Fire Investigation Summary

Board and Care
Arlington, Washington April 27, 1998

A fire in a board and care facility claimed the lives of 8 people. This is another fire in this type of occupancy where some of the same common factors are being seen-notably, the lack of a sprinkler system and open doors that allowed the fire to spread to the second floor.

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National Fire Protection Association Fire Investigations Department

On April 27, 1998, a fire occurred in an occupied board and care facility in Arlington, Washington. This fire killed eight of the building’s 32 residents. The facility was a two-story, wood-frame structure that had originally been built as a hospital in 1908. Since that time, it had undergone several renovations and changes in usage. The building was not equipped with an automatic fire sprinkler system. A local fire alarm system was installed with hardwired, AC powered smoke detectors and heat detectors located in the corridors and common areas. Manual pull stations were located adjacent to the exterior exit doors. One audible device was located on each floor.

At approximately 11:00 p.m., a fire broke out in a first floor room occupied by three woman. The fire was discovered by a staff member who opened the door to the room of origin while she was conducting a routine bed check. She advanced into the room several steps, but the fire was too severe for her to attempt any action. She retreated back into the corridor, leaving the door to the room open. She then yelled out for the other employee, who was in the basement. The second staff member came up to the first floor and observed the fire, which had not yet extended into the corridor. The second staff member then proceeded up to the second floor to begin evacuating the residents on that level. She reported that at approximately this time the fire alarm, which was a local system, began to sound. Assisted by a female resident, she began to wake the residents on the second floor.

The upper level had three means of egress: a stairwell on the north end that discharged to the exterior, an exterior door on the south end that led to an exterior The fire extended from handicapped ramp, and an the room of origin, interior stairway in the middle through the open door, of the floor area that into the first floor discharged into the corridor corridor. Immediately on the first floor. This adjacent to this room was interior stairway had a solid the interior stairway Room of Origin. It was determined that the core door that was equipped between the first and fire started in the bed. with an automatic door closer second floors. The fire located on a landing between then extended up this levels. It was determined that at the time of the fire stairway, to the second floor. The door had been the door was held open by a 10-pound block. blocked open and did not impede the movement of the smoke and fire to the second level. The building was wood frame structure. The interior wall and ceiling finish was either gypsum The Arlington Fire Department was notified of the wallboard or plaster and lathe. The floor finish fire when the staff member who discovered the fire throughout the building was either linoleum or tile. called 911. The fire fighters responded from a station located 1/2 mile (0.8 km) away. Upon arrival, they Thirty-two residents and two staff members were extended a hoseline in the north entrance to the room of in the building at the time of the fire. The residents origin and extinguished the fire with approximately 200 were mentally challenged and had varying degrees of gallons (750 L) of water. physical handicaps. -NFPA Fire Investigations Summary-Arlington, WA Board and Care ©-

Eight residents were killed-the three occupants in the room of origin, three women in a second floor bedroom that was directly opposite the interior stairway that served as a path of travel for the fire, and two women who were found in a second-floor bathroom adjacent to the interior stairway. At least one of the women in the second-floor bedroom who was killed had stopped to begin getting dressed. The two women found in the bathroom had been in their room on the north end of the floor, immediately adjacent to an exit stairway. Apparently, they were attempting to travel south to the handicapped ramp to exit the building when they either became disoriented or attempted to take refuge in the bathroom, where they subsequently were killed. The fire was determined by the Snohomish Fire Marshal’s office to be incendiary in nature. The area of origin was a bed in the first floor room where it is believed that the resident ignited her bedding material using either a lighter or matches. Based on the NFPA’s investigation and analysis of this fire, the following significant factors are considered as having contributed to the loss of life and property in this incident:

• An open door on the second-floor bedroom that was directly in the line with the stairway where the fire extended to the second floor • Failure of two second-floor residents to use the exit stairway immediately adjacent to their room Abstracts from these incidents are including in an appendix to this report. Copies of the full reports can be ordered from the NFPA Library. This fire is the seventh fatal board and care fire investigated by NFPA since December, 1984. These seven incidents have resulted in a total of 50 fatalities over a period of 3-1/2 years. The other six incidents include: Broward County, FL Mississauga, Ontario Laurinburg, North Carolina Shelby County, Tennessee Ste. Genevieve, Quebec Harveys Lake, Pennsylvania 5 Fatalities 8 fatalities 8 fatalities 4 fatalities 7 fatalities 10 fatalities

North
Room 5 Room 8 Room 6 Room 3 Room 4

• Ignition of bedding material • Lack of an automatic fire sprinkler system • Lack of system smoke detectors in the room of origin • An open door to the room of origin that allowed the fire to spread into the corridor • An open fire door that allowed the fire to spread from the first floor to the second floor • An open door on the second-floor bedroom that was directly in the line with the stairway where the fire extended to the second floor • Failure of two second-floor residents to use the exit stairway immediately adjacent to their room • An open door to the room of origin that allowed the fire to spread into the corridor • An open fire door that allowed the fire to spread from the first floor to the second floor

Down Up Room 1 Origin

Nurse’s Station

Room 2

TV Room

Kitchen

Dining Area

Arlington, Washington Board and Care First Floor =Fatality

-NFPA Fire Investigations Summary-Arlington Board and Care ©-

Fire Investigation Summary Board and Care Fire
Arlington, Washington April 27, 1998

The National Fire Protection Association's Fire Investigations Department documents some of the most significant fires and incidents throughout the world. The objective of these investigations is to determine what lessons can be learned from these incidents. This information is then made available to the fire safety community to be used in developing future codes and standards. A complete listing of reports is available, either upon request or can be viewed on our web page.

NFPA Fire Investigations Department One Batterymarch Park Quincy, MA 02269 USA 1-617-984-7467 (tel) 1-617-984-7056 (fax) investigations@nfpa.org www.nfpa.org

Related reports published by the NFPA Fire Investigations Department include:
Broward County, FL Mississauga, Ontario Laurinburg, North Carolina Shelby County, Tennessee Ste. Genevieve, Quebec Harveys Lake, Pennsylvania

To order full copies of this report, or any other Fire Investigation report...
Contact the NFPA’s Charles S. Morgan Library. 1-617-984-7445 (tel) 1-617-984-7060 (fax) library@nfpa.org

WASHINGTON APRIL 27.BOARD AND CARE ARLINGTON. 1998 .

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1998 8 Fatalities Prepared by Ed Comeau Chief Fire Investigator National Fire Protection Association . Washington April 27.Board and Care Arlington.

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This fire killed eight of the building’s 32 residents. The upper level had two means of egress: a stairwell on the north end that discharged to the exterior. Thirty-two residents and two staff members were in the building at the time of the fire. The floor finish throughout the building was either linoleum or tile. This stairway would be more appropriately classified as a convenience stair since it did not meet the requirements for exit enclosure or vertical opening protection. a fire broke out in a first floor room occupied by three woman. 1998. The building was not equipped with an automatic fire sprinkler system.org © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.nfpa. a fire occurred in an occupied board and care facility in Arlington.. The residents were mentally challenged and had varying degrees of physical handicaps. At approximately 11:00 p. MA 02269 USA Phone: 617-984-7467 Fax : 617-984-7056 Email : investigations@nfpa. Manual pull stations were located adjacent to the exterior exit doors. She retreated back into the corridor.ABSTRACT On April 27. The facility was a two-story. It was determined that at the time of the fire the door was held open by a 10-pound block. Since that time. and an exterior door on the south end that led to an exterior handicapped ramp. A local fire alarm system was installed with hardwired. The fire was discovered by a staff member who opened the door to the room of origin while she was conducting a routine bed check. WA Board and Care Page 1 . The building was wood frame structure. She advanced into the room several steps. One audible device was located on each floor. She then yelled out for the NFPA Fire Investigations Department One Batterymarch Park Quincy.m. An an interior stairway in the middle of the floor area discharged into the corridor on the first floor. wood-frame structure that had originally been built as a hospital in 1908.org Web site: www. This interior stairway had a solid core door that was equipped with an automatic door closer located on a landing between levels. AC powered smoke detectors and heat detectors located in the corridors and common areas. but the fire was too severe for her to attempt any action. leaving the door to the room open. it had undergone several renovations and changes in usage. The interior wall and ceiling finish was either gypsum wallboard or plaster and lathe. Washington.

She reported that at approximately this time the fire alarm. WA Board and Care . which had not yet extended into the corridor. which allowed the movement of the smoke and fire to the second level. The fire fighters responded from a station located 1/2 mile (0. The fire was determined by the Snohomish Fire Marshal’s office to be incendiary in nature. to the second floor. The two women found in the bathroom had been in their room on the north end of the floor. immediately adjacent to an exit stairway.8 km) away. they were attempting to travel south to the handicapped ramp to exit the building when they either became disoriented or attempted to take refuge in the bathroom. they extended a hoseline in the north entrance to the room of origin and extinguished the fire with approximately 200 gallons (750 L) of water. who was in the basement. Assisted by a female resident. The door had been blocked open. three women in a second floor bedroom that was directly opposite the interior stairway that served as a path of travel for the fire.other employee. At least one of the women in the second-floor bedroom who was killed had stopped to begin getting dressed. The Arlington Fire Department was notified of the fire when the staff member who discovered the fire called 911. The fire then extended up this stairway. The second staff member came up to the first floor and observed the fire. Upon arrival. The area of origin was a bed in the first floor room where it is believed that the resident ignited her bedding material using either a lighter or matches. The second staff member then proceeded up to the second floor to begin evacuating the residents on that level. into the first floor corridor. Apparently. she began to wake the residents on the second floor. The fire extended from the room of origin. Eight residents were killed-three occupants in the room of origin. where they subsequently were killed. which was a local system. Immediately adjacent to this room was the interior stairway between the first and second floors. through the open door. Page 2 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. began to sound. and two women who were found in a second-floor bathroom adjacent to the interior stairway.

Tennessee Ste. Genevieve. FL Mississauga. Copies of the full reports can be ordered from the NFPA Library. WA Board and Care Page 3 . North Carolina Shelby County. Ontario Laurinburg. 1984. Pennsylvania 5 Fatalities 8 fatalities 8 fatalities 4 fatalities 7 fatalities 10 fatalities Abstracts from these incidents are included in an appendix to this report. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.Based on the NFPA’s investigation and analysis of this fire. The other six incidents include: Broward County. These seven incidents have resulted in a total of 50 fatalities over a period of 31/2 years. the following significant factors are considered as having contributed to the loss of life and property in this incident: • Ignition of bedding material • Lack of an automatic fire sprinkler system • Lack of system smoke detectors in the room of origin • An open door to the room of origin that allowed the fire to spread into the corridor • An open fire door that allowed the fire to spread from the first floor to the second floor • An open door on the second-floor bedroom that was directly in the line with the stairway where the fire extended to the second floor • Failure of two second-floor residents to use the exit stairway immediately adjacent to their room This fire is the seventh fatal board and care fire investigated by NFPA since December. Quebec Harveys Lake.

WA Board and Care .Page 4 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.

Background Occupancy Classification The Building Furnishings Fire Protection Systems Means of Egress Building Occupants Staff Training Weather III. Discussion 19 20 22 24 27 29 29 33 39 41 VII. WA Board and Care Page 5 . The Fire Discovery and Occupant Activities Fire Department Notification and Response Casualties Damage IV. Introduction II.CONTENTS Page 7 9 9 11 11 13 17 17 18 I. Analysis Cause and Origin Fire Growth and Spread VI. Conclusion Appendix A Abstracts from Related NFPA Fire Investigation Reports © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. Timeline V.

WA Board and Care .Page 6 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.

The NFPA has not analyzed the building regarding its compliance with the codes and standards that were in existence when it was built or during its operation. The NFPA’s Fire Investigation Department documents and analyzes incident details so that it may report lessons learned for life safety and property loss prevention purposes. WA Board and Care Page 7 . Chief Fire Investigator of the NFPA Fire Investigations Department. That three-day. All information and details regarding fire safety conditions are based on the best available data and observations made during the onsite data collection phase and on any additional information provided during the report development process. INTRODUCTION The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) investigated the Arlington. Current codes and standards were used as criteria for this analysis so that conditions at the building on the day of the fire could be compared with state-of-the-art fire protection practices. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. the NFPA intends that its report present the findings of the NFPA data collection and analysis effort and highlight factors that contributed to the loss of life or property. and Edward Comeau. Rather. visited Arlington. Entry to the fire scene and data collection activities were made possible through the cooperation of the Arlington Fire Department. It is not the NFPA's intention that this report pass judgment on. or fix liability for. that these codes and standards may not have been in effect during construction or operation of the facility. Board and Care Fire in order to document and analyze significant factors that resulted in the loss of life and property. documentation and analysis of the event are the basis for this report. however. Washington to perform an on-site study of this incident.I. This report is another of the NFPA’s studies of fires having particular important educational or technical interest. Washington. It is recognized. The investigation was conducted by the NFPA as part of its ongoing program to investigate technically significant incidents. on-site study. The NFPA became aware of the fire on the day it occurred. the loss of life or property resulting from the Arlington Board and Care fire.

the Snohomish County Fire Marshals Office and the Washington State Fire Marshal’s Office is greatly appreciated. WA Board and Care .The cooperation and assistance of the Arlington Fire Department. Page 8 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.

The southeast corner of the facility.II. wooden studs on both the exterior walls and interior partitions. THE BUILDING The building was a two-story. x 6-in. WA Board and Care Page 9 . Photo 1. x 1/2-in. (305-mm x 305-mm x 13-mm) tiles were adhered to the © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. and in the early 1960’s the building was converted to a nursing home. BACKGROUND OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION Per NFPA 101®. Structural support was provided by 2-in. x 12-in. Life Safety Code®. The hospital vacated the building in the late 1950’s. The interior wall and ceiling finish was comprised of either plaster and lathe or gypsum wallboard attached directly to the studs or joists. The building measured approximately 130 feet by 36 feet (40 m by 11 m). In 1979 it was converted and licensed as a board and care facility. this facility would have been classified as a large board and care facility. 12-in. wood-frame structure that had been originally built as a hospital in 1908. In the corridor on the first floor.

The building was supplied with natural gas. A Type V (000) structure will have a 0hour fire resistance rating for the exterior bearing walls (first digit). WA Board and Care . This area contained the boiler for the heating system. It appeared that these tiles were not combustible. and a clothes washer and dryer.1 m) wide. this structure would be of Type V (000) construction with a fully sheathed interior of either lath and plaster or gypsum wallboard. There were handrails provided to assist the residents in moving down the corridors. There were no automatic door closures. The corridors measured 7 ft (2. Page 10 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The floor finish was either linoleum or 12-in. an emergency generator. According to NFPA 220.118-mm) wide. There was a basement under a portion of the building. The hardware was conventional knob-style. non-locking. No fire rating labels were found on the doors or door frames. Heating for the building was provided by a natural gas fueled boiler in the basement that circulated hot water through a radiator system. but that the mastic failed during the fire. latching hardware. No obstructions or storage was observed in the corridors. causing them to fall. Each of the bedrooms was equipped with a 44-in. the hot water heater. Power to the building was provided via an aboveground service connection. a 0-hour fire resistance rating for structural frame or columns and girders supporting loads for more than one story (second digit). and a 0-hour fire resistance rating for the upper story assembly (third digit). However. (305-mm x 305-mm) tiles. (1. solid core wood door. The frames that they were set in were also wood. this generator was inoperable. Standard on Types of Building Construction 1995 edition. x 12-in.gypsum by mastic. An emergency generator that was powered by natural gas was located in the basement.

Fire Extinguishers There were 2-1/2-gal (9. Fire Alarm The building was equipped with a fire alarm system comprised of the following devices: • Hardwired system smoke detectors in the corridors. common areas. WA Board and Care Page 11 .FURNISHINGS The furnishings in the resident’s rooms varied. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The furnishings in the kitchen area on the first floor and in the common area on the second floor were metal-framed chairs with upholstered seats and backs. pressurized water fire extinguishers located in the corridors. A variety of upholstered easy chairs were observed. basement and common areas • Hardwired system heat detectors in the corridors. basement. Clothing was hung in open-faced wardrobes.5-L). The beds were metal frames and a mattress. FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS Suppression Systems The building was not equipped with a fire sprinkler system or a standpipe system. and kitchen • Manual pull stations • Audible devices in the corridors No single station smoke detectors were observed in the individual sleeping rooms. The tables were constructed of metal frames with Formica tops. The television area on the first floor was furnished with upholstered easy chairs. There were no box springs on the beds. Bedside tables were made of combustible materials.

Page 12 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. No visible notification appliances were connected to the alarm system. No alarm signals were transmitted off premises. it would sound an alarm on all three levels of the building. Washington Board and Care First Floor EL Room 2 =Emergency Light A =Audible Device H =Heat Detector S =Smoke Detector P =Pull Station Kitchen Figure 1. WA Board and Care . despite the fact that several residents were either completely deaf or hard of hearing. When the alarm system was activated.P Room 5 S Room 3 Room 8 Room 6 Room 4 North EL Nurse’s A Station Up to 2nd P Room 1 Origin H P TV Room H S EL Dining Area Arlington. Location of fire protection/detection equipment on the first floor.

118-mm) solid core door that was equipped with panic hardware and automatic door closures.118-mm) wide stairway. (1. (1. Both interior doors and the exterior door were operable at the time of the fire and were in a closed position. A 48-in. This stairway was separated from the corridors on the two levels by a 44-in. The staff reported that this door was frequently used by the residents. A 4-ft (1. (1. Some combustible materials were stored on the landing on the second level.118-mm) door was located on a landing midway between the two levels.5-kg) object. should be classified as a “convenience stair” and not as a “means of egress” because it did not fully meet the requirements in NFPFA documents for separation and protection. A 44-in. connected the first and second levels. (1. this stairway was not routinely used by the residents to move between floors. South end. At the time of the fire this door was held open by a 10-pound (4.Several staff members reported that there had been a history of nuisance alarms in the recent months. located midway in the building. The frequency of these alarms could not be verified. There were three means of egress from the second level. None of the doors on the north stairwell were equipped with any type of alarm that would sound when the door was opened (it was reported that the staff and residents believed the doors were alarmed).118-mm) solid core door in the common area on the south end led to an exterior handicapped ramp that would allow the occupants to travel down to the ground level.2-m) wide stairway passed from the north end of the corridor down to the first level where a door allowed the occupants to discharge directly to the exterior of the building. while serving as a means to move between floors. WA Board and Care Page 13 . This door was equipped with panic hardware and an automatic door closer. (NOTE: This stairway. Interior convenience stairway. This door was operable at the time of the fire. MEANS OF EGRESS Second level. A solid core. According to staff members.) © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. North end. 44-in.

118-mm) wide and were equipped with panic hardware and automatic door closures. The door on the landing for the central stairway had been propped open at the time of the fire. First Floor The first floor had six doors that led to the exterior of the building. The occupants could exit from the building via a door at the north end of the corridor. Not all of them would have been classified as acceptable means of egress. East side. (914-mm) wide door was located on the east side of the building. down several steps. There was some storage in the stairway landing on the first level.Photo 2. Both the interior and exterior doors were 44-in. which swung inward. WA Board and Care . This door was not identified as a means of egress from the interior of the building and would not have been an acceptable means of egress from the building. The door was equipped with a slide bolt on the inside and it was not equipped with panic hardware. The occupants would be required to travel through a small room to gain access to this door. A 36-in. Page 14 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. North end. (1. and then through a door that discharged directly to the exterior of the building. These doors were in a closed position at the time of the fire and were operable.

There were two doors in this area. it was very common for this door to be held open.067-mm) in width and had return landing midway where a 32-in. One 36 in.067-mm) wide stairway required that the occupants travel down several steps to gain access to the door. The second door also discharged onto the same landing and provided egress from the common area/dining area on the south end of the building. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. A 44-in. Second Level There were three routes through which occupants of the second floor could travel. West side.Southeast corner.118-mm) wide door provided egress from an interior area where the south end of the corridor intersected with the TV room. northern portion. This route was not identified as an exit and would not have been considered an acceptable means of egress. This stairway was located halfway down the length of the building and connected the first and second stories. (914-mm) door. This 36-in. There was not evidence of fire rating labels on either the door or the metal door frame. The door did swing in the direction of travel from the building. It measured 42in. Interior Convenience Stairway. At the top of these steps was a gate designed to deter movement through this stairway. This door was operable at the time of the fire and did swing in the direction of egress travel. (813-mm) wide door was located in a stairway on the west side of the building. West side. which swung inwards. (813-mm) door was located. (1. (1. downward and was equipped with an automatic door closer and panic hardware. This door swung inward. This door discharged onto a landing. It was not equipped with panic hardware or an automatic door closer. served the kitchen area and was not identified as a means of egress. WA Board and Care Page 15 . (914mm) wide door was equipped with an automatic door closer and panic hardware. According to some of the staff. southern portion. This door was equipped with panic hardware and an automatic door closer. was equipped with a slide bolt and was operable at the time of the fire. (1. A 32-in. At the time of the fire. The 42-in. This interior stairway provided a travel path between the basement and the first floor. This door swung in the direction of travel from the upper level. this door was propped open.

North Stairway. (1. This stairway measured 48-in. A stairway at the north end of the building provided a travel path from the second floor. The door was in the closed position at the time of the fire. down to the exterior of the building.118-mm) in width. equipped with an automatic door closer and panic hardware. separated the stairway from the second level. Access to the ramp was through an exterior door that measured 44-in. this ramp was the primary exit route used by the residents on the second floor during the fire. Page 16 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. This ramp provided an exit path from the second floor. WA Board and Care . (1. South Exit Ramp A ramp at the southeast corner of the building provided a travel path from the second level to the ground. Constructed of combustible material. There was no evidence of any fire rating labels on the door or the metal door frame. A door.219-mm) in width. Photo 3.

The residents were mentally challenged to varying levels. There were specific times that they were allowed to smoke. However. The employees interviewed by NFPA reported that they did not receive training in fire safety from the facility management. she would have residents on the first floor use alternative routes out of the building. WA Board and Care Page 17 . The only area where smoking was permitted inside of the building was in the common area on the south end of the first floor. With the exception of a female resident in the room where the fire started and a male resident. Fire drills were held monthly. One reported that they were conducted monthly. depending upon which room they simulated as being on fire. One staff member reported that when on duty. The residents were not trained in using alternative exits if their primary route was obstructed. canes. official investigators reported that all employees received regular training. matches or lighters. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. Several also suffered from a variety of mobility impairments that required the use of walkers. Residents and staff were also allowed to smoke outside of the building. none of the residents were allowed to possess cigarettes. STAFF TRAINING According to some staff members. or wheelchairs. According to several staff members. fire drills were conducted several times a year. Another staff member reported that when on duty. and the training focused on isolating the fire and calling 911. The facility had defined areas where smoking was permitted. she would always direct the residents to evacuate the second floor from the south door and down the handicapped ramp. It was reported that the fire alarm system would be actuated during these drills and the residents would be directed to move out of the building. all of the residents were capable of moving independently if necessary. No smoking was allowed in the individual bedrooms.BUILDING OCCUPANTS The building was occupied by thirty-two residents and two staff members at the time of the fire. and at those times the staff would give the residents a cigarette and light it for them.

was cloudy with overcast at 12.000 ft. Page 18 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. WA Board and Care . at 10:00 p. the dew point 39°F (4°C). The relative humidity was 58%.m. The temperature was 54°F (12°C). Winds were from the west-northwest at 4 mph (6 k/hr).WEATHER The National Weather Service at Arlington Airport reported that the weather on April 27. 1998.

At the same time. THE FIRE DISCOVERY AND OCCUPANT ACTIVITIES At approximately 10:45 p. other reports indicated that he arrived after the second staff member went to the second floor. she also observed fire burning very intensely..) When the second staff member looked into the room. The second staff member proceeded to the second floor to begin evacuating the residents on that level.m.m. She reported that the fire was burning very intensely and that there was not very much smoke.. she could hear one of the occupants in one of the other beds in the room of origin begin banging on the wall and shouting for help. Upon opening the door she immediately observed a wall of flame inside the room.m. into the room and was able to see that the woman in the bed immediately to the left of the door was on fire. She reported that the fire had not yet extended into the corridor. looking into the room of origin. WA Board and Care Page 19 . with very little smoke production. continued her bed check. extending the width of the room from west to east. She closed the door to this room.m. The fire. A male resident was standing next to the first staff member with a pressurized water fire extinguisher. and then was relieved at 11:00 p. or while traveling to the second level.m. The second staff member was in the basement at the time. and 11:09 p. (There are conflicting reports on the exact time this male resident arrived. At some time between 11:00 p. a staff member who was finishing her shift conducted a bed check. she reported. to report the fire. she reported that she believes the fire alarm system activated.2 m).III. She backed out of the room. however. leaving the door open. an oncoming staff member opened the door to Room 1 to conduct a bed check. The first staff member dialed 911 from a telephone located in a nurse’s station diagonally across the hall from Room 1 at 11:09 p. or approximately 4 ft (1. She walked several steps. Either as she was leaving the first floor. She came upstairs immediately and observed the first staff member standing in the corridor. was too intense for any attempts at either rescue or suppression using the fire extinguisher. She reported that when she opened the door to Room 1 she did not observe any abnormalities. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. and began shouting for her co-worker.

where they suppressed the fire. Six units were immediately dispatched. (44-mm) line through the north door. While advancing the line they reported that the smoke was completely obscuring their vision. and the female resident woke residents on the north end. After they retreated they began to establish a triage and treatment area for the residents that had been evacuated. According to the pump operator. Engine 46 arrived on the scene shortly after the medic unit and positioned itself on the north end of the building.The staff member on the second floor began waking the residents and alerting them to the fire.8 km) away. He estimated that the fire was suppressed using approximately 200 gal (750 L) of tank water.m. As they neared the room of origin they observed fire at the ceiling level. The personnel from this unit attempted to make entry into the building. the interior attack crew suppressed the fire before he was able to have a water supply established. Crew members advanced a preconnected 1-3/4-in. reported fire showing from the west side and requested a second alarm. a medic unit. The medic unit was dispatched from the Cascade Hospital. FIRE DEPARTMENT NOTIFICATION AND RESPONSE At 11:09 the Arlington Public Safety Answer Point (PSAP) received a telephone call from one of the staff members at the facility reporting the fire. some from the station located approximately 1/2 mi (0. down the corridor to the room of origin. This unit. They continued to advance until they reached the room of origin. Page 20 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. WA Board and Care . The staff member woke residents on the south end. The first unit arrived on the scene at 11:14 p. The fire fighter on the nozzle discharged short bursts of water at the fire at the ceiling level. A female resident assisted her. The occupants were being directed to evacuate from the building via the door at the south end of the building. but were not able to penetrate very far because they were not equipped with any protective clothing or breathing apparatus. and it immediately darkened down.

Photo 4. Southwest view of the facility. Although the fire vented out the exterior window on the first floor, there was not any significant fire spread to the second floor from the exterior of the building. Additional crews arrived on the scene to assist in the rescue operations. Most of the residents had evacuated the building by this time and were being directed to the treatment and triage area. Some crews were assigned to this sector to assist in the treatment and transportation. A nurse, the wife of a fire fighter, began a patient tracking system that was continued by a medic unit that arrived on the scene later. Additional handlines were advanced from Engine 46 to the east side of the structure. A 35 ft (11 m) ground ladder was placed on this side, and a handline was advanced into the interior. Personnel also made entry into the second floor via the handicapped ramp on the south side of the building. Primary and secondary searches were conducted of the first and second floors. Five female occupants were removed from the second floor. All five subsequently died. A total of 23 patients were transported by ambulance. Two critical patients were airlifted to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

© 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington, WA Board and Care

Page 21

CASUALTIES
Eight female residents died in this fire. Three of those fatalities were located in the room of origin. All three residents died from exposure to the fire.

North

Room 5

Room 8

Room 6 Room 3

North
Room 4

Nurse’s Station Down Up Room 1 Origin Room 2

Arlington, Washington Board and Care First Floor =Fatality

TV Room Kitchen

Dining Area

Figure 2. Location of fatalities on the first floor. Page 22 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington, WA Board and Care

Another three residents were located in the second floor room that was directly in line with the interior stairway and received the brunt of the fire that traveled up through the stairway. The final two residents were found in the bathroom immediately adjacent to the interior stairway. These two residents were in Room 11 at the time of the fire and walked down the hall to the south, towards the fire, instead of using the exit stairwell adjacent ot their room. All five of these residents on the second floor died from smoke inhalation.

Photo 5. The bathroom where two residents died on the second floor was next to the central stairway that was the main avenue of fire spread to the second floor.

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Down

Room 11

North

Room 9

Arlington, Washington Board and Care Second Floor =Fatality

Bath
Down

Room 9

Bath
Kitchenette

Ramp

Common Area

Figure 3.

Location of fatalities on the second floor.

Twenty-three people were treated and released for smoke inhalation.

D AMAGE
The room of origin and its contents were completely destroyed by the fire. The corridor outside the room and the interior stairway was also severely damaged by the fire.

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The corridor on the second floor was also damaged by the fire. WA Board and Care Page 25 .Photo 6. There were varying degrees of smoke damage throughout the facility. There was minimal water damage. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The contents of the room of origin were severely damaged by the fire.

WA Board and Care .Page 26 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.

IV. TIMELINE
4/27/98 11:10 Time of call. 11:10 Engine 47, 46, 46AS, Rescue 46, AC47, A49 dispatched. M49 also responded. 11:14 Medic 49 on the scene. Requesting second alarm. 11:15 A49 on the scene reporting multiple patients trapped. 11:17 Engine 46 on the scene, laying a supply line. 11:17 Third alarm requested. 11:23 Ladder 47 on the scene. 11:25 Engine 49 on the scene. 11:26 Engine 49A on the scene. 11:30 Deputy Chief 46 on the scene. 11:40 A46, E46A, E47 on the scene. 11:41 R46, U46, AC47 on the scene. 11:41 EMS Strike Team Assembly area is Station 43. 11:50 Two patients airlifted to Arlington Hospital. 11:52 Reported that there are 15 green patients, 4 yellow patients, 2 red patients. 11:55 One patient airlifted to Cascade Hospital. 11:56 Secondary search complete. 4/28/98 1:28 Twenty-three patients reported transported .

