME Baltimore & Ohio R.250 00 814.000 1996 5. Cin. Deb Central Pacific 30 year. Chicago & St.000 1990 73.000 1934 2. Canadian Pacific Ry.500. Interborough Rapid Transit 1st • Long Island R. Louis R. Cin. 87 96. 65. 78. Mtg Colorado Industrial Co. May 4 Nov. L.460 00 2. Conv. 90. Cleve. Div.024.000 1941 45. 4>£ July 5 July 3^ Oct. Pitts.600.R.000 1965 300. 4 5 314 4'- 1948 $ 6.400 1945 S 66.000. Louis.000 91.000 1937 3. 1st. 1st Mtg Norfolk & Western Ry. Refunding .91 H JO W > VI July July Aug.780 00 29. Denver & Sio Grande R. .R.000 2000 175.168. New York. 4 Jan.880 00 54.550 00 1. 1st Consol Northern Pacific Ry. Wabash R.580 00 3. Pac Chicago. 82 76 95 94 91 93 99. 90.000 1940 6.R. Milwaukee & St. Cin. Con. 1st Mtg.000 1949 2.R. D Rutland R.032.00 29.00 167.200.R. Chic.000 00 960. Representing Both Principal. Refunding Louisville & Nashville R. 1st Conso! Illinois Central R.000 1944 82. 85.000 1993 200. Trust. Prior Lien Ry.100 00 65. Mtg Cleve. 1913.000 1937 35.250 00 233.R. Omaha Div.00 144. Coll.000 00 5. 102 89 97 80. Trust . 4 Nov.500 1948 £ 2. Gen. Chicago & St. 1st Consol Sunday Creek Co.9193 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000 00 1.723. 4 July 6 Jan.000 1952 1. St. Ser. Chicago & St. Gen.00 63.100 00 261. 3l< Dec.76 87.R. 4 Oct. 4 Mar.005 00 5. 4 June 5 Aug. Consol .500 1997 6.000 1986 1.800 00 5.H5 00 1 1. 1st New York Connecting R. Unified Magnolia Petroleum Company 1st Morris & Essex R. 81. 78.000 1953 250. Louis Ry. 5 Jan.000 1936 6.R. 1st RATE % DATE OF MATURITY AMOUNT PRICE %* CASH PRICE § 6. $y2 Aug. & Land Grant Pennsylvania R.000. 1st Western Maryland Ry. 4 Oct. Louis Ry.000 1989 30.000 1941 25.812 60 33. 4 May 4 Nov. 4 Jan.200.R.

733.12 894.23 670 140 00 246.'.481 12.300 00 61.000 1.547.976.287. Louis R. Preferred .984 8.119.937 4.632 00 4.482 60 587. Chicago & St.00 178. Atchison.070 00 918..234 29.000 10.695 4.422 4.478 2. Pipe Lines Standard Oil Co.480 00 44876 00 200. 100 190.982. Louis R.00 10 32/5 00 § 6.12 1. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .900 00 1.. (Kentucky) Standard Oil Co. 72 361 3333 140. Common Northern Pipe Line Company Solar Refining Company .416.025 00 462.024.044.420.816 1.376 00 1.23 495 690 619 7.488.000. 103 25 TOTAL SECURITIES BELONGING TO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 8 1.800 00 2 087.842 9.000) United States Rubber Company 1st Preferred z 461 20.R.514.750 00 145600 00 5500 00 31.000 295 670. Manhattan Ry.959.265 00 1. Topeka & Santa Fe Ry.093. Interest and dividends accrued at the date of purchase or donation being allowed for. Company Capital National Lead Company Preferred New York Chicago & St. 2nd Preferred Pressed Steel Car Company Preferred The Provident Loan Society Certificates (Par 85.34 G > -3 t-t O NOTE:—All securities ore valued at the price at which they were purchased or at the value assigned to them when they were donated. .20 $36.413. Common New York.365. . Preferred Galena-Signal Oil Co.". Common j-j 3 Claflin Company Common .877.. . (Nebraska) Swan & Finch Company Union Tank Line Company Washington Oil Company (par §10) RATE % 20 40 12 32 6 40 8 13 10 10 20 46 20 30 5 40 6 6 6 7 7 7 5 7 6 8 NUMBER OF SHARES PRICE % CASH PRICE $ 146.400 600 88 775 128 776 130 95 95 79 20 100 400 509 40 100 104 55 78 70 89 75 100. 200 70 30 *J o c P I Miscfuaneous stocks. .919 000 00 35 719 20 2600000 00 53. Consolidated Gas Company Cuban American Sugar Co.050 00 S3 220 00 §21. South West Penn. Standard Oil Co.EXHIBIT ^-Continued STOCKS NAME Oil Company Stocks: Chesebrough Manufacturing Co.442 14. w o n w t-1 t-< w JO 190 110 160 185 007 275.482 1.016 421 53 270.062. The Continental Oil Company Crescent Pipe Line Company (par 850) Cumberland Pipe Line Company Eureka Pipe Line Company Galena-Signal Oil Co.333.193 20. Consol The Colonial Oil Company . . (Kansas) .907 2.200 00 1. 60.13 3...391.774 20.R. .13 1.966 2.

TREASURER'S REPORT 1914 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

15 1.34 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CASH ON DEPOSIT 174.641.054.59 1.1914.015. Gentlemen: Herewith are submitted statements giving the financial statistics fiscal year ending December 31.054.321.00 $103.55657 $105.886.764.960.34 73.000.56 I i 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .53 224.95 $103. GENERAL BALANCE STATEMENT ASSETS INVESTMENTS: General Fund (Exhibit H) Special Funds ASSETS ACQUIRED THROUGH APPROPRIATIONS OF INCOME: Grand Chenier Tract-p Bird Refuge in Louisiana ACCRUED INCOME ON GENERAL INVESTMENTS 604.321.146.138 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION THE ROCKEFELLER To tht Members of THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION.088.833.

895.079. Laura S.35 2. Rockefeller (Exhibit B) INCOME: Appropriated for purchase of assets In suspense Special contribution (Exhibit D ) .TREASURER'S REPORT—10H FOUNDATION December 31.00 224.395.146.000.886.00 8J).00 320.00 $ 73. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR PAYMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF MR.000.48 1105. ROCKEFELLER'S DESIGNATIONS.263.56 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . .338.000. J. Rockefeller (Exhibit C) $ Gift of Mrs.73 100320.1914. NOT YET MATURED: (Exhibit D) UNPAID FOUNDATION APPROPRIATIONS: (Exhibit E) UNAPPROPRIATED INCOME 25.04 784.759.60Q.079.000. . 1914 FUNDS AND OBLIGATIONS GENERAL FUND: Original donations (Exhibit A) Reserve (Exhibit A) $100.305. D.95 80. of The Rockefeller Foundation and its subsidiary organizations for the AS OF DECEMBER 31.000.00 600.764.01 1.OO 4.73 SPECIAL FUNDS' Gift of Mr.000.00 48.

Milwaukee & St.00 214.000.00 67.000 New York City Corporate Stock Notes 6%.115.5 600. 214.39 Net Gain LOSS $ 257. due 1915 100. City Corporate Stock 6% Notes 100..674 30 shares New York Transit ^ Company 277.505.790.000 Chicago.600 shares Wabash RR Preferred 4.538. 67.23 695 shares South West Penn.50 170.925.846 145 shares Borne.9626 331 shares Swan & Finch Co.00 515. Paul Debenture of 1909 4s 91.000 New York City Two Year Revenue Bonds 6s.000.82714 5.959 17.000 Sunday Creek Collateral Trust 5s 100.000.139. 50'shares American Shipbuild" ing Co. 1.296. 97.* $400.505.000 Chicago. General 4s 93. Central Lines Equipment 4Ms 100 345.00 36.000 N.69 275.375.750.700 shares Wabash RR Common 98038 15.140 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Changes in Investments During the Year 1914 Were as Follows: Sold and Redeemed at a gain of $170. due 1916 100.97 7.91 787 shares Crescent Pipe Line Company 57. 293.57 1. Y.000 N.000 International Navigation GAIN 1st Sinking Fund 5s @ 100 $ 4.45 S 44. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Milwaukee & St.45 . Burlington Si Quincy.968.062 600.95 8215.671.667 / 937 shares Northern Pipe Line 120.901.50 "§2157505. Paul General Mortgage 4^s 103.9$ 819.003.000.000.10 669. 272.553 65 sharesEurekaPIpeLineCo.52 157.00 935.710 shares Union Tank Line Co.64 1.00 546.45 8215.96 200.32 13.217.926.8559 24.8953 1. Y. 1 st Mtge 5s © 100. Pipe Lines 148.0971 442 shares Continental Oil Co.00 13. 220. 228. 337. Scrymser Co.000 Chicago.92 1.903.75 18. Preferred 79.5935 9.00 Bought: 8 400 Ashland Power Co.

066. Treasurer. due 1917 @ 100. Cons. Preferred 106. MYERS.500.169.000 New York City Three Year Revenue Bonds 6s. Consolidated Mortgage 6% bonds.997.00 100.000 of this issue owned by the Foundation.5 375. have been deposited with the Farmers' Loan & Trust Company as depositary for the Protective Committee for this issue.00 100.140. Rockefeller conveyed to the Foundation $25. The $520.030. 1914. $ 94. and January 1st.025.7625 91. 1915.039 499. As a special fund this account is shown separately in Exhibit C.762.908.000 Pere Marquette RR Consolidated 4%.000. thus reducing the book value of same to 81.50 $4.051.4^s 93.000 (par value) Euclid Heights Realty Company Bonds.28.000. with whom the bonds were deposited. MtgeGold4s 83.20 450.400 have since been credited with a payment of $4.00 390. This has been credited to the cost of $716. The $80. 6s 117.000 Southern Pacific Branch Railway Co.5 94. to the amount of $202. Louis & San Francisco Company.1914.000 Northern Pacific Ry.33 500 shares Great Northern Ry. as long as the Foundation shall deem it wise. Mr.00 504. Respectfully submitted.00 1. Louis & San Francisco Refunding 4% bonds (now in default).000 New York Central Lines Equipment Trust of 1913 Gold 4^s 99.400 (Total 8603. t There t follow eight statements.TREASURER'S REPORT—1914 141 $ 94.000 par value Canada^ Southern Ry. entitled Exhibits A to H inclusive. Refunding & Imp.72.466.00 1.168.000 received for the coupons belonging to the $2. but is carried in "Suspense" pending the outcome of the receivership of the St.38146 £57.000 Washington Railway & Elec. have purchased the coupons maturing July 1st.28) as a distribution of the proceeds of the sale of Euclid Heights Realty Company property. Under date of December 15. due 1964 94.000 shares Northern Pacific Ry 91.03 During the year the Foundation has received from the Cleveland Trust Company $401. The Mortgages of $202. L.Bonds.370.750. The Protective Committee for the St.000 New York City 4M% Corporate Stock. reducing value to §198. which give the various financial details in reference to the Foundation.05 53.1402 117. which have been in default since their receipt.100 shares Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Common 82.150. the income of which is to be paid to the Baptist Home for the Aged of New York City. John D. and a participation certificate in mortgages on property formerly owned by the Euclid Heights Realty Company. has not been treated as income.6439 90. G. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Cleveland.1913. 1913.028. 8. in securities and accrued interest and dividends 21.178.1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to Euclid Avenue Baptist Church. John D.000.320.079.00 Gift of September 11.00 Mr.46 RESERVE: $100.079.000.095.000. John D.159.000. Rockefeller's gift of June 27. in addition to the f 100.M2 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Statement Showing Condition of Various Funds Held by The Rockefeller Foundation as of December 31.00 flnvested in 360.00 INCOME ACCOUNT Twelve months' interest on above gifts Amount sent to the various Societies as above $3.320.079.000.1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York) $8.000. from Messrs. Murphy and Jerome D. Income.320.00 » NOTE:—The Investment Schedule (Exhibit H) covers.000.73 principal referred to above. in securities and accrued dividends 65..00 Gift of December 9. Greene.000. 2913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to the Baptist Home of Northern Ohio). The endowments being of a special character.402.000 Colorado Industrial Company 6% Bonds @ 80% 48.01. Rockefeller's gift of June 4. Jr.000. tNOTE:—The securities referred to above are not included in the Investment Schedule (Exhibit H).032.00 320.00 Gains on securities sold and redeemed $ 171.73 EXHIBIT B SPECIAL FUNDS OF MRS. securities amounting to §2. Starr J.320.079.079. or appropriations is made only In ths Gcnsrd Statement 011 pags 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . in securities and accrued dividends 10. mention of their principal.241.000. Rockefeller's gift of March 6.320. LAURA S.920. Trusteesj in bonds $ 3.569.73 Investments in genera! investment $100. representing Income temporarily invested.1913.00 Gift of November 29.1914.00 3. ROCKEFELLER: Gift of June 7.079.1913 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York) 8.569.200.73 $100. Ohio) 24.73 $100.73 Special distribution Solar Refining Company 148.00 848.54 Mr. Rockefeller.000.73 schedule (Exhibit H) $100.1914 EXHIBIT A PRINCIPAL OF GENERAL FUND OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Amount received May 20.00 Mr.

The endowments being of a.00 DISBURSEMENTS DIRECT EXPENDITURES BY THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ON ACCOUNT OF APPROPRIATIONS: Traveling Secretary's office Treasurer's office ADMINISTRATION EXPENSES: $ 780.000 Canada Southern Ry.62 Total income for 1914 5.13 Mr.69 APPROPRIATIONS EXPENDED BY FOUNDATION SUBSIDIARY ORGANIZATIONS: China Medical Commission: Conference $1.831. $6. as to which there is no restriction $3.65 $6. income.731..1914 $1. set aside 1.484.984.96 §50. Company Consolidated 5s @ 100% 25.122.00 Contribution for Belgian Relief work from Miss Olivia Cutting 500.82 313. JOHN D. or appropriations is made only in the General Balance Statement on page 139.000.64 Commission 35.TREASURER'S REPORT—1914 EXHIBIT C 143 SPECIAL FUND OF MR.489. and January. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .162. $25.000... mention of their principal.45 Proceeds sale of July. ROCKEFELLER: Gift of December 15.643.000 for period March 6 to December 31.32 836.1914 (Income payable at Foundation's discretion to the Baptist Home for the Aged of New York City).1914.00 invested in $25.75 Total income available for disbursement during year '.906. 1914.19 1.68 11. coupons belonging -to $2.817..835.000.000.986.651.00 EXHIBIT D Statement Showing Receipts and Disbursements of The Rockefeller Foundation Income from General Funds for Year 1914 (SPECIAL FUNDS SHOWN BY EXHIBITS B AND C ARE NOT INCLUDED HEREIN) RECEIPTS Balance January 1.000.45 AMOUNTS CARRIED FORWARD * NOTE:—The securities referred to above are not Included in the Investment Schedule (Exhibit H).568.828. 80. Rockefeller's proportion of "Reservation" of $2.383. St.924. 1915. special character.000.70 Income for year 1914. Louis and San Francisco Refunding 4s now in default (carried in suspense).337.652.

