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The Merciad, Feb. 13, 1986

The Merciad, Feb. 13, 1986

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Feb. 13, 1986
The Merciad, Feb. 13, 1986

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THE
mERCIOD
VOLUME
59,
NUMBER 17THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
13,
1986
Foundations set forexchange with Chinese
By Betsy Lantz"They're very, very new at thehospitality industry but they're readyto explode," said an enthusiastic JohnWolper, director of the HotelRestaurant Management Department,regarding his recent experience inChina from Jan. 5 through Jan. 14.Wolper spent six days lecturingbefore an audience of 210 captivatedChinese at the Institute for Financialand Commercial Executive Development in Guangzhou (Canton). His dailylectures on the "Opening and Financing of Hotels and Staffing" were part ofa volunteer effort by Mercyhurst
Col-
Jnhn Wolper
and Gary Bukowski
(tenter) wilh
some faculty and students of GuangzhouInstitute where Wolper lectured for six days.
Concert ticketsselling well
By
Jennifer
Laird
Ticket sales for the Donnie Iris andthe Cruisers concert, scheduled for
Feb.
22 at 8 p.m., have been going exceptionally
well.
We can probably expect a sell-out," said Lisa Costello,director of the Student Union, ticketsales are expected to increase over thenext couple o* weeks due to recentadvertising on local radio stationK104.Pat Callahan, Special Projects Committee chairman, said "Support fromthe community has been great. Ourtotal sales as of Feb. 7 are $1,094.Sales in the next two weeks will bevery important." Callahan agrees withCostello that there is a good chance ofa sell-out."Showcase," a weekly entertainment section of the
Erie
Daily
Times,
has scheduled an interview with
Don
nie
Iris
prior to the concert whichshould also boost ticket sales.Tickets for the concert can be purchased at the Mercyhurst StudentUnion and Student Government Office,
Dahikemper's
in the
Milicreek
Mall,
Edinboro University, Gannon University, and Behrend College. Tickets are $5for Mercyhurst students with
ID
and $8for the general public.lege to assist the institute in developing a full-fledged HRM university.
If
the HRM program at the institutegains official recognition, it will be thefirst of its kind in China, a country ofover one billion people, and Mer
cyhurst's
name will be behind it,Wolper
said.
Dr. Chen Ji-Wen, president of the institute, affirmed the newly established
Chinese-Mercyhurst
partnership by honoring Wolper as professor
emeritus
of the Chinese school.According to Wolper,
both
he andhis guest Gary Bukowski, director ofAlumni Relations, were treated asroyalty by the Chinese. "The Chineseare so warm, intelligent and hospitablethat
I
feel like I've acquired a new
fami
ly,"
Woiper
commented. "I want to be apart of them and their growth whenthey discover the world.""Even though it's a communiststate,
I
didn't feel as if
I
was constantlybeing watched," Bukowski added."They are a very accomodating, genuine people."The Mercyhurst duo's "whirlwind"trip has set the foundation for potentialexchange programs between Mercyhurst and two Chinese schools.Through a tentative exchange with theinstitute, Wolper hopes to bring fourChinese teachers to Mercyhurst overthe next two years, placing them in atraining status in key HRM courses. In
return,
these trainees could teachclasses in Chinese cooking andliterature while at the college.continued on
page 3
AUGUST
SEPTEMBEF
OCTOBER
29
12
3
1010-1224
31
NOVEMBER
17-18
21DECEMBERJANUARYFEBRUARYMARCH
MARCHAPRILMAY
145
a
B
10
5
1213
16-17
203
4
5
61825
IS
21241
4
1219202124
FALL TERM
Frl.
Mon.
Tua.
Wed.
Wed.
Frl.JSun.
Frl.
Frl.
Mon.n*u«
Frl.
Mon.
Thu.Frl.
Mon.
Tu*.