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V. ANALYSIS CAUSE AND ORIGIN
According to the Snohomish County Fire Marshal’s office, the fire originated in the area of the bed located along the east wall of Room 1. The cause was determined to be incendiary “by use of a handheld flame” by one of the female residents who died in the fire in Room 1.

Photo 7. The fire was believed to have started in the area of this bed in Room 1 on the first floor.

FIRE GROWTH AND SPREAD
Once the bedding material was ignited, other objects in the room were ignited very rapidly, including the clothing hanging in an open wardrobe facing the fire, the wardrobe itself, and other combustible furnishings within the room. When the staff member opened the door shortly after 11:00 p.m., she reported that the fire was burning very intensely, but that there was little smoke development. This

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statement was reinforced by the observations of the second staff member who observed the fire. After detecting the fire, the staff member left the door to the room of origin open, allowing the fire to extend into the corridor. The stairway immediately adjacent to the room of origin provided a path for vertical fire spread. Because the door on the midlanding in this stairway was propped open, the smoke and fire was able to spread upward, unimpeded.

Photo 8. The central stairway was immediately adjacent to the room of origin on the first floor. This stairway was the primary avenue of fire spread to the second floor. The smoke and fire then extended upward to the corridor on the second floor, igniting material in that area. The room across from the open stairway was in the direct line of attack from the fire. This room did not suffer significant fire damage. However, smoke was able to spread unimpeded into this room, killing three of the occupants.

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WA Board and Care Page 31 . Photo 10.Photo 9. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The room on the second floor (seen in these two photographs) where three women died was directly across from the central stairway. This room was not severely damaged by the fire.

Page 32 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The common room at the south end of the building on the second floor was damaged by the spread of heat and smoke. WA Board and Care .Photo 11.

The second door that could have limited the fire spread was in the stairway adjacent to the room of origin. If this door had been closed following detection of the fire. Open doors. allowing the smoke and fire to spread beyond the room of origin. the spread of smoke into this room could have been reduced. This door was not equipped with an automatic closer. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The first was the door to the room of origin. Photo 12. Three separate doors were in the open position. The three residents in this room died from smoke exposure. the fire spread could have been limited to the first floor. It is critically important to stop the fire from spreading upward-if this door had not been propped open.VI. WA Board and Care Page 33 . The door on the landing was equipped with an automatic closer but was propped open. The door leading to the second floor from the central stairway was propped open at the time of the fire. If this door had been closed. The third door in the open position was the one on the bedroom at the top of the interior stairway. DISCUSSION A number of factors contributed to the loss of life in this facility. the fire might have been confined to this room and not endangered any of the occupants outside of this area.

and it was felt that they would have reacted appropriately to a fire situation. they traveled south down the corridor. Such actions. and that they performed several inappropriate actions. given the rapid response by the fire department and the quick suppression. Their effectiveness is unquestionable. presumably heading towards the south door as directed by the staff member. experience with fire sprinklers states: “When sprinklers are present. and improve the chances of survival. rather than immediately evacuating the room. Instead. A report published by NFPA’s Fire Analysis Division on the U. installed. Sprinklers can provide a level of life safety that can contend with some of these factors. These were the residents with higher cognitive levels. Sprinklers A properly designed.S. in this case. were fatal.”1 US Experience with Sprinklers: Who has them? How well do they work? Kimberly D. and maintained sprinkler system would have been pivotal in changing the outcome of this incident. It was also reported that at least one of the people on the second floor who died was wearing clothing. It would appear that this was not the case. All of the staff members who were interviewed indicated that they would have expected the people who died to be those with the likeliest probability to live. The effectiveness of a sprinkler system in controlling a fire and reducing the potential for life loss is well documented. September 1997 1 Page 34 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. A closed door can serve as a critical barrier to the spread of smoke and fire. compared to fires where sprinklers are not present. It appears that she was taking the time to get dressed after being awakened.improving their chances of surviving the fire. In a number of fires investigated by NFPA. such as not using the closest egress route and delaying their escape in order to dress. Resident Training Two residents of Room 11 on the second floor did not elect to use the stairway immediately adjacent to their room to evacuate the building. This path took them directly towards the fire instead of away from it. the chances of dying in a fire and the average property loss per fire are both cut by one half to two thirds. WA Board and Care . open doors have been significant contributing factors to the loss of life. Rohr.

WA Board and Care Page 35 . Resident Actions At least three of the residents took inappropriate actions which contributed to their deaths. Considering the fact that this was not a relatively big fire. and because they may have been trained during fire drills to use this route instead of evaluating conditions and then selecting the safest and quickest route possible. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The fire marshal reported that the fire was not a slow. the fire did not have time to grow to large proportions. smoldering fire. This delay proved to be fatal. and that the main body of the fire in the room of origin was suppressed with only 200 gallons of water. Furthermore. one resident stopped to get dressed instead of immediately attempting to escape. a smoke detector would have automatically activated the fire alarm system earlier. next to the exit stairwell. if the fire alarm system had automatically transmitted an alarm to the fire department. The existence of a smoke detector in the room of origin would probably not have played a significant role in decreasing the detection time. taking them further into danger instead of away from it. they apparently elected to head through the corridor toward the south exit. Two other residents were in their room at the north end of the building. It was theorized that they may have done this because a staff member was directing the occupants in this direction. alerting the other occupants in the building to the fire earlier. After being awakened. steps be taken to get out of the building immediately. so detection was probably not significantly delayed. they would have been able to initiate a response earlier and therefore begin suppression operations quicker. Instead of using this stairwell. However.Fire detection It would appear that the fire was detected shortly after ignition. Anything that can be done to reduce the amount of time for required for occupants to being reacting to a fire improves their odds for surviving a fire. It is imperative that once a fire is detected.

These seven fires have resulted in 50 fatalities. the majority live in facilities with more than 50 beds. most residents live in fairly large facilities. Over a period of 27 years. there have been 64 fires. killing 296 people.This fire is the seventh board and care fire that NFPA has investigated within a 3-1/2 year period. • While the perception is that board and care consists of small. Some interesting findings emerged from this report: • The average resident is significantly older and more disabled than a decade ago.000 licensed board and care facilities in the United States with 613.S. WA Board and Care . the size of the elderly population will peak in the period 2010 to 2030 due to the baby boom. private. Unk. the Administration on Aging and the Health Care Financing Administration. A 1995 study commissioned by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. Census Bureau. Incident Cause Sprinkler Alarm in Rooms Staffing Door Time of fire Occupants Deaths Broward Laurinburg Shelby Mississauga Ste. since 1971. Genevieve Harveys Lake Arlington Smoking Electrical Smoking Smoking Smoking Smoking Incendiary No No No No No No No No Heat No No Heat No No 1 3 Unk.000 beds. Based on information from the U. Page 36 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. family homes. A logical extension might be that the number of board and care facilities will also expand to accommodate this larger aging population. estimated that there were 34. 8 1 2 Open Open Open Open Open Open Open Night Evening Night Evening Mid-day Evening Night Mentally Challenged Elderly Elderly Elderly Elderly and Mentally Challenged Elderly and Mentally Challenged 5 8 4 8 7 10 8 Table 1.

The study went on to state that “study findings point to a board and care population that is considerably older and more frail and disabled than it was a decade ago. the mix of physically frail elderly. al. WA Board and Care Page 37 . p.dhhs. Also.gov/daltcp/resident/care.pdf) 2 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.”2 These points raise concern about the current level of fire protection that is being called for in these occupancies. 1995 (url: http://aspe. and residents with mental illness and developmental disabilities.os.. cognitively impaired elderly. July 10. some of whom are nonelderly. Executive Summary. presents a complex caregiving challenge. Analysis of the Effect of Regulation on the Quality of Care in Board and Care Homes. 38. Hawes. et.

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open doors and a lack of sprinkler systems. according to information from the NFPA Fire Analysis Division. One of the cylinders. but with how much success? We must start to develop strategies to implement in buildings housing our nation’s elderly that will provide them with enough safety from fire. Fortunately. is not limited to these types of facilities. North Carolina resulted in the deaths of two of the residents. However. The risk. NFPA. However. none of the residents were killed or seriously injured during this fire.”3 This is so graphically demonstrated by the fires that NFPA has documented in recent board and care facilities. this fire also involved exploding oxygen cylinders. it is likely that there will be a future growth in the number of these types of facilities. Louis. two and two-thirds the national average for adults age 75 and older. It is a logical conclusion that if there are increasing numbers of these facilities housing more people. Louis high-rise building housing elderly residents spread upward from the apartment of origin to the two floors above it. This fire was accelerated by exploding oxygen cylinders in the apartment.S. Another fire in an elderly high-rise in Raleigh. based on data from the U. CONCLUSION Presently.VII. however. As in the fire in St. the data is insufficient to conclude that there is an upward trend developing in fatal board and care fires. a fire fighter was critically injured while trying to rescue the trapped resident. There are a number of common factors in all of these fires-smoking materials. The elderly are at a much higher risk from fire. 1997 3 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. Census bureau and assisted living organizations. A recent fire in a St. “Home fire death rates were nearly twice the national average for adults age 65 and older. WA Board and Care Page 39 . Patterns of Fire Casualties in Home Fires by Age and Sex. causing it to move and allowing smoke to spread into the apartment where an occupant was trapped. when it exploded. May. rocketed against the adjoining wall to the next apartment. and more than four times the national average for adults age 85 and older. the chances of a fire occurring are greater. The first two are human behaviors that can be modified. 1990-94 John Hall.

Who has them? How well do they work? Kimberly D. tragically. WA Board and Care . We must begin to make a change that will ensure the safety and well being of our nation’s elderly. While. sprinklered board and care facility. Rohr. Arizona. the other residents in the two story complex were not endangered by the fire. The chair was ignited. According to a report from NFPA.The best solution available is automatic fire sprinkler systems. compared to fires where sprinklers are not present. The effectiveness of sprinkler systems in controlling fires and saving lives in unquestionable. “when sprinklers are present.”4 This was demonstrated in a recent fire in a Tempe. the chances of dying in a fire and the average property loss per fire are both cut by one-half to two-thirds. September. NFPA. 1997 4 Page 40 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. and the woman was not able to extricate herself from the fire. Too often we see the tragic results of fires where sprinklers are not present. US Experience with Sprinklers. the woman died. The sprinkler system was activated and the fire was extinguished. An elderly woman fell asleep in a chair while smoking.

and four residents died in the building. Two of the rescued residents later died. The building was a one-story.APPENDIX A ABSTRACTS FROM RELATED NFPA FIRE INVESTIGATIONS REPORTS BROWARD C OUNTY. as a result. fire officials considered the occupants to have “slow” evacuation capabilities. representatives of local and state agencies. FLORIDA At approximately 3:45 a. Local fire officials were unable to secure detailed information regarding the capabilities of occupants. The effect that staff and resident capabilities had on the outcome of this incident is an important lesson for fire department officials. and requires more stringent fire protection equipment as the abilities of the residents decrease. 1994. an accidental fire occurred in a board and care facility in Broward County. These doors provided direct access to the building’s exterior. They must understand that adequate life safety does not depend solely on building features and fire protection equipment. and the installation of at least one exit door in every bedroom. The facility involved in this fire had many code-required fire protection provisions for residents with moderate abilities. The abilities of both staff and © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. A staff person and eight residents were able to self-evacuate. the installation of a building-wide fire alarm system and single-station smoke detectors. one before being transported to the hospital and the other in the hospital. six residents had to be rescued. Florida that resulted in the deaths of six residents. single-family dwelling that had been modified for use as a board and care facility. The fire. on Thursday. caused heavy damage in the room of origin and in an adjacent dining area. WA Board and Care Page 41 . Therefore. the ability (or inability) of residents to perform during the actual fire emergency was a major contributing factor affecting the survival of residents. which started in a resident’s bedroom. The modifications included the construction of several bedrooms. and property owners who have responsibility for life safety in board and care facilities. The 1994 Life Safety Code® anticipates various levels of resident performance. Smoke filled all rooms throughout the building. December 1.m.

residents are integral factors that must be considered while striving for even a minimal level of life safety in a board and care facility. WA Board and Care . Page 42 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.

March 17. Both residents in that room escaped from the room. and the other 11 self-evacuated.m. The following factors contributed to the loss of life in this facility: • • • • Staff members inability to enter the fire area due to smoke and heat Occupants inability to evacuate before untenable conditions developed in the fire area Room doors that remained open due to the lack of door self-closing devices Lack of automatic sprinklers © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. Eight residents died in this fire. Seven of these residents died in their respective rooms.LAURINBURG. on Sunday. smoke filled the smoke compartment where this room was located and smoke spread was mostly contained to that compartment. Approximately 18 other residents were on the wing of fire origin. a fire occurred in a singlestory board and care facility in Laurinburg. 1996. Even though the fire involved only one room. North Carolina. WA Board and Care Page 43 . Sparks from a faulty electrical receptacle ignited bedding materials in one of the resident rooms. NORTH C AROLINA At approximately 10:00 p. reportedly. Staff. but only one safely evacuated the building. were unable to enter the wing of fire origin due to severe conditions. The doors to rooms in which residents died were in the open position. The other was overcome by smoke and died in the corridor.

Thus. had been removed or deactivated allowing doors to remain open. and wall and ceilings assemblies were covered with gypsum wallboard. The open doors permitted smoke to spread from the fire apartment. the staff was reportedly trained with regard to fire safety. The building construction and most fire protection equipment that was provided performed well.SHELBY COUNTY. WA Board and Care . All areas in the building had various fire protection provisions including smoke detectors. fire alarms. a fourth resident also died of a smoke-related injury. gypsum wallboard walls and ceilings restricted the spread of combustion products. restricting the spread of combustion products to the wing of fire origin. fill the corridor with smoke and spread into several other apartments. The fire occurred in one of the board and care wings.m. TENNESSEE At approximately 11:45 p. fire doors. Smoke from the apartment of fire origin spread to other apartments through open doors. self-closing devices for many apartments. The 20-year-old facility had six wings and a central core. Two other residents suffered smoke-related injuries and died in their respective apartments. the open doors compromised much of the benefit afforded by the gypsum wallboard wall and ceiling assemblies. All areas were of woodframe construction. a fire occurred in a Shelby County board and care facility that was housing elderly residents. However. Four of the wings contained apartments for elderly residents and two wings contained apartments for elderly residents with special needs. but he died several days later from burn injuries. on February 8. The fire was caused most likely by improperly disposed smoking materials. including the apartment of fire origin. In addition. These two wings will be classified as board and care occupancies. 1996. Staff rescued the resident in the apartment of fire origin. Four residents died as a result of this fire. again. Page 44 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. Smoke detection and fire alarm systems operated and cross-corridor doors equipped with self-closing devices remained closed. In many areas. and door self-closing devices. Twenty-seven days after the fire.

the following factors were considered as having contributed to the loss of life in this incident: • • • • • Improperly disposed smoking materials Lack of automatic sprinkler protection Ineffective response of some staff members Failure of occupants to respond effectively to operating fire alarms Room doors that remained open due to the deactivation of door self-closing devices and chocks © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.Based on the NFPA's investigation and analysis of this fire. WA Board and Care Page 45 .

as were the hallways. WA Board and Care . was found in the hallway. The fire was determined by the Ontario Fire Marshal's office to have been caused by smoking materials which ignited clothing in a closet in one of the rooms. The alarm system was connected to an alarm monitoring company. who was confined to a wheelchair. smoke was able to penetrate into this void space via unprotected openings in the ceiling in the room of origin and then into the other areas through unsealed penetrations in the various walls. Of the 70 occupants. The room was occupied by two people at the time of the fire. She then was able to escape from the room via an exterior window. who was confined to a wheelchair. occurred over a span of eight months. determined to be related to the fire.. March 21. having become overcome by smoke while attempting to escape. Six of the other fatalities were found in their rooms. The building was a one story structure that was partially sprinklered in the basement area only. 1995. Many of the occupants had some degree of mental or physical impairment that could have impeded their ability for self rescue. and 15 suffered from varying degrees of mental impairment. The resident's rooms were equipped with heat detectors. The other occupant. The remaining four fatalities.M ISSISSAUGA. 17 used canes or walkers. However. was not able to escape. ONTARIO On Tuesday. 20 used wheelchairs. Smoke was able to spread to the other rooms through the void space above the rooms. One of the occupants of the room called the fire department via 911 and reported the fire.m. which occurred at 7:39 p. The fire resulted in eight fatalities and 12 injuries. Page 46 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. The 70 occupants ranged in age from 60 to 101 years old. Ontario. Three people died at the time of the fire and one died five days later.m. which were connected to an alarm system. a fire occurred in a onestory board and care facility in Mississauga. The corridor walls and the walls between the individual units did extend above the ceiling to the underside of the roof diaphragm. One other victim. at approximately 7:40 p.

smoke also penetrated into the rooms through the corridor doors to the individual units. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. In several of the rooms. There are a number of common factors between the two fires.In addition to the void space. WA Board and Care Page 47 . This is the second fire to have occurred in a Mississauga facility housing elderly people with serious loss of life. The following are considered significant factors that contributed to the outcome of this incident: • The lack of sprinkler protection (except for the basement). • The combustible room contents. • The failure to close the door to the room of fire origin following detection of the fire. the occupants died from smoke inhalation even though the door to their rooms were closed. and • The lack of staff training and fire drills. which include lack of an automatic sprinkler system and failure to close the door to the room of origin. In 1980 another fire in a nursing home killed 25 occupants.

It was equipped with a fire alarm system that was comprised of system heat detectors in each of the rooms. Seven residents died as a result of this fire. at 12:30 p. the roof structure was ignited by direct flame impingement on the exterior of the building. The fire spread from the second floor to the third floor via an open exterior window on the room of origin. WA Board and Care Page 48 . The building was a two story structure that had an occupied basement. 1996.. fire was also allowed to spread via these avenues.m. with a reinforced masonry exterior. The wall between the resident’s rooms and the corridor did not extend fully through the combustible void space. The fire was determined to have started in Room 208. A staff member on the third floor heard a noise and went to the second floor to investigate. Since the corridor doors and the stairwell doors were propped open. into the corridor on the 200 level. She proceeded to remove the occupant from the room and then went to sound the alarm. QUEBEC A fire occurred on Saturday. August 31. The building was not sprinklered. which was occupied by 41 elderly residents. The system reportedly transmitted a signal to a central monitoring station. at some point. There were eight staff members on duty at this time. Fire also spread through the interior of the building when it breached the ceiling in the closet in Room 208 and then spread laterally through the floor trusses between the 200 and 300 levels. which were attached to the bottom chord of the trusses. traveling up the outside of the building and then re-entered the building through a window directly above the room of origin.STE. Also. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. GENEVIEVE. Fire and smoke also spread through the open door to the room of origin. two system smoke detectors in each hallway and two system heat detectors in each hallway. The roof and floor structural systems were lightweight wood trusses. which was occupied at the time. Manual fire alarm boxes also were located in the hallways. in a board and care facility. The ceilings were also either 1/2 inch (13-mm) or 5/8 inch (16-mm) gypsum wallboard. Upon arrival she saw the fire in the closet in Room 208.

on the occupant’s rooms on the 300 level. and on the room of origin. According to information provided by the facility. Based on the NFPA’s investigation and analysis of this fire.All seven fatalities were residents who were on the third floor. the following. Their ages ranged from 74 years old to 90 years old. © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. four were considered ambulatory patients and three required the use of wheelchairs. significant factors were considered as having contributed to the loss of life and property in this incident: • • • • • • • • Lack of automatic fire sprinklers Fire spread through a combustible void space Inadequate corridor separation Combustible room contents Combustible contents in the corridors Delayed notification of the fire department Staff response Open doors on stairwells. WA Board and Care Page 49 .

Once ignited. At this point. At some point during these events. and the property loss was estimated at $270. Investigators believe that the fire broke large windows between the porch and the interior of the building allowing the fire to enter one bedroom and a living room. Wall and ceiling finishes were noncombustible. 1997. combustible exterior siding for the building. The facility was not equipped with an automatic sprinkler system. the self-closing device on one of the stairway doors was deactivated. and combustible furnishings. PENNSYLVANIA On Tuesday. Fire protection features included a fire alarm system with smoke detectors and heat detectors. the fire involved the combustible materials used in the construction of the porch. Investigators determined that the fire started on an exterior screened-in porch that was being used as a smoking area. a fire occurred at a board and care facility in Harveys Lake. The residents included elderly people and people with a range of mental abilities. Interior stairways were enclosed. the Harveys Lake Fire Department was notified of a fire at the board and care facility. Steel doors with self-closing devices protected openings to the stairways.000. The facility was a two-story plus basement. State fire investigators determined that the fire most likely started on a screened-in porch. and fire extinguishers. May 13.m. Fire fighters began arriving on the scene about 3 minutes © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. Investigators determined that the fire was caused by disposal of smoking materials on the screened-in porch area of the building.HARVEYS LAKE. which increased the size of the building. Pennsylvania. WA Board and Care Page 50 . One staff member and 21 residents were in the building at the time of the fire. but could not. The staff person attempted to reset the system. Investigators were not able to determine the type and frequency of fire safety training that had been provided for residents and staff. The fire killed ten residents and injured three others. At approximately 9:10 p. The building was heavily damaged by the fire. the building’s fire alarm system operated automatically. wood-frame structure with several additions that had been made over time. however. The staff person then took actions to assist in the evacuation of residents. one of the residents confirmed that there was a fire..

Many residents had escaped by the time that fire fighters arrived. WA Board and Care Page 51 . Based on the NFPA's investigation and analysis of this fire. After the fire was extinguished. Despite the severity of the fire. and they reported to fire fighters that others were still in the building. the following factors were considered to have contributed significantly to the loss of life and property in this incident: • Improper use or disposal of smoking materials • Ineffective resident and staff action • Inadequate means of egress • Open fire doors in vertical fire separations • Room doors with inadequate fire resistance ratings • Lack of automatic door closing devices on individual room doors • Lack of automatic sprinkler system © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington. Preliminary information indicated that all residents died of smoke inhalation. later died in the hospital. which prevented fire fighters from entering many areas. fire fighters were able to rescue six residents. the bodies of six residents were found in various locations throughout the building.later and they found that the building was heavily involved in fire. Four of the residents who had been rescued.

MA 02269 USA 1-617-984-7467 (tel) 1-617-984-7056 (fax) email investigations@nfpa.org Page 52 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association • Arlington.org www.National Fire Protection Association Fire Investigations Department 1 Batterymarch Park Quincy. WA Board and Care .nfpa.

Key to references: 1=January/February 2=March/April 3=May/June 4=July/August 5=September/October 6=November/December YEAR ISSUE Charcoal lighter ignites board and care facility fire.97 SUBJECT PAGE # © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 1 . The following is a description of the codes used on the entries to identify the issue where a particular entry appeared.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 NFPA Journal 10 Year Index The following is a ten-year index (1987 to 1997)to the NFPA Journal. 96:5.

98:3.79. 93:5. 96:5.97 Malfunction causes fatal fire.101 Hazardous materials storage. See also AIRCRAFT RESCUE AND FIRE FIGHTING (ARFF) Cargo aircraft Military plane.87 Literature review. 93:4. 95:3. 91:6. 95:6. 94:1.77 Building construction products. 95:5.25 Paint cans explode in warehouse fire. See also GASOLINE Charcoal lighter ignites board and care facility fire. 98:4.73. 92:6. 92:5.126 Detection devices and systems. supplies. 93:6.105. 95:2.124 Protective clothing. 91:1. 98:2. 95:2.126 Extinguishing systems.116 NFPA Annual Meeting exhibitors 1994. 92:4. 95:6. 98:5.100 AIRCRAFT CRASH FIRES.21 School fire ignited by.103.26 ADULT CONGREGATE LIVING FACILITY FIRES Florida.65. 96:6. 93:6. and services. 91:2.32 Incendiary fire ignited by.66 Takeoff aborted.89 Explosion ignites dwelling fire. 93:1.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 A ACCELERANTS.89.87 Security systems.26. 97:1. See also HVAC SYSTEMS Blocking window. Indiana.92. 95:6. 1992.50 Pyrotechnic accelerants used to ignite high-temperature fires.96 AEROSOL CONTAINERS Containers in area of ignition accelerated fire. 98:6. 94:5. 94:4. 6. 91:1. 95:4. 92:4. 95:5. 92:6. 92:6.65. 94:5. 94:5.105. 94:2. 95:1.131 1997.80. 97:3.111.105. 95:2.27 Insecticide ignited by LP-Gas pilot light. 91:5. 92:6.105. New York. 92:2.104.87. 1991. 96:1.67 Unknown accelerant Clinic fire ignited by.45 Warehouse fire ignited by.35 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENTS Alarm devices and systems.109 1998. 96:4.85. 94:3. factor in catastrophic fire. 96:4. 94:5. 94:5. explode. 93:6. 95:6.98 Store fire ignited by. 96:2. 91:5.45 Fire spread by.111. 96:3.97 Gasoline ignites dwelling fires. 96:3.128. 1994.96 Electrical products.81. 94:5. 93:4. 98:5. 93:5. 92:6.39 ADHESIVE MATERIALS Spontaneous ignition of. 93:1.25 Flammable solvent/lubricant containers damaged by forklift.23 Hair spray used to ignite incendiary fire.28 Flammable contents ignited by open flame. 98:5.96 Apparatus and rescue products.79. 91:6.38 AIR CONDITIONERS. 93:2. March.135 1996.75.79 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 2 .24 Manufacturing plant fire ignited by. 94:5.20 Operating noise masked alarm.20 Restaurant fire ignited by.85.79.91.106.106.91 Fire service equipment. crashes into restaurant/hotel. 96:5. 97:2. 92:6.80.129 1995.94 Vehicle/dwelling fire ignited by. 92:2. Feb.80. 92:1.

1996.69 Jet and cargo van. Apr. Indiana. 1991. Virginia. 96:5.72 Twin-engine plane. North Carolina. Georgia.72 Twin-engine plane.54 Commercial plane.99 Single-engine passenger plane. Jan. Georgia. 97:6. Kansas. Alabama. 93:5. Aug. 1993. 92:4. March 23. Nov. 92:6. 91:3.55 AIRCRAFT FIRES (NONCRASH) Airports.110 Military aircraft California.. New York. Michigan.110 DC-10 cargo jet. 91:6.100 Twin-engine plane. 1997. Jan. 1993. West Virginia.108 Single-engine plane. 1995. 1996.99 DC-8 cargo plane crashes during takeoff.36 Kansas. Illinois. 1991.96 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 3 .67 Four-engine turbo-prop plane. 1991. New York. April. 1. Dec. Feb. 7. 19. Oct. 94:6.72 Twin-engine plane. Texas.74 AIRCRAFT HANGAR FIRES California.. Mich. 5. 94:6. Aug. 92:4. Oklahoma. 95:6. July.72 Seaplane. Sept.110 Cargo plane. Sept. 91:4. Sept. Dec. California. 98:6. crashes. Indiana. March. Utah. 96:5. 97:5.100 Military cargo plane. 1994.68 Light passenger plane. Aug. 95:5.106 Private passenger jet.66 Private passenger jet. Feb. 6. North Carolina. 1996.68 Twin-engine plane. July 20. California. 1990.120 AIRCRAFT CRASHES Fire fighter injuries related to. crashes into restaurant/hotel.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Catastrophic B-727 and DC-9.91 DC-9-35 crashes near runway.99 Twin-engine plane. 95:6. at (See AIRPORTS) Military plane. 21. Florida. 1996. Florida. 96:5. Aug.99 DC-9. 96:5. May 11. runway collision. Alabama. 1992. 98:6. 97:5. 1995. Feb. Georgia. California. 26. 97:5. Nov. July 9. 1991. Dec.110 Jumbo passenger jet. July 2.54 Commercial jet. 7.66 Fighter-jet. New York. B-737 and twin-turbo prop.70 Commercial commuter plane and private plane. 19. 1992. Connecticut. Illinois. 94:5. 95:5. Feb. New Mexico.54 Runway collision. 92:4. 93:6.60 Fokker F-28 passenger aircraft. North Carolina. Florida. Oct. 1994. Nov. 97:5.77 Simulated crash into high-rise tests emergency preparedness. July 10. 1994. 96:5. 91:4. 1996. 1994. 1990. 15. 93:5. Jan. 21. 93:6. 1995. 1994. 6. 1992. 93:6. 95:5. 1995. 93:5. Dec. 12.. 95:6. 93:5. 1994. crashes into restaurant/hotel. March 22. 95:5. 96:5. 1990. 1991. June 23. 7. Sept.68 Four-passenger plane. 1993. 94:6. June 21. Ohio. 1990.98 North Carolina. 21. 3.. 1995. 1993.76 Detroit. 26. 1992.98 L-1011 aircraft aborts takeoff. 92:4. 3. 1993. 1992. 1992.35 Statistics compared to motor vehicle fire statistics. 93:5. 6. 1994.. New York. 11. 1994.67 Twin-engine plane. 1992. 30.70 Twin-engine plane. 1994. Oklahoma. Dec. 17. 1995. 94:5.110 Runway collision Boeing 737 and Metroliner.. Texas. 10.54 Light passenger plane. runway collision. May. 1991. Sept.88 Jetstream 4101 crashes into warehouse. July. California. California.68 F-16 and C-130 midair collision. April 27.88 Lear jet crashes into residential/commercial area. 95:6. Rhode Island. 92:6. 95:4.