00 25.613.000.00 182.383. La.292.879. Japan ON ACCOUNT OF MR.984.00 20.986.000.237.000.000.886.00 48.000.00 . Cooperation and Efficiency in Foreign Missionary Work Charity Organization Society New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor New York Milk Committee Relief Society for the Calamities in the Northeastern Districts and Kyushu.96 Grand Chenier Tract.81 PAYMENTS MADE TO UNAFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS: ON ACCOUNT OF FOUNDATION APPROPRIATIONS: American Academy in Rome American Red Cross Brooklyn Bureau of Charities Bureau of Municipal Research Bureau of Social Hygiene ..45 10.984.00 10.10.000.63 Mission Society 50.06 1.00 8.000.551.95 International Health Commission 133.00 §1.000.000.00 War Relief.53 10.421.144 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AMOUNTS BROUGHT FORWARD.00 600.000.00 6. 994.519.000.34 86.603.986.00 4. ROCKEFELLER'S DESIGNATIONS: American Baptist Foreign $6. for Bird Refuge 224.13 Research in Governmental Problems 10.00 ""^ 35. §50.500.618.65 China Medical Board 2.00 American Female Guardian Society and Homeforthe Friendless Alta Social Settlement of Cleveland AMOUNTS CARRIED FORWARD 855.031.640.45 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .06 Investigation of Industrial Relations 5.

.. 1...000. 5.... College..00 $1...350. on Prevention of _.00 AMOUNTS CARRIED FORWARD §148.00 Charity Organization Society...... ...00 Eugenic Field Workers (State institutions) . 10....00 Newfoundland Sealing Disaster Sufferers ... Springfield.. 34 §6..500.... Mass . 2.986.984.00 Brooklyn Bureau of Charities ... ....... Tuberculosis ..000... A.......000.... 2............. 250. 200..00 Legal Aid Society of New York .. 6.000. 1.988..00 George Junior Republic Association ..00 Charity Organization Soc... 1.....00 Boy Scouts of America ...00 Baptist Union of Western Canada .603. M...00 National Child Labor Commission ............500... .. 5.... ..CA ..00 """" Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America ____ 500...000.00 New Jersey Baptist Convention .. ..00 International Y....00 National League on Urban Conditions among Negroes ..000....00 $1.00 Layman's Missionary Movement . ..000...00 International Committee ofY........000.00 National Highways Protective Society .M... ...000..500.. 603.. 1. 1..45 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ......T R E A S U R E R ' S REPORT— 1914 145 AMOUNTS BROUGHT FORWARD $55.000.000... 700........ C.. 500.... 47.551..00 Cleveland School of Arts .Y.......00 Honest Ballot Association ofN.......34 $6.46 Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York ..00 -^ Cleveland Federation of Charity and Philanth'py 2..... 2..C ...000.. 1. 1. ..500..984.000..551...

55 Income Receivable 604.49 $4.984..45 $6.34 $6.695.000.097.305..000.000. New York City 3.603. M. C.00 81.46 New York Association for Improving the Condition ofthePoor $6.27 BALANCE: Acts. C.00 Parks and Playgrounds Association 260.61 On Deposit 1.35 4.492.00 §858.500.00 Prison Association of New York 500.561.000.986..146 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AMOUNTS BROUGHT FORWARD §148...659. New York 151.00 Westchester Poor: Special .00 **r Public Schools Athletic League.04 170.J 1.00 Westchester Poor: Eugenic Investigator 675. 4. 10.45 NOTE.895.000.00 3..960. Rec.000. Pble.84 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .00 Y. New York City 600. 627.53 Investments in General Schedule 2. Jersey City.524... Public Education Ass'tion 2.00 500.35 80.940. Brooklyn.59 Acts.236.986.492.27-" Salem Fire Relief Fund.00 Y.—Above balance is divided as follows: Amount to credit of Mr.00 New York Milk Committee 4.00 Girls'Branch 500.00 .984.054.315.984.00 Whittier House.00 New York Child Labor Committee 300. A.524.00 Religious Education Association 750.241. N. 8174.000.^-Agent 900.986.00 Society for Italian Immigrants 750..500.00 State Charities Aid Association 2.000. M.541.00 The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.84 " " $6.054. A. Rockefeller's Reservation Amount credited to Suspense Amount credited to Special Contributions Undisbursed Income Total $ 784.

000.094.01 $4.386. to December 31.000.118.000.00 10.120.640.809.36 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000.651.000.879.000.578.TREASURER'S REPORT—1914 147 EXHIBIT E Statement Showing All Appropriations from General Funds Made in Accordance with Resolutions Passed at Meetings of The Foundation from its Beginning on May 22.00 25.000.640.00 10.292.37 142. Louisiana.886.00 35.95 Investigation of Industrial Relations 20.000.06 APPROPRIATIONS MADE TO UNAFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS: American Academy in Rome American Association for Conservation of Vision American Red Cross : Brooklyn Bureau of Charities Bureau of Municipal Research Bureau of Social Hygiene Charity Organization Society Cooperation and Efficiency in Foreign Missionary Work $450..13 International Health Commission 482.094. 1913.46 994.292.53 225.809.809.00 10.094.00 120. Japan Wellesley College Totals Unpaid Appropriations 100.00 5.00 Less Amount Lapsed.96 36.000.00 10.000.47 New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor New York Milk Committee Relief Society for the Calamities in the Northeastern Districts and Kyushu.000.261.000.00 84.00 40.000.00 8.13 5.618.96 China Medical Commission 36.00 448.35 §2.76 Scientific Research in Governmental Problems 50.395. Bird Refuge 225.613.000..36 §4.467.00 320.000.00 10.000.36 81.00 48.000.050.759.95 224.000..96 Grand ChenierTract. 1.00 War Relief 1.000.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.018.00 750.00 8.96 $ 2.000.699.879.53 25. 1914 APPROPRIATIONS TO BE EXPENDED UNDER DIRECTION OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNAMOUNTS PAYMENTS DATION: APPROPRIATED China Medical Board $509.651.000.

367. Lucia St..03 §7..500.685.76 4.742.93 Office Furnishings.769.694.781. 3914) $1.967.67 3.076 21 S 43.03 383.1914.843.769.545.30 4.36 9.27 Field Director's Traveling Expenses 1.335.53 Director's Assistant in Egypt and Ceylor 2.32 Field Director's Traveling (from Sept.30 DISBURSEMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT EXPENSE: Office Salaries §19.18 38.03 General Office Expense 3.06 1.780. 1.30 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .333.1914 Appropriated September 25.700.* 40. Vincent 1.711.47 250.18 Traveling Expense.260.63 9.309..33 ..843.30 60.003. on account British Guiana Trinidad Antigua Grenada St.20 $165.00 100. 4..333.36 Library 260. Hookworm Charts Panama-Pacific Exposition WEST INDIES: Field Director's Salary (from Sept..533.00 $35. Appropriated March 18.707.134.76 AMOUNTS CARRIED FORWARD 7.87 Rent 2.18 7.769..00 $165.06 7.1914) 31S.148 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION EXHIBIT F Financial Statements of Subsidiary Organizations of the Rockefeller Foundation for the Year 1914 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION Balance of Appropriation Unexpended January 1.S6 Field Director's Report.14 CENTRAL AMERICA: Field Director's Salary 6.000.652.936.1914 $ 15.00 6.48 / 60.90 Motion Pictures of Clinics and Field Work Printing and mailing Circulars in connection with Survey of Foreign Medical Missionaries .000.

30 $165.99 19.769.27 Miscellaneous Expenses: Cable Messages 99.641.93 Commission Expenses: Salaries $17.29 $133.30 Balance of Appropriation Unexpended EXHIBIT G Financial Statements of Subsidiary Organizations of The Rockefeller Foundation for the Year 1914 CHINA MEDICAL COMMISSION Conference Expenses $ 1.843.TREASURER'S REPORT — 19I4 Panama Costa Rica Guatemala Nicaragua EAST: Field Director's Salary Egypt 9.31 Traveling Expenses 14.33 23.64 32..78 5.769.13 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .552..30 149 AMOUNTS BROUGHT FORWARD .237.519.700.96 CHINA MEDICAL BOARD Salaries Traveling Expenses Other Expenses: Equipment @1.651.292.618.96 INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Salaries Traveling Expenses Other Expenses 4.174.12 $36.934.141.54 2.489.769.07 Cost of Express Traveler's Checks 10.24 $165.817.395.63 1.00 708.00 19.63 375.221.499.50 Printing Report 579.25 455.560.10 768.068.532. $7..00 35.20 $165.60 185.41 9.03 883.57 22.938.32 Other Expenses: Equipment $195.14 774.64 Visit to England of Representative 1.30 27.05 Exchange for Drafts on Letters of Credit 599.06 32.

. 15. Mtg. Chicago & St.000 80.. 1929 3 Chicago & Alton R. Gtd. 1949 31^ July 1950 Chicago & Alton Ry. 1st Mtg. R.000 1.000 1. 1st Mtg Cleveland. . . Mtg Mar.R. Ry.100. Refunding Oct.305.700.5 uly 1915 Central Pacific Ry.000 600. Oct. Deb . Burlington & Quincy R. 4 May 1989 Chjeago. 1928 5 Ashland Power Company 1st Mtg.Tr. Cincinnati. 91 0626 95 102.R. St. & Imp Chicago..000 551.000 677000 6.000 600.000 8.000 30. Trust Jan. C. 30 yr. Milwaukee & St.000 50. and Income Temporarily Invested BONDS RATE DATE or MATURITY % 5 American Agricultural Chem. A.EXHIBIT H Schedule of Securities of The Rockefeller Foundation on December 31.R. Mtg. 4 Nov. Gen. .000 854.00 O 646375 00 47500 00 81. Milwaukee & St.250.&M.000 500. Pac 314 Aug. Ry. 1914. 1958 4 July 1955 Chicago & Eastern 111.S.109250 00 935000 00 189000 00 d > 29. 1st Mtg uly 1948 Canadian Pacific Railway 1st Mtg. Paul Gen. Paul Gen. Gen. Gtd.000 500. Conv. 4H May 1989 4 July 1934 Chicago.000. Ser.00 587. Coll . . 83. Louis Div. Lien 5 Chicago City & Connecting Rys. 103.000 700. Chic. 97 90. 1990 Cleveland.000 73. Representing Both Principal.S. 4 June 1993 Cleveland Short Line 1st Mtg. 1927 4 Chicago. Paul Debenture 4 Chicago & North Western Railway Extension Aug. L. Mtg.000 300. 414 April 1961 NAME AMOUNT §500.89 95 o o w M fiflosnn m il 5460 00 w 2550 00 f r 1 780 00 358 150 00 452.. Louis Ry. Coll.00 H 516. . Ser.600. by So.000 £ 500 32. & St. an 1928 5 Atlantic & Birmingham Railway 1st Mtg. .00 485000 00 65.00 475000 00 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Cin.R.000 PRICE % CASH PRICE $ 505000 00 8000 00 w S 101 100 90 91 102 89 65 53 85 93 5 63 97. . an 1934 4 Baltimore & Ohio R. Fund Debenture 5 May 1933 5 Feb.620 00 1. Milwaukee & St. Refdg. Louis Ry. 1927 Chicago Railways Co. .. 1st Mtg.000. '26 Chicago & North Western Railway Skg.

00 1. 1922 Feb.000.198.000 84. 1st Consol Erie R.000. So. Ry. of 1913 Gold New Vork City Corporate Stock New York City Corporate Stock Notes. Trust Co. & Refunding Mutual Fuel Gas Co.692. Tr. 175.100.75 250.00 144.00 67.325.673. 1916 Sept.800. 3. Participation Ctf. Mtg.00 H g > w £ B v M & M 3 S ? 1 5 £ Liq. 40-year Collateral Morris & Essex 1st R.00 2. Euclid Heights Realty Co.000 87. 1966 Oct.00 960.98 94. Fund Missouri Pacific Ry.Colorado Industrial Co.000 87. 1915 Sept. 1. 94.000.00 2. 75.00 701.000 90. Central Lines Equip. 1934 Jan.200.997. Gen. to 4 5 VA 5 5 3}* 4 4 4 4 6 VA 4 3H 5 4^ 4M 6 6 6 4 Nov. 1936 April 1953 2.R. 6.50 250.305. (Cleve.040.. Fund Lake Erie & Western R. Ry. 2. 1947 36M ea. Y.000 90. . Unified Magnolia Petroleum Company 1st Missouri. Kansas & Texas Ry. Refunding Louisville & Nashville R.000 99.800.72 198. Series "B" .000.00 1.503.000. in certain mtgs.00 1. Chicago & St. 1937 Jan.000. r err f-i 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 3. Jan.000.R.00 6.R. 1917 Oct. 1st Mtg Lake Shore & Mich. Skg.459.000 75.620.000 95. 1929 July 1941 June 1997 Sept.00 805. International Navigation Co.00 1. 2nd Mtg Lake Shore & Mich.812. Conv Denver & Rio Grande R.00 463.000. to 202.000 100.600. 1st Skg. Louis R.000.000 92.00 33. & Coll.000.400 300. 100.000 100. Ry.000 1.00 798. 1949 July 1940 Jan.000 716.000 100. 1945 Dec.000 96. Debenture Long Island R.R.000. Debenture Lake Shore & Mich.000 80. 926. 85. 468. So. 2. Conv. Refunding Interborough Rapid Transit 1st International Mercantile Marine Mtg. 1928 May 1931 Mar.580. 2. 35. on property formerly owned by Euclid Heights Realty Co Illinois Central R.R.00 3.200.370. Receipt fo Cleveland Trust Co. yr.00 94. 1.000 92.160.5 14.000 6.318.000 82.00 100. 1.00 261.750.00 5.250.000 55.000 94. 67.750.000 00. 1937 Liq.R. Tr. 2000 Nov.113.000 100.R.000 00. So. 1st Mtg 5 4 4 Aug. New York City Two-Year Revenue Bonds New York City Three-Year Revenue Bonds New York. 1964 Sept. '16-'2S Mar.065. 1st Mtg N. 1955 Jan.600 00 978. 1.. 762.00 14. 193S Mar.039 100.R.600. Gold.030.000 60.000.