Wed.
isee-is87Saptambar
3-Dacambar
1 1
Faculty WorkshopFreshman Orientation
ReglslrationJupperclassmen
returnFirst day ot
classes'late
registrationLast day to change/enter classesFall WeekendMid-term progress reports to RegistrarLast day to withdraw/declare pass-failWinter term registrationLast day ot classes/Thanksgiving vacation begins afterclassesClasses resumeCompleted work lor spring and summer
Incompleles lo
instructorsLast day ot
classes'spring
and summer Incompletes to RegistrarFINAL EXAMSFINAL EXAMSFINAL EXAMS
WINTER TERM: January
5-March
6
Mon.Mon.Frl.
Mon.lTue
Fri.Tue.Wed.Thu.Fri.
Firsl
day ot classes/late registrationLast day to change/enter classesMid-term progress reports to RegistrarSpring term registrationLast day
lo
withdraw/declare pass-failCompleted work for
(all
Incompletes to instructorsLast day ot
classes'lncompletes
to RegistrarFINAL EXAMSFINAL EXAMS
SPRING TERM: March 1
8-May
21
Wad.Wad.Thu.Tua.
Frl.Fri.
Mon.Tua.Tua.Wed.Thu.Sun.
First day of classes/late
registration
Last day
tochange'enter
classesLast day of classes/Easter vacation begins after classesClasses resume
Mid-term
progress reports to RegistrarLast day to withdraw/declare
pass-lail
Fall term registration beginsCompleted work for winter Incompletes to instructorsLast day of classes/winter term Incompletes to RegistrarFINAL EXAMS/senior grades to RegistrarFINAL EXAMSGRADUATION
1986-87 Academic Calendar announced
By R.J. ZonnaAcademic Dean Dr. David Palmerhas announced the 1986-87 academiccalendar. As he admits the calendar islate coming out."We like to get the calendar out earlyso schedules can be set up andeveryone knows what to expect," saidDr. Palmer.There is very little difference between the present academic calendarand next year's. In fact, next fall'sschedule is almost exactly the same asthis year's.Dr. Palmer
added,
"The fall scheduleis not that difficult; it's the winter andspring schedule that causes the
dif--
ficulties. The problem in the spring isthe floating Easter holiday. Thescheduling is dependent on whenEaster occurs."The Academic Dean explained thatin developing an academic calendar2,250 contact minutes or 38-40 hoursper trimester is the minimum standardallowed. "This is difficult to accomplish when you're dealing with 10week terms," he
said.
Fall classes will begin on Wed.,Sept. 3 and the last day of final examswill be Wed., Dec. 10. Fall Weekend isscheduled for Oct. 10-12.The winter term starts on Mon., Jan.5 and final exams are completed on
Fri.,
Mar.
6.Spring term begins on Wed., Mar. 18.Easter break will begin on
Fri.,
Apr. 17with classes resuming on Tue., Apr.
21.
Spring term concludes on Thu., May
21.
Graduation will take place on Sun.,
May 24.
Dr. Palmer said he must be realisticin developing the academic calendar,adding that sometimes being realisticputs a great deal of pressure upon him."The academic calendar is for properly scheduling classes so werealistically get in the proper amountof time," he concluded.
INSIDEAt MSG
p.
2Editorial p. 4Circle K
p.
6BulletinBoard p. 7
 
PAGE
2
THE MERCIADFEBRUARY 13, 1986
At
MSG
Elections moved, money raisedfor
Big
Brothers and Sisters
By Susan
Marcy
A proposal
to
move studentgovernment elections
to Apr.
1-2
was
passed
at
Sundaynight's MSG meeting. Lettersof intent
for
next year's
of
ficers
are due by Mar. 3 and
the open forum
for the
can
didates will be held Mar. 25-26.MSG President David Armstrong announced that Mercyhurst will
be
obtaining
10
rooms at the Jolly Roger Motelin Florida which means therewill
be
accomodations
for 40
people.
At
this point,
32
students have signed
up for
the complete spring breakpackage.
Two-hundred
and
fiftydollars
was
raised throughMercyhurst College for the
Big
Brothers
and Big
SistersOrganization
at the
CelebrityBowl last Saturday.
MSG
donated
$100
each
to
Armstrong
and MSG
Vice-President Matt Whelan.
The
college donated
$25
each
to
the
two
bowlers.A proposal
was
made
for a
Student Activities Committeeofficers' compensation
by a
proposal committee formed byPat Callahan, Tracy
Wasson
and
Sue
Trumbull.