108 Not in area of fire. 93:4. 97:6. Wisconsin. 19. 1990.62 Dwelling. 1996. 1991. Aug. 96:3. Stapleton Airport.88 Catastrophic fires Aircraft fire on runway. Illinois. 91:4.68. 1. 1997. March.67 Board and care facility. 92:4. Logan International Airport. 19. 93:6. Boston. 92:6.50 Not set off immediately. July 20. 97:6. March. 1996. Düsseldorf.70 Catastrophic. 1992. preparedness. 95:5. See also AIRCRAFT RESCUE AND FIRE FIGHTING (ARFF) Aircraft fire on runway Catastrophic.25 Manufacturing plant fire. 91:4. Colo.26 Warehouse fire. Dec.76 Aircraft fire on runway. Illinois. Dec. 1991. 96:3. 1991. May. Sept. Dec. 25. 92:6.72..54 Georgia.72. Detroit Metropolitan Airport.88 New York.22 New York.C.85 Tank farm fire. May 23. 97:5.39 Manufactured home fire. 93:5. lack of.80 ALABAMA Catastrophic camping trailer fire. 92:4. California.92 Electric generating (nuclear) plant fire. D. 1996.51 Electric generating plant fire.32 Waterflow alarm did not operate. 1991. 10. airports equipped with state-of-art fire protection and security systems.76 Catastrophic. 93:4. 98:5.22 Not heard outside empty building. 11. 1994. Nov. 98:5. 91:4. Oct.88 ALARM DELAYED Alarms Monitored alarm. 1990. 94:5.25 Central station notification of fire service delayed.. Jan. 94:6. 197.. 93:6. 91:4. 96:4. 3. 95:6.79 New York. 97:2. 2. Detroit Metropolitan Airport. 97:5. 96:6.70 Aircraft fire on runway.58 Warehouse fire.106.43 Washington. 1994. 98:3. 97:4. Germany. 1993. 92:4. 19.. Feb. June.84 NFPA role in international aviation fire safety. 1990. California. 6.66 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 4 . 98:4.39 Waterflow alarm incorrectly installed. 1991. 1992. 91:4. Dec. May 23.50 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. Nov. Nov.56 Catastrophic dwelling fire.. 7. 3. 91:2.76 Electric generating plant fire. 1993. Mass. 97:5. funding.21 Cruise vessel delayed alarms factor in fatal fires. 1996. 27.77 Massachusetts. Nov. 92:6.72 Aircraft. 98:6.54 Military aircraft fire. 97:2. July 10. 1990. 92:6.60 Terminal fire. 1998. types of rescue. 1991. fatal. 96:3. 92:3. Nov. 1992. 1997. Apr. 92:6. 92:1.54 Life safety jeopardized by tighter airport security. 95:6. 1991. 1996.50 AIRPORTS. 1990.107 Nuclear energy plant fire. Feb.64 Dwelling. 91:3.58 Fatal dwelling fire. 98:4.98 Emergency response drill. 1996. 94:6. 1992. 1. 19. Denver. Sept. 12. 97:6.68 Board and care facility.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 AIRCRAFT RESCUE AND FIRE FIGHTING (ARFF) Debate continues on need for crews.54 Board and care facility. Feb. 1996. 1995. June 23. 97:5. Oct.

95:6. 91:4.49 Hotel room occupant had difficulty contacting front desk.71. 92:4.84 Protection systems unsupervised. 97:5. 93:1.79. role of Attempted rescue. 93:6.24 Failed to use manual alarms. 96:3.104.30 Passer(s)by. 92:4.19. 2.102 911 called prior to alarm box report.56. 91:1. 83. 92:3.33.34. 26. 91:4.22 Searched for fire. 94:6. 93:2. 93:6.27. 67. 93:6. 91:1.30 Detectors below fire. 86. 97:2.102.82.106 Dispatched to wrong address. 95:5.26.89 Left site to report fire.28.77.29 Failed to locate source of fire. 93:1.23. 93:2. 89.22 Called police.67 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 5 .20.29. 98:5. 91:5. 95:5. role of Confirmed fire. 92:4. 91:2.28 Manual pull stations not operational. 93:6. 95:6. 3. 79.23. 94:5. 106.64.52. 94:5.69. 93:6. 92:6.24.34 Refused to call fire department. 25. 94:5.32 Neighbor(s).108 Detectors.18.29 Not set off immediately.99. 107.23.96. 94:5. 94:4. 94:6.20. 94:5. 92:4.23. 96:6.16 911 system lacking.22 Detector alarms not heard outside empty building.91:3. 93:1. 98:6.69 911 call incomplete.21. 6. 3/25 Fought fire.106 Lacking. role of Attempted rescue. 50. 95:4. 90 Left site to report fire.81.27. 95:6.30.74. 94:5. 94:1.29.21. 91:4.30.64 Plant closed for weekend. 30. 93:6.26.68. 94:2. 5. 75. 6. 94:2. 95:5. 96:6. 96:5.54. 95:4.23 Power shut off. 93:3.30 Mistook alarm for false alarm.29. 97. 97:2. 95:6. 95:6.31. 96:1.47.84. 91:2.31. 95:6.67.53. 91:5.23 Evacuated patients.26. 40.25.31. 96:6. 88.39.49. 95:3. 91:3.82 Interior location of fire. 91:3. 91:5.98.35 Tried to locate smoke source. 85. 94:3.18.22.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Detection system lacking.25. 95:2. 97:6.29 Fought fire.30.95 Motion alarms not set off immediately.34.89. 91:4.64 Left site to report fire. 94:1.23. 92:5.30.31. 92:3. 6. 92:5. 98:6.30 Reported fire as under control. 97:6. 98:5. 91:4. 93:5. 92:2.53 Mistook fire alarm for intrusion alarm. 95:2.34 Fire burned undetected. 85. 102.97.32. 93:6. 91:1. 94:5. 92:1. 91:6.39. 97:5. 5. 92:6.58 No fire detectors.37. 73.34 Not functioning. 97:2. 92:1. 95:5. smoke Below area of fire origin. 92:6.28. 5.38. 98:4. 98:1. 92 Fire department advised to disregard alarms due to scheduled building maintenance.108 Occupant(s). 95:6. 56.64.23.98. role of Fought fire. 95:5.28.28. 98:4. 94:4. 95:1.28 Industrial area unpopulated due to holiday. 91:4. 97:3.20 911 dispatcher misunderstood nature of call. 95:1.6.64 Employee(s). 93:3. 92:6.

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Reason unknown, 94:5.95, 95:5.36, 95:6.38 Remote location, 92:1.23, 93:5.62, 93:6.83 Security personnel confirmed fire, 97:5.23 Shopping mall closed for night, 97:4.21 Sprinkler system not connected to central alarm, 93:1.26, 95:3.39 Telephones not available at site/building, 95:5.58, 96:1.23 Telephones not operable due to fire, 93:5.66, 93:6.29, 30, 95:6.99, 96:6.22, 97:6.50 Water motor gong outside building not heard, 91:5.25 Waterflow alarms Did not operate, 96:3.39 Incorrectly installed, 91:3.25 Weather obscured fire, 92:1.23 ALARM SYSTEMS Addressable systems, testing of, 94:2.41 Computer use in, 92:2.32 Design of, 92:4.12 Inspection, testing, and maintenance to ensure reliability, 96:5.68 Installer certification required in Seattle, 93:1.55 Integrated fire and security systems in commercial buildings, 97:3.60 Intelligent systems eliminate false alarms without compromising protection, 97:6.78 Manual pull stations not operational, factor in catastrophic apartment building fire, 98:5.45 Manual pull stations not operational, factor in catastrophic hotel fire, 94:5.95 Manual pull stations not operational, factor in fatal fire, 97:4.19 Manual system out of service, factor in school fire, 98:1.21 Modified redundant systems increase safety, not cost, 93:6.68 Multisensor alarms speed detection, reduce nuisance alarms, 98:1.46 NFPA 72, The National Fire Alarm Code 72 and UL standards provide comprehensive equipment and installation requirements, 93:5.25 1996 edition, questions answered, 97:4.25 Consolidates signaling standards, 93:5.70 Previous standards combined, 91:5.86 Proprietary system at Chrysler Corp. Technology Center, 95:3.129 Reliable hardware, system design, installation, maintenance all needed, 95:1.49 Software management is crucial, 95:1.54 Sound and strobe alarms required by Americans with Disabilities Act, 95:4.58 Terminology needs clarification by users, engineers, designers, code enforcers, 98:5.62 Voice alarm system design guidelines, 94:1.50 ALARMS, FALSE Catastrophic fire alarm delayed because assumed false alarm, 98:5.53 Causes, costs, and solutions to U. S. false alarm problem, 95:1.45 Delayed response in fatal fire, 95:6.37 Delayed response to catastrophic fire, 94:5.98 Intelligent systems eliminate false alarms without compromising protection, 97:6.78 Multisensor alarms can reduce false alarms and speed detection, 98:1.46 ALASKA Catastrophic ship fire, July 27, 1996, 97:5.54 Hotel fire, March 20, 1996, 97:6.57 Manufacturing plant fire, April 3, 1997, 98:6.84 Store fire, April, 1994, 95:6.100 Vacant manufacturing plant fire, April 25, 1997, 98:6.92 Wildland/urban interface fire, June 2, 1996, 97:6.59 ALBERTA, CANADA © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 6

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Apartment building fire, 1990, 91:5.26 Bulk storage elevator fire, 1996, 97:4.20 ALCOHOL (BEVERAGE) Apartment building fires, factor in, 91:3.26, 92:4.69, 95:5.34, 96:5.24, 96:5.91 Catastrophic fires, factor in Apartment building fires, 92:4.69, 96:5.91, 98:5.49 Automobile fire, 95:5.68 Board and care facility fire, 96:5.96 Dwelling fires, 91:4.64, 65, 66, 68, 92:4.68, 93:5.64, 94:5.97, 95:5.60, 96:5.92, 93, 98:5.49 Fraternity house fire, 97:5.50 Motor vehicle accident/fire, 98:5.55 Dwelling fires, factor in, 91:4.64, 65, 66, 68, 92:4.68, 93:2.22, 93:5.64, 94:1.31, 94:5.97, 95.5.60, 96:5.92, 93 Fatal fires, factor in Apartment building fire, 95:5.34, 98:2.16 Dwelling fire, 93:2.22, 94:1.31, 98:1.23, 4.19 Fraternity house fire, 97:6.21 Hotel fire, 98:6.23 Manufactured home fire, 98:1.23 Manufacturing plant fire, 98:6.22 Motor home fire, 95:5.36 Shed fire, possible factor in, 93:2.20 Fraternity house fire, factor in, 97:5.50, 6.21 Group home fire, factor in, 92:1.26 ALCOHOL (FUEL) Possible misuse in kerosene heater, fatal fire cause, 98:2.16 Spill ignited by light, 94:2.27 ALMAND, KATHLEEN H. Profile of, 98:3.54 AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE (ANSI) U. S. response to European economic unification and global standards led by, 91:6.54 AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT Accessibility standard set by act, 93:3.42 Builders and owners, effects on, 92:2.14 Life Safety Code changed to conform with, 93:3.18, 94:2.34 New technologies aid compliance, 97:6.38 Title III, discussion of, 95:4.54 AMMONIA Liquid refrigerant, factor in warehouse fire, 94:3.27 AMUSEMENT CENTER FIRES New Jersey, Dec., 1992, 93:6.79 Tennessee, July, 1992, 93:6.81 AMUSEMENT PARK FIRES Arizona, April, 1995, 96:6.73 California, 1993, 94:3.28 APARTMENT BUILDING FIRES. See also CONDOMINIUM FIRES; HOUSING FOR ELDERLY FIRES Alberta, Canada, 1990, 91:5.26 Arizona, 1994, 95:6.37 Arkansas, 1993, 94:3.28 California, 1990, 91:4.26, 91:5.26 California, Nov., 1993, 94:6.89 California, Dec., 1994, 95:6.110 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 7

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 California, 1996, 97:3.30 California, 1997, 98:2.18, 4.19, 5.15 Catastrophic California, Sept. 7, 1991, 92:4.69 California, April 26, 1993, 94:5.96 California, May 3, 1993, 94:5.95 California, June 6, 1994, 95:5.59 California, Oct. 14, 1995, 96:5.93 California, Feb. 6, 1996, 97:5.49 California, Dec. 13, 1997, 98:5.46 Illinois, May 30, 1990, 91:4.65 Illinois, March 14, 1991, 92:4.69 Illinois, Dec. 9, 1991, 92:4.67 Illinois, Dec. 6, 1992, 93:5.64 Illinois, March 20, 1994, 95:5.53 Illinois, Sept. 15, 1997, 98:5.46 Illinois, Oct. 26, 1997, 98:5.46 Kentucky, Sept. 12, 1997, 98:5.46 Louisiana, Aug. 10, 1994, 95:5.60 Massachusetts, March 21, 1994, 95:5.59 Massachusetts, Dec. 28, 1997, 98:5.49 Michigan, July 31, 1991, 92:4.68 Michigan, Feb. 28, 1993, 94:5.95 Minnesota, Nov. 10, 1993, 94:5.97 Minnesota, Feb. 28, 1994, 95:5.58 Minnesota, Jan. 14, 1995, 96:5.91 Mississippi, Jan. 26, 1993, 94:5.95 New Jersey, Feb. 13, 1991, 92:4.69 New Jersey, May 6, 1997, 98:5.45 New York, Jan. 16, 1990, 91:4.65 New York, Aug. 4, 1990, 91:4.66 New York, March 13, 1991, 92:4.67 New York, Aug. 22, 1994, 95:5.66 North Carolina, Sept. 5, 1993, 94:5.100 Ohio, Dec. 11, 1993, 94:5.102 Ohio, Jan. 12, 1994, 95:5.58 Oregon, June 28, 1996, 97:5.49 Pennsylvania, April 5, 1997, 98:5.45 Rhode Island, Feb. 27, 1993, 94:5.96 Rhode Island, Dec. 23, 1995, 96:5.93 Texas, Aug. 21, 1993, 94:5.100 Colorado, 1997, 98:4.20 Colorado, July 18, 1997, 98:6.90 Connecticut, 1996, 97:2.21, 5.21 Florida, 1990, 91:3.25, 91:6.24 Florida, 1992, 93:1.27 Florida, 1993, 94:5.27, 94:6.33 Florida, 1995, 96:1.23 Florida, 1996, 97:3.29 Hawaii, 1993, 94:2.28 Illinois, 1990, 91:4.25 Illinois, 1993, 94:1.31 Illinois, 1994, 95:4.37 Louisiana, 1997, 98:2.16 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 8

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Maine, 1995, 96:5.24 Maryland, 1989, 91:2.29 Maryland, 1991, 92:3.34 Massachusetts, 1990, 91:3.26 Massachusetts, 1992, 93:6.28 Massachusetts, 1994, 95:5.34 Massachusetts, 1995, 96:1.22 Massachusetts, 1997, 98:4.19 Michigan, Feb., 1994, 95:6.99 Missouri, 1994, 95:3.37 Nebraska, 1997, 97:5.22 New Hampshire, 1990, 92:1.26 New Jersey, 1991, 92:2.28 New Jersey, 1996, 97:5.22 New Jersey, 1997, 98:3.41 New York, 1993, 94:5.27 New York, May, 1993, 94:6.90 New York, March 28, 1994, 95:6.85 New York, Aug., 1994, 95:6.100 New York, 1996, 97:6.20 New York, 1997, 98:2.18 North Carolina, 1994, 95:4.38, 95:5.34 Ohio, 1993, 94:2.29 Ohio, 1995, 96:5.24 Ohio, 1996, 97:4.20 Oregon, 1996, 97:3.30 Pennsylvania, 1990, 91:4.26 Rhode Island, 1992, 93:2.22 Texas, 1996, 97:2.22 Texas, Jan. 16, 1997, 98:6.90 Utah, 1994, 95:6.36 Utah, 1995, 96:2.23 Utah, 1996, 97:5.21 Vermont, 1996, 97:2.22 Virginia, 1992, 93:3.35 Virginia, 1993, 94:3.28 Virginia, 1997, 98:5.15, 6.22 Washington, 1995, 96:1.22 Washington, 1996, 97:1.25 Washington, 1997, 98:6.23 Washington, Nov. 13, 1997, 98:6.90 APARTMENT COMPLEX FIRES California, Nov. 10, 1990, 91:6.73 California, 1992, 93:5.35 California, 1993, 94:2.28 Georgia, 1995, 96:1.22 Massachusetts, 1989, 91:3.26 Missouri, elderly housing, 91:1.30 New Jersey, 1993, 94:1.32 New Mexico, July, 1995, 96:6.74 Ohio, March, 1992, 93:6.81 APOLLO I SPACECRAFT Fatal fire, 96:1.68 AQUEOUS FILM-FORMING FOAM (AFFF) © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 9

59. caused explosion. Cincinnati.22 ASPHALT Ignited in roof fire. Aug. March 21.78 Dwelling. Dec.. 1992.107 Incinerator plant fire.28 Catastrophic fires Building-under-renovation. 91:5. June 18. 1995. 98:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Concentrate extinguishes aircraft fire.106 Manufacturing plant fire.28 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:6. 1992. 98:1. 97:4. 5.55 Exposure response policy.97 Dwelling.53 Electric generating plant fire. May 20. N. March 13. 94:4. New York. 94:5. 1993. 94:3. 97:6. 9.23. 96:5. 94:5. 12. 1993. 93:4. 92:1. 91:5. 1990. 1993. 94:6. 94:5.23 Fatal manufacturing plant fire. 93:5. 96:6.21 ARSON.67 Packaging and storage facility. 91:6.29 Dwelling fire. 1990.64 Clubhouse fire cause. March 26.38 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:6. See INCENDIARY (SUSPICIOUS) FIRES ASBESTOS Emergency response protocols for asbestos abatement site fires. 98:3. 28. 95:6. 98:1. 91:1.. 6.50 Motor vehicle. 93:4. 1995.99 Nursing home. 1994.73 Nursing home fire. Aug.33 Motor vehicle repair shop fire. 1994. 95:6.42 Haz-mat contamination. 1994. Nov.84 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 10 ..22 Catastrophic dwelling fire cause..27 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:6. May 8. July.120 ARIZONA Athletic complex fire. Jan.92 Careless disposal of Apartment building fire cause. 96:6.94 Manufacturing plant fire. 1995.37 Manufacturing plant fire. 93:6. 1997. 93:6. 1990.21. 1994. 1998. 95:6. 1993. 1990.95 Leaked asphalt ignited by unknown source. 98:5.. Nov. 4.76 Haz-mat team gathers particles from ducts after fire.. 1996. 1993. Dec. 96:5. 94:6. 91:4. 92:6. 92:1. Ohio. 91:6. 1993. 94:6. Y. April. 1995.104 Manufactured home. 91:6. 91:2.28 Movie studio/amusement park fire.22 ASHES Boiler blocked by. 92:3. updates fire protection system. 98:5.30 Catastrophic fires Dude wildland/urban interface.92 Fatal dwelling fire.34 Fatal apartment building fire. 1993. Dec. June 25. 95:6.104 Manufacturing plant fire. 91:4.92 Dormitory fire. 1992.86 ARKANSAS Apartment building fire.1 990.70. terminal fire.64 Shopping mall fire.73 ARENAS Crown Coliseum.19.23 Dwelling fire cause.76 Limited prepiping hinders operations in fuel tank fire. 1994. 1997. Nov. 1193.49 Warehouse fire. 1997. 98:4. 92:6.29 Store fire.

1993.90 Lack of separations factor in fire spread. 94:4.67. 3. 95:6. 1995. 1992. TEXAS City contracts with volunteer fire departments. Dec.49 ATTICS Fire spread into.70. Jan.64.76.29. 1993.28 AUTOMOBILE REPAIR SHOP FIRES Arizona. 97:5. June 18. 92:4. 96:5.32 Catastrophic California. Nov. 1991. 1997. 95:6.21.55 Pennsylvania. 4/30 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 11 . Oct. 91:6.20. 1992.31. 95:5. 96:5. 94:5. 11. 96:1. 91:3. 95:5.60 ATLANTA. 1990. 2. 97:2.84 Texas. firefighter's account. Nov. March 17.106 Florida. 23. 6. 1990. 91:4. 91:4. 94:1. 91:4.67 California. 1997.98.24.23. 1994. 6. Sept. 1990. Apr. Aug. 1990. 94:4. 1996. 1996. 1991. STEPHEN P. 98:2.70 California.36. Nov. 91:6. 96:6. 58 Fire spread through. 1994.54 Idaho. 98:5.70 Tennessee. 91:4.72 California.28. 6.55 Missouri. 95:5. 1990.54 Kentucky. 95:4.33 Recruiting and retaining fire protection engineers. 1994. 1991. Austin Fire Department survey.64. Aug. 18.52. 91:2.68 Texas. 29. 1996. Sept. 93:5. 6. 92:2. Jan. 91:4. 100. Stadium fire.39.88 Illinois. 97:5.26.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 ASPHYXIATION Fire fighter fatalities related to.22.73 California. 95:5. 1994. 96:6.50. 17. 97:1. 92:4. 8.25. 1. 1996.23. 27. 100. 11. 92:6. 94:5. 1993.104 Fire service uses media attention to increase fire safety.22. July 20. July 26. March 3.69. 98:1.77. GA. 96:5.32 Kansas.108 AUSTIN.68 West Virginia. 1993.49 AUTOMOBILE FIRES. 23. Nov. 51.65. 97:4. Nov.86 Fire started in. 1994.25.55 Georgia. 1994. July. 91:4. Feb. 5. See also TRUCK FIRES California.27. 4. 93:6. 28. 97:2. 95:5. 73. 97:5. 10. 91:4.70 New Jersey.68 Virginia.68 Kentucky. 96:1. 1996.69 Fire statistics and fire safety information.58 AUSTRALIA Fenny Creek/Dandenongs wildfire. 92:2.55 Iowa. 91:2.108 Texas. 92:4.31 Oregon. 97:2. Dec. 108. July 22. Profile of. 98:5. 96:5. 94:5. 4.38 AUSTIN. Feb. 98:6. 1995. 97:5.68 California. 53.21.100 California. 1990. 2. 94:4. 1996. 95:2.97 California. 93:5. 97:5. 21.55 Florida. July 4. July 12.68 Tennessee. 9. 1990. 93:1. 95:5.

1991. 95:2. 94:5. 1995. 1990. 95:2.104 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 12 . Profile of. 95:4. 91:6. 1990. 1994..23 Michigan. 91:4. 96:2.23 Cigarette lighter. ignited by. DONALD G. ignited by.23 Texas.22 BARN FIRES Illinois.26. 91:2. Profile of.30 Catastrophic. ignited by.28 Incense.30. 91:1. Jan.15 Cigarette. 1993. ignited by. 91:2. 97:6. 1997.25 Marijuana cigarette. N. 1996. 1995. 97:5.70 Ontario. 1990. ignited by. March 28.97 Medical equipment fire. 91:2.55 Louisiana Oct.100 Massachusetts. 91:2. 1996. ignited by. 91:4. Nov. disabled person.69 Cigar dropped by elderly.89 South Carolina.25 BARRACKS FIRES Washington.31. 1995. 94:5. 98:5.98 Massachusetts.75 Model of incident. N.21 B BACKDRAFTS Fire fighter injuries related to. 91:4. apartment building fire.32 Massachusetts.77 BATHURST. 91:3.53 Catastrophic fire involving. 95:5. 1990. Canada.97. 98:4. 97:2.31 Washington. 1989.70 Florida. See also MATTRESSES Candle. 95:6. 11. 91:5. ignited by. 97:5.65. 98:6. ignited by. 97:5. ignited by juvenile with.40 New Mexico. ignited by.34 Lamp plug. 1996. ignited by.30. 91:1.22 Fire spread to.20 BEDDING. 95:1. ignited by.23. 98:6.. 95:5. Y.31 Massachusetts. ignited by. 92:4. 93:6. Ohio.37 Cigarette lighter.26 Detention center inmate. 97:5. 95:6.27 Electric heater. 1994. ignited by. 94:5. 94:2. DAN W.85 BAILEY.26 Georgia. 92:2. 97:1.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 California.52 BARGE FIRES Catastrophic Illinois. 91:5.16 BALCONIES Apartment building fire started on. 96:3. ignited by. 96:6. 92:4.22 Match. 1990. 98:4. 94:6.52 Fireworks. 98:5.30.54 Cigarette lighter. May 11.26 Gasoline in fatal fire. 30. 94:5.30 Michigan. 1995.19 Kerosene heater in fatal fire. 1997. 97:1.70 Colorado.98 Electrical receptacle arc in catastrophic fire. Y. 92:1.. ignited by child playing with. July 3. 96:6. 91:2. ignited by. May. 1990.. 93:6. 96:2. Aug. 1990.28.

8. 12. 13.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Open-flame device. 1996. 1990.26 BENARICK. 1992. Profile of. 97:1. 97:2. 91:4. 94:5. 1991.68 Alabama.34 Life Safety Code protection requirements questioned. Profile of. 97:5. 1994.24 North Carolina. DONALD P. ignited by. 96:5. 97:3.52 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 13 . Oct. 1990. April 11. Oct. 1996.42 Propane cylinders. 98:5. Profile of. 3. 98:4. 91:4. 9. ignited by. 7. 1995. June 2. and protection. Michigan. Feb. Profile of.105 Wisconsin. 95:5. 91:4. 1.70 Connecticut. A. 98:1. March 11.23. 96:2. June 2. Dec. Dec. GLENN P. 91:6. Jan. 93:5. 91:4.92 Smoking materials. 31.18 BLEVE Fire fighter fatalities related to. Oct. 95:5. 1990. 91:4. ROBERT E.53 Sparkler. 97:5. Nov. 1990. 95:5.21 BELL. 98:6.69 Tennessee. 22.33 BLISS. D. fire investigation report. 94:1. 97:5. 94:2. 91:6. 1996.64 BEYREIS. 96:6. 1990. ignited by. JOHN A. 1990 4.36 BOARD AND CARE FACILITY FIRES California. 10. 94:5. 1996. 95:5. 1993. Profile of. Profile of. Aug. March 4. 96:5.68 Oregon. 98:5. 1991. 97:5. 92:4. Nov. 94:4. ignited by child(ren) playing with.96 Pennsylvania.27 Catastrophic Alabama. March 17.36 BEVERLY HILLS SUPPER CLUB FIRE Overview of fire. 1993.97 Colorado. 1995. Jan. 96:5.97 New York. 1996. 96:5. 1992. 19. 17. 96:2.53 South Carolina.64 Georgia.62 California.60 Forklift gas cylinder BLEVEs. 93:1. 1995. 91:4.67 Alabama.68 Massachusetts. 1998. April 9. Sept.29 Fatal fires.92 Smoking materials in catastrophic fires.63 LP-Gas tank. 96:5.69 Detroit.22 BERND. 95:5.53 Florida. investigation report. JAMES R.66 Michigan. 20. statistics on contributing factors. 1994. Feb. May 14.68 Texas. Aug. ignited by. 1995.52 Pennsylvania.30 California. 1994-1998.64 Space heater. 97:5.67 Michigan. 11.20 BLAIR. 1997. Iowa.52 Texas.

96:1. 98:1.23 BREEDLOVE. 97:5. 16. 1997. FRANK Profile of.50 BOAT FIRES. 97:6.26 Massachusetts. 97:1. California. Profile of. Apr. wiring. 95:4. 28 Simulated plane crash into Hancock Tower tests emergency preparedness. HERMAN W. 1991.35 Terrorist response training funded by Domestic Preparedness Act. 1995. 1990.68 Quebec. DIANE Profile of.93 Fire landmarks in city. 94:5.57 BOYD.26 BRUNO.81 Power boat. 1994.28.40 Yacht manufacturing plant fire.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Pennsylvania.73 Kentucky. SHERWOOD Profile of.22 BRICE. 2/54 Nightclub fire. 98:3. 93:4. 96:3.74. 93:6.31 Yacht.36 BOSTON. May 9. 1992. 1996. Profile of. See also SHIP FIRES Catastrophic Cabin cruiser. Ohio. 96:3. Florida. 95:5.60 BOATYARDS Electrical safety requirements. 95:6. May 4. 95:1. 31. HOWARD F. 1993. 95:5. 97:1. 194291:3. 96:4. 92:4. 1991. 94:6. 1996. Nov. Fire inspection requirements determined by life safety evaluation.37 BRANCH DAVIDIAN COMPLEX FIRE Fire investigation. 1990. Florida. 91:4. 95:1. 1996. 97:3.34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.18 BOYD.21 BRIDGE FIRES Connecticut. 93:6. Canada. HAL Profile of. 96:2. COLO.106 Sailboat. 1993. 6. Nov. 1997. Nebraska. Aug. Connecticut.104 Logan International Airport.38 BRUSH FIRES © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 14 . MASS.91 BRANNIGAN. 19.42 Marina. analysis.36 BOARDING HOUSE FIRES. 1996. Profile of. Congressional testimony. See PIER AND WHARF FIRES BOATS Electrical safety requirements for repair equipment.110 Fire department profile. 96:3.38 BOULDER. 94:3. WAYNE H. TOM Profile of.33 Pennsylvania. 91:6.40 BOEHLERT.39 BRACE. 94:2. See ROOMING HOUSE FIRES BOARDWALKS. analysis. 92:2. CANADA Manufacturing complex fire. 91:2.44 Vermont. Fire department overview. March.39 Ohio. 98:4. emergency response drill.