Sept. 100 80.000. Louis R.000 455..00 814. Ser. Chic. Ry. Deb New York Connecting R.180.R. Oct. 1st.000 25. Mtg. 1st Consolidated .500 390. 65.000 PRICE % CASH PRICE 1.00 22.000 500.000 100.606.158.000. 98 106. Debenture. May Aug.00 140. Nov. Pennsylvania JR.000 00 54.EXHIBIT H—Continued NAME New York.R.000 434.00 '29. and Land Grant Ohio Fuel Supply Co.250.00 S35.. Consol Philadelphia Co. Cin.453 65 5005 00 357. . .350. Texas & Mexico 1st Seaboard Air Line Ry.000 00 475.000.000 450..76 2. Adjustment Southern Pacific Branch Ry. July July Mar.115..803. Wheeling & Lake Erie R. April July Feb.000 4. Refunding & Imp Northern Pacific Ry. Lake Erie Div.000 1.660 00 3. 97.000. Aug.R. 1st Western Pacific Ry.786.38146 91 5761 93.00 515.000 1.000.00 350. . Con. Oct. Oct.00 1. Pere Marquette R.500 • 51 925 £ 2400 $520. 77. Cin.000 117.000 56. & St. Con.R.000. Chic.R. 60. 1st Consol.032. Convertible Debenture Philadelphia Co. Gold Western Maryland Ry.00 270.79 4 4 5 5 4 4' 6 4}^ 4 6 5 5 5 3J4 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 1931 1953 1996 2047 1997 1927 1943 1951 1922 1919 1946 1963 1941 1951 1940 1949 1937 1944 1939 1941 1941 1951 1952 1933 1926 1949 87 91 93. Dec. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Oct. Prior Lien Ry. St. July Oct. Detroit & Ohio Ext. Coll. Louis & San Francisco.000 3.5 78 9193 O 2. Chicago & St.140 20 63.. Louis & San Francisco R.R.000 5.R. Omaha Division 1st Washington Railway & Electric Cons.600.200. 81. Mtg Northern Pacific Ry.00 347.520. 69. 2nd Mortgage Wabash R.R. Ry.133.000 450. Trust Wabash R.180 00 114.320. 83. Refunding St. .000 2. D Pittsburgh.910.750.1402 O Cj 78. & St. AMOUNT 1 303000 250.R. 1st Consol TOTAL BONDS RATE DATE OF % MATURITY 4 4M 4 &1A 2 May Aug.R. July Jan. Mar. L. New Orleans.00 61 925 00 11880 00 327.000 5.000 81..160 00 5. Mar. 1st Wheeling & Lake Erie R.600 00 970. Consolidated .R. 117.000 140.000 45.00 375. 1st Mortgage Sunday Creek Co. I Rutland R.R 1st Mtg Norfolk & Western R. May Jan. L.610 00 233.039. Gold Convertible Pittsburgh. Ser. 76.000 500. 1st Wabash R. 100 H a M 99 63 97 95 o o w f 103.00 117.

867 4. .464. Buckeye Pipe Line Company (par 850) Cheseborough Manufacturing Co. to §49.481 12. 20 16 40 12 6 5 24 8 12 20 12 20 10 10 24 16 20 24 12 5 40 350 49..652. 190 125 111 41 300.30 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .365. 420.845 126. CASH PRICE . Common Indiana Pipe Line Co.434 2.000 4.00 990.185. . .632 00 4. . Preferred .000 00 847. Washington Oil Company (Par §10) TOTAL OIL COMPANY STOCKS RATE % NUMBER OF SHAKES PRICE % 295 160 670.000 00 918.481 12.108.976 12 3.995 59 587.600 00 1 687 350 00 £3.385 28 5. (Par §50) National Transit Co. .959.000 00 180.STOCKS NAME Oil Company Stocks: Borne-Scryinser Company .693 7..000 8 690 619 100 ISO.193 20. Pipe Lines Swan & Finch Company Union Tank Line Company.392 9.280. . Consol The Colonial Oil Company The Continental Oil Company Crescent Pipe Line Company (par $50) Cumberland Pipe Line Company Eureka Pipe Line Company Galena Signal Oil Co. (Par §25) New York Transit Co Northern Pipe Line Company Solar Refining Company Southern Pipe Line Company Standard Oil Company (Kansas) Standard Oil Company (Kentucky) Standard Oil Company (Nebraska) Standard Oil Company (Ohio) South West Penn.845 4.703308 88 1. 160. 103250 00 7.482 8. 110 '.984 24. 270 185 229 275 140 007 5556 016 509 903 24.220 00 G M 53 M TJ O SS H t-« it".966 7.695 8.842 24. Galena Signal Oil Co.600.721 00 3.330. 60 72 361 33 140. .458.960880 00 462300 00 61.547 23 670.733 13 1.200 00 178.320 00 1.503. .375 00 5.000 14.105 1.120 2.140 00 3.044.774 200 70 30.900 00 1.024 13 3.717.

009.400. 15.000 20.555 56 212. 3.121 286 79 32 98 6222 100.775 36. Common Participation Certificates H.00 135.527 46. 88. Common International Paper Company Common RATE NUMBER OF SHARES 9.575 5. B.123.00 68. Common International Mercantile Marine Co.350.00 63.00 1.832 16.875.000 00 2.05 53.200 1.00 64.212.467 14. 8.000 00 1. 5.518 o o W 451 2. Common Central National Bank of Cleveland Chehatis & Pacific Land Company Chicago City & Connecting Ry.00 14.100. 11.500 2. P W O Cj 55 0 > H w O 7.7361 106. Preferred International Agricultural Corp.530 10. 238.845 00 624.600.700 1.908 33 79. 30.603 400 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .809.00 3.774 92 246. Ship & Engine Building Co Cuban-American Sugar Company Preferred Erie Railroad Company 1st Preferred Great Lakes Towing Company Common Great Lakes Towing Company Preferred Great Northern Ry.152. Claflin Company Common Cleveland Steel Company Cleveland Trust Company Colorado & Southern Ry.88 315.688.000.05 11.972 21.200.025.265.540 00 35.345 12.EXHIBIT E-Continufd NAME Miscellaneous Stocks: American Shipbuilding Co. Preferred.1875 500 220 w w 17. International Agricultural Corp.100 PRICE CASH PRICE S 803.500.200.856.00 340. 12.00 62. Company 1st Preferred Consolidated Gas Company Win.020 00 2.00 9. 648 600 130.00 6 8 ?M 8 10 6 7 7 7 85 35 95 95 159 22 45 45 69.00 49.611 10 10.77 378. 600 88. Preferred International Mercantile Marine Co. Preferred Participation Certificates Chicago City & Connecting Ry.000 54.195 30. Cramp & Sons.720. Common Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Ry.

200. Preferred Provident Loan Society Certificates (Par $5000) St.00 91.000.675.00 0.00 59.46 221. Common U. 21.400 73.000 4.35 44.8333 27.00 30.000.00 4. 104. Rubber Company 1st Preferred U S.444 10.321. S.400 300 1.00 48. Louis R. Chicago & St. Preferred U. 80. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co.500. S.50 170.400.200.000 1.00 600.100 300 200 691 300 SO. 78. 7.00 232. Louis R.900 10. 60.000.480. 89.000.100.762.780 4. Co National Lead Company Preferred .00 89. U.40 13.776 26. 0.00 42.70 91 .75 100.708. NOTE. Steel Corporation Common Wilson Realty Company Woman's Hotel Company Woman's Hotel Company (Dividend Scrip $720) 7 7 3 •• 8 7 7 6 12 8 2 .R.00 200.00 44. 90.015.369.500 100 400 1.600.00 3.683.256.000. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co.00 1. Common New York. 4.000 2. S.644.00 12.000.350.H H.00 31.R.287. 1.00 1. 54.300 3.—All opcuritlca arc valued at the price at which they were purchased or at the value assigned to them when they were donated.600.750. Common Superior Savings £c Trust Company (Cleveland. National Lead Company Common New York.2313 65.00 §17. Preferred Seaboard Air Line Ry. 101.00 52. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000.580.00 145. 95. 55.987 8. 2nd Preferred Seaboard Air Line Ry.000 4.00 24. 297. 20. 2nd Preferred Northern Pacific Railway Company Ohio Fuel Supply Company (Par $25) Otis Steel Company Preferred Otis Steel Company Common Pope Manufacturing Company Common Pope Manufacturing Company Preferred Pressed Steel Car Company.875.34 w G fa M w > P) •fl O TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS *TOTAL SECURITIES &ELONCING TO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION *NoTE:—The securities representing Special Funds Exhibits B and C are not Included In the above. 80.22 81.416. 128. Louis & San Francisco R.00 71.000.) Tilden Iron Mining Company. 100.154 140 329 364 280 500 40 6.19 8103. Chicago & St.7626 41.R. Interest and dividends accrued at the date of purchase or donation being allowed for.00 6. 15. Kohlsaat Company Manhattan Railway Company Missouri Pacific Ry.314.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

APPENDIX 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Chairman Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Nominating Committee Starr Jocelyn Murphy Wickliffe Rose Members To serve until the annual meeting of 1916 Q John Davison Rockefeller John Davison Rockefeller. Jr. Frederick Taylor Gate. Jr. Jr. Chairman Simon Flexner Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Charles Otto Heydt Finance Committee John Davison Rockefeller.. JR.. MEMBERS and COMMITTEES THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 1913 President JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE Treasurer LOUIS GUERINEAU MYERS Assistant Treasurer HARRY POTTER FISH Executive Committee John Davison Rockefeller.s To serve until the annual meeting of lots Hauy Pratt Judson Starr Jorelyn Murphy To serve until llx annual meeting of 1014 Simon Flexner WickHffe Rose Jerome Davis Greene 150 Charles Otto Heydt 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .APPENDIX I OFFICERS.

1914) Assistant Treasurer LEFFERTS MASON DASHIELL (Appointed March 18. Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE Treasurer LOUIS GUERINEAU MYERS Assistant Treasurer HARRY POTTER FISH (Resigned March 18.1914) Executivf Committee John Davison Rockefeller... JR.1914 President JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. Jr. Jr. Jr. Frederick Taylor Gates To serve until tlu annual meeting of 1015 Harry Pratt Judson Simon Flexner 160 Starr Jocelyn Murphy 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Ciiairman Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Nominating Committee Frederick Taylor Gates Harry Pratt Judson •* •» Starr Jocelyn Murphy Members To serve until (he annual meeting of 1917 Charles William Eliot Wickliffe Rose Jerome Davis Greene Alonzo Barton Hepburn Charles Otto Heydt To serve until the annual meeting of 1916 John Davison Rockefeller John Davison Rockefeller. Chairman Simon Flexner Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Charles Otto Heydt Finance Committee John Davison Rockefeller.

JR. Recording Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE Director WlCKLIFFE ROSE Assistant Director JOHN ATKINSON FERRELL Executive Committee John Davison Rockefeller.. and the following: To serve until the annual meeting of 1915 ** Wickliffe Rose Frederick Taylor Gates To serve until the annual meeting oj 1916 William Henry Welch Walter Hines Page To serve until tin annual meeting of 1917 Charles William Eliot David Franklin Houston William Crawford Gorgas 161 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . ex officio.THE INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 1913 Chairman JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. Chairman Simon Flexner Starr Jocelyn Murphy Jerome Davis Greene Charles Otto Heydt Members The members of the Executive Committee of the Rockefeller Foundation. Jr.

Jr. Platt Walker Covington 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Benjamin EarlWashburn 162 Director for the East Dr. Walter Hawthorne Rowan Director for the West Indies Dr. Joseph Hill White Director for Panama Dr. Henry Rose Carter. Louis Schapiro Director for Guatemala Dr. Hector Haldbrook Howard Substitute Director jor Trinidad Dr. Lewis Wendell Hackett Director for Nicaragua Dr.1914 Cteirman JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. JR. Victor George Heiser Director for Latin America Dr. (Resigned) Director for Costa Rica Dr. ex-cjficio. Recording Secretary JEROME DAVIS GREENE Director General WlCKLIFFE ROSE Assistant Director General JOHN ATKINSON FERRELL Director of Surveys and Exhibits ERNEST CHRISTOPHER MEYER Members The members of the Executive Committee of the Rockefeller Foundation. and the following: Wickliffe Rose To serve until the annual meeting of 1013 Frederick Taylor Gates To serve until the annual meeting of 1916 William Henry Welch Walter Hines Page To serve until the annual meeting of 1017 Charles William Eliot David Franklin Houston William Crawford Gorgas FIELD STAFF Director for Costa Rica Dr. Daniel Murrah Molloy Substitute Director Dr.

Wickliffe Rose o To serve until the annual meeting of John R. JR. Mott Wallace Buttrick Simon Flexner Frank J.CHINA MEDICAL BOARD JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER. Goodnow INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Director William Lyon Mackenzie King 163 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Jr. Chairman WALLACE BUTTRICK Director ROGER SHERMAN GREENE Resident Director in China EBEN CHARLES SAGE Secretary Members To serve until the annual meeting of igi6 Harry Pratt Judson Frederick Taylor Gates Francis Weld Peabody Starr Jocelyn Murphy To serve until the annual meeting of William Henry Welch Jerome Davis Greene John Davtson Rockefeller.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

by vote of a majority of the members of the Corporation attending such meeting. Junior. Any member may withdraw from the Corporation by a notice in writing to the President or Secretary. Rockefeller. Gates. Greene. Frederick T. equal numerically. Simon Flexner.. At T 165 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . whether as successors to those named in the Act of Incorporation or otherwise. and in every case the member shall hold office after the expiration of his term until his successor shall be chosen. The members shall be at all times divided into three classes. Rockefeller.APPENDIX II CONSTITUTION OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ARTICLE I Members HE members of the Corporation shall consist of the persons named in the first section of the Act to incorporate The Rockefeller Foundation. and the original members shall at their first meeting. shall be elected by ballot. be divided into three classes. as nearly as may be. Starr J. WicklifFe Rose. John D. m. the members of the first class to hold their membership and office until the first annual meeting. Jerome D. Murphy. Heydt. Harry Pratt Judson. New members. and such additional members as they or their successors shall see fit to associate with them. and Charles O. John D. the members of the second class until the second annual meeting.and the members of the third class until the third annual meeting. being Chapter 488 of the laws of 1913 of the State of New York. either at the annual meeting of the Corporation or at a special meeting duly called for that purpose. or as soon thereafter as may be convenient. and their successors. together with such persons as they may associate with themselves.