The
committee asked that $500scholarships
be
awarded
to
the following
SAC
officers:vice-chairperson, secretary,treasurer and public relationsofficer. These positions
are
appointed
by the
MSG president,
SAC
director
and SAC
chairperson,
who is
alreadyawarded money through MSG.The proposal
was
passed
and
will take effect beginning withnext year's officers. One
of
theMSG representatives who wasin favor
of
the proposal
said,
"I
think everyone should
be
awarded
for
what they
do."
The money awarded
to
theseofficers will
be
taken
out of
the SAC budget.Mercyhurst InternationalStudents Organization President Humayun Ahmed
re
quested that $300
be
given
to
the organization
for
their Feb.21 trip
to
Toronto
to
visit thatcity's science museum.
A
quorum
was
called, requiringtwo-thirds
of the
representatives to vote on the proposal.Since
a
quorum
was not
present,
the
proposal could
not
be voted upon
and the
meeting was adjourned.This Sunday's meeting willtake place
in
114 Zurn
at 7:30
p.m.
Luau'
86, a
huge success, featured "native" Mercyhurst students,
(I
to
11
Bruce Rubino, Paul Mack and
Pal
Allen.
Put your humor
to
good use.
The
ftvth annual joke contesthas begun.
The
dealine
is
Friday, March
21.
Submit jokes
to
Campus Ministry,The ground rules
for the
contest include these restrictions;no maliciousness,
or
injury
to
persons, property
or
reputation.Mercyhurst College
and
Campus Ministry
are
excludedfrom potential defamation liability.First prize
for the
contest wilt
be
$15.00; second prize$10.00;and thirdprize, $5.00.
For
further information call Campus Ministry.
Senior Matthew Whelanreceived
The
Sister CarolynHerrmann Senior Award
at
the Senior Banquet. Matt
is in-
volved
in
activities
of
Mercyhurst
and
the Erie community.
His
accomplishments
in-
clude: being
a
member
of
bothAlpha
Phi
Sigma NationalCriminal Justice Honor Socei-ty
and the
varsity soccer team,vice-president
and
special projects coordinator
of the
student government,
a
volunteersoccer coach
for the
YMCAand
St.
James School,
a
volunteer
for
Erie SpecialOlympics
and
recipient
of the
1985
Proeject Identificationfor
Pre-School
Children.
$40,000 goal
Alumni interest increasesfor sixth annual phonathon
By Matthew J. Clark
Alumni have returned
to the
'Hurst
to
participate
in the
sixth annual Mercyhurst
Col
lege Phonathon which bearsthe theme "Have
a
Heart
-
Help
the
'Hurst.There will
be at
least
30
alumni, double last year'snumber, taking part
in
the Feb.16-27 event
in
order
to
raisescholarship funds
for
Mercyhurst students.
5 Mercyhurst Student Government $
^
presents:
&
DONNIE IRIS
AND THE CRUISERS
4
Last year's experiencewith alumni
was so
positive,we've expanded
the
callingsession with more alumni,"said Gary Bukowski, directorof Alumni Relations.This year there will
be two
teams
of
alumni which will
be
headed
by
Dario Cipriani,,
a
member
of the
Alumni Boardand
a
graduate
of the
class
of
1974.
The goal
of
this year'sPhonathon, which
is
beingheld
in the
Blue Room
for
thesecond straight year, has beenset
at
$40,000,
a
$10,000
in
crease over last year.Bukowski said that reachingthis year's goal
is
possible
but
added,
"It's one of the
toughest goals we've evergone after."The kickoff
for the 1986
Phonathon
on Sun., Feb. 16
will
be
totally
manned
by
alumni.This
is
perhaps
the
clearest evidence
of the in
creased amount
of
alumni
in
terest
in the
Phonathon."Alumni really believe in
the
Phonathon and
in the
benefitsit offers
to
students throughthe money
it
raises," saidBukowski.Bukowski added that
he
would encourage anyone
in
terested
in
working
at the
Phonathon
to do so. "The
more
the
students
get
involv
ed,
the
more they understandthe importance
of
donatingmoney
to the
college upongraduation," he explained.Anyone
who
participates
in
the Phonathon will receive
a
free T-shirt
for
helping
out.