93:5.33 Life Safety Code. 10.12 Establishing industrial fire safety programs.16 Evaluating occupant load for egress. 1991.14 NFPA 101. 95:6. Nov. 91:6.14 Americans with Disabilities Act spurs changes to Life Safety Code. 98:6. 95:6. Installation of Sprinkler Systems. 98:2. 93:3. applied to industrial occupancies.12 Americans With Disabilities Act affects builders. 1991 edit. and public officials a must in fire protection.12 Life Safety Code.16 Performance-based codes. 96:4. 6. Hawaii.16 Regulations' effect on innovative construction methods. S. observatory. 1996. 94:6. designing buildings for. Jan. 95:2. 96:2.. 93:1.35 Ohio. 95:6. 1997. 96:1. 91:6.64. 92:2.16. 91:5. 91:2. 16.24 Preventing detector nuisance alarms. 92:5. 95:1.77 BUILDING CODES Coordination of model codes. 1994. 94:2.45 Glazing developments offer alternatives to wired glass. changes in. 95:6.24 Cooperation needed to meet fire safety goals.76 Through-penetration protection systems. California. 91:4. changes in. classification of assemblies as. See also DWELLING-UNDERCONSTRUCTION FIRES Apartment building. 1991. 91:3. Oregon.12 Performance objectives for existing buildings. 92:4. walls. 97:5. Life Safety Code.24 Glazing materials labeling controversy. PERCY Past NFPA general manager.22 Performance-based code development.20 Life Safety Code. 96:5. 92:1. windows. 1990.59 Museum.20 Performance-based codes. 95:5. owners.12 Doors.16 Occupant load calculation myths. 94:6.42 BUILDING MATERIALS European Community product testing standards will affect U.12 Evaluating equivalencies and exceptions to fire code standards. building security provisions.52.14 Alarm system design. 96:3.14 Field modifications to fire doors. 1994.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fire fighter injuries related to. 95:3. Installation of Sprinkler Systems. California.110 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 15 .18 Basis-for-design reports help authority having jurisdiction and building owner. 95:4.72 Overview of history and content. also raises code questions. 92:6. 91:1. 92:3.26 Elevators as means of egress. 93:2.46 Design-related sprinkler system problems.16 BUILDING-UNDER-CONSTRUCTION FIRES. products. 94:3. 1994.30 Partnership of owners. 94:6.12 NFPA 13.73 Catastrophic. 93:4. 66 Wildland fire ignited by. 94:1. designers.32 Top five excuses for ignoring fire protection requirements.12 Fire-retardant wood shakes/shingles. 91:2. 93:6.32 Warehouse sprinkler system design.20 Performance-based codes based on existing codes. discussion of. March. 96:6. contents and furnishing regulations. 94:1.18 Apartment complex.30 Engineering life safety in high-rise buildings. 94:4. procedures for.22 NFPA 13. 92:3.54 BUILDING SCENE COLUMNS Adequacy and validity of existing fire tests.99 BUGBEE.30 Out-of-service fire protection systems. 92:5.

74 Aircraft fire. 1994. 1993. 98:5. South Dakota. 1997. 91:6.120 Home heating equipment. 96:1. 91:3.. 98:6. Feb.26 Catastrophic Dwelling. 1990.42 Pennsylvania.26 Apartment building fire. Indiana.30 Apartment building fires. July. Arkansas. 1991. RICHARD W.112 Dormitory fire statistics.26 C CALIFORNIA Aircraft fire. 97:5.112 School fire safety holds lessons for other occupancies. 1997. 1997.104 Residential fire statistics and safety information. Massachusetts.104 Fire safety checklist. 95:5. 1994.160 Poverty's effect on fire risk. 1990.128 Kitchen fire statistics. 1990. 96:5. fire safety information. 1990.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Postal facility. 1. Dec.73 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 16 .15 Apartment building under construction. 98:3. 96:2. 97:6.75 Massachusetts. 1993.160 Disabled persons. 1992.112 Fireworks incident statistics and safety. 92:6. 1990.36 Amusement park fire.104 Fire safety for preschoolers. Nov.79 Fire fighter injuries.52 Historic building. 98:2. fire safety for. 94:5.88 BURNS Burns and smoke compared as fire death causes. 97:5. 92:4. 76 BUS FIRES Illinois.38 Common products that cause severe burns. 92:5. 10. statistics.120 100s in NFPA history. 96:1.120 NFPA codes and standards being updated. causes. 1991. 1996. symptoms. 91:4.24 Recreational facility. risks of. 97:4. 94:1. 96:3.74. 1991.104 Grain elevator. 98:3. 96:4. Oct. prevention.88 Warehouse/homeless shelter. 91:6. March. June 18. 95:4.152 Elderly and fires. 97:6. 97:3. statistics.144 Cigarette smoking statistics. 91:5. 93:6. 1997. 75.110 Aircraft hangar fire.76 Aircraft fire.27 BUILDING-UNDER-RENOVATION FIRES California. 95:6.23 BURNING ISSUES COLUMNS Candle fire statistics and fire safety information.104 Summer fire hazards. 98:4.160 Carbon monoxide poisoning.120 Children and fires. 98:2. 98:5. 97:2. 7. 95:1. 97:3. 94:3. 95:5. 1996. Illinois. Profile of. Washington. 98:6.18 Apartment complex fire. 97:1.31 BUKOWSKI.96 Holiday and heating season fire safety. 97:6.88 Motor vehicle and aircraft fire statistics compared.96 Vehicle fire statistics and fire safety information. 1996. 95:3. 15. West Virginia. 96:6. Nov. 98:1.28 Apartment building fire. 91:6.22 Manufacturing plant.

1997. 93:5. 1995.108 Condominium complex fire. 3. 1990. 94:5. 96:2. Nov. 1997. 97:5. June 27.106 Apartment building. 16. Nov. 98:5. 1994.53 Motor home. 96:5. 1995. 1992. 94:2. 94:5. 1992. 1993. Northridge. 2. 1995. 1993. 29. 26.69 Vacant dwelling.23.79 Dwelling fire. 14.72 Wildland/urban interface. 1991. 98:5. Dec. Feb. 15.70 Motor vehicle. 29.81 Dwelling fire. 20.45 Dwelling fire. Dec. 95:5.55 Runway aircraft collision.52 Electric generating plant fire. Dec. 1990. 30. Nov. 1990. 92:6. 92:4. 10. 1992. Dec. 94:2. 1992. 1994. July 30. Nov. 1994.100 Motor vehicle. 17.28 Dwelling fire. 94:3. Apr.59 Apartment building.67 Wildland. fire.49 Manufactured home. 1997.72 Structure fires due to civil disturbance. 3. 93:6. Dec.30 Building-under-renovation fire. 9. 92:4.100 Motor vehicle. 1996. 1995. 96:5. 1990. 91:4. 1991. 1993. 1990. 94:5.97 Boat. 1995. 96:3.100 Motor vehicle. May 29. 97:5. 97:5. 92:4.55 Board and care facility. 93:4.76 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 17 .91 Dwelling. 1995. 2. 28.26. 1996.24 Detention facility fire.. 1994. 1997. 1992. 1991.62 Dwelling. Dec.28 Board and care facility fire. 1993. 93:5. June 1. 92:4. Oct.25 Dwelling fire. 95:3.50 Manufacturing plant. 1990. Sept. Feb. June 18.72 Motor vehicle. 15.26 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. 91:6. 1993. 1996. 1. 96:5. Jan. March 3.73 Motor vehicle.51 Dwelling. April. 10. Sept. 1992. April 29-May 1. July 12.96 Apartment building. 93:5. Jan. 7. 13. 1991. 14.49 Apartment building. Jan. Sept. 92:5.108 Aircraft. 1995. 1991.35 Apartment complex fire. 98:5. 1995. 1991. June 23. 94:5. 96:5. 91:4.100 Motor vehicle. May 3. 1997. Aug. 91:4. 26.97 Motor vehicle. 1992. 25. 98:5. 92:4. Nov.95 Apartment building. Oct.73 Dwelling. Oct. 23.73 Motor vehicle. Oct. 96:5. 91:4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Apartment complex fire. 1995.69 Apartment building.67 Underground electrical vault. 6. Nov. 1995. 98:5. 92:4.27 Earthquake.64 Dwelling. Sept. July 22. 1993. 96:5. 19. June 6. 91:4. 93:5. 1991. 96:5.36 Dwelling-under-construction fire. April 26. 92:4.36 Dwelling fire. 91:6.92 Dwelling.72 Motor vehicle. Dec. 1993.93 Apartment building.68 Motor vehicle. 1990. May 4. 95:5. 96:5. 94:5.46 Automobile. 1993. 98:5. 95:5. 96:5. 1997. 1991. 93:6.

Oct.40 Wildland fire..79 Manufacturing plant fire. 1995. 1995.25 Motion picture studio/manufacturing plant fire. 95:4. 91:6. March. 1993.30 Dwellings. 1995. 94:6.21 Medical research laboratory fire. 92:1. 1992. 1990. 93:6. 1993.89 Automobile fire. 1993.56 Motor vehicle fire. 1997. Feb. 1991.63 Radio station fire. April 29-May 1. 91:2.21 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 18 .36 Manufacturing plant fire. 97:1. 1990. 92:5. 6. 93:6.88 Wildland/urban interface fires.19 Garage. 1988. 98:4.84 Manufacturing plant fire.31. 96:6. March. 91:6. 95:6. 1995. 98:6. 1990. Dec. 93:6. 1991. 94:2.21 Oil refinery fire. 94:6. 96:6. 1994..78 Office building fire. 1995. 1993.21 Paint plant explosion. 93:4.23. 91:2. 1992. 98:4. 1990.23 Office building fire. 98:2. 95:4. 1990. 1994.25 Manufacturing plant fire.28 Structure fires due to civil disturbances. Oct.106 Manufacturing plant fire. 1992. 91:4.21. 94:4.27 Manufacturing plant fire.24 Library fire. 1990. 12. 91:6. 1995.107 Manufacturing plant fire. 1997. 6. 3. 1994. 1992.22 Fatal propane truck/clubhouse fire. 1992. Nov.75 Manufacturing plant fire.22 High-rise office building fire. 96:1. 21. 1992. residential. Jan.19 Fatal dwelling fire.84 Manufacturing plant fire. 98:6. 1990. 96:5.. 4. 91:5. 95:4. Jan. 94:5. 1994. 91:2.30 Naval facility incident. 91:6. 95:5. 1997.32 Board and care facility. 94:3. Jan. 1991.. 1997. 98:5. 96:6.20.41. 95:6..74 Motor home fire. 93:6. 1993. 1994.29 Health clinic fires. May 4.28 Housing for elderly fire.30 Office building fire. 1994.26 Apartment building. 1990.110 Apartment building. 96:1.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Electric power conversion facility fire. 26. 93:6.29 Office building fire. 1992.. 92:4.16 Fatal fires Aircraft.27 Dwelling. 95:2. 96:1. 95:6.30 National forest fire. 1995. Aug.40 Refinery fire.. April.81 Test facility fire. 1990. 1997.24 High-rise office building fire. 1990. 96:1..82 Oil refinery fire. 93:6.23 Manufacturing plant fires. 92:6. 1993. Nov. 1996.. 1993. 91:6.36 Motor vehicle repair shop fire. 1992.24 Hotel fire.92 Fatal apartment building fire. June 27.35 Office building fire. 15. 95:5.99 Fatal manufacturing plant fire. 1997. fire.56 Hotel fire.30 Mixed-occupancy fire. Jan. 94:6. Nov. Aug. 94:6. 1994. fire. 92:5.40 Manufacturing plant fire. Jan. 98:2. 1997. 1994.

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Restaurant fire. 93:5.. 1995.. 98:5.26 Detention facility fire. Ontario.38 Motor vehicle repair shop fire. June 27.28 Tire fire.21 Supermarket fire. 98:6. 6. St. 93:6.57 Wildland fire. 93:6. 93:5. John.20 CANADA Apartment building fire. 92:6.56 Ohio. 1990. March. Sept. Ontario. 13.53. Aug.56 Ohio. 95:1. 1996. Oct.34 Restaurant fire. Sept. 1991.36.73. Nov. 1997. 6. June 21. 98:5.92 Wildland/urban interface fires. 1992. 1997. Sept.23 Warehouse fire. 92:1. 92:3. 95:6. 97:6. 96:1.49. 93:2. 98:5. 97:3.50 Hazardous materials response. Quebec.35 Storage facility fire. 1992.74 Wildland fire. 75 Wildland/urban interface fire. 1995. 1977..49 Manufactured home fire. 91:1. 91:6.26 Shopping mall fire.55 CANDLES Catastrophic fires caused by Dwelling fires. 95:5. 96:5. 92:6.29 Fatal fires caused by Dwelling fires. 1997. 91:6. 1996.29 Store fire. 98:5. 1996. 97:6. 1997. 97:5. 25. 92:1. 1990. 1997. 97:6. 91:2. 1994. 95:6. 1990. 1989.92 CAMPING TRAILER FIRES Catastrophic Alabama. 1990 5. Oct. 94:5. Alberta. Aug.23.97.88. 97:1. 96:6.79 School fire. 1992. 1990. 94:5. 1997. 98:3.22. possible cause. 1993. 93:5. 91:6.28 Warehouse fire. 1993. 74. 93:4.26 Warehouse fire. 91:1. 1994.26 Store fire. Aug. 93:6. 92:6. 95:6. 27. 1996. 4. 91:1.29 Warehouse fire.89 Wildland/urban interface fires.67 Dormitory fire caused by. June.28.28 Wildland fire.99 Wildland/urban interface fire. 1990.. 93:4.59. 91:6.35 Restaurant fires. 93:6. 1990.64.27 Store fire. 91:1. 1991. 91:1. 1992. 93:4. Aug.38 Store fire.50 Tire fire. 1990.111 Wildland/urban interface fire. 98:4. 93:1. 98:6.61. 1991. 92:6.28 School fire.26 Theater/lodge fire. 1992. 98:5. 1996.111 Wildland/urban interface fires. 94:6.22 Sawmill/manufacturing plant fire.73 Warehouse fire. 1992. 97:5.24 Theater fire.34.29 School fire.89 Wildland fire. 1997.. 29.21.19. New Brunswick. 93:5. 93:4.21 Shed fire. 1991. 1992.74 Wildland/urban interface fire.37.46 Vacant dwelling fire.17 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 19 . Dec. 98:1. 1991. 59. 94:6. 1992.

108 Nuclear energy plant fire extinguished by. 97:5. 93:3. catastrophic fire. catastrophic fire cause. 1990. catastrophic fire cause. G. 98:6.88 1994. 96:3. kills two.86 1996. and prevention of CO poisoning. 95:6.28 Cutting torch.102 Overpowered by fire. 93. 95:5. S.48 1995. 91:4. THOMAS Profile of. and detectors answered. 93:5.46 1997. 91:5. 92:5. 95:6.23. 92:4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Manufactured home fire. 94:5.76 Cutting torch ignites material.95 Fire spread through. 96:2. 92:4. 96:2.100 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 20 . 95:6.90. 95:5.21 Spreads fire.23 Smoking materials. 96:6.83 CARBON MONOXIDE Causes. 92:6. study of.64 Requires defensive attack. ignited by.37 Extension cord. 91:4. study of.35 Fire spread to structural members in.93 CARSON. 92:6. U. See also CONCEALED SPACES Catastrophic fires Ignites ceiling coverings. Georgia. MARGARET D. 96:5.53 Fire fighter injuries caused by. statistics and fire safety information. 98:5. heat.20 CASTINO. study of.42 CEILINGS. Jan. 93:5. ignited by.160 CARBON DIOXIDE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS Electrical fire extinguished by.25. damaged. its effects.67 Floor furnace. 96:5. 91:4.68 Cord. 98:5.67 Spread over tiles. 92:4. 95:6. 94:6. ignited by. 92:2. 91:4. 94:6.35 Lacked sufficient agent for extinguishment..48 Shipboard system discharges accidentally. 94:6.91 Fire started above. 94:6. ignited by. ignited by. ignited by.56 Unintentionally ignited.56 1993.94 Shipboard fire extinguished by. 94:5. 98:1. ignited by. study of.30. 95:5. 95:6.62 Cigarettes. 92:4.64 Ceiling tiles ignite. smoke.28. 98:3. study of. study of.97 Extension cord.75 Questions on gas. ignited by.35 Prevents rescue.20 CARPETS AND RUGS Carpet plant fire. 92:4.108 Dropped Fire spread above. catastrophic fire cause. 97:6.60 1991. 70.26 Residential fires caused by. symptoms. 1995. study of.89. 91:4. 94:6. 96:5.20 CATASTROPHIC FIRES. 97:6. 96:3. study of.62 1992. suspended ceiling fails. Profile of. 92:6. catastrophic fire cause.120 Fire fighter fatalities caused by.31 Collapse Hampers fire fighting.69 Kerosene heater fuel spill.

95:5.70 Texas. cause fire. 98:6.85 Minnesota. 1997. 13. 1991.23 Hydrocarbon-caustic solution reaction possible cause of explosion/fire.70 Minnesota.67 Fatal. May 12. 94:5. 97:5. 96:6.50 Oxidizing pool chemical storage in warehouse stores needs special attention.83 Texas.. contributes to fire spread. Dec. 92:4. Feb. NORTH CAROLINA Fraternity house fire.61 CHASES Fire spread through.28 Polyol level in pump drops.66 Louisiana. causes exothermic reaction. Jan. 92:3. Aug.21 Texas.64 Texas. 1990. 17.53 North Carolina.75 Louisiana. 97:5. 94:5. 1993. 91:5. July.41 Potassium superoxide reacts with organic material. 98:3. 98:1. 94:5.66 CHEMICALS © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 21 . causes flash fire. June/July.78 Motor oil/pool chemicals react. 93:6. 1992. cause warehouse fire.36 Oxidizers/pool chemicals. 1992. 98:6.38 Sodium hydrosulfite/aluminum powder react. 92:4. Nov. 1991.107 CHAPEL HILL.80 Texas.105 Ohio. 94:6. 95:6.44 Peroxide/polyurethane chain reaction. 93:2. factor in retail store fire. April 15. 97:6. 96:6.75 Texas.94 Sodium/water reaction.39 South Carolina. cause fire. cause explosion. 1995. 93:6. 1996. See CHEMTREC CHEMICAL WAREHOUSE FIRES Arkansas.21 Multiple ceilings hide fire. 1993. May.89.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fire started in. May 8. 98:1. 1990.23 Waste chemicals in dumpster react. July 5. 91:6.66 South Carolina.24 CHEMICAL PLANT FIRES California. 1995. 1992. May 1. 1997.31 Louisiana. 1994. 92:6. March. 1991. Nov.96..96 Vaulted design factor in fire spread. Ohio.27 Catastrophic Iowa. 6.86 CHEMICAL TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY CENTER. 98:3. 1994. 17. 91:4. 96:6. 1991. 1997. 93:4. 96:5. 91:3. 95:6.18 CMDP spontaneous ignition causes fire. 96:6. 98:5. 91:5. 94:6. 97:5. limit access. 1.31 Plywood-covered. 95:5. 96:3.58 CHEMICAL FIRES Calcium metal/water reaction cause fire. 96:5. May 27.84 Louisiana.54 Oxidizing pool and spa chemicals present hazard in warehouse stores.83 Minnesota. July. June. June 17.64 Utah. 97:6. 1995. 1997. 98:5. 1995. 92:6. 98:4.70 Muriatic acid/pool chemicals react.30 Foam rubber production chemicals react. 1992.105 North Carolina. 92:6. ignite waste products. Feb. 98:6. 1991. ignite fatal fire. 96:6.95 Chlorine/antifreeze react.49 Fire started in. 96:5.

98:3. ILLINOIS Space program technology applied to tank truck fires by NASA. 94:2. ignite fatal fire.52 CHIEF'S BRIEFING COLUMNS Arson's terrible toll.97.22. 95:3. 94:6.38.13 Mission statement core of operating plan. ignite catastrophic fire. 98:1. 98:1. 95:3. 91:4. 94:3. 92:1. 93:4.64. 98:5. 93:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Federal haz-mat regulations cover intrastate shipments of agricultural chemicals. 95:1.36. 95:5.26.96. 95:5. 92:5.19 Urban Fire Forum discusses global trends. NFPA.90 CHILDREN. 94:5. 98:6.38.25 CHEMTREC Vital link for chemical emergencies.39.17 New Orleans fire chief Bill McCrossen retires. 93:5.38.18 Officer training is key to fire service's success.22. 97:5. 92:4. 93:4.24. 96:5.21 Listening and responding to fire service members.30.89 CHIMNEYS © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 22 . 93:2.26 Manufacturing plant fire cause.14 Truck company duties need emphasis in training.35. 92:1. 93:3.16 Fire cause. Emergency response system upgrade. ignited fatal fire. 5.59.23 Developing professional programs for leadership training.25.23 Fire cause. 98:2. possible cause.144 CHILDREN AND CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Catastrophic fire cause. 95:3. 66.64.21 CHILDREN AND FIREWORKS Dwelling fire cause.54.18.70. 93:6. 95:3.57. 5.24. 93:5. 95:5. 94:5.24. Chicago Fire Dept. 96:2.34. 93:1. 66.26 Public fire safety education is long-term answer to fire loss.54 Wildland fire ignited by.23 Labor relations eased by seeing both sides. UNATTENDED Catastrophic fire victims.21. 94:6. 96:5.19. 93:3. 5. 97:6.92 Fatal fire. 95:4. 96:1. 97:2.34.112 Burdens of command responsibilities. 98:3. 93:5. 91:5.19 Playing with chemicals. 95:5.37. 93:3. 92:4. 94:1. statistics.16. 95:5. 95:4.25.37. 93:6.14 CHILDREN Playing with charcoal lighter.32 Playing with open-flame device.32 Fatal fire cause. 95:2. ignite fatal fire. 94:5. 98:2. 94:4. 98:4. 92:4. 94:2.13 International Association of Fire Chiefs includes retirees.40 CHILDREN AND MATCHES Catastrophic fire cause.62 CHICAGO.36. 95:1. 93:3.50 Fatal fire cause.28.65.21.22.23.54.128 Victims and cause of fires.86 CHESTER COUNTY. 6. 96:3. 93:5.27. 95:4. 91:6. 97:5. 95:1. 91:2. 91:4.13 Leadership requires political savvy.23 Playing with fire. 95:6.104 Urban problems confront fire service.92 Safe Place programs include fire stations. 95:5.15 Networking with external groups. partnership. 95:4. 94:1.23.70. 98:5. 3. 93:2. PA. 91:4.36 Playing with fire.23 Fire risks faced by. 93:3. 94:2.65. 96:5.21. 91:6.38.100. 6. ignites fatal fire.38.33. 66. planning. 95:6.19 Juvenile firesetters need social services. 94:5.28.45 Fatal fire victims.14 Fire department and elderly agencies focus on seniors' fire safety.

. 97:1. 91:4. 1990 fires. 91:4.107 Nursing home fire cause. 91:6. 94:6. 97:5.21 Missouri. 1993. 93:3. Michigan.64 Michigan. 1994. 1992.24 Catastrophic Artificial tree. fire ignites framing.89 Massachusetts.19 Ohio.25 Office building fire cause.20 Lighter fluid used to ignite fireplace fire. 95:5. 92:4. 94:6. 92:1. 1997. 1992. Sep.30 Texas. Dec. Dec.98 CIGARETTE LIGHTERS. 1993. 1993. 22.48 CHRISTMAS TREE FIRES Arizona.22 Michigan.104 Incendiary fire ignition source.31 Indiana.34.39 Pennsylvania. 94:6. 1996.. 1991.30 Texas. 96:6. 1995. 1994. 6. 1989. 93:6. 95:6. 1993. 98:6. 95:5. 1991. 91:1. Ohio. 1993. 96:5. 91:4. 96:6. 92:4. 97:5. 94:2.102.24 Manufacturing plant fire cause. 98:1.87. 94:1. 93:5.23 Pennsylvania.73 Pennsylvania.90 CHURCH FIRES Connecticut.34 California. Sept. 1992. 95:2. See also SMOKING MATERIALS Careless disposal of Apartment building fire cause.28 Utah. Dec.49. 93:6. 1992. Feb.31. 94:5. 1992. 97:5. 93:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fire fighter fatalities related to collapse of. 69. 94:6.24. July.22.79 Illinois.. 94:5. See also CHILDREN AND CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Catastrophic fire ignition source. 69 Fire ignition source. 1992.36 Massachusetts. 1993. Oct. 94:6.30 Indiana. possible.24 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 23 . Dec. Nov. 96:5. 96:1. 95:6.92 Tennessee. 1992. 93:6. 96:2.64 Fatal Artificial tree. 94:4.33 Illinois. 1994.28 Michigan. 1997. 98:4. 93:2.. 93:6. 92:6.37. 95:4. 95:3.31 Hospital fire cause.54 Michigan. 11. 94:6.57 Overheated.22 CHINA Manufacturing plant fire.33 Bridge fire cause.28 Iowa. 97:3.25 Fatal dwelling fire cause. 1990.26 Dwelling fire cause. 93:6.34 Catastrophic dwelling fire cause. 24.68.66 Fire spread through. 1990.105. 96:1.67 Dumpster fire cause. 1994. 95:6.30 Board and care facility fire cause. 94:4. 97:3. 96:5. 94:5. improperly maintained. 19.30.23 CIGARETTES.27 Virginia.49 Catastrophic rooming house fire cause. 98:2. 3.35. 94:1.68.60. 1996.

96:5. 92:2. 97:2. 97:1. possible cause. 97:1. 96:4. 97:5. 97:6.33 Laundry basket of clothes ignited by kerosene heater. 93:5.46 Dwelling fire cause.19 Shed fire.31 Fuel in aircraft crash fire. 93:3.81 CLOTHING FIRES Catastrophic Flash fire ignites clothes. 97:6.16 Wood stove explosion ignites clothing.50 Fatal fire. 91:4. 98:4.26.66 Wildland fire cause.99 Gas-fired furnace.54 Stored clothing.67 Laundry and holding bins ignited.24 Fatal apartment building fire cause. 94:1. 93:5. 91:4. 91:2.27 Fatal dwelling fire cause.26. 92:1.23 Clothes drying near gas furnace ignite. 95:6.23. 98:3. Nevada. factor in. factor in. 5. impede fire fighters. 97:6.22 Stove ignites clothing. 96:5.97 Space heater. 93:6. possible cause. 91:3. April 29-May 1.65.16. OHIO Crown Coliseum arena updates fire protection system.24 Smoking materials.64.92.22 Catastrophic apartment building fire cause. 95:5. factor in.26. 1. ignited by. 94:6. 96:5.22 Fire. ignited by.39 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 24 . 97:5. 93:2. 98:2.34.160 CINCINNATI. ignited by. 1992. 1992.25 Elderly housing fire cause.19 Rioters damage/destroy 862 structures by incendiary fires. 95:3. ignited by.49 Catastrophic dwelling fire cause. 98:5.24.49 Match.38 Lamp ignites clothing.25 Stored clothing.35 Limited-care facility fire cause.54 Statistics on cigarette use.21. 5. 94:6. fires. 97:2.16 Fireworks plant fire cause.20 Incendiary fire started by.54 Lamp. ignited by. 98:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Store fire cause.50 Extension cords ignite clothing placed on cord. 92:3. 96:5. 97:5. ignited by.31.32 Apartment fire cause. 95:5.24 Rooming house fire cause. 96:6.64 Catastrophic manufactured home fire.21 Nursing home fire cause. California. 93:2.22 Stove burner. ignited by. 94:1.20 Worker spills molten metal. 97:5. 93:6. 96:5.27. 92:1. 98:3.35 Warehouse fire cause. 97:5.29 Fatal board and care facility fire cause. 96:3. 98:6.53 Stored clothing Catastrophic fire.35 Group home fire cause. 95:5.92. 96:5. 97:6.51 Fatal Cigarettes ignite clothing. 98:1.66. 91:1.120 CIVIL DISTURBANCES Rioters burn shopping mall. 97:2. 98:1.25.67.89 Careless use of Apartment complex fire cause. 97:1. 91:4. 91:4. dropped.

1990. 95:3. 1993. analysis.85 Passive fire protection systems.43 Existing buildings. S. 1992. Dec. 97:3. 96:1.67 Cocoanut Grove fire. 95:2.46. 1990. 1993. 92:6. 91:6.74 Florida.30 Performance-based codes Benefits of.19 Catastrophic Georgia. 96:2. July 31. 94:3. 93:5. use in. 96:6.16. 96:3.73 NFPA and ICC collaborate to develop one national model fire code. 95:5. 95:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 CLUB FIRES California. March 25.23 Oklahoma.70 U. 1992.74 CODES AND STANDARDS.29 COAL MINE FIRES Catastrophic Kentucky.24 Development process and future trends.68 High technology detectors require new standards. nightclub. 92:6. Scottsdale. Sept. five eyewitnesses remember. 94:1.36 NFPA and International Code Council work on national fire code. 97:5. 93:6. See also CODES ON THE FIRELINE COLUMNS.69 Virginia.22 Existing codes. developing. 97:2. developing consensus for. Department of Energy. 12. 1996. vacant building.. IN COMPLIANCE COLUMNS. 1993. 1991.66 West Virginia. 94:6.59 Indiana. 94:1.89 Michigan.16. 91:3. NFPA CODES AND STANDARDS Basis-for-design reports help authority having jurisdiction. 95:2.40 Fire models to evaluate alternative designs. building owner. 91:6. 95:6. 1992. 1994. 93:5. Oct. Aug. performance objectives for.32 Residential sprinklers requirement. Dec.24 North America.72 Designing buildings for.40 Stratosphere Tower (Las Vegas) designed using performance and prescriptive codes.68 New York. 97:4.46 Nursing home fire verifies authority having jurisdiction/engineers sprinkler design.36 Elevator recall and shut down requirements increase safety. May 11. 97:1. 96:5.30 Illinois. 97:6. See CONCEALED SPACES COCOANUT GROVE FIRE Five eyewitnesses remember. 91:4.72 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 25 .25 Washington.98 Texas. 7.94 Regulations affect use of new construction methods. March 19..42 International electrical standards.20 Development of. 1990.67. 94:6. Arizona. 94:5. 95:2. athletic club.36 Making performance-based codes work.77 COCKLOFTS. 95:1. 95:6.34 International standards. 95:4. 97:4. based on. 94:3. 1990.16 Federal law requires agencies to use voluntary consensus standards. Jan. 91:4. 92:6. 95:3. adopted by. 1990. 97:1. 97:3.39 Illinois. 18.64 Evaluating equivalencies and exceptions to standards.31 Maryland.82 Illinois. 1994. country club. 98:2. 91:3. 91:4.77 Wisconsin. 1991. 91:4. 1997.