In case any member shall by death. delegate to other officers or to committees of their own number such powers as they may see fit. and shall add to their number. subject to the provisions of this Constitution and the By-Laws to be adopted. by general resolution. incapacity to act. If and when the number of members shall be less than nine. his successor shall be chosen to serve for the remainder of his term and until his successor shall be chosen. the members remaining shall have power to add. and all of the members of the Corporation shall be its trustees. resignation. but no act of the Corporation shall be void because at the time such act shall be done the members of the Corporation shall be less than nine. ARTICLE II Quorum A majority of the members of the Corporation shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at meetings of the Corporation.166 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION each annual meeting the successors to those members whose terms of office then expire shall be chosen for the term of three years and until their successors shall be chosen. -i ARTICLE III Trustees The number of trustees by whom the business and affairs of the Corporation shall be managed shall be the same as the number of members. All the powers of the Corporation shall be exercised by its members. and they may. until the number shall be not less than nine. and the election of any person as a member of the Corporation shall constitute him a trustee. cease to be a member during his term. or otherwise. in addition to the powers specified in this Constitution and in such By-Laws. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . *.

together with such other officers as may be determined by the By-Laws. Secretary and Treasurer. ARTICLE V „ President The President shall sustain an executive and advisory relation to the work and policies of the Corporation similar to that usually sustained by the chairman or president of commercial bodies. whether elected or appointed. At each annual meeting of the Corporation or. All the officers. The President. In his absence. then at an adjournment thereof. shall hold office at the pleasure of the Corporation.CONSTITUTION 167 ARTICLE IV Officers The officers of the Corporation shall consist of a President. He shall sign for the Corporation all deeds and other agreements and formal instruments. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . These officers shall have the duties and exercise the powers assigned to them by this Constitution or by the By-Laws. In the absence or disability of the President he may by written instrument appoint a member of the Corporation to discharge such of his functio'ns as he may assign to such appointee. but in no case beyond the time when their respective successors shall be elected and accept office. ex-officio. the members of the Corporation present shall appoint one of their own number to preside. Secretary and Treasurer. and it may choose such other officers as the By-Laws shall from time to time provide. except as herein otherwise provided. the Corporation shall elect by ballot a President. He shall preside at all meetings of the Corporation at which he shall be present. or at any meeting duly called for that purpose. in default of election at such meeting. or by resolutions adopted pursuant to the authority of this Constitution or the By-Laws. He shall appoint all committees unless otherwise ordered by the Corporation. shall be a member of all committees.

herein otherwise provided. At each meeting he shall present an account showing in detail the receipts of the property belonging to the Corporation and of all disbursements thereof since his last report. showing at all times the amount of funds belonging to the Corporation. and other books. Immediately upon the election and appointment of members he shall give notice to them of their election or appointment. and attesting the same. which shall be at all times open to the inspection of the members of the Corporation. He shall be ex-omcio a member of all committees except as. and shall also have the disbursement of its money. subject to such regulations as may from time to time be prescribed by the Corporation. ARTICLE VII Secretary The Secretary shall conduct the correspondence of the Corporation except as otherwise provided in the By-Laws or by resolution of the Corporation. He shall be the medium of communication with the Corporation. including all bonds.!68 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ARTICLE VI Treasurer The Treasurer. He shall keep proper books of account. deeds and other papers and documents relating to such property. He shall keep the records of all committees of which he is a member. He shall have the custody of the corporate seal. shall have the custody of the funds and securities of the Corporation. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . or as provided by resolution of the members of the Corporation. He shall not pay any money except in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws. or the authority of the Executive Committee. He shall give notice of and attend all meetings of the Corporation. taking minutes of the proceedings and transcribing them in a book provided for that purpose.

the amount applied. At this meeting the Trustees of the Corporation shall present a report. Rockefeller. verified by the President and Treasurer.CONSTITUTION 189 ARTICLE VIII Meetings The annual meeting of the Corporation shall be held on the Wednesday next preceding the fourth Thursday of January in each year. appropriated or expended during the year immediately preceding such date. shall ipso facto 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . stated meetings of the Corporation shall be held on the Wednesday next preceding the fourth Thursday of May and October in each -year. appropriations or expenditures have been made. showing the whole amount of real and personal property owned by the Corporation. objects or persons to and for which such applications. or by a majority of the Trustees. unexcused. All meetings shall be held at such time and place in the City of New York. The President or any three members of the Corporation may call a special meeting of the Corporation by not less than five days* written notice given by the President or the Secretary. which report shall be filed with the records of the Corporation and an abstract thereof entered in the minutes of the proceedings of the annual meeting. shall be absent from three consecutive stated meetings. In addition to the annual meeting. If any member of the Corporation. John D. and the purposes. other than Mr. or elsewhere. or the members calling such meeting. as the Corporation shall from time to time order or direct. In the absence of such direction. and the manner of the acquisition. the amount and nature of the property acquired during the year immediately preceding the date of the report. and the names and places of residence of the persons who have been admitted to membership in the Corporation during such year. and where and how invested. the meetings shall be held at the office of the Corporation in the City of New York. such absence. where located.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . provided that written notice has been sent to every member of the Corporation at least ten days in advance of the date of meeting. ARTICLE IX Committees The Corporation may by By-Laws provide for such committees and may delegate to such committees such power as it shall deem wise. Any member of the Corporation may by writing or telegram appoint any other member of the Corporation to act as his proxy at any one or more specified meetings of the Corporation. stating specifically the proposed amendment. and the vacancy so caused shall be filled as herein provided. ARTICLE X Amendments This Constitution may be altered or amended by a majority vote of the members present at any dulycalled meeting of the Corporation.170 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION be deemed a resignation of membership of the Corporation.

from time to time. which are not herewith otherwise provided for. notes or other forms of investment held by the Corporation. A quorum for the transaction of business shall consist of three members. but T in 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . It shall direct and control the purchase of all supplies and the audit of all bills. reporting its action to the Corporation at the next meeting. The Executive Committee shall be elected by the Corporation at the annual meeting by ballot. This Committee shall have power to make investments and to change the same. all the members of this Committee shall be consulted when this is reasonably practicable. and may from time to time sell any part of the bonds. shares. The Committee shall elect its Chairman and shall make such rules and regulations as. ARTICLE II There shall be a Finance Committee consisting of three members of the Corporation. In making investments or changes of in vestments. except those specifically vested in the Finance Committee as herein provided. to be elected by the Corporation at the annual meeting by ballot. This Committee shall have and may exercise all the powers of the Corporation when the Corporation is not in session. it may deem proper for its own government and for the transaction of business of which it may have charge. or any rights or privileges that may accrue thereon. The President and Secretary shall not be ex-officio members of this Committee.APPENDIX III BY-LAWS OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ARTICLE I HERE shall be a standing committee of three members of the Corporation who with the President and Secretary shall be the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee may fill vacancies in its own number or in the Finance Committee in the interim of the Corporation meetings.

172 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the Committee shall be deemed to be in continuous session. and such other officers as may be deemed necessary. and also regarding members or officers to be chosen to fill vacancies which may occur during the year. and may act without formal notice of meeting. The same person may be appointed to hold two or more of said offices. the Executive Committee may by resolution appoint one or more assistant treasurers. officers and elective committees who are to be elected at the annual meeting next ensuing. It shall keep regular minutes of its meetings and shall make report to the members of the Corporation of all investments and changes of investments made by it. a cashier. It shall be the duty of this Committee to make recommendations regarding members. The President and the Secretary shall not be ex-officio members of this Committee. All such officers shall hold office at the pleasure of the Corporation. ARTICLE IV The Corporation at any stated meeting. one or more assistant secretaries. and shall have such powers and be subject to such restrictions as shall be set forth in the resolution appointing them. or at any special meeting called for that purpose or when the Corporation is not in session. The Committee shall elect its Chairman and shall make such rules and regulations as from time to time it may deem proper for its own government and for the transaction of business of which it may have charge. to be elected by the Corporation each year at the October meeting by ballot. and the joint action of any two members shall be valid and binding. but in no case beyond the time when their respective successors shall be elected and accept office. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . ARTICLE III There shall be a Nominating Committee consisting of three members of the Corporation.

the Assistant Treasurer and such of the Assistant Secretaries as shall be designated for that purpose by resolution of the Corporation or the Executive Committee. the Treasurer. who shall be bonded at the expense of the Corporation for such sum as the Executive Committee shall fix. and such member of the Corporation as the President shall designate in writing for that purpose.000) on deposit at any one time may be opened with such depository as may be designated by the Executive Committee. provided that there shall always be two of the foregoing present. No bills shall be paid except those which have been incurred pursuant to a resolution of the Corporation or under the authority of the Executive Committee. which shall be subject to draft upon the signature of the Cashier of the Corporation.BY-LAWS 173 ARTICLE V The Treasurer shall deposit the funds of the Corporation in such banks or trust companies as may from time to time be designated by the Executive Committee. Such deposits of funds shall be made subject to draft only on the signatures of any two of the following officers: President. Access to the vaults may be had and the contents thereof may be withdrawn by members of the Corporation. Treasurer. A current expense account of not to exceed Five thousand dollars ($5. The securities of the Corporation shall be deposited in some suitable safe deposit vault or vaults approved by the Executive Committee. which voucher shall be signed by the Secretary or by such of the Assistant Secretaries as shall be designated by resolution of the Corporation or the Executive ^ Committee. and such bills shall be paid only on a voucher approving the same for payment and referring to the specific resolution or authorization pursuant to which they were respectively incurred. Assistant Treasurer. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Either the President or the Treasurer may execute and deliver on behalf of the Corporation from time to time proxies on any and all stock owned by the Corporation. viz. appointing such person or persons as they shall deem proper to represent and vote the stock owned by the Corporation at any and all meetings of stockholders. whether general or special. and to alter and rescind such appointments at such time and as often as they see fit.174 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ARTICLE VI Any two of the following persons. And a Corporation transferring any such stocks. or other registered securities pursuant to a form of transfer or assignment so executed shall be fully protected and shall be under no duty to inquire whether or not the Finance Committee has taken action in respect thereof. ARTICLE VIII No part of the principal of the funds of the Foundation shall be distributed except pursuant to a resolution. Treasurer and Assistant Treasurer and members of the Finance Committee shall have authority to execute under seal such form of transfer and assignment as may be customary or necessary to constitute a regular transfer of any stocks or other registered securities standing in the Corporation's name. or otherwise. passed by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all those who shall at the time be members of the Foundation at a special meeting held on not less than thirty days' notice given in writing to each member of the Foundation which shall state that 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .: President. shall be in writing and shall be either personally delivered or mailed to the members of the Corporation at their addresses as entered in the office of the Secretary of the Corporation. ARTICLE VII Notices All notices required by these By-Laws. for the purpose of the Corporation. Secretary. with full power of substitution.

stating specifically the proposed amendment. o 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .BY-LAWS 175 the meeting is called for the purpose of considering a resolution to authorize the distribution of the whole or some part of the principal of its funds. provided that written notice has been sent to every member of the Corporation at least ten (10) days in advance of the date of meeting. ARTICLE IX Amendments These articles may be altered or amended by a majority vote of the members present at any duly called meeting of the Corporation.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

this trust shall 177 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Three million two hundred thousand dollars ($3. if living.200. to said corporation. and upon said transfer. or otherwise pursuant to . Starr J. or having broad general o objects substantially the same as those above stated." but subject to the condition that " In case there shall be created during said period. to my son. Junior. Greene and Edward L. namely: to "apply the income and such portion or the whole of the principal as they may deem proper to such charitable use or uses as they may from time to time select and in such proportions respectively as they may determine. for the following purpose. John D. 1913.000) par value First Mortgage Gold Bonds were given by him to John D. Jerome D. including any unappropriated income therefrom. the statement of the objects and the other provisions of the act or instrument incorporating said corporation being satisfactory to me. Rockefeller. January 6. in the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge. if I shall not be living. Ballard. Rockefeller. Murphy. Jr. in the prevention and relief of suffering and in the promotion by eleemosynary and philanthropic means of any and all of the elements of human progress. or. a corporation having as its objects to promote the wellbeing and to advance the civilization of the peoples of the United States and its territories and possessions and of foreign lands.law.APPENDIX IV LETTERS OF GIFT. Rockefeller. said trustees shall forthwith convey the said trust property.. I By a Deed of Trust created by Mr. Trustees. either by act of Congress or by act of the legislature of any State. or so much thereof as shall then remain in the hands of the trustees. John D.

Junior." The provisions of the Act to Incorporate the Rockefeller Foundation as passed by the Legislature of the State of New York. "Jerome D. Murphy. thus establishing the first funds for the uses of the Foundation. Rockefeller. John D. entitled An Act to Incorporate The Rockefeller Foundation. Rockefeller in accordance with the terms of the Deed of Trust above mentioned. and that the statement of the objects and the other provisions of said act incorporating The Rockefeller Foundation are satisfactory to me. "Starr J. formally transferred the bonds in their possession to the Rockefeller Foundation. were formally approved by Mr.178 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION terminate. (Signed) John D. and the trustees shall be released from all further liability by reason of this trust. I do hereby certify that The Rockefeller Foundation as incorporated by the statute above named has broad general objects substantially the same as those stated in the Deed of Trust from me to you. Greene. known as Chapter 488 of the Laws of 1913. May 14. Murphy. dated January 6. Ballard. May 20th. Mr. on behalf of the Trustees above mentioned. Starr J. "Gentlemen:— "The Rockefeller Foundation having been incorporated by an Act of Legislature of the State of New York. 1913. and "Edward L. John D." At the meeting of the Rockefeller Foundation May 22. as follows: "Messrs. 1913. 1913. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rockefeller. 1913. "Very truly yours.

(Signed) JOHN D.028. but in order to relieve you from any uncertainty or embarrassment with regard to them I desire to state specifically that you are under no obligation to retain any of these investments. ROCKEFELLER. based on the market prices of June 4th. Rockefeller's subsequent gifts were communicated by the following letters:— II June 14. Very truly yours. and the principal as well as the income may be used in your discretion for any of the corporate purposes of the Foundation.LETTERS OF GIFT . fifty-two thousand.052. John D. 26 Broadway. Gentlemen:— I hereby give you the stocks and bonds shown in the accompanying statement. of a total value. but are at liberty to dispose of them or any of them and change the form of investment whenever in your judgment it seems wise to do so. of Twenty-one million. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . This gift is made for the general corporate purposes of the Foundation. twenty-eight dollars and fifty-four cents ($21. 1913. It is more convenient for me to provide funds for the Foundation by a gift of these specific securities rather than by a gift of cash. 179 Mr. The Rockefeller Foundation. 1913.54). and I believe the securities have intrinsic and permanent value which would justify you in retaining them as investments. New York City.

based on the market prices of June 4th. 1913.180 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION III Forest Hill. The Rockefeller Foundation. of a total value. No.00). This gift is made for the general corporate'purposes of the Foundation.402. It is more convenient for me to provide funds for the Foundation by a gift of these specific securities rather than by a gift of cash. but are at liberty to dispose of them or any of them and change the form of investment whenever in your judgment it seems wise to do so. four hundred and two dollars ($10. Cleveland. ROCKEFELLER. New York City. and the principal as well as the income may be used in your discretion for any of the corporate purposes of the Foundation. (Signed) JOHN D. of about Ten million.178. Gentlemen:— I hereby give you the stocks shown in the accompanying statement. and I believe the securities have intrinsic and permanent value which would justify you in retaining them as an investment. Ohio. but. Enclosure. Very truly yours. 1913. June 27th. one hundred seventy-eight thousand. 26 Broadway. in order to relieve you from any uncertainty or embarrassment with regard to them I desire to state specifically that you are under no obligation to retain any of these investments. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Subject to the foregoing provision. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .LETTERS OP GIFT IV 181 March 6th. but you are at liberty to dispose of any or all of them and to change the form of investment whenever in your judgment it seems wise to do so.ooo). forty-six cents ($65. (Signed) JOHN D. of a total value at the market price of March I.000 which I have not thus designated during that fiscal year. ROCKEFELLER. 26 Broadway.46). of Sixty-five million. such balance shall be transferred to the general unrestricted income of the Foundation.000. making with the amounts heretofore given by me to the Rockefeller Foundation. to be used as the Foundation shall see fit.000.569. annually. 1914.569. In my opinion the great majority of these securities have intrinsic and permanent value which would justify you in retaining them. shall be applied during my lifetime to such specific objects within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as I may from time to time direct.000). less the interest accrued and the dividends declared thereon to date. Gentlemen:— I hereby give you. five hundred sixty-nine thousand. It is a condition of this gift that from the income of the Foundation the sum of Two million dollars ($2. Very truly.000. New York City. or so much thereof as I shall designate. If at the close of any fiscal year there shall remain any balance of the $2. the securities shown in the accompanying statement. The Rockefeller Foundation. 1914. five hundred sixty-nine dollars. the principal as well as the income of this gift may be used in your discretion for any of the corporate purposes of the Foundation. One hundred million dollars ($100.

