GDAY Round Table

2008 Youth Risk Behavior Survey
Strategies for Prevention and Positive Youth Development

Major Findings Focus Topics

Safety
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Cars Internet Violence Related Behaviors Alcohol Tobacco Other Drug Use Dietary Behaviors Exercise Sleep

ATOD
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Health and Wellness
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Safety

Safety

According to the Academy of Pediatrics: Parents...

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...are the most important influence on their teen when it comes to risky behaviors, including substance abuse and driving. ...can improve teen health and safety by discussing the dangers of using drugs or alcohol at anytime. ...set a good example behind the wheel, establishing driving rules and consequences, teaching them to eliminate distractions when operating a motor vehicle. ...warn of the dangers of riding with impaired or distracted drivers.

Car Safety

1.5% of Grade 6 student and 3% of Grade 8 never or rarely wear seatbelts 6.2% of High School students (with highest incidence in grades 10 & 11 at 9%) never or rarely wear seatbelts 59.9% of 11th Grade students and 77.7% of 12th graders report having driven a car while talking or texting on a cell phone/pda.

Car Safety

2% of 6th grade respondents and 7.1% of 8th grade respondents report having ridden in a car or other vehicle driven by a minor (under age 21) who had been drinking alcohol or under the influence of other drugs. 17.5% of High School respondents report having ridden in a car or other vehicle driven by a minor (under age 21) who had been drinking alcohol or under the influence of other drugs. 25% of Grade 12 students represent the highest percentage.

Internet Safety

5.6% of 6th grade students and 11.7% of 8th graders report having met someone in person with whom they initially had contact over the internet. 15.2% of HS respondents report having met someone in person with whom they initially had contact over the internet.
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14%-9th grade 18.5% -10th grade 16.5% -11th grade 11.5% -12th grade

Violence Related Behaviors
Weapons: items such as guns, knives and clubs carried with the potential to do harm or need protect oneself  6.5% of 6th graders and 14% of 8th graders, mostly boys, reported carrying weapons in the month prior to the survey (March 2008) but not on school property  5.3% of all HS students surveyed indicated they had carried a weapon on at least on occasion in the 30 days prior to the survey with 3.7% doing so on school property.

Violence
Bullying and Dating Violence (grades 8 and 9-12 only)

17.8% of 6th graders and 27.6% of 8th graders report having been bullied in school during the 12 months prior to the survey. Nearly 4% of all High School students reported being bullied in the 12 months prior to the survey with 3.1% reporting physical force in the encounter. Dating violence results in grade 8 indicates that 3.5% of those responding have been hurt physically or sexually by a date or someone they were going out with (girls more so than boys) and 6.2% of HS students reported dating violence, with girls in grade 11 experience the highest incidence at 9%. Although not tracked on this survey, nationally, surveys indicate that 25% of teens in this age range experience cyberbullying, with girls being targeted more than boys. INSERT CYBERBULLYING PSA HERE

Violence
Self-Harm, Injury and Suicide

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Self Harm and Suicide: 14.6% of 8th graders & 16% of HS students report hurting themselves on purpose (cutting, burning, bruising, choking) on at least 1 occasion in the 12 months prior to the survey - females (23.8%) more frequently than males (8.6%). 6% of 6th graders and 9% of 8th graders report having seriously considered attempting suicide. 12.7% of HS respondents considered suicide during the 12 months prior to the survey - females (14.9%) reported ideation more than males (10.5%). 1.5% of 6th graders and 4% of 8th graders report actually attempting suicide with 25% of 8th grade attempts receiving medical attention. 4.3% of all HS respondents reported attempting suicide (Grade 10 highest at 7.3%) and among those attempting suicide, 40.6% report attempts resulted in injury, poisoning, or overdose that had to be medically treated. More girls attempt suicide, but more boys commit suicide.

Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs

ATOD Use and Abuse
Tobacco  .5% of 6th graders, 13.5% of 8th graders and 26.4 % of High school respondents report ever having tried cigarette smoking. 5% of 8th graders and 15% of High School students reporting recent, repeated use of tobacco.  Despite health and wellness programs, GDRSD sees a marked increase in tobacco use between 6th grade, 8th grade and again as students transition to HS. What is happening to the health message?

Alcohol
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26.1% of 8th graders report drinking alcohol other than for non-religious reasons 7% of 8th graders started drinking before the age of 12 According to www.stopalcoholabuse.gov Students who start drinking before age 15 are 5 times more likely to become alcoholic.