96:1. 27. 1994. 98:4. 97:5.27 Fraternity house. 1997. 98:4.23 COMPARTMENTATION Lack of Kennel fire.61. factor in.49 Wildland. 97:1.32 COMMUNITY CENTER FIRES Pennsylvania.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 U. 96:5. 93:1. 93:6. 1994. 97:5. 95:3. 96:5.34 University bell tower. 1997.33 Fuel tank storage facility fire. July 3. 92:2. 1996. July 18. S. Texas.35 Fraternity house. factor in.87 COLORADO SPRINGS.84 COMBUSTIBLE PRODUCTS Effectiveness of current product labeling systems. Sept.27 Marketing residential sprinklers. 95:5. 1996. 1996.30 COLORADO Apartment building fire. 25. 1994. 1992.27 New Zealand fire service operation and code development provide insights.26 Manufactured home. 1997. 97:5. 97:6. 95:1. See also DORMITORY FIRES Classroom building. 1991.70 Hotel. March 4.23 Mixed-use building. 1992.50 Fraternity house. 1991. 98:3.54 CODES ON THE FIRELINE COLUMNS Consensus requirement can slow adoption of innovations. See also specific occupancies Site testing smoke detectors.110 COMMUNICATIONS. response to European economic unification and global standards. 96:4. Chapel Hill.78 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 26 .23 Office building. ANSI's role in. Kentucky.37 Laboratory.25 Warehouse fire. 1994. 1997. 28. 98:1. 98:6. S.87 Warehouse fire. May 12. Rhode Island. June.73 Students need fire safety education. Georgia. 1993. 95:5. Jan. 1995. 94:4. Computer mapping used by fire service. Kansas. 98:5. 93:2. 92:6. 96:2. 97:5.51. 92:4.78 Office/classroom building.. Pennsylvania. 96:6. Aug. 98:6.20 Library fire. 1996. See FIRE SERVICE COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY Fire protection for..67 Fatal fires Automobile repair shop. 96:3.20 Apartment building fire.29 Fire service role in code-making. North Carolina.71 COMMERCIAL OCCUPANCIES. Nov. Indiana.27 COLLEGE BUILDING FIRES. 92:6.79 Warehouse fire. 1990. 1992.29 Evaluating department's initial attack capability. COLO.35 Classroom building. 91:6. 1997. July 23.21 Fraternity house. 92:6. 93:6. factor in. 91:6. 95:2. 1996.43 Regional fire code development committees provide input to NFPA.90 Catastrophic fires Board and care facility.73 Resort fire. West Virginia. 93:2. cable/wire manufacturers promote NEC over IEC as European standard. 94:1. 96:6. Nov. Ohio.79 Sawmill fire.64 U. 95:5. 93:1. 1992.

30 Fire protection for.56 Internet's fire protection applications. 98:5.79. 97:5.85. 95:4.21 Fire started in. 93:6.35. 40. 91:3.77.29 Ceiling Catastrophic hotel fire started in.23.44 Fire service use of.78.99.39 Fire spread through.91. 95:5.98 Fire started in. 98:5. 6.65 Fire spread into. 92:6. 94:4. 98:1. 95:5. 95:6. 95:6. 96:6. 92:6. 93:5. handling incidents involving.32 Fire protection information available on Internet.19. 97:1. 91:4.24.22 Fire spread through.81.106.64 Fire spread into. 94:5. 96:3. 94:4. 97:2.24. 93:6. causing explosion and fire. 5. 95:6.66 COMPUTERS AND RELATED EQUIPMENT Electronic equipment room fires. 98:2.95.32.84 COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS FIRES Cylinder ruptures. 92:6. 94:4.19 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 27 . 98:6.84 Cockloft Catastrophic fire spread through. 97:3. 92:2. 65.92 Ceiling/roof Fire spread into. 94:5.97. 95:5.16 Fire started in.15 Attic Fire spread into.23 Attic/roof Fire spread into.41 CONCEALED SPACES Above door.45. 104.22 Fire started in.29 COMPUTER MODELS. 6. 92:5. 94:6.35. 94:2. 98:1. 94:5.31.90 Fire started in.108 Fire spread through. 98:6.23.100 Fire in uninterrupted power supply spreads to cables.54 Fire protection community. 94:4. loss data. 92:6. 96:3. 95:1. 96:1. See FIRE MODELS COMPUTER SOFTWARE Fire alarm software requires careful management.56. 91:4.107 Fire spread through. 89 Fire started in.90 Responders linked to hazardous materials databases by software. 96:5. 98:6. software useful to. 98:6.93 Flashover. 95:6. 36.98. 95:4.90 Fire spread into.35.89. 95:1.64. 94:1.64. 95:6.21.64. 92:3.25.58. 49. 97:6. 91:4. 79.66 COMPUTER-AIDED DISPATCH Los Angeles implements new CAD system. 94:6.30 High-pressure tanks being vented. 94:6. fire started in. 98:1. 97:2. 2. 94:6.54 COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS Vehicles fueled by.21.22. 96:2.37 Fire started in. 6. 53 Fire spread through. 96:5. 92:2.50 Fire service software. 93:5.36. 94:6. 95:6.78.67. 95:4. factor in.76 Fuel high-rise office building fire. 95:2.89. fuel ignited by static discharge. 97:3.64. 96:6.31 Ceiling/floor Fire spread into.37.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Through-penetration protection systems.59.30. 91:6. 95:5.

96:2. 91:6.22. 1996.67 Church fire. 97:6.24 Fire spread through. factor in fire spread. 94:6. 1996. 1997.96. 1977.36. 94:5. Feb.22 Store fire. 94:6. 98:1. 1996. 98:6.92 Heat produced by belt ignites combustibles. 91:4. 97:4. 97:1. 98:6. 98:3. 94:6. 1995. 10.91 Hot slag drops onto freezer conveyor.91 CONGRESSIONAL FIRE SERVICES INSTITUTE Fire services/safety publicized by. ignites freezer. 94:5.24 Walls Fire spread into. 17. 6. 92:4.79 Fire spread through. 94:5. 1996. 93:3. dust. 97:3. 97:4. 94:6.107. 1992. 1994.79 Detention facility fire. Feb. July 7. 94:2. 97:6. 1991.35 CONSTRUCTION. 92:4. Dec. 91:6. 97:6. 93:3. 94:6.90 Texas. 97:2. 95:5. Nov.80 Stockroom fire.49 CONDOMINIUM FIRES California. 22. factor in fire spread. 92:4. 95.25 Restaurant fire. Oct. 91:6. 1990.21 Bridge fire.23 Fire spread through.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Floor Fire spread into. 95:6. 93:4. April 27.53 Dwelling.94. 1996. 96:2. 1993. 1996.31 CONNECTICUT Apartment building fire. 14. 1996.26 Manufacturing plant fire. 1990.58 CONFERENCE CENTER FIRES New Jersey. 94:6.84 Mechanical failure causes grain to ignite.22 Manufacturing plant fire.21 Library fire. 17. Sept. 96:1. 97:6. 16. 95:5.26 Mill fire.67 Board and care facility.51 Dwelling fire.. 97:5. 1996. 1996. 1993. 96:2.58 North Carolina. 1993. 97:6. Feb.26 Fatal apartment building fire.23 Illinois.57 Illinois. 93:6.93 Fire started in. 1991.. apartment building fire.19.28 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 28 . 1996.58 Openings in construction. FIRE-RESISTIVE Limited fire spread. 97:5.34 Catastrophic fires Aircraft.35 CONSTRUCTION METHODS Balloon construction.30 CONFINED SPACES OSHA regulation aims to reduce incidents in. 90 Fire started in.58 CONVEYORS Friction between belt and roller ignites fire. 98:4. 97:6.54 Roof Fire spread into.42 Marina fire. 1990.19 Fire started in.67. 93:6.24 Delaware.33. 97:5.

Fatal office building fire.60 DETECTION SYSTEMS Automatic. 97:6.36 CRAWFORD.23 Welding sparks ignite belt. 93:5. 1993.104 Optical flame system design.105 Unsatisfactory performance. See DETENTION FACILITY FIRES COX. catastrophic dwelling fire. 92:1. 93:5. 17.97 Condominium fire. integration with building controls.28 Intelligent systems eliminate false alarms without compromising protection. 94:5.99.63 Not a factor in fire Not in service.51 DELAWARE Catastrophic fires Dwelling. 1991. activated after water outage. 94:3. 95:6. See WELDING AND CUTTING OPERATIONS D DALY.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Mechanical failure causes sugar dust to ignite. 97:6. April 10.66 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 29 . Feb.35 Not operational due to poor maintenance. 97:1. 98:5. innovative.16 Methane gas detectors. See HEATING-AND-COOKING EQUIPMENT FIRES COOLING TOWER FIRES Rooftop tower of high-rise office building. 93:2.66 Dwelling. 1990. PHIL Profile of. 95:5. 93:5.29 DENVER. 91:4. did not cover area of fire origin.52 Fire on building exterior. 96:6.25 DELUGE SYSTEMS Satisfactory performance. 25.42 Lack of detectors allowed school fire to spread. 95:3. 91:3. 97:6. 98:1. 94:5.23 CROWDED BUILDINGS Catastrophic fire.28 CORRECTIONAL FACILITY FIRES. 95:6. 94:5. cause major damage. 94:5. factor in. COLO. 92:5. 28. 97:6. 20. 98:6.49 Overheated bearing ignites cardboard.57 Detention facility fire.102 CUTTING AND WELDING OPERATIONS.92 DETECTORS Carbon monoxide detector questions answered. 96:4. in mine explosion/fire. Massachusetts.78 Life safety system installed at Winterthur Museum.97 Fire above detectors. July 7. 98:5. refinery fire. Sept. 95:5. disabled. Nov.68 COOKING-AND-HEATING EQUIPMENT FIRES. 1996.49 Unsatisfactory performance. JIM Profile of.20 DANBURY.26 NFPA 72. consolidates detection standards. 92:5. Jan. 1992. The National Fire Alarm Code. CONN. WENDY L.33 Fire department is progressive.20 High technology requires new standards. 96:6.21 Motion detector sets off alarm in library fire. 92:5. 1977. 97:6.118 Tank farm fire. 1990. Detention facility fire. 1991. Profile of.70 Not a factor in fire Absence of detectors. 94:3. 95:3.

97:3.28 Frequent activation of alarms in absence of fire led residents to ignore alarm. 94:6.28 Fire above detectors. 93:1. 94:1. 93:2. Consumer Product Safety Commission study of detector failure.26 Control system used for safe elevator recall. 88 DETECTORS. 96:4. 93:6. 98:6.96. 95:4.49 Explosion. 94:5.45 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 30 . 93:6. 100. 92:4. FLAME Designing optical detection systems.87.90.38 Battery incorrectly installed. 92:6.35. HEAT.23. 60. 93:3.28 Fire prevention week theme. 96:6. 93:5.69 Many U. 46.30.95 Sample training exercise for detector placement. 5.79 Batteries missing or dead. 98:5. 6. and maintenance to ensure reliability. 98:3.26.64 Defective. 95:1.74 System not operational.77.37. 92:5.37. 91:4. 37. 93:5. 98:3.24 Fire extinguished quickly.25. 96:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Motion detectors covered with tape.26 Residential detectors.95. 94:5. 98:3. 93:6.68. HEAT Residential detectors.27. 98:1.24.90 Fire spread too fast.105 DETECTORS.48 Site testing in commercial occupancies.34 Intoxicated occupants do not respond. 96:6.21. 73 DETECTORS.79. 92:6. 2. 93:1.22 Improperly installed. 17. SMOKE. 92:5. 96:6. 97:5.53. 91:3. 91:5. 93:6. 1992. SMOKE Air sampling detectors. UNSATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE. S. 49 Battery disconnected. fail to detect fire. 92.29. 94:4. 92:6. 98:3. most due to batteries missing or dead. performance in fire tests. 94:4.35.49 Satisfactory performance. 56.38.70.85. 95:6. 95:4. 94:6. 97:2. 102. 98:6. 96:5. 92:4. 92:6.22. NOT A FACTOR IN FIRE Aircraft crash. 93:5. 91:6. 96:5.16 Questions on location and type answered.22 Electrical system shorted. location. 96. 93. 92:2.88 DETECTORS.27 Hearing impaired person may not have heard detector. 94:5. 93:1.38 Inspection. 97:5. 95:6.95.15. 94:5.62. 91:4.88.92 DETECTORS. 16.98 Nuisance alarms: field study in Native American community. 38. 94:6.106. testing. 92:3.25.34. SATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE.27. 51. 91:4. 93:5. 72. 36.40 U. 91:3.30.24. S.29.48 DETECTORS. factor in catastrophic fire. HEAT. 66. 64.22. 93:2. 96:5.68 Free detector distribution program saves residential occupants. 93:1. 30. 95:6. 68. 92:5. factors in catastrophic fire. 93:2. 97:4. 95:3. NOT A FACTOR IN FIRE Not in service.36 DETECTORS. delayed detection.20.24.26. performance in fire tests.65 Preventing nuisance alarms. catastrophic apartment building fire.24 Not in service. 95:5. 94:6. 97.24 Rendered inoperable by explosion. 96:6. 91:6. 5.21.91. 96:5. HEAT.37. 98. overview of.28 Disconnected.67.34. 98:1. S.22. 62.68 Insufficient number. detectors not operable. experience with. 92:3. 99.17 Fire on exterior of building.28. 93:6. 98:5.110 U. 64.32. 96:2. 96:6. 5.19 Delayed operation.28.68 Location delayed notification.26. 54. 92:4. 69.80 Blocked by interior renovations. 93:4.

91:4.28. 95:5.51 Delaware.30 Blind man dies when stove burner ignites bathrobe.96 Physically disabled persons die in catastrophic board and care facility fires. 94:5.97. 1977. 6. 92:4. PHILIP J. 97:5.50 Physically disabled persons die in board and care facility fire.53.16 Physically disabled person ignites clothing while smoking.98. 94:5. 91:3.52. 1990. 93:1. 2.31. 23. 1992.29 Child in wheelchair dies in catastrophic fire. 95:6.29. 60. SMOKE. 23.38. 94. 98:5. 1977.84 Pennsylvania.19. 68. 98:5.27.59 Used as fire starter.54. 94:6. Missouri. Profile of.89 Power supply shut off. 96:1. 50 DETENTION FACILITY FIRES California. 97:1. 94:2. 1992. 92:1. 95:2.53 Physically disabled person dies in apartment building fire.49.49 Florida. 97:1. 96:2. 17.22.36 Catastrophic. 6. 92:2. 98:4. 92:6. SATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE.22 Reason unknown.20 DISABLED PERSONS. April 21. 97:5. 3.54. 1990. June 26.19 Physically disabled person dies in dwelling fire.21. vaporized fuel ignites.24.22 Legally blind man ignites fatal fire. Catastrophic aircraft collision at airport. 24. 96:5. 16.25 Fire protection in correctional facilities. SMOKE. 81. 37. 95:5.50 Short circuit caused breaker to trip. 98:3.28. 97:6. 97:5. 98:1. 93:6.90 DETECTORS. 97:2. 1993.89. 41.26 Mentally disabled resident dies in limited-care facility fire. 28.38. 98:5. 26.23. See also AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT Blind. 94:5. 5. 49.33. 96:6. Sept.22.15. 29. 1994. 96:4.66.20. 94:1. MICH.62. 96:5. 100.16 Removed.69.22.26. 5. 4.52 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 31 . 97:6.26. 93:5. 97:1. 93:1.60. 95:2.58 Disabled grandmother unable to rescue children.70 Danbury.29 DIESEL FUEL Locomotive fuel tanks rupture. 97.33 Maury County.22. 93:3. factor in catastrophic fire. 90. 107.24.107. 1991. 97:1.27 Ohio State Penitentiary. 52. 93:3.53. 94:6. Feb. 49. 98:5.26. 30. 98:1. Tenn. 91:4.21.22.45.30. 98:4. Conn. 91:3. 93:3.59 DETECTORS. 95:2. 92:2. 96:5. 14. June 21. 97. 95:1. 4. 96:5.91.49 Not located in area of origin.22.57 Fatal board and care facility fire..NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Not installed. 1930. 50 Physically disabled person dies in manufactured home fire. ignites fireplace fire. 5. 97:2. 2. 93:5. 24. 96:5. 95:5. 5. 69.27. 96:1.34. 94:6. 91:5.35. 95:5. 94:5. 50.22. 1977.22.33 St.22. 94:5.16.112 Hearing-impaired fire victim may not have heard smoke alarm.20 Mentally disabled person sets rooming house fire. 6. UNSATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE. nonambulatory woman dies when smoking materials ignite bedding. 6. 95:5. John. 94:2. 5. 1992. 96:4.18. 95:3. June 2. 98:5. 70. July 7.33. Brunswick.25.29. 92:4. Dec.31.34 Fire safety principles and education for. 95:5.50 North Carolina. 94:5. 3. 102.38. 95:5.50 DETROIT. 24.70 Dwelling fire.26. 95:6. 1996. 96:6. 98:2. 94:1. 92:6. 93:2.17. 95:5.26.54.21. 97:5. 93:3.96.29 DINENNO. ignites catastrophic fire.21 Mentally disabled residents die in catastrophic fire.. 92:3.

53 Lacking self-closing devices. 97:5. 93. 96:5. factor in.66.62 Catastrophic fire.51 Closed Limited fire spread. 91:1. 97:3.93 Fire fighting operations hampered by.19 Fire. preparation for.91. factor in catastrophic fire. 1. See WASHINGTON. hamper escape in catastrophic food plant fire.59 Terrorist attacks. 97:5. C.64 DISASTER DRILLS Logan International Airport. factor in.35 DISASTER PLAN Los Angeles County Fire Department's response program. 96:1. 51 Catastrophic vehicle fire. 97:6.27. factor in catastrophic motor vehicle fire.37 Fatal fire.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Physically disabled persons die in catastrophic fire. 93:5.55 Locked Catastrophic dwelling fire. 96:5. 97:5. 91:6. 97:5. 98:5. 98:5. 91:6. Fire protection systems. DOMESTIC DISPUTES Fatal fires.95. 93:5. factor in.64. 98:5.35 DISNEY WORLD. factor in catastrophic fire. 51. 100.34 Fire vented through. 98:5. 94:6.56.91.35. factor in. 96:1. factor in.50 Blocked by victims. 96:1. 98:2.24. 98:5.67. 96:6.62 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 32 . factor in. Boston. USAR task force response to. 91:3. Mass. factor in. 94:6. 96:3.29 Nailed shut Catastrophic fires. 93:6. 1995. 5. 91:6. gas exposure. 95:5. 98:5. 69.49 Garage door. 98:5.45 Catastrophic dwelling fire. 95:5.16 DOORS. 98:5. 95:5. 91:2. 94:5. 96:2.17.18 In fire wall. 6.54.64.26. 52.93.63. 53 Fire spread by draft caused by.99. 97:5.60 DISASTER RESPONSE Congress considers natural disaster relief policy reform.20.90 Fire vented through. 49. 53 Security bars. 96:5. 94:2.52. 105. 91:4. 59. FLA. NFPA documentation of response.31 Oklahoma City bombing. 95:3.49.96. 91:4. See also EXITS Blocked by refrigerator.29 Jammed. 96. 92:5.55 Fatal apartment fire. 95:6.54 Plane crash simulation at Hancock Tower high-rise.64.67. 97:5. fire spread through. shopping mall fire. 97:6. 98:5. 94:2. factor in. 96:6.17.75 Inoperable. 98:2.50 Oklahoma City bombing. fire spread through. 95:5. D. 94:5. 92:1.21 Heat spread through. 92:4. 94:6.25 Fire spread through. 6.50 Fatal fire.21.119 DISPATCH. 95:3.30 Fire fighting operations hampered by.56. 97:5. 53 Smoke spread through.23. factor in catastrophic fire.45.51.49. fire fighting operations hampered. See COMPUTER-AIDED DISPATCH DISPATCH CENTERS Los Angeles designs state-of-the-art center.105 Limited heat. 1995.66 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.64. 91:4. 98:5.37 Open Catastrophic fire spread through. fire spread through. 91:4. ORLANDO. 92:1.26.50 Steel screens hinder escape in catastrophic fire. 95:6.50. factor in. Boston.

96:4. 75. 93:3.31. 96:5.49 Operated correctly. April. 95:6.152 DRAFT CURTAINS Satisfactory performance. 97:6. 96:4. Pennsylvania. 92:4. allowed fire spread.111. 96:6.100 Wood.95.50 Ohio. See DISASTER DRILLS. 98:6.73 DRUGS.88. FIRE DRILLS DROUGHT Wildland fire factor. 91:4. May 12.72. 94:5. 1996.74.38 Self-closing. 1990.27. 93:6. 103. 49.59. 93:1. 92:6. prevent fire spread. 93:5. Louisiana. 97:4.67 DOORS. 91:6.70. 95:5.103 Removed.31 Electrical substation plant fire extinguished with. Massachusetts. 78. failed to operate. July 9. 94:6.20 DRY CHEMICAL EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS Delayed activation. 97:5.19. 97:3. 92:4. Feb.21 Self-closing device deactivated.99.26. 98:3. 91:4. 97:5. warehouse fire. Wisconsin. factor in catastrophic fire. 1997.67. 94:5. 95:6. 94:5.53 Self-closing devices removed. 94:5. limited fire spread. factor in. 96:2. under renovation. 93:4. 92:6. 1994. factor in fire spread. 91:2.52 DORMITORY FIRES Catastrophic North Carolina.22 Catastrophic dwelling fire. Washington.85. 94:5.25 Military barracks.42 College/university Arizona.28.12 Limited/prevented fire spread. fire spread through.71 DRILLING RIG FIRES Track-mounted.96. 98:6.60 Cooking chemicals ignite apartment building fire. 92:4. 96:6.21 DROWNING Fire fighter fatalities related to. 97:6. 1996.21 Washington.74.74. factor in. 97:5.52. C. 95:6. 97:4. FIRE Absence of.77 School. 1991. 1990. 93:6.85 Automatic Limited fire spread.92 Open. factor in fire spread. 94:5. 92:4. 98:6. 1991. North Carolina. 95:6. 98:5.100 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 33 .27. 97:5. 97:6. 95:6.50 Texas. 95:6. May 11. 94:6. 95:1. D.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Vehicle passenger door inoperable from interior. but partly successful in restaurant fire. April 19. 1990. 1996.. 95:6.63 Field modifications of. ILLEGAL Careless disposal of marijuana cigarette ignites apartment building fire.95 Roll-down. 91:6. fire spread through.102. 98:6. 76. 92:4.31.21.23 DRILLING PLATFORM FIRES Catastrophic. 1993. May 12. 91:1.36. 97:5.105. 95:5.29 Catastrophic.35. 54. 92:4.52 Failed to close.99 Statistics. 95:6. 97:6.28.64.108. 5.36 Fatal fire. 95:1.84 Failed to operate due to poor maintenance. 15. factor in catastrophic fire. 89.72 DRILLS. 95:2. 97:5. factor in catastrophic fire.95 College.92 Overhead doors.38.

93:6. 98:6.24 DUMPSTER FIRES Hawaii. 98:6. 1992. 4.82. 93:5.84 Deep fat fryer fire ignites grease in. 1996. ignite studs in dust collection bin.87 Sawdust.24 DWELLING FIRES.28 Electrical connection grounded through.49 Sawdust in attic ignited by spreading fire.16 California. 93:2. 96:3. 98:1. 1997. 98:6.33 Overheated bearing box. See also MANUFACTURED HOME FIRES Alabama. 97:6. 90 Grill fire ignites grease in. KENNETH W. 96:6. 95:6.86 Sugar dust ignited by spark or heat. 93:6.90 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 34 .91 Exhaust fan malfunction. 1989. 96:2.23. 1992. 93:3. 94:4.53 Unsatisfactory performance. April. Profile of.43 DUST Conveyor belt heat ignites dust. 11.23. See also CHASES Clothes dryer heat ignites lint in exhaust duct. 97:5. factor in.26 DUNGAN.84 Paper. 6. May 4. 96:5. fire spreads to combustibles from.39 Arizona. 92:4.52. 1992.87. 93:6. 96:4. factor in fire spread.24 DUCTS. fire spreads through dust collection system.28 California. 98:6.49 Synthetic fabric dust ignited by short circuit. 97:6. manufacturing plant fire..83 Paper.24 New York.32 Florida.84 Sparks sent through. ignited by. 98:6.20 DÜSSELDORF. 93:6. 98:1. 96:3. 1995.104.23.84 DUST COLLECTION SYSTEMS Polyurethane dust ignites. 1993. 98:6. 1995. 97:6. 92:5. 94:4. 92:6. failed to operate in restaurant fire.25 California. 1993. 96:1. ignited by heat from gas heater. 98:6.23 California.68. Apr.26 Florida. 91:6. 97:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Not a factor in fire. 94:6. 95:5. 93:4.35 Florida. contributes to fire spread.87 Sparks sent through ducts. 94:5.26. 91:1. 98:5. 95:2. 92:4. ignited by. 92:4.31 Michigan. 1997. 98:6. 96:5. 97:3. 98:6. explodes.35 Fire spread through. 97:6. ignited by smoldering grain.23 Furniture manufacturing plant explosion/fire. 93:6.79 California. 97:6. 1995. 1996.30 California. 92:4. GERMANY Fatal airport terminal fire. 1997. 1992.30 Sawdust ignites. refinery fire.36. 94:3. ignited by heat source.21. fire spreads through dust collection system. factor in. ignite studs in dust collection bin.22 Connecticut.25 Short circuit ignites dust on top of duct.57. 96:4.22 DRYING OVENS Dust and lacquer in vent system.81 California. 96:5. Sept.34 Arkansas. knitting mill fire.28 Hosiery manufacturing plant fire.19. 1991. fire above system.36 Combustible ducts in vapor removal system spread fire. 1991. 1994.75 Polyurethane dust ignites.103 Grain. 98:1.

95:4.37 New York. 1991. 92:2.33 Michigan. 98:1. 95:6. 1996. 92:6.19 Oklahoma.90 Georgia. 1991. 1991.19 Maryland. 93:4. 1996. 1996. 1996.57 Michigan. 91:5. 1991. 1992. 1994. 95:2. 94:5.34 Pennsylvania. 91:5.28 Oklahoma.22. 98:5. 1996. 97:1. 3.36. 93:5.19 Massachusetts.19 Products first ignited in. 1994.22 Illinois.22 Texas. 1997.15 Michigan. 92:1. 1992.36 Illinois. 92:1. 1997.29 Georgia. 17. 93:1. 96:4. 93:3. 1991.38 Indiana. 1994. 1994. 1994. 1989. 1997. 96:5.35 Kentucky. 98:3.23. 92:3.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Florida. Feb. 1994. 1993. 94:1. 93:3. 97:1. 94:1. 98:5.38 Pennsylvania. 1993.22 Idaho. Jan.39 Michigan. 98:4. 92:6. 98:6.38 Pennsylvania.25 Texas. 98:5. 93:2. 95:4. 1994. Nov. 95:1. 1995. 1997.31 Maryland. 1997. 1997. 97:4. 95:1. 22. 1993.22 Massachusetts.16 Massachusetts. 6. 91:1. 93:2. 97:6.30 Iowa.34 New Jersey.26 Kentucky. 23 Pennsylvania. 94:6. 98:1.34 Missouri. 95:6. 96:6.21. 95:5.58 Minnesota. 1983-1987. 92:4.29 Oklahoma. 92:2.25 Missouri. 97:6. 1993. 96:6.26 Iowa.38 Maryland.72 Rhode Island.21. 1994.34 Massachusetts. 1998. 1995.25 New York. 1992. 1991. 1992.28 Ohio.31 New York.28 Mississippi. 1994.22.37 North Carolina. 1991. 95:3. 94:1. 1995. 93:6.27 Massachusetts. 94:6.25. 94:1. 92:5. 97:2.28 Ohio.38 Missouri.27.21 Massachusetts. 1996.22 New York.34 Ohio. 1996. 1990.22. 93:5. 14. 1993.31. 1995. 97:3.29 Texas. 6. 1997. 1996. 1991. 1993. Oct. 96:4. 98:3. 96:3.25 Michigan. 1997.58 Michigan. 1995.28 Michigan. multiple dwellings. 4.36 Massachusetts. 97:5. 1993. 1992.17 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 35 .