Rockefeller's life discontinue paying the income to that Society. Gentlemen:— At the request of Mrs. ROCKEFELLER The Foundation has received gifts of securities amounting in par value to Forty-eight thousand dollars ($48. John D. Should it at any time during Mrs. or if after her death the Foundation shall determine that it is not wise to continue to apply the income to the Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York or such other object as she has designated. If three months after the Foundation has advised her in writing'of its purpose to discontinue the further payment of income to the beneficiary last designated by her she shall not have appointed in writing another beneficiary. 619255 to 19256 inclusive. New York. JOHN 0. 1913. due 1934. the Foundation may then determine to what object the income of the fund shall 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 26 Broadway. June 7th. The Rockefeller Foundation. Rockefeller (Laura Spelman Rockefeller).182 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION GIFTS FROM MRS. Convertible Gold Bonds. John D.) Rockefeller. Laura S. numbers 619272 to 19279 inclusive. These gifts were communicated by the following letters: I 26 Broadway. (Mrs. it is to pay it to such other object within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as she shall designate. I herewith hand you ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. New York City. the income to be paid as it accrues to the Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York so long as in the judgment of the Foundation it is wise so to do.000) from Mrs.

The Foundation is to have the power. New York City. Series A. numbers 12617. the income to be paid as it accrues to The Baptist Home of Northern Ohio. The Rockefeller Foundation. September nth. New York. 1913. Ohio. it is to pay it to such other object within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as I shall designate. in its discretion. Very truly yours. of Cleveland. 12645 and 10120. or if after my death the Foundation shall determine that it is not wise to continue to apply the income to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and may also in its discretion dispose of the principal. 12644. (Signed) STARR J. 12642. If three months after the Foundation has advised me in writing of its purpose to discontinue the further payment of income to the beneficiary last designated by me I shall not have appointed in writing another beneficiary. but the bonds and their proceeds shall be kept upon its books as a separate fund. 12656. due 1934. 12620. II 26 Broadway. Should it at any time during my life discontinue paying the income to that society. for the support and maintenance of the Residents of the Home so long as in the judgment of the Foundation it is wise so to do. Convertible Gold Bonds. Gentlemen:— I herewith hand you ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. MURPHY. to sell these bonds and reinvest the proceeds and to change the investment from time to time as it deems wise. 12643.LETTERS OF GIFT 183 thereafter be applied. 12618. 26 Broadway. 12619.

due 1934. A-3892-95. A-977I-73. Gentlemen:— I herewith hand you thirty Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. so long as in the judgment of the Foundation it Is wise so to do. 6-23711. A-9557. The Rockefeller Foundation. (Signed) LAURA S.184 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The Baptist Home of Northern Ohio or such other object as I have designated. to sell these bonds and reinvest the proceeds and to change the investment from time to time as it deems wise. 1913. Very truly yours. If three months after the Foundation has advised me jn writing of its purpose to discontinue the further payment of income to the beneficiary last designated by me I shall not have appointed in writing another beneficiary. numbers 6-18143-49. The Foundation is to have the power. and may also in its discretion dispose of the principal. it is to pay it to such other object within the corporate purposes of the Foundation as I shall designate. the Foundation may then determine to what object the income of the fund shall thereafter be applied. 26 Broadway. Ohio. 6-19308. Should it at any time during my life discontinue paying the income to that Church. Ohio. New York City. but the bonds and their proceeds shall be kept upon its books as a separate fund. or if after my death the Foundation shall determine that it is not wise to continue to apply the income to the Euclid Avenue 6aptist Church of Cleveland. Ill November 29th. or such other object 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6-19216. the income to be paid as it accrues to the Euclid Avenue Baptist Church of Cleveland. ROCKEFELLER. A-9269-8o. in its discretion. Convertible Gold Bonds.

ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. Very truly yours. ROCKEFELLER. The income only is to be available for the uses of the " Society. the Foundation may then determine to what object the income of the fund shall thereafter be applied. New York. Convertible Gold Bonds of the par value of One thousand dollars each. Gentlemen:— Mrs. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rockefeller heretofore delivered to the Equitable Trust Company of New York. (Signed) LAURA S. The Society is to have the right to alter the form of investment. but such change shall not be merely for the purpose of increasing the income of the fund. you are to receive and retain the proceeds of these bonds and the new securities in which the proceeds shall be invested. December 9th. In case of such change of investment. The Rockefeller Foundation. IV. New York City. in its discretion. The Foundation is to have the power. to sell these bonds and reinvest the proceeds and to change the investment from time to time as it deems wise. and to be applied for maintenance purposes. The principal of the trust is not to be liable for the debts of the corporation. provided that in the judgment of its trustees this is necessary for the safety of the fund. and may also in its discretion dispose of the principal. John D.LETTERS OF GIFT 185 as I have designated. 1913. 26 Broadway. on the following trust:— "These are given to you in trust to hold and collect the income and to pay the same as collected to The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York for the support of the residents of the Home. and is not to be hypothecated for any purpose whatever.

of buildings on the foreign field. Convertible Gold Bonds in trust^for this Society. "Mrs. Rockefeller Foundation in place of your Company as Trustee of the trusts under which she has heretofore delivered to you ten Colorado Industrial Company five per cent. Rockefeller's representative. to be used for the erection . numbers 4942-5." Subsequently Mrs. being bonds. Rockefeller expressed a desire to substitute the Rockefeller Foundation as Trustee in place of the Equitable Trust Company. "The Equitable Trust Company of New York. consented to the substitution of The." . but is to be collected and applied^ only as it accrues.> I understand these bonds have been delivered to you by the Equitable Trust Company. these securities and their proceeds are to become the property of and to be delivered to the Woman's Foreign Baptist Mission Society of Boston. "Mrs. 1913. as Mrs. and this was consented to by the Trustees of the Baptist Home Society of the City of New York. Steeves. "THE BAPTIST HOME SOCIETY. and oblige. 12611-16. John F. Will you kindly send me. President. "Very truly yours. Secretary.186 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The income is not to be anticipated. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 37 Wall Street. Jacob Hayes. "Gentlemen:— "The Baptist Home Society of the City of New York has. We hereby request you tc deliver the same to the Rockefeller Foundation. a certified copy of the resolution accepting this trust. Laura S. Rockefeller. December 2nd. (Signed) STARR J. and the officers of the Society wrote a letter to the Equitable Trust Company as follows:— New York. MURPHY. at the request of Mrs. New York City. "In case the Baptist Home Society of the City of New York shall be dissolved^ or its operations shall be discontinued. Yours very truly. It was understood that the income should be paid to the beneficiaries free from any charges on the part of the Trustee.

all gifts or property received by 187 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . In that year.APPENDIX V THE PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER OF THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The idea of establishing such a body as the Rockefeller Foundation had been discussed and various plans considered for some time previous to 1910. (Hearing on S. but that it should be subject to termination and to the distribution of its funds at some period in the future. it was introduced in the United States Senate (S. at any time. 2nd session. The publication of the terms of the proposed charter was followed by wide public discussion. 6888. At a hearing held by the Committee on the District of Columbia. the significant changes being as follows: (l) Congress might. 26755 62nd Congress). Starr J. 1910. the bill was redrawn and introduced in 1911 (S. and the following amendments were urged: That there should be some limitation on the power of members of the Corporation to elect their successors. March 11. and a report of the hearing was printed. its purposes were described at length by Mr. finally. 6ist Congress. that there should be a limit to the amount of money that could be heaped up for purposes subject to so broad a definition as that given by the charter. that the control of the Foundation should be more specifically vested in Congress. 6888. 1910. As a result of the consideration of these suggestions. Murphy.6ist Congress). to which the bill had been referred. that the Foundation should not necessarily be perpetual. and. impose such limitations upon the objects of the Corporation as the public interest might demand. a bill providing for a Federal charter was drawn up on lines similar to those of the General Education Board's charter.) The bill was favorably reported. and on March 2. however.

subject only to such reasonable delay as may be necessary in the wise administration of the fund. but to be currently applied to the purposes for which the Corporation was created. (2) The income of the Corporation not to be accumulated or added to the principal.000. for the general purposes of the Foundation. exclusive of increases in the value of property subsequent to its receipt. the President of the Senate. The foregoing changes. in view of the fact that Congress could at any time amend or teiminate the charter if it should appear that the suggested limitations were needed. Yale University. as well as the income. with the consent of two-thirds of the members of the Corporation. (4) The self-perpetuating clause modified by the provision that the election of new members of the Corporation should be subject to disapproval within sixty days by a majority of the following persons: The President of the United States.1S8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the Corporation to be held subject to this provision. Columbia University. and the Presidents of the following institutions: Harvard University. the Speaker of the House of Representatives.000. a clause was added clearly limiting to the United States or any Territory or District thereof the provisions of the exempting clause. the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. (5) To make it clear that the charter did not attempt to exempt from taxation property that would otherwise be taxable under the laws of any state in which it might be held. while not regarded as necessary by the incorporators. the principal. (3) After the expiration of fifty years from the receipt of any property the Corporation might distribute. such distribution to take place after one hundred years from the time the property was received. The total amount of property specifically limited to $100. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . if Congress should so direct. Johns Hopkins University. and the University of Chicago.

Its position on the calendar in the closing weeks of the 6znd Congress and at a time when a number of the great public supply bills were being obstructed in their passage. 1913. by eleemosynary and philanthropic means. of any and all the elements of human progress". February 19. made it impossible for the bill to come to a vote. the bill was unanimously reported by the Judiciary Committee of the House (H. n. 529. Report No. Apr. where it was favorably reported by the Judiciary Committee. however. The proposed Federal Charter. 2675. to advance the consideration of the bill until in 1912 it was re-introduced in the House of Representatives (H. No further effort was made to obtain a charter by act of Congress. and was passed by a majority of more than two-thirds (152 to 65) on January 20. and steps were then taken to secure incorporation under the laws of the State of New York. which was accomplished without opposition in any quarter. Report No. After passing the House the bill went to the Senate. Thus modified. on May 14. some of them actually failing to pass and going over to the incoming Congress. 1912). in the form in which it was passed by the House of Representatives is printed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1913 (S. 8) the minimum number of members was increased from five to nine with the additional provision that no gifts should be made when the number of members should for any cause be less than nine. 3) the House bill amended the phrase " and in the promotion of any and all the elements of human progress" to read "and in the promotion.PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 189 were nevertheless cordially accepted as not likely to interfere with any of the purposes of the Foundation. No effort was made. 1258). 21532) in a form identical with S. R. and in the section relating to the membership of the Corporation (Sec. with the following exceptions: In the statement of the purposes of the Foundation (Sec.

Wickliffe Rose and Charles 0. in the prevention and relief of suffering. bequests. save as hereinafter provided. Starr J. SEC. Edwin A. or prop" erty at any time received or held by said corporation shall be received and held subject to the terms of this proviso and to the terms and limitations which may be imposed by any Act of Congress hereafter passed with reference thereto. Junior. A BILL TO INCORPORATE THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 62nd Congress. together with such persons as they may associate with themselves. 3. That the Congress of the United States may at any time impose such limitations upon the objects of tJte said corporation as it may deem the public inter" est demands^ and any and all gifts. Harry Pratt Judson. 21. be. That the object of the said corporation shall be to promote the well-being and to advance the civilization of the peoples of the United States and its Territories and possessions and of foreign lands in the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge. the portions in italics embodying the important changes from the original Senate bill (S. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled. 6888). Rockefeller. Simon Flexner. Gates. and in the promotion." and by that name it shall have perpetual succession. 2nd Session. Alderman. That the name of such body corporate shall be "The Rockefeller Foundation. Heydt. Peters. John D. R. and they hereby are. Rockefeller.532 As Introduced by Mr. H. March 8. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . SEC. 1912. That John D. and their successors. by eleemosynary and philanthropic meant) of any and all of the elements of* human progress: Provided) however. constituted a body corporate of the District of Columbia. devises. 2.ISO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION below. Frederick T. Murphy.

and to hold. and to publish and distribute books. to sue and be sued in any court of the United States or other court of competent jurisdiction. make. bequest!. to take or receive. or purchase. associations. however^ That the total amount of property field at any one time. or of real or personal estate for any purpose within the object of the corporation as aforesaid: Provided. to accept and administer any trust of money. and any of them. or lease the same for its corporate purposes. shall not exceed the value of one hundred million dollars? exclusive of increases in the value of property subsequent to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . sell. or to aid others. to employ and aid others to employ teachers. assistants. and to acquire. and equip buildings and other structures necessary or convenient for said objects. improve. and in general to do and perform all things necessary or convenient for the promotion of the object of the corporation. maintain. lecturers. and endow institutions. That for the promotion of such objects the said corporation shall have power to establish. bequest. association. to collect statistics and information. grant. and reports containing the same. whether by gift. which shall at any time be held by the said corporation hereby constituted.the same at its pleasure. or corporation engaged in similar work money or property. and agents. or devise by which the said corporation shall have received the same. transfer. and furnish all necessary or convenient apparatus and other accessories. That the said corporation shall further have power to have and use a common seal and to alter and change . to donate to any individual. any real or personal estate. and other agencies for carrying on said objects. 4. SEC. enlarge. real or personal. hire. grant. devise. grant. and endow. or any of them. hold.PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 191 SEC. to purchase. documents. including that which is held absolutely as well as that which is held in trust. and to erect. convey. whether individuals. and convey real estate necessary or convenient for the said corporate objects. subject to the terms of any gift. to establish. maintain. or corporations. 5.

J. The enumeration of special powers in this Act shall be deemed to be by way of amplification and not by way of limitation of the general powers hereby granted. sale. assignment.192 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION its receipt by said corporation. subject to the provisions of this Act. That the income of the property of the said corporation shall not be accumulated or added to the principal. grant. devise. or corporation for any of the said purposes for which the said corporation is hereby incorporated. which shall state that the meeting is called for the purpose of considering a resolution to authorize the distribution of the whole or some part of the principal of said funds. and agents. officers. and after 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . transfer. or any part thereof. but shall be currently applied to the purposes for which the corporation is created. real or personal. or personal estate shall be acquired or received by the said corporation. and for the grant. society. for the purchase. Sec. to make by-laws. "afwett as the income thereof. in furtherance of the objects of said corporation. at a special meeting held on not less than thirty days' notice. 6. or bequest. gwen in writing. to any individual. for the investment and control of its funds. provided such action shall be authorized by a resolution passed by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all those who shall at the time be members of the corporation. whether by deed. the said corporation may distribute the principal. or donation of any or all property of the said corporation. subject only to such reasonable delay as may be necessary in the wise administration of the fund. That at any time after the expiration of fifty years from the receipt by the said corporation of any property. for the admission or exclusion of its members. by by-laws or otherwise. and otherwise generally for the management of the property and the transaction of the business of the corporation. Sec. to prescribe. for the casting of votes by its members or trustees by proxy. management. or transfer of its property. the terms and conditions upon which money. for the election of its trustees. real estate.

the members remaining shall have power to add. by reason of such membership or his trusteeship. or bequests to the corporation shall be taken and held subject to the provisions of this section. and all gifts. or as soon thereafter as shall be convenient. SEC. and that in every case the member shall hold office after the expiration of his term until his successor shall be chosen: And provided further. devises. association. That in case any 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the members of the first class to hold their membership and office until the expiration of one year. except that no gift to any individual. That the members of the corporation shall be notless than nine in number and not more than twenty-five. that all the members of the corporation shall be its trustees. that no member of the said corporation shall. be personally liable for any of its debts or obligations. however. from the thirtieth day of June next after the enactment of this law. institution. the members of the second class until the expiration of two years. as may be prescribed by the by-laws of the corporation: Provided. grants. 8. That the members shall be at all times divided into three classes. That if and when the number of members shall be less then nine. or corporation shall be made when the number of members is less than nine. if so directed to do by the Congress of the United States.PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 193 the expiration of one hundred years from the date of its receipt by said corporation the said corporation shall distribute the principal in furtherance of the objects of said corporation. that each member of the corporation shall hold his membership for a term of three years and until his successor shall be chosen: Provided. and the members of the third class until the expiration of three years. to their number until the number shall be not less than nine: And provided. and that the original members shall at their first meeting. equal numerically as nearly as may be. be divided into three classes. and shall add. That no act of the corporation shall be void because at the time such act shall be done the number of the members of the corporation shall be less than nine.

but it shall become effective if and when it shall be approved by such majority. incapacity to act. except reasonable compensation 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Columbia University. member. Connecticut. New York City. or invested for its purposes as aforesaid. but before such election shall become effective. but offices may be maintained and meetings of the corporation.other places as the by-laws may from time to time designate. and committees may be held in such . 12. SEC. or otherwise. written notice thereof shall be mailed by said corporation to each of the following-named persons at his official postoffice address.194 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION member shall. Johns Hopkins University. shall be exempt from taxation by the United States or any Territory or District thereof. trustee. the trustees. Yale University. That the principal office of the corporation shall be located in the District of Columbia. If such election shall be disapproved by a majority of the persons above named. Illinois. by death. 10. New Haven. resignation. Sec. Chicago. Cambridge. namely: The President of the United States. or to produce income to be used for such purposes. and the presidents of the following institutions. his successor may be chosen to serve for the remainder of such term and until his successor shall be chosen. That no officer. and the University of Chicago. itshallbe void. SEC.the President of the Senate. n. the Speaker of the House of Representatives. or at the expiration of sixty days from the mailing of suck notices if it shall not have been disapproved by such majority. That all personal property and funds of the corporation held. New York. g. cease to be a member during his term. the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. namely: Harvard University. That the successors to the incorporators named herein and the additional members of the corporation and their successors shall be elected by the members of the corporation for the time being. Massachusetts. Maryland. SEC. Baltimore. used. or employee of said corporation shall receive any pecuniary benefit from the operations thereof.

