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Power Bike

Power Bike

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Published by Greg Anguish

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Published by: Greg Anguish on Apr 07, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/13/2014

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Power Bike
 
 
By
Earl Seidlinqer 
 ASOLINE-powered engines have beenpopular with bicycle enthusiasts eversince such engines were made small
 
enough to fit a bicycle frame. The powerbike described here is belt-driven. It willgo up to 35 m.p.h. on level stretches. It isdefinitely not a toy that can be hammeredor wired together in a few hours, but re-
 
quires a moderate amount of familiaritywith engines and experience in the use of 
 
machine tools. For the bike shown, a 1-hp.Briggs & Stratton engine was used—butany air-cooled engine of from 1 to 1 1/2
 
hp.will do the trick. Start construction by al-tering the bicycle frame (Fig. 1). The rear
 
forks are cut, bent out, and added to asrequired to allow clearance for the secondrear-wheel rim shown in Fig. 4. This rimis welded directly to the back wheel andacts as a large sheave over which the drive
 
belt runs.A 1/4x6xl3-in. steel base plate is
 
notched as shown and welded to theframe. Care must be taken to have thenotched side toward the sprocket side of 
 
the bike. The notch makes room for thebrake pedal.
11*X4*X3/8*PLYWOODFOOT REST (2)
 
-CUT 1/2* NOTCH
 
| —BICYCLE-FRAME ALTERATION
 
BASE PLATE SHOULD
RIDE 'HORIZONTALLY
 
2-FOOT-REST INSTALLATION
 
REAR FORKS EITHERHEATED ANO BENT OUTWARDOR CUT ANO EXTENDED BYWELDING IN SMALLTUBULAR SECTIONS..
 
DIAGONAL TUBE —ORIGINAL POSITION
 
. ABOUT 2' TOCLEAR MOTOF
 
X
 
ORIGINAL FORKPOSITION
 
-WELDWELDDIA. ROD
 
Holes are drilled in the base to take theengine hold-down bolts. The exact loca-
 
tion of the holes will be determined by themounting holes in the particular engine
 
you use. Make sure that when the engineis bolted down its drive pulley lines upwith the extra rear-wheel rim. The footrests and their mountings (Fig. 2) are ad-ded next.For hooking up the engine, quite a fewsmall parts must be made. The drawingscontain all necessary dimensions. Twoparts are tricky—the clutch and the brake.The latter utilizes the coaster brake al-ready on the bike. Its assembly is clearlyshown in Fig. 3. A short length of chain iscut and run over the rear sprocket. Theupper end is fastened to a 3-in. length of door spring, which in turn is anchored to
 
the bike frame. The lower end is securedto a specially made chain connector and
 
thence through a brake rod to a pedal.The clutch (Fig. 7), although it mayseem complicated, is relatively simple. Theclutch-operation diagram explains how itworks. "When clutch arm,
 A,
is pushed
 
down, pivoting at point
 E,
it pulls rod,
 D.
thus working lever,
 B,
and pulling idlerpulley,
C,
from drive belt. This operationdisengages the clutch. To reengage, slowlylet up on the clutch arm. For locking the
 
clutch in disengaged position, a 1/4-in. pinprotrudes from the clutch arm. This ridesin a notch in the spring-loaded lockingbar.Gasoline is fed by means of either one
 
of the handlebar grips (Fig. 8). Ream itout with sandpaper so it will slide and ro-
 
tate easily over the handlebar, into the endof which a wooden plug and pin are driven.The plug must fit tightly enough so it can't
 
turn. The pin tip fits into the thread of a1/4"x4-in. bolt. The inner end of the bolthas a hole drilled through it to take thegas-feed wire, which in turn connects tothe
DOUBLE HIM REMOVE TIRE FROM CEMENT IN
 
EXPLAINS NEED REAR-WHEEL RIM. RUBBER TAPE
 
FOR WIDENED WELD SIMILAR FOR POSITIVE
 
REAR FORKS STEEL RIM TO IT BELT TRACTION
 
ATTACH TAIL PIPE TO BRACE
5-EXHAUST SYSTEM
 
CUT LOWER LEFTRK ARM
 
Closeup of engine, below, clearly shows throttleassembly, position of the coil, and how the one-quart gasoline tank is mounted behind the engine.
 
4-REAR
-WHEEL ALTERATION
-ENGINE BASE MOUNTED ONRUBBER PADS
 
OLD BED POSTS
(
ALREADY CURVED
)
 
 
 
Here's how the V-type drive belt is installed.
 
Clearly evident are the drive pulley, the clutch
 
pulley, and the extra welded-on rear-wheel rim.
 
 
carburetor. A ^-in. hole is drilled throughthe handlebar, as shown, to let this wire,which must not interfere with the steeringmovements, out. To protect the wire, encase
 
it in a length of curtain-hanger spring.All auxiliary parts of the engine, such asignition coil or battery, must be mountedwherever there is room. Bicycle framesand engine parts differ; so no set rule can
 
apply. The same holds true for the exhaustpipe. In this particular installation, the ex-haust pipe was made from an old iron bedpost (Fig. 5). It fell into place without anyalteration of curvature being necessary.
 
The engine should be mounted on vibra-tion-dampening rubber pads, % in. thick 
 
by 2 in. dia. Further to absorb engine vi-bration, a coil spring from a bicycle seatis bolted to the front bar in such a position
 
that it rides against the upper part of thecrankcase (Fig 7).
 
Standard equipment on the engine shownwas a 3-in. drive sheave. Experimentationproved this to be slightly large. Instead of reducing it, the extra rear-wheel rim wasincreased proportionately by building up
 
its diameter with rubber tape. This workedwell and had the added merit of increasing
 
the friction between belt and wheel rim. Asshown in one of the photos, a piece was cutout of the rear fender to allow the belt topass without scraping.A continuous V-belt may be pur-

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