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The Curse of Lono

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While not my favorite HST book, it tells the tale of a "vacation" from hell in Hawaii and, as always, contains Thompson's trademark craziness. There are a lot of illustrations by Ralph Steadman, who along with his family join Thompson on this adventure (well... at least part of it). If you enjoy HST's writing then you will probably like this book as well.
Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster

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Unlike Endurance, this adventure through the snow and wind does not have a happy ending. In this book survival depended on saving yourself, while at times leaving people behind. Whereas in Endurance, it was only through teamwork that those involved made it out alive.
The Lost Symbol

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Robert Langdon's latest adventure finds him running around DC trying to stop a man from killing his friend and uncovering Masonic secrets. I think I enjoyed this book more due to the fact that much of it takes place in buildings near and in the one where I work. Having this knowledge made each turn a bit more exciting. Overall this book has many similarities to Angels & Demons and The DaVinci Code, so if you liked those, you will probably enjoy this one as well.
Fiend

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I feel like zombies are everywhere lately, but this book stood out for me. In this zombie apocalypse, one day people don't wake up, but when they eventually do, they have become freaky laughing zombies. The only people who haven't turned are those on scante (aka meth). The "hero" Chase Daniels and his friend, Typewriter, work their tweaked way through a week or so of crazy events in hopes of staying high, alive, and finding a safe place to be. This book is as much about meth as it is about zombies and while some have noted that it is kind of like Breaking Bad meets The Walking Dead, I felt there was more to the story than that. Fiend gets inside the mind of a meth addict (or really any hardcore addict in general) and delves into the feelings they have about their addiction, love, and loss. A definite page turner and an interesting addition to the zombie genre.
Broken Piano for President

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"What would Gibby do?" He would read this book! Deshler Dean, lead singer of Lothario Speedwagon and sometime burger executive, drunkenly stumbles his way through incredible scenarios that he rarely remembers, all while trying to fulfill his dreams of rock stardom and figure out how to maintain his relationship with Malinta, if there is one. I liked the way Wensink starts by giving you Deshler's black out "memories" and then proceeds to fill in the gaps as the story moves along. Another aspect of this book that keeps you wanting more is that there are lots of characters whose intentions you are never quite sure about. Who are the good guys, who are the bad guys, is there a difference, does it matter? You should read "Broken Piano for President" and decide for yourself.
The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster

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While I liked this book, I thought I would enjoy it more than I did. The sarcasm is almost too much at times and it almost seemed to me that the scientific "papers" at the end were added to make the book longer.
Endurance

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Endurance is such a fitting name for both the boat and book. It's hard to believe what these men went through and survived, especially considering that these events occurred almost 100 years ago.
Reading the OED: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages

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I've read a few of these type of books, and this is one of my favorites. It's arranged alphabetically with each chapter starting with some of Shea's thoughts on various dictionary related topics and is followed by some choice words from the OED with the author's commentary. While this book isn't for everyone, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to lovers of language.
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea

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I've read a fair amount about North Korea over the years, including a few books, but I found this book to be superior in the way the author interwove different situations together. The six people whose lives were followed gave a greater understanding of their relationships to each other and the government than some other books available on the subject. Instead of focusing on just children or prisoners, the book presents the viewpoints of: •Mrs. Song - a pro-regime housewife, head of the block's inminban [a neighborhood watch-like group that reports to the government] •Oak-Hee - Mrs. Song's rebellious daughter •Mi-ran - an elementary school teacher; part of the "hostile class" and considered to have "tainted blood" due to her father's South Korean roots which disqualifies her from advancement in many ways •Jun-sang - a student with Zainichi Korean ancestry and Mi-Ran's boyfriend in North Korea •Kim Hyuck - a "wandering swallow" or street-boy whose father had committed him and his brother to an orphanage when he could no longer care for them •Dr. Kim - a female doctor If you are looking for a book about the history of Korea, this doesn't have a lot of that, but the coverage of the 1990's (including the death of Kim Il-sung, the rise of Kim Jong-il, and the famine) is well done.
TV Snorted My Brain

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I found this "retelling" of the King Arthur story to be an interesting concept, but I just wasn't really into the writing style. I felt like everything was getting said 3 times and that this book could have been about 10-20 pages shorter and you wouldn't have lost anything.
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