1994. 92:4.91 Illinois. 11. 1997. 94:5. April 26. 1995. Dec. 16.54 Iowa. 93:5. 9.51 California.54 Illinois. Jan. 94:5. 1991. 1992.97 Georgia. 95:5. Oct.51 Alabama. Feb. 15. 9. 92:4. Nov. 1990.65 Massachusetts. 26.64 Florida. 91:4. 20. 94:5. 30. June 27. 91:4. 95:5. 97:5.98 Georgia. 13.45 Massachusetts. 1994. 95:5. 1997. Dec. 1993. 96:5.36 Wyoming. 23. 4. 1990. Nov. 1991. Aug. 95:5.51 Louisiana. 92:5. 96:5. 1990. March 24. 91:4.60 Indiana. 95:6. 3. 9.49 Connecticut. July 7. July 20. 95:5. Jan. Sept. Jan. 1996.64 California. Jan. 91:4. 1994. Dec. 1995. Feb. 1995. Aug.92 Georgia.60 Kentucky.93 Iowa. 1997. 1995. 1993.98 Georgia.62 California. 1. 1997. 24.53 Maryland. 1997. Aug. 95:5. 97:5. 97:5. 26. 1995. Jan. 98:5.50 Hawaii. Dec.97 Florida. 91:4. 96:5. 93:5. June 1. 1997.66 Delaware.64 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 36 . Aug. multiple dwellings. 1993. 16. Jan. 1995. 5. 94:5. 94:5.54 Michigan. 96:4. Nov. 94:5. Dec. 1992. 98:5. 95:5. 98:5. 96:5. 1996. 98:5.45 California.64 Alabama. 1990. CATASTROPHIC Alabama. 1994.50 Maryland. Feb. 19. 1994. 12. 97:5. 1997. 1990. 1994. 1990. 1990.54 Maryland. 14. Nov. Feb. Jan. 1994. March 13. 12. 27. 91:4. 96:5. 14. 1993. March 20. 1993. Nov. 28. Oct. 29. 1997. 98:5. 1990.62 Maryland. 4.45 Illinois. 25. 1991.93 Kentucky.50 Arizona. May 27. 1991. 98:6. Feb.50 Maryland. 1994.65 Illinois. April 23. 1996.92 Arizona. 96:5. March 3. May 29. Oct. 9. 1993. Aug.56 Indiana. 1996. Jan.98 Maryland. 1994.91 California.68 Illinois. 92:4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Texas.68 Louisiana. 1997.26 DWELLING FIRES. 1995. April 10.21 Utah. 1993. March 26. 95:5. June 30. 3.97 California. 1994. 98:6. 14. 96:5. 91:4.23 Washington.67 Delaware. 30. 98:5.66 Florida. 94:5.92 California. 15. 1995. 95:5. Jan. Feb.64 Florida. 1995.96 Georgia. 96:5. 91:4. 97:5.90 Texas. 9.93 Indiana.

1991. 98:5. 1990. 1992. 92:4. 22. Dec. 1992. 1994. 28. 1992.66 Pennsylvania. 5. June 7.49 North Carolina. 21.69 New York. 95:5. 97:5.64 Michigan. April 10.102 Michigan. 7. 1993. Dec. 95:5. 96:5.100 Oklahoma. 20.69 Oklahoma. 1991.67 New York. 26. Nov. Oct. 17. Dec. Jan. 1993. Dec. 91:4.69 New Jersey. 22.62 Ohio. 1990. 1990. Oct. 96:5.92 New York. Aug. Feb.64 Missouri. 1991.50 Missouri. Aug. 1994. 95:5. 1997. 1994.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Michigan. 28.58 North Carolina.96 Ohio.92 New York.91 Oklahoma. Sept. 1990. 8.62 New Jersey.102 New York. 91:4. 96:5. 22. 1995. June 23. Aug. 1994. 92:4.98 Ohio. Dec. 93:5. Feb. 1996. Sept. 21. 1990.49 Mississippi. 1995.68 Montana.56 Mississippi. 19. Feb. 23. 94:5. 95:5. 92:4. Jan. 91:4. 92:4.69 Ohio. 91:4. 92:4.92 New Jersey. 28. 92:4. 96:5. 30.59 Mississippi. Nov. 21. 22. 1993. 1993. 1994.64 North Carolina.64 Pennsylvania. 92:4. Feb. March 3. 1993. 92:4.49 North Dakota. 91:4. 92:4. 92:4.66 Ohio. 95:5.68 Oklahoma. 1994. Dec. 1995. 94:5. 13. Feb. 28. 95:5. 1994. Dec.98 New York.67 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 37 . 1991. 1993. Dec.68 New York. July 22. 95:5. 97:5. 91:4. 1996. 15. 1994. Feb. Sept. 1995. 1992. Dec. 18. July 13. 1991.65 New York. 1996.54 New York. March 13. 94:5. 3. 3. 14. 7.69 New Jersey. Feb. 1992. 93:5. Nov.68 New York. 93:5. 95:5. June 28. Dec. 94:5. 1. Dec. April 3. June 16. 94:5. Oct. 95:5.100 New York. Jan. 1994. Jan. 4. 1990. Feb. 1994.58 New York. 26. 1991. 25. 96:5. Dec. 27.64 Michigan. 22. 24. 1994. 1993. Dec.60 New Jersey. April 21. Nov. 17.62 Pennsylvania. June 11. 1992.96 Michigan. Feb. 92:4. 93:5. 92:4. 1997. 95:5. 1991.68 New York.45 Montana. 1993. 95:5. 94:5. July 30. 95:5.93 North Carolina.66 Ohio. 1991. 28.60 New York. 1994. Feb. 1991. 94:5. 14.56 Ohio. 93:5. 94:5. 1995. 1991. 93:5. Feb.53 New Jersey.62 Michigan. 1991. 98:5.53 Ohio. 1991.62 New York. 97:5. 10. 13. 3. 31.

97:5.49 Washington. 97:5. 95:1. 95:5. 93:5.58 Pennsylvania. Oct.60 Pennsylvania.64 Pennsylvania. 94:5. 94:5. 1997. 98:5.50 South Carolina.59 Pennsylvania. 1991.66 Wisconsin. 1996. 94:3.69 Pennsylvania. Oct. 92:4.66 Wisconsin. 7. 1997. 14. May 24. March 31. Apr. 1996. April 22. March 9. 91:4. 1992. Oct. 1994. 1992. 20. 97:5. 93:5. 1993. 98:5. Nov. 93:5.34 Pennsylvania. C. 1995.66 Tennessee. 1990. 1996. 21. 95:5.64 Japan. Feb. 91:4. 94:5. 1993. 1993. Oct.27 Massachusetts. 23.64 Virginia. 1994.64 South Carolina. 2. 98:5. Oct. 1993. 2. 98:5. FIRES. 98:5. 1994. May 23. May 8. 1991. July 22.62 Pennsylvania. 92:4. See VACANT BUILDING FIRES DWELLING-UNDER-CONSTRUCTION FIRES California. 91:4.97 West Virginia. 94:5. 1992. 96:5. 1993.93 Utah. 7. 1990.49 Pennsylvania.50 Virginia. March 7.50 Virginia.91 Washington. 1992. 1996.67 Tennessee. 95:3. July 8.96 South Carolina. 1995. 92:4. Nov. Dec. 1997.68 Wisconsin. Jan. 94:5.55 How to react to quake. 7. 1991.92 Pennsylvania. 1993. 97:5. 97:5. Oct. March 13. May 25.49 Texas. 1992. 24. 19. 96:5.89 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 38 . 1990. Jan.62 Pennsylvania. July 12. 96:5. 1990. 12. 1995. Feb. 21. 28. Apr. 1992. D. 96:6. 92:4. 95:5. 96:5. Feb. 91:4. 93:5. 1997. 1995.62 Tennessee. July 25. 97:5. 97:5.92 Texas. July 24. Dec. 1991. 26. 1994. May 10.99 Virginia. 17.50 DWELLING. Nov.50 Wisconsin. 7. 1996. 10. 1993. March 10.68 Illinois. 96:5. Nov.97 Pennsylvania.66 Washington. May 15.27 Catastrophic.62 Pennsylvania. 96:5. 21. 1997. Nov.92 Texas. Feb. 93:5. 4. 93:5. New Hampshire. 1996.49 Wisconsin. 91:3. 1996. 93:5.23 E EARTHQUAKES AND SUBSEQUENT FIRES Earthquake kits for home and car. May 31. 1995. 18. 13. 95:3.102 South Dakota. 13. 1990. 5.46 Washington. 91:4.65 Wisconsin. 93:5.. Sept.96 West Virginia.51 Virginia. 1990.46 Pennsylvania. Dec.68 Texas. 94:3. March 13. 1995. 1995. VACANT. Dec.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Pennsylvania. 1992. 1992. April 6.

98:4. deserves support.4 NFPA develops long-range plan. 93:4. perseverance in spreading NFPA message. 96:6. 97:3. 17.88 EDITORIALS Agreement for single model fire code is blueprint for progress. 94:3. Jan. Oct. 96:3. SCHOOL FIRES © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 39 . Calif. prevention of. George D.4 Federal government as partner in code/standard development.8 Homeowner responsibility for wildfire protection efforts. 1994. 94:5. 98:3.5 NFPA commitment to Learn Not to Burn programs. 93:6.4 Fire safe design for high-rise buildings. 91:6. 91:1. 95:3. 1989.6 High technology's value for fire protection.6 NFPA service to members. 95:1. 93:1. 93:2.8 EDUCATIONAL OCCUPANCY FIRES. great rewards. 97:6.5 NFPA's new president.6 Dedication to fire safety can save lives. 92:1.4 NFPA faces stiff competition on international acceptance of codes.4 NFPA must balance tradition.6 Imagining more fire safety achievements.4 Fire safety knowledge is power. 94:6. 96:2. See also COLLEGE BUILDING FIRES. 17. 92:2.6 Fire fighter fatalities.6 Connections.8 Sparky campaign and community fire safety. 95:5. 95:3. 98:5. 92:5.6 NFPA's sense of mission. 97:4. 94:4.8 NFPA. standards. 93:3.6 CPSC amendment of children's sleepwear standard opposed.52 San Francisco.6 Risk Watch program addresses child safety issues. 92:6.6 Renewing our commitment to fire safety. 95:2. S. 98:2.4 HUD turns to NFPA to update manufactured housing safety standards. the old and the new.4 Cast a vote for fire safety. 93:5.4 Constructive criticism from members keeps NFPA on toes.6 National Fire-Incident Reporting System provides important data.4 Fire safety: tough challenges. leading the way on codes and standards. Miller. 97:1. 91:2. 94:3. 94:1. 91:4.4 NFPA's second century of service. 96:4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Methodology to deter and mitigate risk of earthquake-caused fires. critical to child safety.8 NFPA.10 Back to fire safety basics.8 NFPA joins fight against smoking. 97:2.4 Fire safety implications of home security systems. 92:3. 92:4.82 Northridge. International Code Council (ICC) end agreement to develop one U.4 NFPA responds to demands of global community. 97:5.4 Fire protection's future. 91:3.6 National model building code.4 Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition supports residential sprinklers. transition.4 Protecting NFPA copyrights and trademarks protects the NFPA's mission.4 NFPA. Calif. 96:5.6 Using new ideas for fire safety. 94:2. 98:1. fire code. 91:5.4 Call for consensus on NFPA standards.6 National Electrical Code celebrates 100th anniversary.5 Values of publicity. 98:6..4 A plumber's nightmare.4 Children's sleepwear regulations threatened by proposed amendments..4 Risk Watch. 94:3.8 Defining NFPA's mission for year 2000. 96:1. 95:4.6 New Latin American Section part of NFPA's international outreach.

97:1. factor in fatal fire. 18. June. Oct. 1992.82 New York. 95:4.44.102 Illinois. 1997. 93:5. 96:6.14 Exit access. 1991.. 98:6. 97:1.53 Building performance to foster correct occupant egress behavior. June 30. 98:2.44 Fire department and elderly agencies focus on seniors' fire safety.. 93:1. Apr.82 Florida.77. 95:5. statistics. 94:6.29. elderly deaths resulting from. elderly death resulting from. 94:6. 91:6.22 Catastrophic fire victims took wrong turn in escape attempt.. June. stored goods in catastrophic fire.27 University bell tower. 1992. 1993. 24. 1997. 93:2. 94:3. Nov. Dec. 94:6. 10.30 Evaluating occupant load for egress.16. 26.42 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 40 . 93:2. 1992. 1993.59 Missouri.27 Careless use of cigar as cause. 95:6. 97:1.45 ELDERLY Fire deaths of elderly Board and care facility fire. Aug. 1992. 1995. 93:6. 93:5. July. 93:6.92 Arkansas. 98:5. 98:5. 95:6. 1992.67 Kansas.72 Florida.58 Michigan. 98:5.78 EGRESS. June. 92:6. See also DOORS. 98:1.23 Causes and prevention.76 Alabama. Dec. factor in large-loss-of-life club fire..25 Risk of fatalities higher for elderly.30 University building.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fraternity house. 91:2. 1993. June. 1994. and exit discharge must be clear of obstructions.13 Fire risk to elderly. 96:3. April. 1993. 1996.82 New York.91 Georgia.76 California. 1993.39. 94:1.91 South Carolina. 93:3. Nov. 1992.44 Limited from second floor. 1993. 94:6.100 Illinois. EXITS Blocked by furniture.. 91:4. 96:1. 1993.67 Florida. 1994.15 Careless use of cigarette as cause.54 New Jersey. 25. March.67 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Life Safety Code egress standards compared.92 Catastrophic Indiana. Nov. See HOUSING FOR ELDERLY FIRES ELECTRIC GENERATING PLANT FIRES. See also NUCLEAR ENERGY PLANT FIRES Alabama.92 Illinois. 96:2. 94:4. Dec. 1990. 25. West Virginia. Kansas. 5.38 Clothing fires. 98:5. 97:6.. Jan. 93:1. 94:6. exterior exits.62 Building site plan needs exit discharge from exit to public way. 1994. Dec. Aug. 98:6. 92:6. Oct.92 California. 95:6.104 ELDERLY HOUSING FIRES. Pennsylvania. 1991.28 Inadequate.100 ELECTRIC MOTORS Motor and motor-controller disconnect requirements. 93:6. 92:6.49 Elevators as means of egress. 1996.36 Clothing fire. 97:6. 93:5. May. 94:6. 3.92 New Jersey.

ignites wall insulation.23 Trash ignited by. 92:6. 92:3. shorts. ignites carpet. 96:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT FIRES. 94:6. ignites oil. overheats. ignites tree.79 Arc welding sparks ignite stored carpet pads.26 Audio equipment malfunctions.31 Drying machine overheats. 96:5. ignites housing.27 Dimmer switch. 94:5.64. 93:1.67 Christmas tree ignited by. ignites wooden table. 91:2. ignites wood construction.41 Overheats. ignites combustibles.20 Defective. 92:2. 97:5. ignites cardboard combustibles.46 Extension cord. carpet. left on. 95:6. 97:4. ignites stored materials.20 Air-compressor ignites lubricating oil.29 Electrical component in sauna unit short-circuits. 96:5.27 Extension cord Damaged by forklift traffic.36 Ignites nursing home fire.33 Clothing. paneling. 92:2. ignite tree.92 Joined to heater cord.83 Boat electrical system ignites gasoline. 97:6. 97:3. 94:5. 95:5.28 Electrical fault ignites stored combustibles.21 Coffeepot ignites paper products.19 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 41 . 98:3. 95:6. 92:4.34 Improperly spliced. overheats.27 Christmas tree lights Bulb blows. 93:5. 97:5.93. 93:3. unattended.95 Curling iron. ignite plastic garland.28 Improperly modified. ignite tree. ignites spilled glue. 97:3. overheats. 98:4. 93:6.29 Corn popper ignites wood paneling.26 Coffeemaker Cord shorts. 97:4. 96:5. 94:3.36 Clothes dryer Heat ignites lint in exhaust duct. 98:4.37 Failed. overloaded Carpeting ignited by. 92:6. ignites living room contents.96 Overheats. 94:6. ignites chaff and dust. other combustibles. ignite restaurant fire. ignites Christmas tree. 93:6.93 Bearing box overheats on conveyor belt.79 Elevator transformer overheats. creates high-resistance fault. ignites pet food. 94:5.25 Clothes iron.22 Used for space heater. 94:5. toys ignited by. 96:3.29 Cooler/freezer controls malfunction. 91:4. 97:2.51 Combustibles ignited by. ignites wood partitions.90 Short.30 Drop light Incandescent bulb ignites leaked fuel. ignites combustibles. 94:6. 94:2.26 Emergency light ignites stored clothing. 94:6. overloaded.32 Overloaded. ignites carpet. causes short circuit. See also HEATING-AND-COOKING EQUIPMENT FIRES Air conditioner malfunction causes fatal fire.25 Compressor malfunctions. 93:4.60 Improperly spliced to air conditioner overheats. 96:2. ignites sofa. 96:5.35 Cord Damaged.22 Defective. 98:5. ignites combustibles. 98:4.50 Failed.31 Book binding machine overheats. ignites carpeting. ignites glue. ignites wall covering.35 Overheats. ignites counter.

98:1. ignites plastic trim.33 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 42 . 92:4.54 Mercury vapor fixture ignites stored mattresses. 94:6. ignite Christmas tree.20 Light fixtures Arc ignites fire.25. 97:3.16 Light bulb Explodes.18 Shorts or arcs. flooring. ignites spa.65 Fabric ignited by. decorative. 92:1. 95:4. ignites lint.23 Heat. 94:6. 97:6.25 Overheats.36 Hot tub malfunctions. 91:4.28 Structural members ignited by. 95:6.35 Paint tarpaulins ignited by.28 Heat tape Malfunctions.26 Fire ignited by. 93:2. 92:1. 95:6. ignites PVC piping. 97:5. 26 Clothing draped on lamp ignited. 91:4.69 Possible fire cause.94 Lights. ignites carpet in fatal fire. 95:5. 98:5. 97:3. 95:2.23 Heating blanket short-circuits.99 Malfunctions. overheats.30 Gondola motor overheats. wall.33 Motor malfunctions. 94:3.106 Short circuit ignites wood framing. ignites fabric lint. 96:3. ignites leaked oil. ignites ceiling tiles.33 Halide.25 Mop ignited by. ignites combustibles. ignites combustibles. 96:5. ignites structural members. 96:5.39 Stored combustibles ignited by. 98:2. 91:4.35 Malfunctions. 93:1. 91:5. 94:6.36 Lamp Cloth ignited by. 94:6.32 Generator ignites cardboard. ignites dry wood. 91:5.26 Overheats.68 Stored foam products ignited by. 91:6. ignites wood. 95:5.26 Knocked over.25 Fixture used inside ignites carpet. 93:2.87 Halogen. ignites cardboard.30 Glue gun ignites fireworks factory fire.92 Door frame ignited by.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Curtains ignited by. ignites dust. 98:6. 94:4. causes grounding through ducts.22 Fan Improperly wired. ignites curtains.25 Stored paper ignited by.33 Overheats.30 Heating element ignites dip tank. 91:2. 95:5. 91:4. 97:3.28 Wood eaves ignited by. ignites.22 Wood framing ignited by. curtains. 96:6. 98:1.25 Floodlights Cold air balloon ignited by. arcs. 94:3.51 Exterior lights Combustible exterior sidewall ignited by. ignites carbon brushes. ignites wood lining of boat engine room. explodes. 91:6. 96:5.33 Short circuit ignites grease. 93:1.24 Mixer cord pulled from receptacle. 91:6.23 Motor overheats.30 Fluorescent light ballast Foam insulation ignited by.

97:6.17 Toaster.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Outlet Arcs.26 Electrical service circuit protection fails.25 Wall receptacle malfunctions.59 Electric panel Arcs. 98:6.24 Flammable gas ignited by.33 Vacuum cleaner ignites gasoline vapors. ignites bed.49 Conduit/busway contact ignites stored combustibles. 97:6. 97:6. 98:5. 95:6. ignites pentane. 97:6. 92:6.35 Ground fault arc and explosion ignites fire. ignites manufacturing plant fire.52 Packaging machine malfunctions. 98:1. 97:1. 91:2.28 Ground fault created by switch.30 Power transfer equipment fire. spark ignites varnish in dip tank.82 Ground. ignites grass fire. 92:5. 94:2. 92:6. 93:5. 91:3. fighting fires in.28 Waffle iron ignites workbench.98 Quartz lighting ignites oil. arcing ignites cable insulation. electric generating plant. curtains. 94:6. 95:6.22 Damaged by roof collapse.49 UPS systems. ignites rugs.29 Capacitator discharges. ignites fuel. 92:5. 93:6. 94:5.50 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 43 .27 Surge protector malfunctions. 97:1. ignites bed and bedding.26 Junction box fault ignites wood paneling. ignites combustibles.95 Fault in control cable causes generating plant fire.21 Conduit Penetrated by screw. 97:5. 97:6.100 Fault in transformer vault ignites generating station.37 Spotlight ignites wood shingles. 97:6.45 Overheated. ignites combustibles. fire started in.29 Portable light ignites flammable liquid. 94:6. 98:5. ignites hotel fire. 96:6.24 High-voltage box malfunctions.29 Short-circuits. 94:6. 94:2.78 Heat trace cable ignites wood framing. ignites combustibles. 92:6.59 Production equipment malfunctions.30 ELECTRICAL FIRES Bus bar malfunctions.31 Refrigerator ignites wood paneling. wood paneling.106.99 In wall void ignites wood siding. ignites wood cage. 98:5.54 Hydrogen ignited by.26 Friction sparks ignite nylon fluff and oil.94 Radio cord Cabinet ignited by.28 Distribution line arcs. combustibles. 98:6. 94:6.102 Electrical failure causes fire. absence of.28 Waste-handling machine overheats. 95:5. 91:6. 94:1.90 Unspecified equipment failure produced heat.31 Soldering gun ignites oil on cord. 94:5. 94:5.28 Electrical arc Caused by water in electrical system.45 Surgical cauterizing pen ignites sterile drapes.107 Pump arcs. 93:6. newspapers. ignites ceiling tiles. ignites fire. burns plastic insulation. 98:5. key element in fire. ignites combustible materials.91 Forklift control arcs. 96:3.52 Circuit overload ignites school fire. 92:6. arcs. 95:6. 95:6. 98:5. counter top.78 Electrical system failure ignites ceiling. 93:1. ignites combustibles in basement. 92:6.40 High-voltage power line arc ignites bus. ignites fiber residue. 92:4.

cause short circuit. 97:3.24 Transformer arcs. 96:2.57 Power supply to machinery malfunctions. 97:5. 96:5. 93:6.30 Power line.100 Uninterrupted power supply unit ignites fire. ignites bedding. downed.30 Sparks. caused by (See SPARKS) Static electricity ignites paint. 91:6.107 School fire ignited by.62 Receptacle arcs.30 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 44 . 98:6.31 Barn fire ignited by. ignites wood framing.31 In battery ignites truck. 93:1.25 In fixed wiring ignites structural members.54 Cloth-covered.92 In wall receptacle ignites wall paneling. 91:3. 98:6.84 Wood framing ignited by. 93:1. 98:6.106 In fan ignites wood framing. ignites dry vegetation. ignites second fire. 93:5. 93:5. 91:1.69 In low-voltage wiring ignites beams.74 Automobile fire possibly ignited by. 94:4. probable fire cause. 94:6. 92:6.26 In electrical cord ignites sofa.28 Light ballast material ignited by.29 In lighting. 93:6. 95:6.25 In battery ignites subway car.30 Wiring Arcs as power is restored after fire. electrocutes fire fighter. 92:2. 93:6.62 Connections corrode. 95:2. shed. 98:1. 95:6.25 In lights ignites Christmas tree.21 In junction box ignites stored goods.24 In neon sign ignites mixed-use building. 95:2. 92:6. damaged. 97:4. arcs. 93:1. ignites structural members.25 Wall covering ignited by.38 Temporary electrical system malfunctions.31 created by switch.26 Burns hole in conduit.62 In wiring ignites artificial Christmas tree. malfunctions.92 Underground feed lines penetrated by augur.77 Arcing from power lines.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 On/off switch malfunctions. floor. 93:6. 91:5. 95:5. 96:6.49 In typewriter ignites plastic housing. 91:6.16 Structural framing ignited by.28 In line ignites underground electrical vault. sound equipment ignites fire.28 In fan ignites grease. ignites oil. 93:6. 93:4.28 In extension cord ignites van fire.29 In extension cord ignites Christmas tree. 91:4. wire insulation fails. 98:5.26 In lamp cord ignites sofa. arc. 98:6. ignites rolled paper. 92:6. 93:6.38 Service cable. ignites rafters.54 In dryer motor ignites sawdust.92 Arc ignites mine fire. 96:1. 97:3.81 Plywood wall ignited by. 98:3. 97:6. 91:4. 97:5.52 Receptacle wiring overheats. ceiling.28 In wiring ignites paneling.83 In electric raceway ignites counter.27 In freezer cord ignites stored paper products. ignites fire. 98:5.21 In sign wiring ignites hotel facade. 98:6.28 In wiring ignites synthetic fabric dust.93 Short circuit In appliance ignites fabric. 95:6. 92:6. ignite framing.

94:3. 95:3.27 ELECTRICAL INSPECTIONS Budget cutback threaten inspections. ignites wall. incorrect. 92:4.86 Inadequately sized. 92:1. National Electrical Code terms and requirements. 93:6.38 Residential electrical system reinspection. ignites fire. 91:2. 96:5. 93:3.56 Malfunctioning. 92:3.32 Harmonics and power quality.67 Overheats. Protective Signaling Systems.93 Fire ignited by.34 Malfunction in concealed space ignites fire. 95:2. 95:4. 95:6. 94:3. ignites fire.80 ELECTRICAL SAFETY Experts answer questions on National Electrical Code. ignites insulation.24 Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). 96:5.29 Joist ignited by.32 Installed incorrectly.67 Installed incorrectly. 92:2.86 NFPA 72. 93:5. UL alarm standards work together. 93:4. 94:5.30 Holiday lighting hazards.31 Staying safe around high-voltage equipment. 98:4.120 National Electrical Code prevents hot tub. ignites wall paneling.38 Grounding equipment to protect people and equipment. and the global marketplace. ignites cardboard. 91:3. 92:4.56 Overloaded or damaged. 97:5.22 Fault in. 92:4. 96:6. 94:2. 94:6.51 Overloaded. 97:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Defective. 98:2. 95:5. ignites wood framing.46 Insulation ignited by. 91:1. ignites wood framing. heats housing. 94:1. 96:2. ignite joist. 98:5.72 Sprinklers installed over energized electrical and electronic equipment.23 Fault in. 94:4.19 Overloaded. ignites framing. 96:1. historical arguments for/against.100 Wrapped on nail ignites joist. spa accidents.116 Portable tool safety. 91:4.33 Fire investigation safety precautions. 95:1. 98:6.34 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 45 . 91:3. 91:5. ignites wood framing. 98:5.42 Main service disconnect.64 Short-circuits.22 From utility pole ignites vehicle after accident. 95:5.15 Installed incorrectly. 94:4. factor in catastrophic fire. 93:2. equipment. combines previous standards.40 Grounds out on conduit. ignites structural wood.45 Service-entrance conductors protect against overloads.24 Overheats in concealed space.27 Short-circuits.28 Boat repair safety requirements for wiring.40 Electrical standards go global.80 Fighting fires in UPS systems.112 Resistance-type heat tape installation to prevent frozen water pipes. ignites insulation.35 Excessive fault current prevention. ignites structural framing. 94:4.68 Transformer connection.34 Ensuring electrical safety in workplaces. 91:6. heat nails.88 Motor and motor-controller disconnect requirements.37 NFPA 72.22 National Electrical Code work space requirements for energized electrical equipment. 92:3.42 National Electrical Code. ignites soffit. 95:5.36 Grounding of electrical systems. 95:4.28 ELECTRICAL SAFETY COLUMNS Alarm systems ensure safe elevator recall. 93:5. ignites kitchen fire.

72.51 EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE Fairfax County. ignites leaked oil. See also FIRE SERVICE COMMUNICATIONS Ham radio operators' role. 91:1. 97:4.44 Oklahoma City bombing.57. 97:5. overview. 98:1. catastrophic fire. 96:4. 94:2. fire. 92:5. 93:6. 94:4.54.78 E911 fails in telephone exchange fire.30 Safe use as vertical exits. 22. 97:5. plane crash simulation at Hancock Tower high-rise.23 Tire fire pollutes environment.108 Fire service public service programs. 1998.112 NFPA report on foam and environment.61 ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT. 94:5.28 ELECTROCUTION Fire fighter fatalities related to.21 Six-part process for emergency planning. Logan International Airport. 91:1. 92:2. Va. 93:1.35 Terrorist response training funded by Domestic Preparedness Act.22 Terrorist attacks. 1995.62 Northridge.104 Means of egress. 95:4.31 Hospital's plan effective in actual emergency. 93:3. 97:4. 97:2. earthquake. Calif. 91:2. Boston. preparation for. 96:6. 96:5.65. 96:2. 93:3. 97:3.32 ELEVATOR MECHANICAL ROOMS Motor malfunctions. 95:1.50 ESCAPE. Mass. inspections aids in actual fire attack. 96:2. Boston. Fire and Rescue Department response to CIA shooting incident.38 EMERGENCY RESPONSE Fire service response to Florida tornadoes. Feb. 98:4. Canada. 98:3. 17. EXITS EUROPEAN COMMUNITY © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 46 . 1. 95:3. and recovery. 95:4. 1994. preparation.20 Elevator recall and shut down requirements increase safety. 91:1.35 Federal program trains first responders for terrorist attacks.88 Prefire planning.28 Bulk storage (grain). 96:1.52 Bulk storage (grain). 96:1. Oct. Alberta. 95:5. ignites hospital fire. 97:5.77 Fire fighter injuries related to.109 How to upgrade existing systems. See COMPUTERS AND RELATED EQUIPMENT ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY Fire protection for. 94:1.52 EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS.64 Fire spread through shafts. use as. 97:5. 1996.26 Workers trapped in stalled elevator in catastrophic fire. 1996.33 ELEVATORS Alarm systems ensure safe recall. Jan..66 EMERGENCY PLANNING Drill.46 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Basics of mitigation. 97:3.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Who interprets the NEC?. 98:1. April 19. 98:6. Indiana. 58.52 ENVIRONMENT Fire and the environment. 91:1..34 Hazardous materials incident response to mitigate environmental damage.12 Workplace safety procedures are important. 93:2.67 Run-off controlled in automobile repair shop fire.54 Drill. See EGRESS.70 User fees implemented to recover cost of services. Vancouver. 95:3.60 EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEMS Analysis and enhancement of system. response.49 Transformer overheats. Wash.