SEC. Sec. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .PROPOSED FEDERAL CHARTER 195 for services in effecting one or more of the purposes of the corporation. held by the corporation. 14. That the corporation shall annually file with the Secretary of the Interior of the United States a report in writing. stating in detail the property. That this Act shall take effect immediately on its passage. and the expenditure or other use or disposition of the same or of the income thereof during the preceding year. amendment. i$. SEC* 13. real and personal. or repeal at the pleasure of the Congress of the United States. That this charter shall be subject to alteration.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

..122.82 $ 13.. to January I. Treasurer's office .000 00 994.32 36...06 5...292........... /p/4..80 ..... 191$ Administration Expenses: Traveling Secretary's office Treasurer's office International Health Commission Investigation of Industrial Relations China Medical Commission: Conference Commission China Medical Board Purchase of Bird Refuge in Louisiana Research in Governmental Problems War Relief 81..618.. International Health Commission $65........ to January /..19 1...........50 56 ....13 ° 107 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .411 ... jpij..20 January /.20 58..230....886.421....031 81 $ 780..70 89. Secretary's office .95 10.....731.828.613 06 81..68 11.APPENDIX VI EXPENDITURES I DIRECT EXPENDITURES BY THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ON ACCOUNT OF APPROPRIATIONS May 2p. Administration Expenses: Traveling ...96 2. $ 18050 9........237...651.64 35....69 133.......96 224...489...162.

beginning January i. the building to serve as a permanent headquarters.1913—To the American Red Cross as a contribution toward the acquisition of a site in the District of Columbia and the erection thereon of a memorial to commemorate the services of the women of the United States in caring for the sick and wounded in the Civil War.000.000.640. $700. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .$1:00.1914—To the American Academy in Rome an appropriation of $10. 5. 21.000. 20. 1914. 10.198 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION II APPROPRIATIONS TO OTHER AGENCIES The following appropriations have been made by the Rockefeller Foundation from the time of its establishment to December 31.640. 108.000.000.000 a year for a period often years. 8.1913—Through the Bureau of Social Hygiene a sum not exceeding $720 a month during the year 1914 as a contribution toward the support of the diagnostic laboratory _and clinics for venereal diseases maintained by the Department of Health of the City of New York Total appropriations in 1913 Reserved for payments due in future Payments in 1913 $100. 8. upon condition that the entire sum needed. namely. . 1914:— 19*3 Dec.640. 1914 Jan. be raised Dec. for the general purposes of the Academy To the American Red Cross for the relief of sufFeringin Bulgaria 100.

000. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . a sum of $5. Aug.000) a year To Wellesley College toward a fund of Two million dollars ($2.000.. 13.000 a year for five years.000.EXPENDITURES 199 Jan. 29... 10. upon condition that the contribution of the Rockefeller Foundation in any year shall be payable only upon the execution of other pledges to the amount of at least Ten thousand dollars ($10.000) so as to assure a budget of not less than Fifteen thousand dollars($i 5. 10.000.000) for buildings and endowment..1914—To the Bureau of Municipal Research for carrying on its work in New York City for the remainder of the current calendar year To the American Association for the Conservation of Vision. 30.000.1914—To the American Red Cross as a contribution toward the cost of sending physicians and nurses to Europe under the auspices of the American Red Cross. 1915. 450. 750.1914—To the Committee of Reference ana Counsel of the Annual Foreign Missions Conference of North America for the carrying out of a program of cooperation and coordination in the foreign missionary work of the principal American Mission Boards a pledge of May 27. 25^000.1914—To the Tohoku Kyushu Saigai Kyusaikai of Japan (Relief Society for the Calamities in the Northeastern Districts and Kyushu) April 16.000. or to such organization as should represent the merger of that Association with the New York Committee for the Prevention of Blindness. on condition that the full amount be subscribed in good and responsible pledges on or before January i.

..000.....000.00 Reserved for Payments due in future ... 8...000.471.120..645..00 $182... for studies relating to the State Government preparatory to the Constitutional Convention of 1915 Dec..... 1014—To the Bureau of Municipal Research of New York City.53 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 10.. SjOoo.. due to the war and the industrial depression To the Chanty Organization Society as a special contribution in view of the unusual amount of distress in the city... 21.000..... 3.. 10. a sum of $20....... due to the war and the industrial depression To the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities as a special contribution in view of the unusual amount of distress in the city..200 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION To the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor....000.519. due to the war and the industrial depression 200.... $1.. 1. as a contribution to help the Association in its work of providing pensions for dependent widows with families. 10.. Total Payments 1914 . Paid on account 1913 Appropriations .000 a year for a period not to exceed ten years Sept.. 1914—To the New York Milk Committee as a special gift toward the expenses of the current year in view of the serious diminution in the receipts of the Committee from sources usually depended upon Oct.....47 Payments in 1914 .. Total Appropriations in 1914 ..... 25.... 25...640..1914—To the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor as a special contribution in view of the unusual amount of distress in the city..000...

1914.500. Should the International Committee carry out the plan for adding ten new workers at an additional cost of $20.EXPENDITURES III 201 FOUNDER'S REQUISITIONS.500 To Mr. Fancher. Treasurer. Under this heading are recorded gifts for objects within the corporate purposes of the Foundation. John D. for the relief of the families dependent on the men of the S. See page 181 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000. as a contribution to its foreign work for the fiscal year ending December 31. Thomas S. under the direction of the New York General Committee on the Newfoundland Sealing Disaster. B. 1914.S. 124 East 28th Street.900 and the additional $17. payable at any time during the year. when notified of the raising of regular budget of $438. Bowring. payment to be made on or about June 24.000. and raise $17. McLane. after having raised the budget of £438. for expenditure. as a contribution toward their work for the present fiscal year 1 $ 1. Treasurer. designated by Mr. The New York Milk Committee. 1914—To Mr. 105 East 22nd Street. New York City.S.000. H.Newfoundland. Southern Cross and the S.* May 4.who recently perished or were disabled at sea To Mr. Charles W. International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations. Rockefeller.500 additional. Treasurer. 4. ° 32. New York City.the Foundation will makeafurther contribution of $2. in accordance with the terms of his letter of gift.900 for work already undertaken.500. dated March 6.

1914 To the Prison Association of New York. with the stipulation that no part of Mr.. I West 34th Street.000.000. Winnipeg. 250. 135 East 15th Street. New York City. New York City. New York City.1914 To Mr. 7S°- 5. 2. as a contribution toward the expenses of the current fiscal year To the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor.202 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION To the Baptist Union of Western Canada. and payments hereafter to be made June I. N. as a contribution to their work for the fiscal year ending September 30. September I. New York. New York City. . as a contribution toward the expenses of their fiscal year. Warburg. Y. Paul M. beginning March i. New York City. 69 Schermerhprn ^ Street. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Treasurer. 200 Fifth Avenue. . Canada.000. New York Child Labor Committee.1914 To the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities. 300. Room 345. Brooklyn. Rockefeller's contribution is to be used in the foreign field To the Society for Italian Immigrants. 129 Broad Street. as a contribution toward their expenses for the fiscal year. for a contribution toward the work of the Society for the fiscal year ending December 3i> I9H To the Boy Scouts of America. 1914—the first ' payment to be made now. as a contribution to the expenses of their current fiscal year 10. 500. 6. and December 1. ^05 East 22nd Street. as a contribution toward the expenses of their fiscal year 1914 To the National Highways Protective Society. Somerset Building. ending April 30. 52 William Street. No.000. as a contribution toward their Baptist missionary work for the current fiscal year.

S. for the general purposes of the Association May 14. May 12.^V. Long Island. Davenport. 1914—To W. Brice.1914 June 3.1914—To Dr.ooo. 1914 To the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America as a contribution toward the work of the Council for the fiscal year. for the purpose oft providing field workers in eugenics. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . for the purpose of paying the expenses of an additional eugenic investigator in Westchester County for one year May 5. Event Macy.EXPENDITURES 208 To Mr. 1914 900. acting through local committees To Mr. Public Education Association. Event Macy.500. Treasurer. Cold Spring Harbor. New York. K. New York. 1914—To the Baptist Ministers' Home Society of New York as a contribution toward the work of the Society for the fiscal year.1914 To the Cleveland School of Art as a contribution toward the current expenses for the fiscal year ending August 31. i>35O2. the work to be done under the auspices of the State Charities Aid Association.1914—To the Laymen's Missionary Movement as a contribution toward the work of the Movement for the fiscal year 1914 May 15. i»£oo.1914—To the National Child Labor Committee as a contribution for the fiscal year ending September 30. for the purpose of meeting the cost of salary. 200. traveling and other expenses of one trained agent to work among the poor children of Westchester County. Charles B. the institutions or the State paying the maintenance and expenses of the workers in the field. 675. 700. V.

Treasurer. 1914—To the Charity Organization Society as a contribution toward the work of the Society for the fiscal year ending September 30.1914—To the Honest Ballot Association of New York City as a contribution toward the expenses of the Association for the current fiscal year Aug.000. 1914—To Mr. equipment and additions to endowment 527*315.14—To the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research for land. Salem Fire Relief Fund. 1. June 24. Brooklyn Young Men's Christian Association as a contribution toward the cost of land and buildings for the Brooklyn Young Men's Christian Association 1.1914 6.1914 2. Secretary-Treasurer.14—To the George Junior Republic Association.000. June 17. 10.000. Lane. 1914—To the New Jersey Baptist Convention as a contribution toward the work of the Convention for the fiscal year ending October 15. as a contribution toward the work of the Association for the fiscal year ending September 30. 18.000. New York.000. at Freeville. 1914 2. Daniel W. June 30. Mass July 29.000.000. 1914—To the State Charities Aid Association as a contribution toward the work of the Association for the fiscal year ending September 30. 1914—To Gardiner M. 10.. 10. June 19. McWilliams.27 June 26. buildings. for the relief of the sufferers from the conflagration at Salem. 150. 1914 July 8. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .1915 300. 1914—To the Girls' Branch of the Public Schools Athletic League in New York City as a contribution toward the work for the year ending June 1.204 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION June t.

000. payable the last day of each month. 1914—To the Legal Aid Society of New York as a contribution toward the current expenses of the Society for the present fiscal year Sept. 1915. September i.000. Williamson. 29. during the fiscal period ending September 30. Rudd. in its discretion.. 1. 26.000.000) toward the Repair Fund for the same fiscal year. One thousand dollars (#i . The Alta Social Settlement of Cleveland. 1914—To the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society for the general purposes of said Society Sept. 11. Cleveland. 9. Ohio. 2. 50. for meeting the emergency disclosed by the correspondence of September 16. as a contribution to the current expenses of the College 1. Ohio. 4»5oo • 1. James D. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to wit: Thirteen thousand. for the following purpose. 1914—To the Public Schools Athletic League of the City of New York as a contribution toward the work of the League for the present fiscal year Nov. 1914—To the International Young Men's Christian Association College at Springfield.500) toward the budget for the fiscal year.1914 Aug. to be used by the Federation. 2. The Cleveland Federation for Charity and Philanthropy for the support of the Young Women's Christian Association of Cleveland. 1914. George A.000. 1914 Oct.EXPENDITURES 205 To Mr. 3. five hundred dollars ($13. 1014—To The Cleveland Federation for Charity and Philanthropy. 500. payable as called for Sept. Treasurer. Mass. Treasurer.000. I9i£^-To Mr. Ohio. to September I.

.. To the Brooklyn Young Men's Christian Association as a contribution toward the expenses of the Association for the current fiscal year ....... 1914—To the National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes..... J. 1. 5. ... 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ....... 1914. 1........................ this being an emergency contribution and not to be considered as a precedent in making application another year..... 20.... as a contribution toward the current expenses for the present fiscal year ............. Nov.000..... N....206 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Nov.3>ooo..—To the Girls* Branch of the Public Schools Athletic League of the City of New York as an additional contribution toward the current expenses of the present fiscal year on account of the unusual circumstances they are confronted with. 30. Nov... To the Charity Organization Society Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis as a contribution toward the Red Cross Christmas Seal fund . Nov........ 500. Jersey City..... 200...... 750.. 1914—To the Religious Education Association as a contribution toward the current expenses of the Association .... toward the work of the League for the fiscal year. To Whittier House... 1914—To the American Female Guardian Society and Home for the Friendless as a contribution toward the expenses of the organization for the current year .... 1 8.. Dec.... 500...... 1014— To the Young Men's Christian Association of the City of New York as a contribution toward the General Expense Fund of the Association for the year 1914 .000..... 17.....