60% of HS respondents report having at least one drink of alcohol on at least one occasion (other than for religious reasons) and 12 % report starting drinking before age 12 34.1% of HS students reported drinking in the month prior to the survey
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Grade 9-19.6% Grade 10- 36.7% Grade 11-34.6% Grade 12-52.4%

Teen Alcohol Abuse

22% of HS students reported binge drinking on at least one occasion in the 30 days prior to the survey
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9th Grade = 7.1% 10th Grade = 22.6% 11th Grade = 24.3% 12th Grade = 40.4%

Alcohol Abuse
6% of 8th graders report having been at a party held in homes in the school district where alcohol use by teens is allowed by adults 27.5% of HS students report having been at a party held in homes in the school district where alcohol use by teens is allowed by adults. Gr 9 = 12.9% Gr 10 = 26.3% Gr. 11 = 29.2% Gr. 12 = 48.3%

Other Drug Use and Abuse
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13.6% of 8th grade students report trying marijuana 7% of 8th grade students report having been offered, sold or given drugs on school property in the 12 months prior to the survey Parent drug use and abuse is recognized as a significant factor in student drug use

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30.7% of all HS students report having used marijuana. The incidence of lifetime use of marijuana use increases each year by grade to nearly 50% of 12th grade students reporting use of this illegal drug. 17.2% of HS students report being offered, sold or given drugs at school Parents, family members, medicine cabinets are noted as major sources of drugs used in abusive ways.

Health and Wellness

Dietary Behaviors

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Over 60% over middle school students surveyed described themselves as being at about the right weight 58.3% of middle school students exercise in order to maintain or lose weight. 12.5% of 6th graders and 28% of 8th graders eat breakfast on fewer than 5 days a week In almost a 2:1 ratio, middle school girls are more “concerned” with weight issues, body image or losing weight

Dietary Behaviors
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59.6% of HS students report being at about the right weight with 36.4% trying to lose weight In order to maintain or lose weight, 58% of HS students choose to exercise 10% skip meals or have gone 24 hours w/o eating Nearly 40% of HS students report eating breakfast fewer than 5 days during the week prior to the survey Girls skip breakfast more frequently than boys

Work, Rest and Play

Over three quarters of 6th and 8th graders report vigorously exercising for at least 20 minutes at least 3 days/week 66.7% of HS students report vigorously exercising for at least 20 minutes at least 3 days/week

14.3 % of 6th graders and 34.5% of 8th graders report getting fewer than 7 hours of sleep on school nights 63.7% of HS students report getting fewer than 7 hours of sleep in school nights. Time management is a key factor in providing balance in a student’s work, rest and play.

What Can We Do?
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Model Appropriate behavior: be kind and considerate and your children will be too. Review School District Student Handbooks Know the law!
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It is illegal to serve alcohol to minors. It is illegal to host a party at which drugs and alcohol are served to minors.

Get to know your teen’s friends, their parents, coaches and other influential people in his or her life Get to know your child’s patterns and look for changes in sleep, eating, emotions and social networks.

Note changes in appearance and clothing that might hide bruising or other injuries. Establish limits on computer and cell phone use. Check call logs and computer history with your child. Talk about their usage habits

Talk to your kids and let them know what your expectations are

Remove computers from bedrooms
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Teens who report having conversations, contracts and other strategies with parents about youth risk behavior are more likely to stay drug and risk free. Use on-line resources to develop family contracts and action plans for car, cell phone and computer safety Visit the GDAY Resource room for free books, pamphlets and parenting articles

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Monitor on-line purchases Lock up personal weapons and touch base with local law enforcement regarding safe storage of weapons.

Resources and Sites to “Check Out”

www.gdrsd.org For the 2008 YRBS data and school homepages for:
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GDRHS Student Handbook and policies GDRMS Handbook and policies

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www.samhas.gov Resources for reducing/preventing youth risk behavior www.stopalcoholabuse.gov Parenting information on underage drinking and associated risks www.aap.org American Academy of Pediatrician site that outlines statistics and strategies for youth ATOD risk behavior www.cdc.gov Centers for Disease Control providing studies and advice regarding youth risk behavior www.theantidrug.com Parenting advice regarding youth risk behavior www.g-day.org Family Computer Use and Social Networking Contract www.steerstraight.com Teen Driver Protection programs www.allstateteendriver.com Family/Teen driving contract www.nhtsa.dot.gov Seatbelt safety studies Prescott Parent Resource Center and GDAY Resource Annex

Children Learn What They Live
by Dorothy Law Nolte
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If children live with criticism, they learn to condemn. If children live with hostility, they learn to fight. If children live with ridicule, they learn to be shy. If children live with shame, they learn to be guilty. If children live with encouragement, they learn confidence. If children live with tolerance, they learn to be patient. If children live with praise, they learn to appreciate. If children live with acceptance, they learn to love. If children live with approval, they learn to like themselves. If children live with honesty, they learn truthfulness. If children live with security, they learn to have faith in themselves and others. If children live with friendliness, they learn the world is a nice place in which to live.

Copyright 1972/1975