25 Food plant fire.29. 92:4. 91:4. successful. 91:5.67. 95:5.22 Theater. successful. 97:5. 91:4.90. 95:5.38 High-rise office building complex (World Trade Center. See also DOORS. 93:3.50 By fire. successful. California. 92:1. 98:6. factor in catastrophic fire. 91:4.35 Aircraft. 93:3. successful. 93:6.102 By fire. 97:5.35.45. 96:1. 92:5. 98:2.93 Railroad collision and fire.59 By refrigerator.33. 97:2. 92:4. 94:5.66 Community center. factor in fatal fire.81 Housing for elderly. 94:6. 97:5.36 Board and care facility. 94:5. successful. successful. 93:5.77.27. 5.26 Wildland fires.28 Plastics manufacturing plant. 91:1. 95:2. successful.27.25 School.50 Limited-care facility fire. 92:4. factor in catastrophic fire.23 Store(s). 97:3. successful.30. successful. 95:5. 94:6. factor in fatal fire. successful. 96:2.29. factor in catastrophic fire.36 Board and care facility. 98:3. 92:4. factor in fatal fire.50. successful. 97:6. 93:6.26. successful.108 EWELL. area surrounding. successful.21 Hazardous waste incinerator.85 Wildland/urban interface fire. 97:4. factor in. factor in fatal fire. successful. 92:5. 93:2. 92:2. 91:5. area surrounding.91 Restaurant. successful.17 Office building. crash damage.30.104.25 Iron foundry.29 Fraternity house. 94:5. successful. 94:6. successful.30 Meeting hall fire.21 Nursing home. successful.88 Hotel. successful.26 Chemical manufacturing plant.70 By chair. 94:5. successful. 94:5.29.27 Manufacturing plant. 93:5.20.22. 97:5. 94:5.59 Hospital.21 LP-Gas distribution facility.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Product testing standards. 98:5. 96:3. 97:4. successful. 92:6. 96:5.52 Bus.45 EVACUATION Adult congregate living facility.66 Catastrophic food processing plant. 93:6. factor in catastrophic aircraft fire. area surrounding. due to propane fire. successful. successful. P.29 Food store. 92:4.68 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 47 .18 By burning mattress. area surrounding. WINDOWS Blocked By burning chair.23 Department store elevator. 95:6.104.27. successful. 93:6. due to toxic smoke. unsuccessful. 4. unsuccessful. Y.25 Catastrophic dwelling fire. 91:2. area surrounding.28. 95:3. successful.100. area surrounding.33 Medical research laboratory. 96:3. 94:2. electrically charged. 69.88 Apartment building. factor in.20 Manufacturing plant.33 Dormitory. LAMONT Profile of. 97:6. EGRESS. 98:1. 93:5.25. 96:2. 92:5.105.25.22 Auto dealership.33.).66.38 By security bars (See SECURITY PROVISIONS) By water. 98:4. 98:5. 92:6.20. 98:3.30 EXITS. successful. 94:5. successful.64. 91:3. 97:1. successful. N. 96:5.62. 95:6. unsuccessful. area surrounding. unsuccessful.36 By furniture. firefighter evacuation. 97:3. 92:6.

75 Chemical refinery. 95:5. Alabama. factor in fatal fire. 94:5.66 Chemical packaging and storage facility. 94:3.67 Texas.68 Conflict between security and fire safety. 1990. 92:4. 1990. factor in.16 Inadequate exit arrangements.110 NFPA "Great Escape" promotes home fire drills and escape plans. 91:3. factor in catastrophic vacant club fire. tank storage facility Louisiana. 1994. 97:4.49 EXPLOSION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS Disabled. March. 93:3. 91:4. April 20. 92:6.49 Exit access. and exit discharge must be clear of obstructions. 94:5.22 Elevators as safe vertical exits. April 13. July 3. 91:4. LP-GAS FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS Aerosol container explodes.103 EXPLOSIONS. 91:4.54 Lack of second exit. 97:3. 1991. Sept. 1993. 98:3. 92:6.28 Inadequate egress routes.27.67 Large loss of life manufacturing plant fire. 95:5. 92:4. Louisiana. 92:6. 91:4. 1997. 17.28 Aircraft in flight. 97:5. 95:4. overview. 13. 1991. factor in.66 Locked Catastrophic manufacturing plant fire. 1997. May 9.31 Ohio.26 Hamper fire fighting operations in shopping mall fire.70.106 Camping trailer. 1994. 1997. 1994. not a factor in explosion. factor in catastrophic fire. 92:4. May 1. 98:5. 1990.19 School exits require balancing fire safety and security needs.72 Ammonium nitrate mixing plant. 96:6. May 27. Aug.68 Single exit from apartment.31 Ohio. factor in catastrophic fire. 98:5. 1991. June 17. 98:5. 92:4.64 Compressed natural gas cylinder ruptures.. See also BLEVE Fire fighter injuries related to. 4. 95:5.33 Steel plant. Florida. May 15. Pennsylvania. 98:5. factor in. factor in catastrophic fire. 96:6. 1991. 1990.70 Black powder manufacturing plant. 1993.53 Chemical plant Louisiana.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Building site plan needs exit discharge from exit to public way. 91:4. exterior exits.56 Chemical fertilizer plant.39 Nebraska.70. 6. 91:4. Minnesota. 1995.66 South Carolina. 91:3. 93:5. 94:3.106 Propane.73 Massachusetts. Ohio.71 Boat California. Arkansas. 91:1. 98:6. 95:5. 91:4. 11. 1991.48.107 Paper mill. 16. 95:6.46 Secured. 1991. Nov.80 Texas. 1994. 98:5. 1994. 98:3.30 Crude oil vapors. 98:5. 94:4.64 Hamper escape in fatal apartment fire. 94:1. 91:4. 91:4. Dec. factor in. Texas. Nov. 92:6. Dec.64 EXPLOSIONS AND FIRES.66. ignites dwelling fire.29 Large loss of life club fire. 92:4.55 Barge fire. May 8.105 Barge fire.32 Propped open. 95:6.110 Hamper escape in catastrophic dwelling fire.70 Catastrophic vacant dwelling fire. Illinois. 1990. Texas. 92:4.42.74. 94:1.75 Ohio. See also GAS FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS.68 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 48 . Iowa.

96:6. Ohio. 1992. 20.92 New Jersey. 97:6. Dec. Feb. June 22. Washington. 1996. 98:5. 1996. Apr.30 Pyrotechnic storage and manufacturing facility. 95:6. 6.100 Kansas. 1995. 1994. 91:6. 1997.69 Oil and natural gas drilling well. Dec.28 Propane storage tank. warehouse fire. 22. 96:6. 92:3. 1991.38 Hydrogen storage tower at soap plant.96 Oil storage tank.. 98:6. 1994.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Oklahoma. 1937. 1994.75 Restaurant in high-rise office building fire. 93:2. 92:4. 91:4.35 Wisconsin. Texas. Aug. 93:6. 93:3. coal mine. 21. 1992. 1995. 21. 24.49 Propane cylinder BLEVE. Kentucky.87 Hazardous waste incinerator. Oct.69 Dwelling. Aug. Oct. 98:5. 1997. 95:6. 1991.100 Explosives.53. June 5. 92:6. 1993.96 Office building. New London. 91:4. Iowa. 98:6. 96:5. 95:6.31 Fireworks plant Mississippi. 1991. Carolina.94 Ships. Oct.20 Electric generating plant Arkansas. 96:4.28 Halide lamp explodes.86 Metal foundry. 1. 91:1. 93:5. April.28 Grain dust at mill and storage facility.63 Pharmaceutical manufacturing plant. ignites cardboard.67 Magnesium smelting operation. 95:6.23 Propane gas. Apr.104 Oil well. 1996. May 16.49 Pennsylvania. 1996. Illinois.94. March 18. Arkansas. Indiana. Jan. Jan. 94:1. 1993. Oct.92 Illinois. 92:4. 96:5. Dec. March. 92:6. 94:6. 1997. Iowa. 25. 1990.34 Manufacturing plant.50 LP-Gas bulk storage facility. 1917. 92:4. 1997. June 16.. 1997. dwelling. 98:5. 1991. Oct. Kentucky. 1995. 92:6. 91:4. 91:1. 6. Nov. Louisiana.94 Plywood manufacturing plant. 1991. California. 1996.82 S.102 Munitions ship explosion. July 2.103 Metal building components manufacturing plant.28 Paper and pulp products plant. 1992.30 New Hampshire. 1996. Oklahoma City.30 Iron foundry..22 Rocket propellant test facility. 1991. Michigan. 97:6. 1995.91 Oil refinery Ohio. 97:6. April 7. 92:4. Nova Scotia. 1996. Sept. 94:6. 93:5. Texas. Dec. 1991. California. 10.58 Illinois.50. North Dakota. 16.. 96:5. 1989. 94:5. 1992. 1997.71 Gasoline vapor ignited by gas furnace. Ohio. 98:6. 12. 1993. 1994.67. 97:6. Carolina. New York. 97:6.71 Paint plant. N. New Jersey.. 1993. Texas.53 Refinery California.44. Aug. 1995. Halifax.98 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 49 . Texas.. April 19. 95:4. ignited by pilot light.54 Missouri. 1989. June. 93:5. 95:6. 1994.40 School. 93:3.97 Methanol production plant. 1990. 94:6. 18.93 Texas. 1993.. 95:4. 31.84 Louisiana. May 1. Tennessee. New Hampshire. 96:1. 1994. 91:5. 94:6. Florida. Washington. 1990.24 Fireworks in garage. 96:5. 1993. New Jersey. Nov. Massachusetts.51.77 Louisiana. 97:6.69 Fireworks display.

33 Store fire. 1997.67.104.97 Washington.53 Warehouse Washington.39 Training and use of.26 Successful use of Department store fire. 98:6. 95:3. 92:3. 97:2.30 NFPA 10.44. 97:6. 93:2. 15. 98:5. 93:5.26 Halon.87 Steam explosion. Nebraska. 97:6. 95:2. successful in medical research laboratory fire. 1995. 1994. 96:5. 96:4.21 Funeral home fire. 96:6.104 Fraternity house fire. 1992. 95:3. PYROTECHNICS Accidental detonation.19 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 50 . 92:4.69 Bomb site.35 Food processing plant fire. successful in hospital fire.94 Improperly stored. See also FIREWORKS. Aug. 26. 91:4. 96:5.99 Fireworks fire. 68. 96:6. Feb. 94:6. 93:5. 97:4. 91:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Short circuit in underground electrical vault.32 Department store fire. Indiana. 93:2. catastrophic fire cause. 25.. Portable Fire Extinguishers. 91:4. Dec.54 Dairy plant fire. 1995. 1997. 93:6. 94:6.82 Toy manufacturing plant.64 EXPOSURE TO FIRE PRODUCTS. Oct.25.30 Hosiery manufacturing plant. 97:3.103 Sports equipment manufacturing plant. 95:6. 96:6. See FIRE PRODUCTS EXTINGUISHERS. 91:5.20. petroleum refinery. July 20. 98:6. 95:6. common questions answered.26 Nursing home fire. California. 23. fire fighter injuries related to. 1995. 93:5. New Jersey.23 World Trade Center. March 3.54 Detonation by terrorists. April. 95:6.49 Tank farm/storage facility Georgia. Sept. 91:4.59 EXPLOSIVES. New York.90.62 Thermal generating plant.97 Pennsylvania. 94:6.22 Electric power generating plant fire.67. 97:2.33 Hotel fire.72 Dormitory fire. PORTABLE Carbon dioxide. 96:4. 1993.37 Spread fire from engine room in boat fire. 98:6. Nov. 28.70 Sugar refinery.72 Juveniles injured making napalm. FIRE Fire fighter fatalities related to. 97:6. Texas. 94:5. 91:6. 1995. June. 98:5. 69 Fire fighter injuries related to.. 1991. catastrophic fire cause. Apr. Louisiana. successful in solvent fire. 96:5.21 Gasoline fire.28 Portable multiclass. 1996. 1993.69 Soybean processing plant.29 Unsuccessful use of Adult congregate living facility fire. explosion of. 93:6. 96:5.19 EXPOSURE. 95:5.37 Warehouse fire.66 Oklahoma. 97:6. 94:4. 95:6. catastrophic fire cause. 93:3.30 Carbon dioxide. 91:4. 92:4.54 Hospital fire.91.39 Textile plant fire.35 Building supply store fire.

29 Insulation fire. 95:6.35 Observatory fire. 92:5. 95:5.23 EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS. 96:3.28 School fire.23 Knitting mill fire.29 Warehouse fire. 96:6.77 FALSE ALARMS.46 FILMS.22. factor in fatal fire. 91:2. 97:6. 97:3. See also WALLS. VIRGINIA Fire and Rescue Department response to CIA shooting incident.35.53 Store fire.85. 95:6. 95:3. 98:5.50 EXTINGUISHERS.86. 96:6.84 Museum fire.33 Food processing plant fire. 94:6. 97:5.85 Christmas tree fire. 91:6.25 Unsuccessful use of Automotive parts manufacturing plant. 93:6. See SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS F FAIRFAX COUNTY.27. 93:2. 84.44 FIRES Earthquakes as cause of (See EARTHQUAKES AND SUBSEQUENT FIRES) FIRE AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 91:2.97 Fires caused by (See ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT FIRES) FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA) Disaster management role. 97:6.17 Laboratory fire. 91:1. 98:3.24 Plastics plant fire.87 Wood product manufacturing plant fire. 97:6. 95:4. warehouse fire. 93:6. 93:6. reignites after use.25 Electric vault fire. 98:5. 93:4.36 Store fire. FIRE Inadequate.69.72 Restaurant fire.36 Detention center fire. 92:6. 97:1. 94:3.18 Successful use of Deep fat fryer fire. 98:6.34 Power plant fire. 96:6. 97:6. DRY CHEMICAL Empty. PORTABLE. 93:3.28 Restaurant fire.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Meat processing plant fire.59 Paper plant fire.89 Theater fire.39 Store fire. 95:5.106 Metal products plant fire.23 Magnesium smelting operation fire. 95:5.68. 97:5. See ENVIRONMENT FIRE BARRIERS.35 Foundry fire.33 Limited success. 98:6.84 Office building fire. factor in fatal fire. 95:6. 94:5.24. 91:6.28. 91:6.36 Lack of. 98:6.35 Tar fire.44 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 51 . missing extinguishers in warehouse fire.64 Hotel fire.31 Hospital fire. 98:6. FALSE FANS Factor in fire spread. NFPA Senior fire safety with Jonathan Winters. See ALARMS. 96:6. 98:6. 95:2. 94:1.

1980-88 overview. fire investigation report.32 School. 98:5.46 FIRE COMMAND COLUMNS Deploying resources effectively. Arkansas. Ind. 23. 91:2.31 High-rise office building fire. 94:4. 96:5. 91:3. 28. standard review items.70 Office building fire. Denver. 98:4. 94:3. 1994.109 Fire critiques as evidence for lawsuits. 91:5. 92:2. 93:2.44 Smoke and burns compared as fire death causes. Indianapolis. use in. S. 97:5..104 Fire critiques. 91:5.64 Identifying and mitigating fireground risks to avert firefighter fatalities.42 Chemical packaging and storage facility.104 Steps in assembling.109 FIRE DEATHS. Sept. Colo. 20.39 Limit fire spread in chemical plant fires.99 Risk of fire fatalities higher for elderly. 91:6. LP-Gas tank.76 Civilian deaths. 98:6.46 U.144 Matching response capabilities to fire conditions. 95:1. Iowa. Feb.48 Furniture refinishing plant fire. 5. S. 91:4.94 NFPA 600 requirements. 97:1.14 FIRE CRITIQUES Characteristics of effective critiques. 1984-1994. 1994. 1991. U.64 Members die in catastrophic fire..36 Factors contributing to deaths. See also CATASTROPHIC FIRES. S. 91:2.72 Of elderly. See DOORS.. 92:1..93 Civilian deaths. 91:5. March 28.152. planned programs. 1990 report.18 Fire service management modeled on fireground management. staffing realities. 91:2.98 FIRE BRIGADES.106 Fire critiques.30 Urban violence complicates fire service operations. 95:1. N.. 95:6. effective. N..24 FIRE FIGHTER FATALITIES Apartment building fire. 1992.30 Shrinking budgets. 1998. 92:3. 1984-1993.38 Smoking materials as leading cause. 91:2. April 9.110 Civilian deaths. characteristics of. 91:3. 1997. Feb.. 1991 report. 92:2. 1991. 91:4. Pa. causes and prevention.104 Fire critiques. FIRE FIGHTER FATALITIES Building security measures contribute to fire deaths.106 Lawsuits.53 False alarm-related. Y.56 High-rise club/hotel fire. 92:6. 1996. 1997. 1995. 92:3. 96:3. 93:2.33 Ten year analysis..NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 In structural joints. steps in assembling. 92:4.18 Standard review items. Philadelphia. 96:5. resulting from. May 8. 96:6. 91:4. FIRE FIRE DRILLS NFPA "Great Escape" promotes home fire drills and escape plans.85 BLEVE. 92:1. 93:6.74. 92:5. U. 4. INDUSTRIAL Alarm delayed while brigade fought fire. S. Y.73 High-rise building fires. 91:6. Dec.52 Civilian deaths. 98:3.28 Standard operating procedures reduce legal risk. 92:4. 92:5.73 Heart attacks. 98:5. 1992.86 FIRE DOORS. 91:1. 95:5. 92:6.152.83 Chemical plant fire controlled by.40 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 52 . 94:3.62 U.

33 FIRE FIGHTER INJURIES 1990 report. 97:5.63 U...66 FIRE INJURIES. 95:6. review of literature.56 1993 report. 1995 report. 97:6.19 FIRE FIGHTING. 95:4. S. 94:3. 92:4.90 Hazardous materials training programs' effectiveness questioned. 91:6. 91:1.57 NFPA introduces Fire Inspector I Certification Program.27 NFPA introduces training seminars at 1997 Fall Meeting. 95:2. 93:1.76 FIRE INSPECTIONS Inspectors now must be highly skilled professionals. 1993 report. of wildland fires counteracted by training.51 Soviet Union. 97:1.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 U. 98:3.64 State fire training methods. 96:6. 98:3. 94:1. 93:4. S. 1994 report. S. 92:6. 97:3. INTERNATIONAL Japan.57 1994 report. new technologies aid investigators. 98:6. and Firearms National Response Teams aid in catastrophic fire investigations. See also FIRE FIGHTER INJURIES Civilian. S.50 Wildland fire fighting rules to prevent fire fighter fatalities. 95:1.68 Hantavirus poses health threat to wilderness fire fighters. performance requirements for structural fire fighting ensemble.41 System operation training for fire fighters. 91:6. 95:1..83 U.48 FIRE FIGHTER SAFETY Analyze risk before risking lives.59 Truck company duties need emphasis. 98:4. 98:2. 98:6. consolidates testing.61 Stress.74 Fire fighting demands aerobic fitness. 94:3.14 Wildland fire fighting personnel qualifications..33 FIRE FIGHTER TRAINING Fire fighter injuries related to.46 U.86 Urban problems confront fire service. 93:2. 91:5.116 Required inspections determined by life safety evaluation.74 NFPA 1971. 95:1. NFPA standard.92 Electronic information sources. S. 93:2. 94:3.33 Working in pairs as a fundamental safety concept.66 1997 report.21 Command safety guidelines.33 Wildland fire fighting rules to prevent fire fighter fatalities.42 1991 report. 97:4. 95:4. Protective Ensemble for Structural Fire Fighting. 95:5.. 91:3.56 1992 report. 93:6. 94:6. keeps personnel safe. 95:4..55 Hazardous materials incidents use new training regimens.62 Reconciling safety and customer service needs. S. fear. 97:4. 93:2. 96:4. 1996.80 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 53 .31 NFPA 1500. 1997 edition.84 NFPA Fire Inspector Certification program. 1996 report. 1997 report. 94:4.44 U. 94:2.103 1996 report.14 Bureau of Alcohol. Tobacco.55 U. 97:6. Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program.57 FIRE INVESTIGATIONS Apply mutual aid to fire investigations. 1992 report.63 1995 report.

93:1. 91:3. April 9.66 FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS Chrysler Corp. 91:3. 97:2. 50. 92:1. 94:5.71 "Sparky" speaks out. Guide to Fire and Explosion Investigations.85 Computer fire model. overview.68 1993 week is culmination of year's fire safety education efforts. 1997.46 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 54 . 75. N. 52.76 1997 report. Kansas City. 60. 95:5.62. 97:5.129 Explosion destroyed. 90.60 FIRE PREVENTION WEEK 1991 theme: fire escape planning. 97:1.43 Recruiting and retaining fire department FPEs. 92:4. 98:6. 96:4. Royal Jomtien Hotel. 95:3. 94:5. 1994-1998. airports equipped with state-of-art systems.53. 92:5. NFPA Board of Directors view. 92:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fatal board and care facilities fires. 4. 51. 93:5.59. 98:3. 91:4.47 Stadium fires demonstrate unique protection problems.49. July 11. 95:2. overview. Iowa. U. 92:5. Technology Center.74. Y. 98:3. 91:2. 98:6. D. 1991 overview. U.. 1998.38 Future of. 98:2. 63. 54.89 1995 theme: watch what you heat (home fire causes).93 1995 report.68 Backdraft incident. 96:5.36 Passive systems. apartment building fire.40 Thailand. March 28.36 1991 report.104 High-rise buildings.C. Albert City.66 FIRE PROTECTION PROGRAMS Soviet Union. 97:4. 51.49 FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERS International higher education programs developed. factor in fire spread. N.50.77 1998 theme: "Great Escape" promotes home fire drills and escape plans. 93:5.46.32 History of.57. 65 FIRE PROTECTION Future of. requires unique systems.34 LP-Gas tank explosion.32 1992 report.68 Users' manuals needed to document building systems. 48. 53. 98:4. interview with fire prevention mascot. as authoritative treatise for litigation.106 18th edition.30 Underground SubTropolis storage/manufacturing facility. Y.42 National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) and other national reporting systems. 94:4. 98:4. 64.59. 95:6. 94:3.78 1993 report. S. 91:5.34 FIRE LOSS. 98:5.57 1994 report. 96:2. 62 Fire fighter injuries related to.80 NFPA 921. 91:5. 1990 report.80 Water mist systems. 72. 69. 68.72 FIRE MODELS Alternative designs evaluated using. 91:6. S. 95:4. 94:2. 76. overview. 98:5.58 FIRE PROTECTION HANDBOOK 17th edition.66 FIRE PRODUCTS Fire fighter fatalities related to.. 91:6. 67.34 1992 theme: smoke detectors are lifesavers. Missouri. 94:4.26 Washington. 98:4. 52..71. 94:5. See also LARGE-LOSS FIRES. design of systems for.52 1996 report. 1994. 93:1. 95:5. 93:4. value of.

96:1. 97:4.74 In-service programs for teachers. 96:3.93 Public education for wildfires.28 Preschooler fire safety education. workplace. 93:5. 1994.32 Public education is long-term answer to fire loss. 92:2. 1950. 92:3. implementation.90 Learn Not to Burn champions. 97:2.25 FIRE SAFETY.22 First NFPA public service announcement campaign. 91:4.28 Fire service public service programs.70 Politics of fire safety regulations at local to federal levels. 1995.14 Risk Watch addresses eight preventable injuries most threatening to children. 95:6.70 Fire fighters work with youth through Big Brothers/Big Sisters program.53 Summer fire hazards.4 Implications of home security systems. NFPA commitment to.45 NFPA "Great Escape" promotes home fire drills and escape plans. 93:4. Head Start program.16 Performance-based fire safety design codes coming to North America.77 Outside U. 91:4. 98:3.46 Detectors distributed free by fire department saves residential occupants. 94:3. designers. 97:2.. S.70 Health care facilities' fire safety prognosis for '90s. Oregon. 97:4.83 Partnership of owners. 92:2.29 Safety principles for disabled persons. 96:5.112. citizens held responsible for fires. 94:6. and evaluation. 97:1. 93:6. Consumer Products Safety Commission addresses fire safety issues. See also FIRE PREVENTION WEEK.112 Sprinkler systems' importance for fire safety. 95:1.12 Navajo Nation and NFPA Center for High-Risk Outreach cooperate for fire safety.89 High-rise buildings.77 Checklists for home. 98:5. 98:4.74. See also FIRE SAFETY EDUCATION Americans underestimate fire risk.32 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 55 . residents untrained. 96:4. 95:1.96 U.32 Other countries' programs compared to U.74 NFPA general manager Percy Bugbee's fire safety efforts. 98:6.30 Risk Watch is useful tool as fire service's mission expands.67 Learn Not to Burn champions.71 NFPA Champion Award Program provides age-appropriate fire safety education.66 College students need safety training.33 Risk Watch curriculum goals.67 Proactive safety leadership role for fire departments. 95:5.4 Industrial fire safety programs. S..70 Fireworks education program result of illegal fireworks fire. 94:3.81 Preschool program saves lives in dwelling fire.35 KFN-TV teaches fire safety to kids. 94:1. 93:1. 96:4. fire safe design for. 93:1.49 United States should hold citizens responsible. 4.4 Navajo Nation fire safety awareness campaign. 98:3.38 FIRE SAFETY EDUCATION. 97:3. 93:6.104 "Contract with America"'s effect on fire safety. child fire safety. OUTREACH COLUMNS Board and care facility staff. 94:3. 95:3.45 Preschoolers learn fire safety in Portland.103 Learn Not to Burn programs.12 Performance-based fire safety design code development. S. 96:3. 96:3. 93:2. 91:6.34 Dick Van Dyke's contribution to Learn Not to Burn. 98:3.38 Fire service public service programs. editorial. 98:2. 95:6. 98:2. establishment of.84 Risk Watch demonstrates value of team work for fire safety. 95:4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 FIRE PUMPS Failure to operate automatically. factor in catastrophic fire. 3. 97:5. and public officials necessary for fire safety. 93:5.

96 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 56 . 95:3. 91:3. develop partnerships. 91:3.90 Defining the problems of fire services. 92:1. 1991 theme: fire escape planning. 93:4. serve customers. 92:6. 95:4. 94:2.36 Comprehensive fire protection systems.22 School fire drills.20 Mission statement core of operating plan. 94:5. 94:1. Colo.. 94:4.30 Sparky's new public service announcements.75 Spanish-language versions of Learn Not to Burn Curriculum for Hispanic/Latino populations.67 Member evaluation of fire department.164 Leaders should lead by example. 91:4. Fla.16 Computer software for. 93:4. 91:4. fire departments. 93:2.14 Liability for negligent fire fighting activities. wildfire managers top concerns.59 Officer training is key to fire service success.17 Management reviews. planned programs for. 91:5. Learn Not to Burn program for 10 cities. 92:1.136 Fire inspection requirements determined by life safety evaluation.112 Leadership training. 97:5. Ariz.26 Orange County. Fla. 94:4.63 Orlando Fire Department.30 Denver. 98:4. LEADERSHIP COLUMNS. 93:4. 93:2.59 Participatory management enhances volunteer morale. 93:3. 94:1.35 Juvenile Firesetter Program.112 FIRE SAFETY UPDATE COLUMNS Fire Prevention Week.38 Listening and responding to fire service members.96 Leadership requires political savvy.57 Fireground management as model for.104 Discipline promotes effective performance. 93:5.27 Budget negatively impacted by internal departmental conflict.93 Labor relations eased by seeing both sides.90 Marketing fire service via improved public relations.144 Funding alternatives for volunteer departments. 95:1. overview of. 94:3. 94:2. 96:4. Fire Department is progressive. 92:5. 93:2.17 Combination career/volunteer departments.21 Leadership takes many forms.13 Laughter as workplace morale booster. 96:3. 93:2. MANAGEMENT MATTERS COLUMNS Administrators' role in fire code development.80 Encouraging participation in fire service organizations. 91:3..NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Risk Watch's injury prevention curriculum teaches safe fun. 96:5.28 Membership input to volunteer fire department decisions.120 Harvard program provides leadership skills. 96:4. innovative.40 Teaching safety to disabled persons. 93:3. Fire and Rescue Service operates as a consolidated force. 92:3. 94:1.15 New service areas can generate revenue.. 91:2. Phoenix.96 NFPA survey of U.58 Safe Cities. 96:1. 91:2.38 NFPA survey.85 Educating municipal officials about resource needs.13 Management concerns. 93:1.116 Leaders should encourage cooperation. S.34 In-service programs for teachers.124 Marketing fire service to gain public support. 95:4. offers innovative service to tourist center. See also FIRE CRITIQUES. 91:2.23 Chiefs' responsibility to network with external groups.112 Burdens of command responsibilities. 91:1.24 FIRE SERVICE ADMINISTRATION. 95:3. 97:2.83 Leadership: what is it?. developing professional programs for. 95:6.118 Deploying resources effectively. 92:1.