May 2g? 1913.031.443.411.53 III.421. Payments on Account of Appropriations to Other Agencies.940.902.519. 1914—To the International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations as an emergency subscription toward the work on the Home field of the Associations 15*000. to January i. Direct Expenditures.81 *Not including amounts due in future under terms of Mr. Rockefeller's pledges.519.01 II. Founder's Requisitions I9H* 858.27 Total Expenditures.571.00 I9H 182.53 282.20 I9H 1.940. 1914—To the Parks and Playgrounds Association of the City of New York as a contribution toward the work of the Association for the present fiscal year 250.000. 30. 1915 $2. 19*3 # 9. 1913 100.EXPENDITURES 207 Dec.27 RECAPITULATION I.430. 18.81 #1. Total Payments on Founder's Requisitions $858. Dec. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

ca'pa"city. with list of current needs and estimate of cost. (2) Secure map and mark every medical station. if any. (3) Get full data as to hospitals. AIM—TEE GRADUAL AND ORDERLY DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIFE AND EFFICIENT SYSTEM OF MEDICINE IN CHINA METHOD—The following is suggested as a working plan. annual cost to missionary boards.APPENDIX VII MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA The following memorandum. staff. At convenience. educational qualifications. prepared by Mr. their cost. Gates. 208 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . operating medically in China. Frederick T. and similarly mark on same map. native contributions. statistics of work. was presented to the Trustees of the Rockefeller Foundation and accepted by them as a tentative plan for the guidance of the Trustees and of the Commission in their study of medical needs in China: January 29. equipment. location. 3914. secure similar data from English and other foreign boards. Mastery of existing data as complete as possible: (a) Data Available in the United States. and statistics of annual work of every medical missionary in China. to be modified as experience and further knowledge shall suggest: Step I. before the appointment of the China Medical Commission. (b) English and European Data. male and female. (4) Mark these hospitals and index them on the same map as above. (1) Secure immediately from the United States mission boards name.

also the Harvard and the Yale ^ Schools. (2) Attitude of government toward missionary medical schools and their official recognition. (6) He will examine in each section the local schools. its excellencies. their distribution. our second step will be to choose that medical district or province which seems best to lend itself to our p. (3) The difficulties of dissection and how they may be more effectually overcome. (2) It should be easily and cheaply approachable by rail and water transportation. With the data thus secured. best conducted and most efficient medical school associated with best and largest hospital and available clinical material. (3) It should have the largest number of practitioners in its immediate vicinity. and the qualifications required for such recognition. Send a carefully chosen and thoroughly qualified man to China at once to make and currently report a survey of current medical work and education. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . viewed as preparatory schools for medical students. best equipped. which will give us an authentic bird's-eye view of the situation of medicine in all departments. and report their deficiencies and needs. and report in detail on the character and promise of each. (4) He will visit the seven union medical schools commanded by the Chinese Medical Association. its deficiencies and its needs. Step II. character. enabling us to check up the data secured at home with the reports of this expert. (4) It should have the largest. (5) He will visit ^also as many hospitals as possible and as many medical missionaries and report on same.urposes.THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 209 (c) Data in China. and needs. He will report in detail on:— ^ (i) Chinese government medical schools. The field ^chosen should offer the best combination of such qualifications as the following: (1) It should be as central as possible to all practitioners of scientific medicine in China. native and foreign.

in men. (6) It should have immediately tributary the largest number and best equipped missionary and government schools. Step III. (7) It should be located in a large center of both Chinese and European intelligence and wealth. Indeed. best qualified technicians in the various branches of medicine. in equipment. (8) It should have. each equipped with latest advances in his department. it should be near the seat of the ^central government. official government recognition. and chosen our particular section and center as per II. also all necessary surgical equipment for scientific work and proper sanitation. later perhaps in other schools in missionarylands— a world tour series of lectures occupying perhaps a year for each—and thus to keep the school abreast each year with the freshest and most inspiring new discoveries. Let these give series of lectures first in this. we are ready to take several important steps simultaneously. secure qualified trained nurses for each hospital. (10) If possible. and mainly by recruits. (3) Send from the United States on^a systematic plan and periodically. Having now secured our data as per I. for no one of them can reach its maximum efficiency without the others concurrently: (1) Partly by concentration. see that at least two qualified practitioners are connected with every hospital. in clinical material.— This reinforcement and uplift of medical stations to be limited in area to the proper local field of the chosen medical school (2) Put the medical school. where practicable. It would be disappointing if Peking were found inadequate and unsuitable.basis simultaneously with the help given the outlying medical stations. on the best practicable. with their 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . all other things being equal. these steps will have^to be taken simultaneously. facilities for dissection. (9) It should have. in hospitals. or be able to secure. or be able to secure.2X0 MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA (5) It should be union or undenominational.

the foundation and basis of the whole system. (e) From this large concourse of annual students. better skill. (d) This large body of practising physicians constantly in attendance will compel a very high. give the favored region the best body of practising physicians on earth. The change of employment from toil and worry to study later knowledge. will stand out far preeminent. (c) The whole body of practising physicians poured annually through the college will bring ^to the medical school annually an immense fund of practical information and afford the most valuable guide in practical instruction. and if continued will. skill or attainment. Every condition of physical and mental refreshment is here met. e. This is to be the unique central and indispensable condition of any work in China. (0 These men. there will emerge from time to time men of talent. a spirit of corporate achievement. certain men by force of talent. indeed the highest attainable. (4) Within the chosen territory. i. even genius. apply and use the latest medical science. an esprit de corps. will afford the most delightful recreation possible to a rightly constituted man. skill. From these a corps of teachers can gradually be built up of the very highest excellence. excellence in teaching. and local nuclei trained in new technique. from loneliness to stimulating companionship. as will be seen in the development of scheme. pay his extra expenses so incurred^ exceptions to be made only for sufficient reasons. This is nowhere in the world done by any body of practising physicians. require every medical practitioner on foreign pay to spend at least three months of every year at this central medical school. (b) The physician will keep up with. thus mingling together annually for higher skill and attainment. Among the advantages of this requirement are the following: (a) Physicians in China are greatly overworked. in no long time. will come at length to have a corporate life.THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 211 appropriate demonstrations.. (g) It should be the conscious duty of every man to select one or more of the most promising Chinese boys 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . which will animate and inspire every member.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . efficient in spirit. that it subordinates all to one center of enlightenment and power in which all denominations unite. (6) Concurrently with these steps. keep themselves and the school up to the highest pitch of enthusiasm and efficiency. and preparatory schools. the work and growth of many decades. that provision is made for the best instruction in this center. in method. It is on this side of scientific study and preparation that the Foundation will come into relation witn the missionary schools. every dollar. are to be made active agent sin making the present schools and colleges in their respective spneres of influence efficient preparatory schools for Chinese medical students.212 MEDICAL W O R K IN C H I N A under his control. of course. hospitals. (2) That as such unit. in connection with large hospitals. the Foundation will establish proper nurses' training schools for men and women. without loss or waste. it provides for the education of an annually increasing supply of scientific Chinese physicians. it covers a single large province only. It provides that the practitioners shall. and finally through a system of schools made fit. constantly stimulated by western experts. In so far as practicable the Foundation will assist selected schools to meet the requirements. General Remarks It will be observed— (1) That this plan is a unit with simultaneous interplay of necessary parts. with a great central medical school having a full complement of outlying stations. by three months' study annually in this center. This brings us to another simultaneous factor in our system. (5) These medical missionaries. or see that others fit. practitioners. every institution. every man. in extent of instruction. (3) That within the chosen area the plan organizes into one present organic whole. and fit. ^every item of equipment now existing for medical work. always. so trained and so charged. and^ through a careful local selection of fit students annually. him properly for scientific medicine and bring him to the central medical school.

As the system proves practicable and efficient. efficiency. it will command confidence abroad. we may extend it to other similar centers. whether in America or^Europe. has any system of medicine at all comparable in efficiency or promise. using their organization and agencies helpfully and sympathetically and joining with them in choice of a local agency of control. The^plan^also utilizes to the full through generous cooperation with the missionary boards the whole power of Christian sentiment in this and other lands and enlists this sentiment in greater practical service. It will awaken enthusiasm at home. and we may confidently hope that the resulting skill.THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 213 Step IF. and China will be in a fair way ultimately to lead the world in medicine. for today no land. We should enter into definite and detailed contractual relations with the boards. and power will quickly render the system self-supporting on Chinese soil. Already far more than half the whole expense is borne abroad. This plan promises also the largest economic advantages. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . even though the initial expenditure may be considerable. or it will perhaps extend itself.

200 Sugar and Cocoa 6.07 $9. BELGIAN RELIEF SHIPMENTS SHIPS Massapequa DATE TOTAL CAHGO OF SAILDJO TONS CAHQO LBS.972 Beans 593.000 Salt 90. Canned Beef.270 Beans 277. 2 S252.195.15 $68.458 Massaoequa Dec. 31 3529 Flour 6.000 Salt 80. 23 7500 Wheat 280. Old Clothing 555 Cs.767. 39f $84.000 Coffee 44.775.444.960 Peas 448.78 91.000 bti.038.896.911.146. on S.90 $397.57 84.178.J«7 03 §120. Industry) 196 Flour [iannah 392.APPENDIX VIII. (23.001.78' §322.000 Bacon 55.96 §986. 39t 204.556 Beans 145.649 Peas 613.94 Administratioji Expens .s Amount refun ded by C'ommission for Relief in Belgium for expenses of snips Amount paid by Belgian Relief Fund for cargo forwarded per Massaptjqua Net amc unt expended by the Rockefeller Foundation. 214 tlnclmling 95.772.896.90 $119.190.224.650 Beef Tongues 19. 12 6830 Flour 11.000 Lard 44.13 $442.073.248.000 Salmon 7.360 Coffee 110.000 Lentils 165.022 Agamemnon Dec.000 Condensed Milk 150.496 Flour 5.97 1320. Small quantities of Rice.906.230 Bacon 100.06B.29 S9.169.008.000 Milk 63.000 Neches Dec. 4 2800 Flour 4.46 Turned over to Commission 2500 5882 81.911. 81 3. NET COST OP CABGO SHIP EXPENSES TWAIfl 3627 Bacon 126.867.867.46 $31 .407.606 Rice 1.74 845.000. 187.266.867.232.87 Belgian Relief Committee Donated and Purchased *Expenses two voyages Massapequa not separated 884.09 81. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000 Beans 250.12 Belgian Relief Committee 36. Jams and Rolled Oats Ferrona Dec.391 §322.000 Sugar 17.90 §6.644 bus.631 Coffee 40.44 in addition to payments recorded in first edition of this report.000 Rice 1.S.321.399. .305.000 New Clothing 425 Cs.000 Nov.

GIFTS TO: Appropriation: Account of unusual distress 144. 147. 200 Widows' pensions 147. ANDREW 44 BALLARD.. .149 Research in governmental problems 147 Rockefeller Foundation: Disbursements account of. GIFTS TO: Physicians and nurses sent to Europe Permanent headquarters Relief of Bulgarian sufferers 24. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget. ASSISTANT DIRECTOR-GENERAL. Subsidiary organizations 147 Unaffiliated organizations.142.205 AMERICAN FEMALE GUARDIAN SOCIETY AND HOME FOR THE FRIENDLESS 144.198 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF VISION 147.85 APPROPRIATIONS: International Health Commission 147.199 AMERICAN BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY 144. PORTO Rico ANKYLOSTOMIASIS. 162 ASSISTANT TREASURER.83 86 63 83 84.199 134. ANTIGUA.147.143 BAPTIST HOME OF NORTHERN OHIO 10. 159.148. .147. A.206 AMERICAN RED CROSS. see under Disbursements. DR. 200 Founder's designation 146.202 BAGSHAWE. ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION : .198 ANEMIA PRODUCED BY HOOKWORM INFECTION ANAEMIA COMMISSION.205 AMERICAN ACADEMY IN ROME 144.. i6f. STEAMSHIP 26.144. Inauguration of work Extension of work Haemoglobin test Results Statistics 63.INDEX PAGE ACT or INCORPORATION 7 AGAMEMNON.198-200 See also country or organization concerned.133. . EDWARD L 9 BAPTIST HOME FOR THE AGED OF NEW YORK Crry 141. ALTA SOCIAL SETTLEMENT OF CLEVELAND 144.160 ASSOCIATION FOR IMPROVING THE CONDITION OF THE POOR. see HOOKWORM DISEASE. DR.183 215 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . G 46 BALANCE SHEET. BALFOUR.64 60 83 14.147. 214. INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 13.198 147. 147. see GENERAL BALANCE STATEMENT.

144.200 145.147.202 BUREAU OF MUNICIPAL RESEARCH BUREAU OF SOCIAL HYGIENE BUTTRICK. Art. 10.202 60 45.203 BAPTIST UNION OF WESTERN CANADA 145.73»8i 14.214 BICKNELL. II Financial regulations: Deposit of funds. Art. BOARD OF TRUSTEES. V 216 144. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget Inauguration of work Extension of work Summary of work Preventive measures Results Statistics Disbursements 145. WALLACE BY-LAWS: Adoption of Amendments. Art.214 BELGIAN RELIEF SHIPMENTS 214 BELGIUM: Report on relief work Shipment of supplies . BUREAU OF CHARITIES. BROOKLYN. V Officers authorized to draw funds.133.202 BARLOW. see COUNTRY OR ORGANIZATION CONCERNED. W BRITISH ADVISORY COMMITTEE BRITISH GUIANA. DR. Art.200 134. see GRAND CHENIER TRACT. GIFTS TO: Appropriation Founder's designation 46 144.145. V Payment of bills. see SECURITIES. 10. V Current expenses account. VISCOUNT JAMES BUDGETS. ERNEST P BlLHARZIASIS 28 48 BIRD REFUGE. 28 25.PAGE BAPTIST HOME SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. Art. Art. 1 Finance committee.128 72.^198 33 9 175 171 171 173 173 173 173 173 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . DR.147. C.147. .185 BAPTIST MINISTERS' HOME SOCIETY OF NEW YORK.71 81 66.142. Art.133. see WEST INDIES. IX Executive committee.142. see TRUSTEES.75 81 73 77-8o 128 BRITISH WEST INDIES.182. See also Commission for Relief in Belgium. SIR THOMAS 45 BELGIAN RELIEF COMMITTEE OF NEW YORK 27. V Deposit of securities.199. BRYCE. BONDS. BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA BRANCH. Art.

26.149. 205 (2) CLEVELAND SCHOOL or ARTS 145. VI Requirements for distribution of funds. 145.. 32. By-Laws.147. Art. HARCOURT. VI Projties.203 COLONIAL SECRETARY. SIR R. 198 CLARE. CHINA: Conference on medical work 31.214 COMMITTEE OF REFERENCE AND COUNSEL OF THE FOREIGN MISSIONS BOARDS OF NORTH AMERICA 29-31 COMMITTEES: See Executive Committee. by F. IV 174 174 174 172 174 172 CARREL.PAGE Transfer of stock. HAVELOCK 46 CHARTER: Acceptance by Trustees 9 Text of 7 See also Federal Charter. HENRY R 24 97. Gates 208 CHINA MEDICAL BOARD: Appropriations 147 Disbursements 144. appointment of.197 Officers.32 Memorandum on medical work. ALEXIS CARTER. VII Officers.27. Ill Notices. JR. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH f. T. Art. Nominating Committee. Finance Committee. DR. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Organization of work 56 Summary of work 52 Disbursements 128. Art. See also entries under Constitution.162 CENTRAL AMERICA.48 CHARITY ORGANIZATION SOCIETY. Art. GIFTS TO: Appropriation 144.. COMMISSION FOR RELIEF IN BELGIUM 25. VIII Nominating committee. DR.197 CHINA MEDICAL CONFERENCE: Summary of work 31*32 Disbursements 143..206 CHARLES. L 87 CLEVELAND FEDERATION OF CHARITY AND PHILANTHROPY.33 Appropriations 147 Disbursements 143. 147.204.200 Founder's designation 145. 217 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . .148 CEYLON 14.149.197 CITY OF NEW YORK.147. see L. SURGEON-GENERAL H. Art. 163 Organization 33 CHINA MEDICAL COMMISSION: Appointment 32 Activities. proposed. Art.

