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01.10.12

01.10.12

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Thursday, January 10, 2013 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 70
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................5
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .......................8Puzzles ......................7Classifieds ................7
 T-storms
70º/61º
Friday 70º/63º
Chance of rain
 
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By Marquavius Burnett 
Sports Editor
Every fall, the Alabama gym-nasts gather for team bondingexercises and to create a newidentity for the team that willcompete in the spring.One of the main goals of thistime spent together is to gener-ate a team slogan that will helpdefine the upcoming season.This year’s slogan, “StrongerWe Are Together,” or SWAT, willfuel the Crimson Tide’s upcomingrun at a potential third nationalchampionship in three years.Alabama has won back-to-backchampionships, currently withsix in school history.The two-time defending NCAAChampion Alabama gymnasticsteam holds a No. 1 preseasonrank after being ranked secondin the preseason poll the last twoyears.The Tide will return to theapparatus on Friday, when ittravels to Columbia for a meetwith Missouri. It will be theTigers’ inaugural meet in theSoutheastern Conference andwill be a pink meet, with bothteams wearing pink leotards.Alabama is currently undefeatedwhen wearing pink
.
By Melissa Brown
News Editor
A charter bus transportingUniversity of Alabama cheer-leaders from the BCS NationalChampionship Game in Miami,Fla., was involved in an acci-dent Tuesday night with twoother vehicles, leaving threepassengers injured.Lt. Jerry Boykins of theMontgomery CommunityPolicing Bureau said a pas-senger car and pick-up truckwere involved in the accidentaround 10:20 p.m. Tuesdaynight.No one on the charter buswas injured, but a Universityspokeswoman told TheCrimson White Wednesdaythat a UA student was takenby ambulance from the sceneto the hospital.“A passenger in the pick-up truck was transported to alocal hospital with life-threat-ening injuries,” Boykins saidin an emailed statement. “Twopersons in the passenger carwere transported with minorinjuries.”The crash occurred on theWestern Boulevard of I-65.The bus was returning toTuscaloosa from Miami, Fla.,following the BCS NationalChampionship Game. Thefootball team arrived earlierTuesday night via charterplane from Miami, Fla.Boykins said the crash iscurrently under investigation.
UA businvolvedin I-65accident
Students injured inTuesday night crash
NEWS
| ATTENDANCE
By Jordan Cissell
Staff Reporter
Don’t mistake its relativebrevity for insignificance.Though many studentsplan on spending their firstclass meetings doing littlemore than reviewing syllabi,University of Alabama facultysay equal solemnity should beapplied to the first three-dayweek of the spring semesteras is shown the following 16.Aaron Hinkelman, a sopho-more majoring in operationsmanagement, said most classmeetings during the first weekof the semester seem to servemore as introductory time foreach course.“Especially because I’m onlya sophomore, I’d probably saythat all of my classes during mytime here have just passed outand gone over the syllabus onthe first day of class,” he said.“Usually everybody comesin and gets settled, we spendabout 20-30 minutes going overthe syllabus, and then you getto head out. Professors usuallydon’t even take attendance oranything like that.”However, Director of MediaRelations Cathy Andreen saidrumors that University policyforbids professors from track-ing attendance during the firstweek of class are not true.“There is no restrictionregarding faculty takingattendance during the firsthalf-week of the semesteror any other time during thesemester. Whether a facultymember takes attendance isleft to the discretion of theinstructor,” she said in anemailed statement. “The onlyUniversity expectation is thatinstructors share their poli-cies with their students at thebeginning of the term so thereare no surprises.The UA Faculty Handbooknecessitates attendance poli-cies be defined to students atthe semester’s beginning.Peter Johnson, anassistant professor of account-ing, informed his studentsof class policies before thesemester started. Studentsenrolled in Johnson’s AC310: Financial Reportingand Analysis for spring 2013received an email Thursday,Jan. 3, outlining the course’sschedule, mandatory atten-dance requirement and extracredit reading and homeworkassignments for Jan. 10’s classmeeting.
Professors decide on 1st week attendance policy
Spokeswoman dispelsmyths about classes
SPORTS
| GYMNASTICS
NEWS
| BUS CRASH
By Madison Roberts
Staff Reporter
Students heading back to classon Wednesday might be grate-ful for a shortened school week,but with the drop/add periodending next Wednesday, Jan. 16,students have just a few classmeetings to decide whetheror not to drop a class withoutreceiving a withdrawal grade ontheir transcript.Shane Emplaincourt, a pro-fessor in the College of Arts andSciences does not see a problemwith the University’s week-longdrop/add policy.“I think the University wantsit to start working as smoothlyas possible and as quickly aspossible for everyone that’sinvolved: the professor, the stu-dents and the class as a whole,”Emplaincourt said. “When I wasin school, on the first day of class Ihad a pretty good idea of whetheror not I needed to stay in there.”Melissa Stephenson, a sopho-more majoring in general busi-ness, is not a fan of the drop/addpolicy and thinks the time periodshould be extended by three orfour weeks.“I do not always have a testbefore it’s the time to drop a class,and then I end up with a “W”because I didn’t know I was goingto fail the class,” Stephensonsaid.Although her suggestion toextend the drop/add period couldcause students to be addingclasses a month into the semes-ter, Stephenson feels studentswho choose that path would bewilling to make up work.“If I choose to add a class afterthree weeks, making up thatwork is my problem, but I shouldstill have the opportunity to dothat without being penalized,”Stephenson said.Because Emplaincourt’sFrench classes meet four days aweek, he said it may be difficultfor a student to catch up after aweek of transferring into theclass, so if a student had the abil-ity to add French 102 after theclass was in session for threeweeks, they would miss 12 classperiods of learning.
Some UA students want more time to decide to drop, add classes
NEWS
| DROP/ ADD PERIOD
Withdrawling afterJan. 16 results in ‘W’
Patterson builds ‘SWAT’ team
CW File
The University of Alabama gymnastics team will return 20 of 24 championship routines from last season.
CW File
The 2012 gymnastics team celebrates back-to-back national championships.
Defending championsto focus on team work
SEE
ATTENDANCE
PAGE 2SEE
GYMNASTICS
PAGE 2SEE
DROP/ADD
PAGE 2
Whether a faculty membertakes attendance is left tothe discretion ofthe instructor.
— Cathy Andreen
If I choose to add a classafter three weeks, makingup that work is my problem.
— Melissa Stephenson
 Jesse Williams Skypes with Australian prime minister 
Page 8
 
GO
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Page 2• Thursday, January 10, 2013
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036Advertising: 348-7845Classifieds: 348-7355
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CW Staff 
University of Alabama headcoach Nick Saban announcedWednesday the hiring of GregBrown as Alabama’s secondarycoach. Brown has three decadesof coaching experience, includ-ing 15 years as an assistantcoach in the NFL. He spent thelast three seasons in the collegeranks at Colorado and Arizona.Brown takes over for JeremyPruitt, who was recently namedthe defensive coordinator atFlorida State.“I’m extremely happy to adda coach the caliber of GregBrown to our staff,” Saban saidin a statement. “Greg has a tre-mendous amount of college andNFL experience, and his knowl-edge in the secondary reallymade him the perfect fit for thisposition. He will be an out-standing addition to our coach-ing staff, and we look forwardto Greg and his family joiningour staff at The University of Alabama.”Brown served as the defensivecoordinator at the University of Colorado over the last two sea-sons, his third stint with theBuffaloes. He spent the 2010season as the co-defensive coor-dinator at Arizona, helping theWildcats return to the top 25 forthe first time in over a decade.From 2006-09, Brown was thesecondary coach at Colorado andworked as the defensive passinggame coordinator during the lastthree of those seasons.“It is an honor and an unbe-lievable opportunity to jointhe staff at The University of Alabama,” Brown said. “I’veknown and respected CoachSaban for many years, and heis the best in the country atwhat he does. It is the dreamof any defensive coach to learnfrom Coach Saban, especiallyat a place with Alabama’s greattradition and history. I look for-ward to doing my part to helpcontinue the success with thetop college football program inthe nation.”
Alabama football hires NFL coaching veteran Greg Brown to replace Jeremy Pruitt and lead Tide’s secondary
CW Staff 
Alabama right guardAnthony Steen announced onWednesday he would returnfor his senior season to playfor the Crimson Tide in 2013.“After sitting down with myfamily and Coach Saban, I havedecided it is in my best inter-est to return for my seniorseason,” Steen said. “Gettingmy degree was one of my goalswhen I came to The Universityof Alabama, and I am on sched-ule to graduate this spring.“I also think returning in2013 will give me a chance toimprove my draft status, whilealso providing the opportunityto enjoy another season withmy teammates, coaches andour fans. I enjoy Tuscaloosaand our fans way too muchto leave early. We are alsolosing two great seniors thisyear, and this will give methe chance to help get play-ers ready for their new rolesin 2013.”Steen, a native of Lambert,Miss., and graduate of LeeAcademy, has started 25games at the Capstone whileplaying in 40 contests. He is atwo-year starter that helpedAlabama rank 16th nationallyand second in the SEC in rush-ing in 2012 at 227.5 yards pergame. Steen helped block fortwo 1,000-yard rushers in 2012(Eddie Lacy and T.J. Yeldon).“We are glad that Anthonyhas decided to return, andhe’ll be one of the senior lead-ers of our offense,” Alabamahead coach Nick Saban said.“He’s done an outstanding jobfor us as a starter at guardon the last two champion-ship teams, and I think he canbecome an even better playerand improve his status fornext year’s draft with anotherseason here.”
Right guard Anthony Steen announces he plans to return to play for Alabama during his senior football season
“Our policy is to follow thecalendar, so it’s the student’sresponsibility to catch up,and that’s something that thestudent knows by droppingand adding. That’s a decisionthe student has to make,”Emplaincourt said. “It’s a bal-ance and personal choice foreach student, but I personallywill always work with a studentwho asks for it, and we havethe tutors as well, so betweenoffice hours and the servicesthat are available, with a goodstudent, catching up should notbe a problem.”Thomas Courtland, a sopho-more majoring in political sci-ence, said he thinks the timeperiod for dropping a courseshould be extended, but thetime for adding a course shouldstay the same.“If a student adds a coursetwo weeks into the semester,they will be behind, and if it’sa small class, it can disrupt theentire pace of the course. So asfar as adding courses goes, theweek-long period is enough,”Courtland said. “For droppingclasses, though, I think stu-dents need a lot more time toactually decide if a course isright for them without havingthe penalization of a ‘W.’”The University of Arkansasfollows a schedule that is com-parable to Courtland’s idea.According the University of Arkansas’ academic calendar,students have four days to adda class to their schedule, buttwo weeks to drop a class with-out being penalized.Other schools in the SECsuch as the University of Georgia and Louisiana StateUniversity follow similar poli-cies to Alabama regarding thedrop/add period. According toUGA’s academic calendar, stu-dents have five days from thestart of classes to drop or add.At LSU, students have a weekand a half from the first dayof classes, allowing those stu-dents in Tuesday/Thursdayclasses to meet three timesbefore deciding to drop a class.The University of Alabama’spolicies still allow for studentsto drop classes well into thesemester in exchange for a“W” grade. This allows stu-dents to get several tests orassignments under their beltsbefore making a decision, butsome students feel a W holdsnegative connotations.“When you apply to gradschool or law school or whatev-er other school you want to goto, a W on your transcript doesnot look good,” Stephensonsaid.Courtland said the nega-tive perception of withdrawalgrades could contribute towhy students feel the periodfor dropping classes should belonger.“With the pressure to passclasses and the stigma of with-drawal grades on our shoul-ders, a week is not long enoughknow if we will do well in ourclasses,” Courtland said.
DROP/ADD
FROM PAGE 1
Other schools havesimilar ‘W’ policies
“This course is designed forstudents to come prepared toeach class so that studentsmay participate in the learningprocess,” Johnson said in anemailed statement. “Studentsshould read over the syllabusprior to attending class on thefirst day and be prepared to askquestions and to participate.I approach my course simi-lar to business professionals.Would a new employee expectto show up for the first day of work, receive some instructionabout their job expectationsand then be sent home earlier?A new employee will be famil-iar with their duties prior tothe first day of work, show upready to ask questions and tobe trained.”Hinkelman said he andmany other students like totreat the week of first classmeetings as a test period todetermine which classesto commit to before theUniversity’s Wednesday, Jan.16, deadline to drop a coursewithout a grade of “W.”“It’s an opportunity to real-ly experience a class and seewhat you signed up for, whatyou should expect, especiallyif it’s a non-required class,”Hinkelman said. “Why wastetime taking a non-requiredclass you don’t enjoy? Andin most cases, professors arereally good about doing morethan just reading the sylla-bus off to you. They give a lotof insight into what to expectand what you need to do tosucceed.”Johnson said the most effec-tive way for students to devel-op an accurate impression of the schedule for which theyhave registered is for the firsthalf-week of classes to faith-fully represent the remainderof the semester.“I use the first day of class asa demonstration in how classtime will be used throughoutthe semester,” he said. “Forthe first day, we do a minicase assignment based on theassigned reading for that dayto demonstrate how studentsare expected to be preparedfor class and how they shouldwork in groups. Students maynot understand their own abil-ity to manage several coursesat once and so may overloadtheir schedule with several dif-ficult and challenging courses.I believe it is better for thestudent to know on day onewhether they will be able tomanage their course load.”
ATTENDANCE
FROM PAGE 1
Professors use 1st dayto introduce courses
Alabama returns seven of itseight All-Americans from lastseason: seniors Ashley Priess,Marissa Gutierrez and AshleySledge; juniors Kim Jacob,Sarah DeMeo and DiandraMilliner and sophomore KaylaWilliams. The Tide returns 20 of its 24 routines from last year’schampionship team.“It really doesn’t matter if we’re returning a majority of our routines from a champion-ship team as we did last season,or if we’re going to be count-ing on half our routines com-ing from the freshman classas we have at different times,the dynamic is always differ-ent,” said head coach SarahPatterson. “Every year youstart fresh; every year it’s a newteam, with different chemistryand personality. So we workon that from day one, comingtogether and discovering thatteam’s identity.”Patterson and husband Davidare entering their 35th seasonat the helm of one of only fourteams to win an NCAA cham-pionship (1988, 1991, 1996, 2002,2011, 2012).“Winning as consistentlyas she’s won is tremendous,”UA director of athletics MalMoore said. “We support Sarahstronger than any coach at theUniversity.”Every year presents adifferent set of challenges, andAlabama is aware of the targetit will have on its back this sea-son. While success often breedscomplacency in most, this teamisn’t shying away from the chal-lenge. In fact, they’re embracingit.“There’s a lot of team own-ership this year,” Priess said.“We’re aware of the successwe’ve experienced and awareof what it takes to try to do itagain. That ownership has cre-ated a competitive atmospherewhere we have a lot of desire tobe successful again. That’s thedifference for this team becauseeverybody is willing to do whatit takes to be at the top.”
Priess’ impact 
Like every talented team,Alabama gymnastics has hadto deal with departures overthe years. Going into the 2012season, Alabama had to replaceHonda Award winner KaylaHoffman, and in 2013, Alabamahas to replace two-time indi-vidual NCAA champion and12-time All-American GeralenStack-Eaton.But Alabama won’t have toreplace fifth-year senior AshleyPriess. Priess, only the secondfifth-year senior in programhistory, received a medical red-shirt after breaking her rightankle and ripping ligamentsfrom the bone in the Super Sixat the 2010 nationals. It side-lined her in 2011, but never tookaway her fight.Priess bounced back in 2012,punctuating her comeback byclinching the championshipwith a 9.95 on the balance beam.Priess said she began dis-cussing it midway through lastseason and debated whetherher body could handle it, but theteam’s championship run lastseason made it an easy decision.“After nationals, even thoughit felt like the fairytale endingfor everything I could havehoped for,” she said, “there wassomething about the experienceand the journey with all thesegirls that made me think I’dbe crazy to not want to do thatagain.”She will have to be paced toavoid injury early in the sea-son, but her presence gives theTide another veteran leader. Asthe season progresses, Priessshould reemerge as an all-around competitor for the Tide.But it isn’t just her skills thathave teammates excited.“I’m thankful that she isback,” Gutierrez said. “Sheleads in so many different waysand is so good at what she does.I like to observe her. The coach-es have this look that lets usknow when we need to pick itup and she’ll walk around like‘hey, get it together.’ So havingher leadership on this team isa blessing in itself beyond hergymnastics.”
Tough Schedule
The Tide will face one of the toughest schedules in thenation. All nine of its oppo-nents are ranked in the top-25,including three of the top four,with UCLA at No. 2, Florida atNo. 3 and Oklahoma at No. 4.The Gators and Bruins, who fin-ished second and third last sea-son, respectively, in the tightestchampionship finish in gymnas-tics history, are separated by asingle point in the preseasonpoll.“It’s definitely the tough-est schedule I’ve experiencedduring my time here,” Priesssaid. “Teams are going to bringtheir best game when theysee Alabama. They’re goingto make sure they peak onthat night. For us, it’s a battleeach week of trying to be atour best. Yet, we also haveto be smart about timing ourpeak performance.”
GYMNASTICS
FROM PAGE 1
Crimson Tide to faceall top-25 opponents
DateOpponentLocationTime
Friday, Jan.11MissouriColumbia,Mo.6:30 p.m.Friday, Jan.18LSUTuscaloosa,Ala.7:30 p.m.Friday, Jan.25KentuckyTuscaloosa,Ala.7:30 p.m.Weekend of Feb. 1GeorgiaAthens, Ga.TBAFriday, Feb. 8FloridaGainsville,Fla.7 p.m. ETFriday, Feb.15AuburnTuscaloosa,Ala.7:30 p.m.Friday, Feb.22ArkansasFayetteville,Ark.7 p.m.Friday, March1UCLATuscaloosa,Ala.7:30 p.m.Friday, March8LSUBaton Rouge,La.7 p.m.Friday, March15OklahomaTuscaloosa,Ala.7:30 p.m.Saturday,March 23SECChampionshipLittle Rock,Ark.TBASaturday,April 6NCAARegionalsTuscaloosa,Ala.TBAFri.-Sun., April19-21NCAAChampionshipLos Angeles,Calif.TBA
Full Season Schedule
MCT Campus
Four fraternity brotherscharged in the felony hazingdeath of a Northern IllinoisUniversity freshman arescheduled to make their firstcourt appearances Friday inSycamore.Alexander Jandick, OmarSalameh, Steven Libert andJames Harvey were eachcharged with a felony lastmonth following the death of freshman David Bogenberger.Bogenberger, a 19-year-oldfinance major from Palatine,died of alcohol-induced hearttrouble at NIU’s Pi KappaAlpha chapter house after anight of heavy drinking duringan initiation party.The fraternity leaders areamong 22 students charged inconnection with Bogenberger’sdeath. The other 17 facemisdemeanor hazing charges.DeKalb police Lt. JasonLeverton said Thursday that18 of the 22 charged have sur-rendered to authorities sincepolice issued warrants for theirarrest Dec. 17.Bogenberger was found deadin the fraternity house Nov.2, the morning after he tookpart in a party called “ParentsNight” sponsored by the Pikeschapter and its associatedsorority.Participants, police said,went from room to room atthe fraternity, answering ques-tions posed by senior membersand sorority sisters, who thenpoured alcoholic drinks for thepledges.A postmortem showed thatBogenberger’s blood alcohollevel was almost five timesthe legal limit for driving. Theliquor he drank contributedsignificantly to a fatal heartarrhythmia, authorities said.The fraternity chapter wassuspended in the wake of Bogenberger’s death.Dr. Susan Lipkins, a NewYork psychologist and author,said most national fraternityorganizations do a poor jobof informing campus chapterleaders that they can be heldresponsible for hazing inci-dents that end badly.
ON THE RADAR 
4 facing felonies in NIU hazing death to make 1st court appearance Friday
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Thursday, January 10, 2013
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Page 3
By Taylor Veazey 
Contributing Writer
During the beginning of eachsemester, The University of Alabama Supply Store imple-ments extra workers, addi-tional registers and onlineoptions to serve approximatelytwo and half times the typicalamount of customers each daythroughout the first week of classes.To manage the volumeof customers, Supply StoreDirector Teresa Shreve saidthe SUPe Store hires extra staff to assist with preparing for thebook rush as well as assistingcustomers at the start of eachsemester. To prevent bookshortages, staff members worksome days during the holidaysprocessing shipments in orderto be better stocked, she said.“Additional training is con-ducted with the staff in orderto better serve the Universitycommunity,” Shreve said.Molly Moore, a junior major-ing in public relations, was inand out of the SUPe Store in 20minutes, which she said wasmuch faster than in the past.“Considering the amount of people that they have the firstweek of classes, they do a pret-ty good job,” Moore said.Moore attributed the quickservice to the amount of employees helping students.“Two workers came up tome immediately and asked if I needed help,” Moore said.“In the past you had to go findthem to ask a question.”The SUPe Store also providescourse material information onthe University registrar’s web-site and the store website, sostudents know what they needto purchase or rent when theycome to the SUPe Store.In addition, students canorder all their books andcourse materials online, to bepicked up in-store.“Students who order onlinethrough the store’s website areable to select in-store pick-upinstead of having to pay forshipping, which saves themmoney,” Shreve said.Tiffany Dargan, a seniormajoring in exercise and sportsscience, picked up her onlineorder inside the SUPe Store.She said she has switched toordering books online afterbuying inside the store a fewtimes.“It’s quicker,” Dargan said.“You just come in and pick upinstead of looking around foryour books.”Dargan said the onlineoption creates a smaller crowdin the store, which helps outthe students searching fortheir books. She also prefersbuying online because of theconvenience.“Online I can see exactlywhat I need and compare pric-es before I buy,” Dargan said.According to Shreve, theSUPe Store offers variousformat and price options suchas new, used, binder-ready,electronic books or rental.“These options are offeredin the store as well as onlineto assist students with stretch-ing their educational funds,”Shreve said.
SUPe store manages usual early semester rush
By Adrienne Burch
Assistant News Editor
University of Alabama alum-na, Sonequa Martin-Green, isseeing her dreams come truebefore her very eyes.Five years ago she spoke theline, “True I talk of dreams,which are the children of anidle brain,” while playing thecharacter of Mercutio in theUA department of theatreand dance’s production of Shakespeare’s “Romeo andJuliet.”She recently accepted roleson two major television shows,“Once Upon a Time” and “TheWalking Dead.”“Sonequa was ravenous as astudent,” said Seth Panitch, aUniversity of Alabama associ-ate professor of theatre.Panitch directed Martin-Green in her role as Mercutio.He said even when she was ayoung student, he saw some-thing in her that made him sureshe would be successful.“I had no doubt whatsoever,”he said. “I might have thoughtit would take longer than it did,but with the dedication, thedrive and the absolute dedica-tion to getting better every day,every role, I was convinced itwas only a matter of time forher.”Martin-Green landedher role on AMC’s hit-show“The Walking Dead” in lateNovember 2012 and within amonth was also cast in ABC’sshow “Once Upon a Time.”Entertainment Weeklyreports she will be a recurringcharacter in the second seasonof “Once Upon a Time” and pos-sibly the third.Martin-Green performed inseveral UA theatre productionsduring her time as a studentand was a regular act in AlphaPsi Omega’s Guerrilla Theatreshows.“There was an abandon-ment and an extreme sense of showmanship in the perfor-mance that lit up on stage,”Panitch said. “She was also ourbest sword fighter, so the com-bat sequence (in ‘Romeo andJuliet’) was a thrill to behold.”William Teague, theatredepartment chair, said hethinks there are two reasonsMartin-Green has succeeded inher career.“One is that she isincredibly driven,” he said. “Iknow I sound like Nick Sabantalking about football players,but she is incredibly focused onwhat she wants to do.”Teague said any student pur-suing a job in theatre or actingmust have a similar drive if they want to go anywhere. Hesaid the other reason Martin-Green has done so well isbecause she possesses an enor-mous amount of raw talent.“She has a beautiful speak-ing voice and carries herself with so much grace on and off the stage,” Teague said.Teague also said the talentcoming out of the deparmentof theatre and dance does notstop with Martin-Green. Withthe increase in Universityenrollment in recent years, hehas seen the talent level in hisdepartment elevate as well.“We have a lot of studentswho are very successful andnot just in performance roles,”he said. “One of our graduatesfrom the mid-1990s is the direc-tor of production at the GeorgiaAquarium. It’s not just in NewYork, it’s in other places too.”Per Martin-Green’s actingagent, she was unavailable tocomment by press time.
By Ashley Tripp
Staff Reporter
The University of Alabama’sPublic Relations StudentSociety of America chap-ter placed first in a nationalcontest to promote the Duckbrand College Duck Tape. Thechapter received a $1,000 prizefor their work during the fall2012 semester.“This campaign was agreat way to start off thesemester,” Melissa Stewart,co-director of Duck Tape forthe University, said. “I wasso pleased with the numberof students who participatedand helped implement it. Wecould not have led an award-winning campaign withouteveryone on our committeeand their hard work.”The Duck brand producesa College Duck Tape that fea-tures logos and mascots fromcollege teams across the coun-try. PRSSA chapters acrossthe country were challengedto develop a campaign to raiseawareness about the producton their campuses.Tracy Sims, the facultyadvisor for the University’sPRSSA chapter, said the UAteam produced great resultsunder a tight deadline.“Within a month’s time,they not only put together acomprehensive, multimediacommunication plan, but alsosuccessfully implementedit, exceeding their campaigngoals,” Sims said.The team utilized socialmedia to raise awareness,using the Twitter hashtag#DuckTapeforUA and creat-ing a Facebook events page.The team also created a boardon Pinterest.Kyle Borland, co-directorof the University’s team, saidDuck Tape for UA was his firstcampaign to work on, and hehad a great experience.“I’m so proud of the DuckTape team,” Borland said.“When I first heard the news,I couldn’t stop jumping upand down. Working so closelywith Melissa and the teamwas a blast. Although stress-ful at times, it is great to seethat our hard work paid off.”
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. They give a lot of o what to expect andneed to do to suc-said the most effec-r students to devel-urate impression of ule for which theytered is for the firstof classes to faith-sent the remainderester.e first day of class asration in how classbe used throughoutster,” he said. “Forthe first day, we do a minicase assignment based on theassigned reading for that dayto demonstrate how studentsare expected to be preparedfor class and how they shouldwork in groups. Students maynot understand their own abil-ity to manage several coursesat once and so may overloadtheir schedule with several dif-ficult and challenging courses.I believe it is better for thestudent to know on day onewhether they will be able tomanage their course load.”
 
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