Cash prizes will also be awarded
to the
first
and
secondplace teams."We're inviting
as
manyvolunteers
as
possible
to
takepart
in the
Phonathon,"
con
cluded Bukowski. Those
in
terested
can
sign
up at the
Alumni Relations Office, Main
216,
or
call ext. 245
or
246
for
more information.
Featuring opening band:"Friction"
d
J
Date:
Saturday, February
22,1986
*
Time:
8:00
p.m.
^fc
Place:
Mercyhurst Campus Center
d
Tickets:
$8.00 General Admission
A
only
$£00
X
»HMi^v^H
saie time
to Mercyhurst Student (with
I.D.)
See Bulletin Board for advance ticket
j
A
sale times and places
°2
Stick-on Easter
Egg
Decorating Kits
24-
Egg Kit for
*2.00
See Campus Ministry
for
more details
or
orders
 
FEBRUARY
13,1986
THE
MERCIAD
"Chinese hospitality industryready to explode," says Wolper
story continued from page 1
In
a reciprocal gesture, theChinese at the institute haveoffered to house and pay forthe training of any qualifiedtourism program will flourishas Guangzhou is only threehours from Hong Kong, a cityhe dubs "the eighth wonder ofthe world."
»
*•
View of South China
Mercyhurst
students interested in attending their
school.
"They are not at thelevel of sophistication whereour students would benefit as
far
as development in the HRM
field,"
Wolper admitted, "butif you want to learn aboutChinese culture and
cooking.
Canton is the best in the
world."
The Chinese have also extended an invitation to anyprofessors at Mercyhurst whowould like to spend a few
mon
ths as guests at the institute.Wolper himself declined an offer to return to the institute forone full year.Bukowski met withrepresentatives of SouthChina Normal University regarding a similar proposal thatwould allow an exchange inthe areas of philosophy,education,English literatureand Chinese history. Contacting Dr. Li Kerning, presidentof the university, was a majorobstacle for Bukowski. Advance phone calls and lettersproved futile as contacts atthe university did not speak
English.
Only after four daysand the help of two interpreters did Bukowski finallymeet with Kerning.According to Bukowski,education professor EdwardGallagher and professor oflanguages Dr. Marilyn Jewellwill be pursuing furthernegotiations. Bukowski hopesto see an initial faculty exchange between Mercyhurstand the university, followed bya student exchange.Although Wolper and Ji-Wen also agreed that Chinesestudents should not bebrought to Mercyhurst at thispoint, the Chinese government is willing to sponsortheir students who wish tostudy in the United States,once their own HRM programis fully developed. "Most ofthe students that
I
met inChina have an intense' desireto come to the United Statesto go to school," Bukowski
noted.
Wolper is convinced thatthe institute's own HRM andNormal UniversityAlthough the institute is only in its second year of opera
tion,
it also has its ownstudent-operated restaurantwith profits benefitting thecurrent tourism managementprogram. "With their locationand facilities, the institute isin a position to double itscapacity each year," Wolper
said,
"even though theChinese traditionally considerthemselves a humble and poorinstitute and country."The depth of this self-effacing humility ingrained inthe Chinese was epitomized in
Ji-Wen.
Although Ji-Wen ispresident of the institute witha Ph.D. in economics from
Col
umbia University in the U.S., itgraduate level. The generalmanager of one resort hoteldrove in five hours daily tolisten to Wolper speak."They were the most intense and absorbed individuals
I
have ever seen in aclassroom," Bukowskiacknowledged. "They wantedevery question answered. Itwas as if they were suckingknowledge out of us both - allthat they could absorb abouthow Americans doeverything."Since technological growthand modernization have onlyrecently been promoted inChina under the
rule
of DengXiaoping beginning in 1977,the Chinese feel that theymust move now in order tomake up for a great deal of lost
time,
Bukowski explained."Every student
I
met had afavorable impression of Xiaop
ing.
They want to get right tothe meat of technology."Noting that the Chineseeducators with whom he metwere also very intense,Bukowski concluded, "Theywant everything to happenright away in regards to theseexchange programs. As anAmerican,
I
must admit thatwe may move a little slower,just because we want to makesure all the details are nailed
down."