207 _ I9H 144. CHARLES B 162 46 44» 45 203 DAY.200. IX Meetings. VI Trustees are members of corporation. NORTH AMERICAN SECTION 30 COSTA RICA.201-207 See also country or organization concerned. I Method of election. H. Art. VIII Members: Classes of.207 1914. Art. Art. H4» H7> H8-H9. DR.147. Ill PAGE 9 170 169 170 169 165 165 165 166 166 166 167 167 166 168 165 168 166 CONTINUATION COMMITTEE OF THE EDINBURGH CONFERENCE. Art. Art. ROCKEFELLER 99 177 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. III Vacancies. Art. 1 Are trustees.147. Art.207 TT I9I4. Art. DR DEED OF TRUST.CONSTITUTION. IV President. LORD DAVENPORT. VII Text of Treasurer.200. Art.I97» 200. Art. V Quorum.200. DR.198.207 Founder's designations 144-146. VIII Committees. 1 Officers. 1 Powers and duties. Art. Art. I43-J47. CHINA MEDICAL BOARD 198 163 DISBURSEMENTS: International Health Commission 128. X Annual meeting.197.144.207 Subsidiary organizations: 1913 *• J34» *97» 207 143. 218 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Art. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget Inauguration of work Summary of work Preventive measures Results Statistics Disbursements 97 97 14. CREATED BY JOHN D.66 98 97 98 149 COVINGTON. 1485 197 Rockefeller Foundation: Statement of: 1913 i34> 197.198. Art. R CREWE. RESIDENT. II Secretary. Art. CITY OF NEW YORK DIRECTOR IN CHINA. 1 List of. Adoption of Amendments. Art. Unaffiiiated organizations: Appropriations: 1913 134. PLATT W COWELL.

STEAMSHIP FIELD STAFF. Disbursements. CONTINUATION COMMITTEE OF. FERGUSON. General balance statements. DR.203 7^.186 10. EXPENSES.184 i4S> 203 161.133. NORTH AMERICAN SECTION 3° EGYPT. FEDERAL CHARTER. II FINANCIAL STATEMENTS: See Appropriations.107. INSTITUTE OF 16 EDINBURGH CONFERENCE. Art. E. SIMON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 219 145. 87 DURRANT. 1 3> 39 43 185. JOHN A FERRONA. INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION FINANCE COMMITTEE. J. Set (dso organization concerned.99 13* 39 26? 214 162 I59» i<5o 171 3» 7> 39 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . DR. DR.142.149 ELIOT.162 I59» IO° 171 EXPENDITURES. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget ico Inauguration of work 47»99 Extension of work Haemoglobin test Hospital work Survey work Summary of work Results Statistics Disbursements 106 64 ico 102 55 ICQ 101-105. ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Members of Powers and duties—By-Laws. see DISBURSEMENTS. R . J. CHARLES W ENGLAND EQUITABLE TRUST COMPANY OF NEW YORK EUCLID AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH EUGENIC FIELD WORKERS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: International Health Commission Rockefeller Foundation: Members of Powers an<j duties—By-Laws. see MALAY STATES. see MISSIONS. COL. see DISBURSEMENTS. PROPOSED: History of Text of. with suggested amendments •.108 128. G FERRELL. Receipts. FLEXNER.PAGE DODD. Art. DR. CYRIL H 89 ECONOMIC RESEARCH. 187 190 FEDERAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN AMERICA FEDERATED MALAY STATES.

EDWIN F 16 GENERAL BALANCE STATEMENTS. DR. John D. List of 2««-z»f Right reserved to make 181 FUNDS HELD BY ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION.139 GIFT.143.33 90 .204 64.142. S HANNAH. DR.000 in trust to 9. FREDERICK T.133 Elected member of International Health Commission 39 Elected Recording Secretary of International Health Commission 39 GREENE.200.197 GRAND CHENIER TRACT: Appropriations for 147 Disbursements account of 134. 64. PROFESSOR J. Rockefeller 9. J. WILLIAM C 39 GOVERNMENTAL PROBLEMS. GIFTS RECEIVED BY ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: From John D.93.142 GATES. E 44 GORGAS.133.197 Value of 138 GREAT BRITAIN 43 GREENE.147. LETTERS OF 177-186 GIFTS MADE BY ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION.PAGE FOUNDER'S DESIGNATIONS OF PORTION OF INCOME OF ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget Inauguration of work Extension of work Preventive measures Results Statistics GRINDLE. ^Rockefeller Foundation 9 Gift of $3.133.147.14^ 90 92 92 90 90.149 145.177-181 From Mrs.: Member of Board of Trustees Incorporator of Rockefeller Foundation Memorandum on medical work in China 3 7 208 GAY. HALDANE.144. Rockefeller 9. L. ROGER S GRENADA. STATEMENT «F CONDITION OF 133. W HAEMOGLOBIN TfiST 32. G GUATEMALA GEORGE JUNIOR REPUBLIC ASSOCIATION HACKETT.: Member of Board of Trustees 3 Incorporator of Rockefeller Foundation 7 Elected Secretary. RESEARCH IN 144. see APPROPRIATIONS.182-186 GODFREY.162 63.91 46 14.142.. ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: 1913 130* 131 1914 138. STEAMSHIP 220 46 214 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . JEROME D.

141 92 231 INVESTMENTS: Changes in See also securities.44. H. DR HEALTH DEPARTMENT. DAVID F HOWARD.162 Visits to foreign countries to initiate work of relief and control of hookworm disease 13. H INCORPORATORS OF ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 36 Name of 161.162 3 3> 7» 39 46 28 30 145. INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE. Appropriations for Disbursements account of Institution of 147 144. HON. M HOLLAND. CAMPAIGN AGAINST: Distribution of disease Initiation of work in foreign countries Preliminary investigation and conferences Organization of work and working agencies Work which organizations are doing Educating the people Methods of relief and control Preventive measures Haemoglobin test Infection survey See also countries concerned. A. REPORT ON RELIEF IN HOME BASE COMMITTEE HONEST BALLOT ASSOCIATION OF NEW YORK CITY HOOKWORM DISEASE. Commission on Industrial Relations. SIR F.204 n. transmitting annual report o . INVESTIGATION OF: See Investigation of Industrial Relations. PROPOSED ORGANIZATION OF 16 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION: Organization of.62 13. A.HARCOURT. C.60. U. C..40.162 7 INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH.43 INTERNATIONAL Y. Institute for Economic Research. M. 12. DR. see Y.43 43 53 59 68 41. BARTON HEYDT. CHARLES O HODGSON.149. 11. LEWIS. CITY OF NEW YORK HEISER. M. DR.. S. VICTOR G HEPBURN. JAMAICA 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 39 72.197 16 140. A. PAGE 44>4S 99 198 52.61 65 63 62 HOUSTON.147. SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE BRITISH COLONIES HASTINGS. INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 37 Director-General: Appointment of 13 Letter of.

83.' DR. GATES MEMBERS: China Medical Board International Health Commission Rockefeller Foundation. STEAMSHIP McCALLUM. STIPENDS PROVIDED FOR SCIENTIFIC PROFESSORS 29 14.: Member of Board of Trustees Incorporator of Rockefeller Foundation Gift of $3. ANGUS 56 90 MACY.199 MYERS. STEAMSHIP 26.50 MACCALLAN. SlR H 203 63. DR.203 NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR MENTAL HYGIENE 22 NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS. STARR J.214 NEWFOUNDLAND SEALING DISASTER SUFFERERS NEW JERSEY BAPTIST CONVENTION 145.202 NATIONAL LEAGUE ON URBAN CONDITIONS AMONG NEGROES. JR JUDSON. see AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF VISION.214 46 MEDICAL WORK IN CHINA. . DR. VICTOR MOTT. see ASSOCIATION FOR IMPROVING THE CONDITION OF THE POOR.161. J.162 MENTAL HYGIENE MOLLOY. A MACDONALD. 29.144. D. L. LAURENCE LAYMEN'S MISSIONARY MOVEMENT LEGAL AID SOCIETY OP NEW YORK LETTERS OF GIFT: John D.204 NEW YORK ASSOCIATION FOR IMPROVING THE CONDITION OF THE POOR. 208 163 39. MEMORANDUM BY F.147. see Trustees. John D.201 145. L. Rockefeller Mrs. COOPERATION AND EFFICIENCY IN . MACKENZIE KITCHENER. HARRY PRATT KING.206 NECHES.203 177-181 182-186 LOUVAIN. 222 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . JOHN R MURPHY. DR.145. see MALAYA.PAGE JAMES. EVERTT— MARSHALL. FOREIGN.. NATIONAL HIGHWAY AND PROTECTIVE SOCIETY 145. Rockefeller MALAY STATES. LORD LAUGHLIN.200. MALAYA 28 3>7»32 17 47 16 145.000 in trust to 21 162 16 29 3 7 9. V. UNIVERSITY OF.203 145. T. W.133 MISSIONS. G 9 NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMISSION 145. M MORAWETZ. ERIC MASSAPEQUA.86 26. HENRY.

REPORT ON CONDITIONS PRESIDENT. 39. FRANCIS W PELLAGRA PETERS. Art. see AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF VISION..° .149 159. AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO GREAT BRITAIN. NEW YORK MILK COMMITTEE.207 32 48 190 . DR. THOMAS W 16 PAGE. 52 29 159.206 READ._. transmitting annual report to Trustees Names of . H.202 NEW YORK. ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Election of • Letter of. IV Names of See also organization concerned. By-Laws.203 146. CITY OF.160 9 3 1S9» i&> 167 PRISON ASSOCIATION OF NEW YORK PUBLIC EDUCATION ASSOCIATION PUBLIC SCHOOLS ATHLETIC LEAGUE.. V 146. HON.200 146.162 9 172 159.. WALTER H. J 223 46 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .93 Extension of work 97 Haemoglobin test 64 Results 94 Statistics 95. Powers and duties. G PHILIPPINE ISLANDS POLAND. J.96 Disbursements 149 PAHKS AND PLAYGROUNDS ASSOCIATION PEABODV.204.39>43>44 PANAMA: Budget 93 Inauguration of work 14.160 OPHTHALMIA 48 PAGE.205 145.147.. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 198 NEW YORK COMMITTEE FOR THE PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS. 38. Art. NEW YORK CITY Girls' Branch 146.201 NICARAGUA NOMINATING COMMITTEE: Members of. Powers and duties.161.PAGE NEW YORK CHILD LABOR COMMITTEE 146. 144. Art.202 146. constitution. GIFTS TO: Appropriation Founders designation . ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF 30 OFFICERS: International Health Commission Rockefeller Foundation: Election of Method of appointment.160 172 NORTH AMERICAN FOREIGN MISSION BOARDS. Ill 14. by-laws..

206 RESIDENT DIRECTOR IN CHINA 163 RESEARCH IN GOVERNMENTAL PROBLEMS 144.RECEIPTS: International Health Commission Rockefeller Foundation PAGE 148 i34» *43 RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTB: Stf Disbursement!.147. SIR THOMAS B 45. RED CROSS. WICKLITFFE: 11. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget Inauguration of work Extension of work Summary of work Preventive measures Results 334 ".: Incorporator of Rockefeller Foundation Member of Board of Trustees Gift of $3. Receipts.: Gifts to Rockefeller Foundation—income to be paid to various organizations 9.133.: Incorporator of Rockefeller Foundation 7 Member of Board of Trustees . W.10. created by 177 Gifts made to Rockefeller Foundation .197 ROBINSON.147. REQUISITIONS.142 Letters of gift 182-186 ROCKEFELLER. see FOUNDER'S DESIGNATIONS. see AMERICAN RRD CROSS. FOUNDER'S. JOHN D. '25 162 33 88. in trust to Elected chairman.133.9..37.133 39 9 ROCKEFELLER SANITARY COMMISSION ROSE. JAPAN 144.39 7 3 13. MRS. Rockefeller Foundation Elected Director-General International Health Commission Member of War Relief Commission ROTTERDAM ROWAN.199 RELIGIOUS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 146. JOHN D.3 Deed of trust.141 Founder's designations of portion of Rockefeller Foundation income: List of 201-207 Right reserved to make 181 Letters of gift 177-181 ROCKEFELLER. H RUSSIAN POLAND: see POLAND. JR. JOHN D.46 ROCKEFELLER. RELIEF SOCIETY FOR THE CALAMITIES IN THE NORTHEASTERNDISTRICT AND KYUSHU. SAGE.89 88 89 14 89 88 Statistics 89 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . DR.000. International Health Commission Elected president. LUCIA. Rockefeller Foundation 7 3 9.200.15. EBEN C ST.39 28 Incorporator of Rockefeller Foundation Member of Board of Trustees.

REPORT ON CONDITIONS 29 SHIPLEY. DR 99 TOHOKU KYUSHU SAIGAI KYUSAIKAI OF JAPAN. 146. 225 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Louis SECURITIES OWNED BY ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Bonds: 1913 „ 19/4 Stocks: 1913 19*4.203. Art. M SCHAPIRO. Members. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN 11.. A. DR.89 SALEM RELIEF FUND SALMON. VINCENT.• • .159. STOCKS.15 STATE CHARITIES AID ASSOCIATION 146.204 STATISTICS.202 SOUTHERN STATES. transmitting annual report to President Name of Powers and duties. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget Status of work PAGE 89 14. VII 161.162 9 5 159. SIR DAVID 46 SERBIA. DR..160 TRINIDAD.160 168 SEMPLE. TREASURER. VI 9 159.ST. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Budget Inauguration of work Extension of work Sanitary survey Results Statistics TRUSTEES OF ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Charter.160 168 87 14. Trustees. see COUNTRY OR ORGANIZATION CONCERNED. Art. see RELIEF SOCIETY FOR CALAMITIES IN NORTHEASTERN DISTRICT AND KYUSHU. E 45. F. acceptance of. THOMAS W SANDWITH.' STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT 30 TODD. ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION: Election of Name of Powers and duties.204 22 44.46 SOCIETY FOR ITALIAN IMMIGRANTS 146. . DR.86 88 87 87 87 9 9 3.. see SECURITIES.See also Investments. constitution.99 162 135 150* 151* !52 136 iS3» i$4> iSS SECRETARY: International Health Commission Rockefeller Foundation: Election of Letter of. DR. First meeting Members of Board of See dso Constitution.

C.204. Springfield. PAGE UNITED STATES COMMISSION ON INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS WAR RELIEF: Appropriation Disbursements Summary of WAR RELIEF COMMISSION See country concerned for report on conditions.147.205 29.: Brooklyn International College.145.206 89 146. N. CLEVELAND 20. DOUGLAS . Y. M. DR. HOOKWORM CAMPAIGN: Disbursements Preliminary investigation Summary of work WHEELER.97. WASHBURN.197 23 27 162 39 147* *99 128. DR.206 145..162 146. A.207 146 205 228 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .148 46 58 16 43.UNCWARIASIS. HARRY A WHITE. Mass International Committee of New York City Y. see HOOKWORM DISEASE. J YOUNG. C. W. JERSEY CITY. A. BENJAMIN E WELCH. JOSEPH H WHITHER HOUSE.21 147 144. DR. WILLIAM H WELLESLEY COLLEGE WEST INDIES.201.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful