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Chromatic Chemistry

Chromatic Chemistry

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Published by Paul Schumann
All You Ever Wanted to Know About Dyeing and Then Some
Presented by:
Shelley Abernathy
chemgeek05@aol.com
Melissa D. Jones
mdjchem@yahoo.com
For:
A Kaleidoscope of Chemistry in Katy
ACT2 11th Biennial Conference
June 28 - July 1, 2010
Sponsored by:
Flinn Scientific, Inc
All You Ever Wanted to Know About Dyeing and Then Some
Presented by:
Shelley Abernathy
chemgeek05@aol.com
Melissa D. Jones
mdjchem@yahoo.com
For:
A Kaleidoscope of Chemistry in Katy
ACT2 11th Biennial Conference
June 28 - July 1, 2010
Sponsored by:
Flinn Scientific, Inc

More info:

Published by: Paul Schumann on Jun 26, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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Chromatic Chemistry:
All You Ever Wanted to Know About Dyeing and Then Some
Presented by:Shelley Abernathychemgeek05@aol.comMelissa D. Jonesmdjchem@yahoo.comFor:
A Kaleidoscope of Chemistry in KatyACT
2
11
th
Biennial Conference June 28 - July 1, 2010
Sponsored by:Flinn Scientific, Inc
 
Table of Content
History of the Dye …………………………………………………………………...……3Quick Explanation of the Chemical Processes Involved in Tie-Dyeing…………………..3Helpful Hints………………………………………………………………………………4Color Chart………………………………………………………………………...………5Folding Patterns……………………………………………………...……………………7Dyeing Options………………………..…………………………………………………11Comparison table…………………………………………...……………………………12Traditional Tie Dye…………………...………………………………………………….15Silk in Microwave…………………..……………………………………………………17Shibori……………………………………...…………………………………………….19Marbling Paper …………………………………………………………………………..21Marbling Fabric…………………………….……………………………………………23References……….………………………………………………………………………25Appendix (Down and Dirty Instructions)………………………………………………262
 
HISTORY OF TIE DYE
Tie-Dye resist techniques have been practiced around the world in many forms for centuries. There are the Traditional Japanese Shibori, Indian Bandhana, and IndonesianPlangi or Tritik. Ancient examples have been found in South America as well.The endresults are random patterns that are either geometric or loose and free flowing and/or combinations of everything in between. Now a days, tie-dye describes a pattern of color made by preventing the dye fromreaching some areas of the fabric while dyeing others. Folding, tying, stitching,crumpling or otherwise preparing the fabric inhibits the flow of the dye to some areas.Usually most folding, scrunching and twisting is done with the wet shirt flat on a plasticcovered table. The pattern of the folds and where the colors are squirted helps todetermine what the design will be. However, surprise is part of what makes tie-dyeexciting and interesting.
QUICK EXPLANATION OF THE CHEMICAL PROCESSES INVOLVED INTIE-DYEING
Fiber reactive dyes attach permanently to cellulose fibers using a covalent (electron-sharing) bond. These molecules carry a "chromophore" which absorbs varying spectra of the light, allowing only certain spectra to reflect.Covalent bonding is one of the most basic and strongest types of chemical reactions. Thisreaction happens gradually over time depending on temperature and/or the pH level of the surrounding environment.The sodium carbonate pre-soak raises the pH level of the garment or fabric toapproximately 10.5. Raising the pH level of the solution that the fabric or garment issoaked in raises the level of negative hydroxide ions in the dyeing environment. Thechemical bonding process uses these ions in the reaction. Pre-soaking in sodiumcarbonate solution is what allows the fiber reactive dyes to work at room temperature.The reaction can also be aided with heat. Some tie-dyers have had success with using baking soda and microwaving their dyed articles. Since sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)is a weaker base than sodium carbonate, it must be accompanied by heat. Some peoplewho are "chemically sensitive" choose to use this method.The dye is allowed to react in a desirable host environment for up to 24 hours. After thistime, the bonding sites on the cellulose should be saturated with dye molecules. Excessdye molecules that have not bonded permanently are washed away using warm water rinse and a dye-carrying detergent.3

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