Gary Bukowski with South Chinatook Wolper eight days tolearn his host's title at the institute. And this he established only by directly questioning
Ji-Wen.
"His
office
was theequivalent of our janitor'scloset," Wolper said of Ji-
Wen.
In fact, there is no indoorlighting or heating at the institute. This made the size ofWolper's audience at lectures,and their intense concentration on the subject, extremelysurprising; students werehoused in a barren, cementhall in 40 degreetemperatures. Yet the Chinese"literally hung on every word
I
said,"
remarked an incrediblyimpressed Wolper.He was also pleased to findthat over 70 general, vice anddeputy managers from thelargest hotels in Guangzhouand the surrounding provincewere among his audience,which also included a majorityof students at the post-Normal Univ. President of Faculty.
£
DUBLIN'S OWN
J|
jfc!
Dating Snrjle £
'jj
IRELAND'S MOST
'j?
(;
v
POPULAR
BALLADEER*
-J
Thursday, February 27th
•»
at 8:00 p.m.
*
j,
in Caulley Auditorium
_
;. 215
East
4th St.
%
*
Tickets
'8.00
>
l|>.
or $9.00 at the door
J.
~
(if available)
~
r
Purchase tickets at i|
*
SULLIVAN'S*
*
CAFE
3rd and French St.
PAGE
3
Consumer Psychologyclass to be offered
Do you know why you likethe music you
like,
why youchoose the movies you see, orbuy the clothes that you buy?
Do
you know why other peopledon't like what you like? If not,you might find out theanswers by enrolling in a newcourse that will be offered this
spring;
Psychology275-Consumer Behavior.In
this
course, psychologist-musician Dr. Mark Gridley willapply principles of psychologyto explaining why people likewhat they like and buy whatthey buy. How can you grab aperson's attention? How canyou change someone's
opi
nion? How can you predictwhere someone will shop?Gridley will explain theanswers to these questions bycombining his knowledge ofpsychology with his own experiences writing advertisingcopy, broadcasting on theradio and publicizing bands.Gridley is an active member ofthe Association for ConsumerResearch, the AmericanMarketing Association and theConsumer Psychology
divi
sion of the AmericanPsychological Association.Consumer Psychology canbe important for two reasons."Most liberal arts graduatesfind themselves in thebusiness world. Therefore,Mercyhurst students wouldbenefit by learning the skillsof salesmanship that derivefrom the psychology of
con
sumer behavior," said Gridley."Even those who do notthink of themselves as'businesspeople'
will
benefitfrom this course. They have tosell their ideas
and
values, justas business people do," hecontinued.Another advantage of takingthe course is to determine thedifference between what wereally want and what we aremanipulated to want. "Weneed to understand the waysbuyers are irrational and howpredictable those irrationalities are," concludedGridley.Practical aspects of thecourse also include numerousfield trips to critique localstore practices. Students
will
enjoy the participation ofguest speakers who are experts in marketing movies,restaurants and clothing. Thecourse is in the psychologylistings of the spring termschedule. It is slated to takeplace
M-W-F,
1:45 to 3:15 p.m.Consumer Behavior is a threecredit elective, and there areno prerequisites.
REGISTRATION
Mon.
Feb. 17 9
a.m.-12
noon Seniors/Juniors
Mon.,
Feb. 17 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Adult College Students
Mon.,
Feb. 17 9 a.m.-4 p.m. SophomoresTues.,Feb. 18 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Freshmen
Wed.-Fri.
Feb.
19-21
9 a.m.-4 p.m. All Students
«
"Erie's
oldest
Irish
^
^Drinking
Establishment'
*
< V A A V
*'
ill
6&.
Free Delivery
Sunday-Thursday
8:00-12:00
Open for pickup
Fri.
&
Sat.
4-11
825-2041
FRESH DOUGH PIZZA
With Cheese & Pepperoni16"only
$
6.50 14"only
$
4.50
WINGS
18-M.00 36-'6.00Barbecue
-
Medium - Hot
FREE Liter of Popwith any Pizza
COUPON EXPIRES
2/19/86

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