50.74 Public service programs offered by fire services. MUTUAL AID RESPONSE At asbestos abatement site fires. Mo. 69. Calif.114 Volunteer training accomplished with flexibility. 91:6. 96:5. 55 Robot use pioneered in Tokyo. 72. 74. 110. 91:1. 53. contracting with. effect of. purchases all new apparatus.74 Radio communications hampered by static.25 Regionalization and other answers to department downsizing. 94:6.31 Overwhelmed by incoming calls. 68. 64.54. 94:5.78 Urban problems confront fire service. 54. 61. 93:2. 91:2. 55. 95:5.28 Specialization of support services. Louis.18 FIRE SERVICE APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT. San Francisco Fire Department.30 Shrinking budgets.78 Splinter groups. 95:1. 91:4. 69. 93:6.26 Good fire service requires team effort.78 Fireground behavior after fire is out. St. Louis. 75. management skills.14 Urban violence complicates.29 Initial response (See FIRST RESPONSE COLUMNS) Liability for fire ground decisions. 91:6.119 Fire station response and support specialization. 92:4. 93:4. 94:4.67 St. See also FIRE SERVICE OPERATIONS HAMPERED. 91:6. evaluation of.66 Volunteer fire departments. planning.94 FIRE SERVICE OPERATIONS. 98:4.80 Fire fighter injuries related to.71.98 FIRE SERVICE COMMUNICATIONS Engine companies lacked radio communications.41 Fire fighter fatalities related to. 69.73 FIRE SERVICE FACILITIES Renovation of. 68.43. 92:2.70 Speed bumps' effect on response times.58. 92:6. 97:4..NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Peer mediation.29 Pride as factor in volunteer department morale. 52.. 98:4. 95:2. 95:6.65. 66.19 Truck company duties need emphasis in training. 63. 96:6. 92:4. 93:4.62 Politics of fire safety regulations at local to federal levels. staffing realities.96 Hazardous materials incidents require new training. 95:6. Austin. technology.. Tex. 48. 98:6. 91:2. 57. 91:4.46. 94:3. 91:2.56 Fire fighting challenges of San Francisco. 97:6. 97:1. 93:4.30 NFPA 1500. Mo. 97:2. 94:6.62 Fire fighter injuries related to.51. 91:2. See also PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Development of NFPA standards for. 58.38 Matching response capabilities to fire conditions.19 User fees implemented to recover cost of services. fire department. 92:3. 95:4.40 Liability for negligent fire fighting activities. 91:2.58. 94:3. 51. 64.108. Fort Worth. 97:4. 98:6. 91:1. 91:1.57. 92:5.53.18 Public information officer can improve media coverage. 92:2.. 98:4.74 Electrical inspections threatened by budget cutbacks. 55. Fort Worth. 91:3. valuable tool in fire fighter safety.65.49.14 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 57 . 63. 91:1. Tex.70 Initial attack capability. Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program.73.90 Identifying and mitigating fireground risks to avert firefighter fatalities. 51. Tex. 92:3. 91:6. 96:4.104 Volunteer fire officers. 97:2.55 Command safety: a wake-up call. 96:6. 93:3. garbled transmission.90.74 Hampered by power shut-off.. 63.27 Lack of 911 service factor in building-under-renovation fire.

92:4. 92:4. 91:4. 94:6.107 Waterfront location. 93:6. WIND Access limited Blocked doors. chains. 93:6.98 Onlookers blocked roads.78 Emergency shutdown procedure caused delay. 92:4. 93:6.62.31 Overwhelmed by incoming calls. 94:6.104.28.51 Security gates. 91:4. 91:6. 93:3. 96:3.74 Power shut-off. 96:1. 92:5. barred/covered windows.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 FIRE SERVICE OPERATIONS HAMPERED.58 System disabled. 95:6.20 Overhead obstructions. 92:6.111 Aerial ladder lacking.73 Size of fire area.90 Deteriorating conditions force defensive attack. 91:1. 92:6. 93:2. 98:6.24 Confined space.72. 97:5. 91:3. 91:5.72 Emergency lighting failed. 95:3. 94:6. 98:1.19 Ceiling collapse.21 Stored furniture.79.71.88 Location/size of other buildings.90 Electrical transformers.74 Radio static. 97:4. 94:6.70. 93:4. 94:6. 92:6.33. 92:3.90 Parked vehicles. 92:6. See also DROUGHT.34 Bystanders interfered. 93:2.33.31 Chicken-wire partitions in attic. 91:3.26 To concealed spaces.84 Relocated driveway.79 Ceilings. 97:6.79. 98:6. 97:5.89. 96:6.62 Burned stairs.93 Locked gate. 20 Electrical power loss.25. 91:4.21 Chemicals prevented use of water. 94:6.95 Civil disturbance threatened fire fighter safety. 92:4.26 Stairway fire.81 Communications hampered Lack of 911 service.106 Apparatus.19.24 Road of poor quality.21 Fire lane chains. 93:5.30 Security devices. 92:4. 91:6. 92:1. 91:6. 78.73. 95:4.36 Cargo shift in aircraft fire. 95:6. fire fighters at earlier fire.81 To wildland fire site.37 Flooding.27 Radio communications limited. 93:5.19. 93:3. charged electrical wire. 95:6. high-voltage lines nearby. 91:4. 94:6.67.56. 92:6.27 To roof.27.56 To site. ceiling voids. 97:6.68.96 Street layout.26.99.74. 91:1.35. 93:2. collapsed wall. 91:6. 93:6. 93:2. garbled transmissions.91.90 Nailed-shut door.37 Locked doors. 98:6. 93:5. 92:5.26 Fence. 94:6. 91:6. 102 Burning. 97:5. 94:6. 93:5.70.29. 98:2.92 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 58 . 94:6.37 Offshore fire.98 Difficult-to-open doors. 94:5.64.67 Stored goods. 95:6. 91:6.74 To two sides of building. 94:2.

94:6.37.73 Propane trucks at fire site. 95:3. 94:6.36 Explosions of materials.111. 92:6.60 Fog. 94:2. 97:1.40 Smoke density.36 Large number of occupants hamper rescue.95 Large size of building. 91:6.104 Fire protection systems damaged. 94:6. 93:2. difficult to reach. 93:6.58 Fire spreading behind fire fighters.104.79 Flashover forces exterior attack.72 Nursing home patients in restraints slow rescue. 92:6.104 Fire spread.95.19. 96:4.33. 92:6. 95:6. 91:3.92 Rural location. 92:5.76.50 Explosions of gas cylinders. 93:2. 98:4. 96. 95:6.67. fuel leak on runway. 95:6.49. 92:3. 94:6. 97:5. 91:4.90. 96:3.30 Multiple exposures affected control efforts.27.33. 97:6.21 Roof collapse. 92:4. 94:5.36. 91:3. 95:6.84 Machinery. 95:4. 97:5. 107 Hydrants frozen or inoperative.76.94.99 Storage configuration. 95:6.96 Remote location. 108. 67. 94:4. 92:6. 100.100. 98:5. 92:4.67 Oil and water on floor. 97:6. 57 Hose lines too short. by presence of.91 Response delayed. 97:6.25.29. fire broke through. 96:6.36 LP-Gas tanks had to be protected.27. 6. 94:6. 98:6. 38 Roof. 96. fire between. 83. 95:6.85.21.49.65.92 Steep terrain. 96:3. 99. 97:6.72 Information on exposure not available. 96:5. 92:1.22 Floor collapse. 94:6. 93:3.78 Standpipe connections lacking. 95:5. 106.26. 97:6. 93:6. 50 Staffing limited. 103.37. 65. 107.36 Flashback fires on cargo containers.59. 96:6.23. 92:6. 93:6.23 Hydrant failed. 94:6. 93:6. 94:5.97 Large size of fire. 94:3.88. 96:6. 95:6. 93:5. 97:6.21.72 Outdated fire plans.70. 94:6. 93:4.106 Rugged terrain.75. rapid. 94:5. 94:6.27 Noise limited communications.30. 91:4. 96:6. 97:3.69 Hazardous materials.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Energized electrical equipment concern.27 Heat forced exterior attack only. 50. 96:6. 94:6. 95:6. 5. 95:6. fuel.67 Safety of area had to be determined.35. 96:6.104 Fire operations control center damaged.88. 6.20 Heat hampered entry.21 Roof thickness delayed venting.63. hazards posed by operating. 98:6. 107 Local response capability limited.31.64 Rescue operation took precedence. 95:4. 94:3.96.18. 96:6.91 Explosions of equipment.30 Foam suppression supplies exhausted.54.107.99.38 Heat and smoke conditions hampered entry. 1.37 Hydrants at distance. 91 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 59 .30 Large number of fires. 94:3. 92:1. 94:6.89 Roof layers.26 Propane tank vented.

70 Water pressure inadequate.45 FIRE WALLS. 92. Oklahoma. 94:4. 92:2.26. 98:6. 36 Structural fire fighting equipment lacking. 96:5.37. 94:6.64. 26. 91:6. 94:5.30. 107.94 Connections damaged. 92:4. 96:5. 96:6. Oklahoma City. 96:1.23. 91:6.72 Winter.54.27. 1995.25.104. 94:4.100. 92:1.71. 91:3.50. 93:6.94. 95:4. 98:6.69 High temperature. 97:3.27. 96:6. 59.72 Rain.74 Water storage problems. 95:6. 93:6. 107. 94:5.21.91 Wall collapse.91 Fire fighter fatalities related to. 94:5.29.107.36.73. 108. 95:6. 92:6. 98:1. 98:6. 91:5.24.59 Water-repellant burning material.51.99 Swampy.74. building materials.22 FIREPLACES Construction fault results in ignition of floor joists. 91:4.75.73 Water supply Connection covered by shed. 91:1. 95:5. 94:6.84 Structural collapse threatened.67.81 Diesel fuel ignites fire. 58 Fire fighter injuries related to.89. 91:6. 4.56 Large number of occupants hampers rescue. 98:1. 97:5. 98:6.55 Nursing home patients in restraints slow rescue. 96:6.94.56. 60.95. 91:4. 98:6.85 Weather Fog. 1990. 92:6.37.50. 97:5. 95:3.21 Transformer fire. 92:5. 65. 94:4.73.50.69 Electric generating station fire.103.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Structural collapse.86 Out of service. 92:6.26. 95:4. 92:5.74.31 Suppression resources in use at other fires. 96:6. combustible terrain.78. 95:6. 94:6.30. 91:6. 94:6.30. 104. 91:4.81. 6.75 Hydrant malfunction.35. 92:2. 91:3. 96:6. 54. 95:3. 92:6.18.40. 97.24 Remote. 94:6. FIRE FIRE WATCHES Meeting hall fire.62. 93:6. 92:6. 94:6.71. 92:5. 6. 59 Window lexan layer hard to penetrate.29 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 60 . 93:3. 92:4. 94:5. 92:4.111. 98:6.67 Office building complex fire. 93:6. 70. 92:6.68. limited by.28.31. April 19. 96:5. 96:5. 53. 94:6.26.39. 96:6. 58.89 FIRE SERVICE RESCUE AND EXTRICATION Alfred P.27. 95:6.14 European Community product testing standards will affect U. 92:4.64.30. 57.95 Los Angeles County Fire Department search and rescue program meets diverse demands.29. 98:1. 96:6. 94:2.22 Ventilation openings lacking.73 Piping damaged. 91:6. 95:6. 106. 91:6. 96:4.106. 92:4.56.50. 95:3. 92:6. 6. 5. 95:6. See WALLS.21 Low temperature. 57.79.90 FIRE TESTS Adequacy and validity of existing tests.36 Transformer circuits checked for power shutoff. 75. 97:5. 96:6. 56.37.26. 95:5. 94:5. 97:1.94 Disrupted by explosion.78. 91:1.26.92 Inadequate.25. Murrah Federal Building. 6.90. S.

25. 92:3.79.128 Defining problems of fire services.20 Customer lit item in retail fireworks store. 94:6.81 Wildland/urban interface fire cause. 91:3.24 Mortars and stored fireworks ignite fire/explosion. 94:1. 95:3. 94:1.19. 94:4. 91:5.27.35 Overview of fire losses.25. 93:1. 92:6. 97:4.21 Statistics on incidents and safety information. 92:4. 93:5.31. 96:5. 93:5. 94:6. 95:6.35. 95:4. 91:4. 96:4.37.164 Fable offers lessons for fire service. 91:5. 92:4. 96:4.23. 93:3.27 Manufacturing plant explosion/fire. 92:3. See also THROUGH-PENETRATION PROTECTION SYSTEMS Clarification of industry's terminology.19 Good fire service requires team effort. 93:6.35. 98:1. 1914. 95:4. 97:6.25.21. 96:6. 93:4.33. 91:2. 92:4. 91:1. 96:2. 96:6. 97:1. 91:1.26.78 Public display Aerial shell fails to explode.78.112 Leadership: what is it?. 92:2.59 FIRST RESPONSE COLUMNS Budgeting for initial response crews.31. apartment building fire cause.21.33.31 Manufacturing plant fire cause. 91:6. 94:4.25.29.22 Pyrotechnic device used in theater ignites net.19. 91:1.30 Dwelling fire cause. 95:2.52 Fire fighters injured by. 92:4.55. 95:3.35. 96:4.15. 96:2.67 FIRESTOPPING. 98:4. 96:2.21.55 Rocket explodes prematurely. 92:5.29. 93:4. 6.61. 92:6.23.21.36. 5. ignites display barge. 97:2.25.96 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 61 .25.21 FIREWORKS.80 Effective leaders encourage cooperation.29.91 Lighter fluid used to rekindle fire.25. 96:4.96 Improving fire protection despite budget limits.26 Sparkler.37. 22 Fire leads to fire safety program. 95:1.17 Fire service management reviews. 2. 96:4. 97:3. 4.27.25.16 Dedication is bond in fire service. 93:4. 91:4.32 Fire service management concerns. 3.79 Lack of. 6.21. factor in fire spread.30. 96:1. 93:2. See also PYROTECHNICS Apartment building fire cause. 93:2. 98:4. 5.21. 91:2. 96:5.23. pamphlet against fireworks use.124 Fire service organizations need to present a united front.27.27.19.22 Garage explosion-fire cause.25. 91:3. 93:1.71.19. 94:3.27.25. 92:4. 93:6.64 Illegal Apartment building fire cause. 92:1. 98:5.23 FIRES Explosions and (See EXPLOSIONS AND FIRES) Myths of fire. 97:5.29.24 Fatal explosion. 94:6. 2.40 School fire cause. 96:1. 95:4.16.30 Educating municipal officials about resource needs. fire.17 Community fire protection systems. casualties caused by fireworks. 94:2.25. 98:1.29. 4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Embers ignite couch. 3. 94:3.33. 95:5.21. 91:4.21 FIREWATCH COLUMNS.37.128 Fire service splinter groups. 93:3. 95:4.21. catastrophic fire cause.65. 96:4.96 Text of NFPA's July 4. kills child. 92:4. 96:3.56. 97:4. 94:4. 94:5.14 Internal departmental conflict negatively impacts budgets.

91:4. 94:3. dye saturated floor. 95:2. GASOLINE.30 Duplicating fluid spills. 30 Naptha feed overheats. ignited by furnace. 93:5. releases.96 Positive image wins budget support.69. 95:5. 94:5. 93:6. 1994. HEATING-AND-COOKING EQUIPMENT FIRES.70 Charcoal lighter ignites catastrophic fire. 96:5. 97:6.22 Aircraft fuel ignites after crash. glue.27 Pentane ignited by electrical arc from forklift controls.30 Safe Place program for young people. See EDITORIALS FISH HATCHERY COMPLEX FIRE.31 Lacquer thinner vapors ignited by pilot light.27 Heat transfer fluid (HTF) ignited by gas heater. 94:5. fatal fire cause. 95:6. 95:5.98 Paint thinner used to ignite school fire.76 Ink. VAPORS.64. PROPANE.128 FIRST RESPONSE (EDITORIAL) COLUMNS. 58 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 62 .96 Kerosene fuels catastrophic fire.110 Airport fuel ignited by unknown source. LEAVENWORTH. 96:5. 91:6. spilled. ignited by arc from extension cord.53. See also ACCELERANTS. OIL.37 Stored liquids ignited by burning fragments from explosion.66 Stored liquids ignited by flash fire.73 Alcohol. 91:6. 91:4. FLAMMABLE Aircraft fuel ignited by electric arc.71 FLAMMABLE. 65. 98:4. 91:3. See DETECTORS. in drums.27 Unknown liquid Catastrophic fire ignited by. FLAME FLAMMABLE. increased fire spread. 94:5. 92:4.69.90 NFPA members vote on minimum staffing issue. 95:6. Wildland fire. 94:6. 91:6. 92:4.97 Charcoal lighter used to ignite chair. LP-GAS FIRES.91 Diesel fuel fuels railroad car fire. 91:2.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Leadership takes many forms.67 Solvent in epoxy resin heated beyond flashpoint. 98:6. possible misused in kerosene heater. 91:2. NFPA 1500. 94:6.93 Regionalization and other answers to department downsizing. contributes to spread of catastrophic fire.16 Alcohol ignited in truck/train collision. 98:2.107 Kerosene.38 Glue. 94:5.105 Furniture refinishing liquids ignite combustibles in catastrophic fire. 91:6. 92:1. 92:2. ignites. COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS Storage lockers for hazardous materials with characteristics of.30 Floor stripper vapors ignited. 95:6. 91:5. ignites catastrophic fire. 93:4. 93:3. 96:6.128 Proactive safety leadership role required of fire departments.48 FLAME DETECTORS.71 Furniture refinishing liquids ignite trash. WASH.96 Preplanning can help withstand budget cut pressures.28 Molotov cocktails used to ignite incendiary fire. 94:5. 96:5.112 Marketing fire service to gain public support. 94:2. 92:4.92 Kerosene spill ignited by lamp in fatal fire. 92:4. ignited by match. COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS FIRES. 92:4.104 Lantern fuel ignited by space heater.106 Aircraft fuel ignited by engine. 94:5.26 Resin and catalyst leaked onto fiberglass matting to create heat reaction.28 Class II liquid fuel ignited in locomotive fire.20 Lacquer overheats.64 Oils.37 Rubbing alcohol used to ignite catastrophic fire.20 Glue overheats. 98:4.101 Diesel fuel ignited by hot manifold. 94:2. ignited. 93:5. stored.

98:5.37 Hotel fire. 21 FLEMING.22 Rooming house fire. 97:5. JOSEPH M. 1996. 92:3. 1996. Illinois. 97:5. 91:4.33 Collapse traps fire fighters. 93:2. 91:4. RUSSELL P. 95:6. Ohio. 98:6. May 11. 94:6.55 Board and care facility. 1993. 98:1.25 Apartment building fire. Illinois. 95:5. 7. 94:6.21 FLAMMABLE PRODUCTS Effectiveness of current product labeling systems. Feb.53 Apartment building fire. 1997.20 Church fire.71 FLASHOVERS Apartment building fire. 93:2. 94:5. Texas.49 Manufactured home fire. 94:6. Sept. 97:6. June 6. 1990. 97:5. California. 1996.33 Apartment building fire.90 Fire started under. 97:3. 18. 19. Massachusetts.23 Dwelling fire. 27. 1993. 98:5. 94:6. 94:5. Profile of.54 Automobile. 1997.64 Dwelling fire. 94:1. 98:6. Illinois.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fatal fire ignited by.14 FLOORS Collapse hinders fire fighting operations. 91:3. Arkansas. 1996. 92:6. 93:5. 1995.30 Collapse hinders rescue of trapped fire fighter. 1. 1992. ignite tank fire. 7.67 School fire.35 Aircraft crash fire.99 Plastic ignited by. 1996. Nov. 1996.105 Shopping mall fire. 1994. 1990.91 Apartment building fire. 93:1.96.98 FLORIDA Adult congregate living facility fire. 25. Ohio. 95:6.30 Club/hotel fire. 1994. 97:5.50 Group home fire. 91:1.93 Unknown liquid vapors released through foam system. 1996.33 Fire ignited by. Jan. Massachusetts.66 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 63 . 97:4. 98:3. March 20.27 Apartment building fire. Oct. Jan. South Carolina. Maryland. 1990. 1994. 20.73 Fire involving. 1997. 98:4. increased fire spread. 92:4.72 Aircraft.66 Wood stain soaked paper towels ignite spontaneously.60 Catastrophic fires Aircraft.64 Dwelling. 13.38 Dwelling fire. 1996.37 FLEMING.34 Dwelling fire. 91:2. 27. 95:6.46 Manufacturing plant fire.34 Large-loss fire ignited by.27 Fire spread through. 95:5.86 Restaurant fire. Idaho. 1997. Feb. 96:6. Colorado. 97:6.27. 1991. Indiana.29 Boat fire.64 Dwelling. 24. Virginia. Jan. 1993. 94:5. 17. 92:4. 1989. Dec. 98:1.23 Dwelling fire. 1997. 95:5. 1992. Jan. Profile of. Pennsylvania. 97:3. 94:6.31 College laboratory fire. 98:4. 1991. Aug. 9. 1992. 1997.50 Saturated with flammable liquids. 91:1. Apr. Nov.

94 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:3. Feb. 1994.119 Dwelling fire. 97:3. 98:4. 94:6. 94:4. 93:6.108 Locomotive fire. 6. April 13. 95:6. 95:6. 1995.23 Board and care facility fire. Sept. Oct.72 Electric generating plant fire. 1995. 94:2. 1994. 91:6.37 Manufacturing plant fire.36 FOAM EXTINGUISHING AGENTS AND SYSTEMS Aircraft fires extinguished with. 1993.20 Storage facility. 1993. ignited in. use on. 1996. 94:5. 1997. 1992.31 Restaurant fire.66. 1992. 1993. 92:4. use on.60 Warehouse fire. 1996.29 Hotel fire. 98:6.106 Train/truck/automobile. 1993. 1995.91 Store fire. 96:2. 94:1. 1996.90 Electric generating plant fire. 96:1. 98:6.50 Restaurant fire. 94:5. 1994.68 Wildland fire. on fuel tank fire.35 Dwelling fire.53 Store fire. 1998. 93:3. 26. 1993.21 Ship fire extinguished with.33 Disney World fire protection systems. 1992. fire investigation report.24 Apartment building.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Dwelling. 98:6.30 Store fire. 1992. 97:1. June 30. April 6. 1993. 1990. 1996.26. Oct.64 Dwelling.91 Fatal fires Apartment building. 6. Nov. 91:5. Aug.98 Shopping mall fire. 5.29 School fire. 95:6. 98:6. 1997. 95:5. 94:4. 95:6.28 Manufactured home fire. 1994. Jan.98 Hotel. 93:2. 96:3. 91:4.28. 91:3. 91:4.26 Tornadoes strike five counties.. 91:6. July. 94:6. 1997. 94:6.. 95:2.100 Electronic equipment repair plant fire extinguished with.30.32 Hotel fire. See INSULATION FOAM RUBBER OR POLYURETHANE Catastrophic rooming house fire. 97:6. 98:5. 22. 96:6. Aug. 1990..106 Club fire. 1990. 1990. Sept. 93:3.67 Oil fire extinguished with. 1993. Jan.73 Electrical substation plant extinguished with.29 Ship fire. March 17. 94:5. 94:6. Oct. Oct.110 Aqueous film-forming. 1990.. 93:5. 22. 1992.29 Manufacturing plant fire. emergency response.37 Dwelling. 91:4. 15.91 NFPA report on foam and environment. 1997. 1993. 94:5.67 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 64 .94 Polyurethane foam manufacturing plant fire. 1997. May 4.89 Store fire. 1993.. 96:6.30 Detention facility fire. December 1. 1995. 98:6. 94:6. 95:2.90 Dwelling fire. 25. 98:3.82 Electric generating plant fire.64 Manufacturing plant explosion. 98:6. March 13.98 FOAM INSULATION. 93:5. 98:6.21.54 Theater fire.29 Hotel fire. 97:6.23 Manufactured home. 1993. 1997.

TEX.24 New Jersey.33 Fuel club/hotel fire. 1995.21 European Commission furniture fire study. 91:5. 96:6. ignited by. 92:4. 95:6. analysis. 94:5.100 Railroad passenger cars. ignited by. 92:4.62 Incendiary fire.41 Manufacturing plant fire. ignited by. 98:1. 96:6. 94:5. 94:5. 92:4. November 18. sparks ignite stock. 91:5. 97:2. 95:6. UPHOLSTERED Chair Child playing with charcoal lighter. 94:6. 92:4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Manufacturing plant fire. ignited by undetermined source. 91:2. ignited by. 96:4.102 Factors affecting fire hazards of. 91:4.107 Manufacturing plant fire.62.63 Electric malfunction ignites warehouse fire. 96:1. 97:5. 92:4. 93:6.21 Seat cushions. ignited by. 96:6. back ignited by accelerant. See WILDLAND FIRES FORKLIFT FIRES Brake overheats. 1996.75 FRANCE Eurotunnel (Channel tunnel) fire. 69. ignited in. 94:5.96. 97:5. 95:6.21 FURNISHINGS 1991 Life Safety Code regulations.98 Unknown source. Support services provided by fire stations. 96:5.78 FOY.69 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 65 . 94:1. 92:6. ignites combustibles. EDDIE First person account of Iroquois Theatre fire. 68. 98:4.19 Child playing with lighter. 93:5. self-ignited in.28. 95:4. 98:1. 97:6.67.31 Hot object ignites wood table in catastrophic fire.104 Stored foam products ignited by light fixtures.69 Chair ignited by smoking materials in catastrophic fire. results.30. 91:6.33 Jammed paper leads to overheating.58 Fire protection for Eurotunnel (Channel tunnel).97 Ignited in catastrophic fire.85 Vehicle ruptures natural gas piping. 94:5. 98:3.91.50 Cigarette.25 Stored polyurethane "buns" ignited by hot exhaust manifold. 91:2. 95:5.84 Recliner.59 Blocks windows in catastrophic fire.30 FORT WORTH. 92:6. 92:4.100 Sofa Accidentally ignited.23 Hot engine block ignited propane leaking from engine.26 Exhaust manifold of unmanned forklift ignited stored polyurethane. 95:4. 1996. 97:6. 98:6.38.67 FURNITURE. ignited by.75 Electrical arc from controls ignited pentane. factor in catastrophic fire.28 Vehicle collides with LPG-powered cleaner.65 FORSMAN. 96:4.23 Furnace heat.30 FOREST FIRES. 95:3. 97:2. 95:5. LP-Gas tank.57 Vehicle hits overhead lights.30 Forklift hits aerosol containers which explode.85 FUNERAL HOME FIRES Michigan. DOUGLAS P. Profile of. 91:5.95 Spark ignites solvent vapors.20 Block door in catastrophic fire.59 Stored furnishings block access/egress in catastrophic fire.

97:3.64. 1991.58. 97:6.18 GAS EXPLOSIONS Coke gas with hydrogen. ignited by. AUTOMOBILE REPAIR.17 Child playing with lighter. 91:6.82 Isobutyl propane.46. ignited by. 91:4. 97:2.31 GAS. 93:5. 95:6.26.39 Smoking materials. 49 Cord short circuit.104. 93:6.38. 95:5. leaking gas ignites.17 Clothes dryer overheats.64 GAS FIRES.24. 1993. 92:6. 96:5. 26.93. 98:5. 94:6. 1989.28 Near point of origin in catastrophic fire. Profile of. ignited by. 92:4. ignited by. poses toxic threat to fire fighters. 95:5. 98:4.56. PROPANE Butane.50. See AUTOMOBILE REPAIR SHOP FIRES GARAGE. 98:5.29 Compressed natural gas cylinder ruptures. 6. 93:5.29 Fireplace embers. 95:5. 1991. 97:4. ignited by. 94:4. ROCCO J. 94:5. 91:1. 95:5. 94:5.60. 98:5. 96:6.37.98 Suspicious fire.68 GARAGE. FIRES High-rise office building complex. 53. ignited by electrical arc.19 Lamp cord short circuit.31 Flame from LP-Gas fire causes natural gas regulator to fail.102.52. 91. 96:4. 94:5. 95:5.102. April 22.21.68 Massachusetts. 93:6. 56. LP-GAS FIRES. 94:5. 91:4.23 Hazardous incident responders need multigas detectors. 66. 98:5.67 Wisconsin.30 Compressed natural gas. ignited by.68.64. 96:5.65. handling incidents involving vehicles fueled by.91 Fireworks. ignites fire.84 Natural gas odorant filtered out by soil. 95:3.16 Cigarette. 95:5.90 Highway department heavy equipment garage. 66. PARKING. 95:4.22. causing explosion and fire. 94:5. 95:5. 98:5. ignited by. 96:5. ignited by.30 Fire-generated combustible gases cause flashover. ignited by. 96:3. 97. New York. FIRES. ignites napkins inside. 94:4. 95:2.29 Catastrophic California. 93:6. RESIDENTIAL.65.85 Carbon monoxide is top hazard.22 GARAGE.50 Open flame.36 Gas compressor fire.85 Hydrocarbon/hydrogen mixture. 97:5. 66.50 G GABRIELE.31. 94:1.24. 98:4. ignited by. ignited by unknown source.20 Ohio.21 Space heater. 91:4.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Ashes. ignited by. 92:6.66 Unknown cause.54. Feb.96. 1996. HYDROGEN FIRES. 91:3. fire spread. 93:5. ignited by. 97:5.49. 5.25 Natural gas. See also COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS Ammonia line bursts. July 22. 96:6. 95:6. FIRES California. 98:3. ignited by. 91:4. July. mop heads ignite in.64 Candle. ignited by. 98:5. 97:5.28 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 66 . 1992. ignited by static discharge.24. 94:5. 98:5:16 Child playing with matches. New York. 94:4. See also HEATING-AND-COOKING EQUIPMENT FIRES.62 GAS EQUIPMENT FIRES Clothes dryer.36. 91:4. 1995. ignited by. 93:6. 98:6. NATURAL GAS FIRES.20. leaking from stove fuel cylinder.22 Spreading fire.

ignited by. 93:6.68 Failed due to heat from fire. ignited by greater. fuels fire. 94:6. ignited by friction.100. 94:6.82 Methyl t-butyl ether ignites laboratory fire. 97:1. ignited by torch. 93:6. 95:4.106 Incendiary fire. ignited by. 91:4. 98:6. 93:5. 93:5. 98:5.23 Gasoline residue on clothing ignites.103 Service line leaks. ignited bedding. PROPANE Acetylene.30 Ruptured.28 Leaking fuel from punctured tanks ignites in vehicle fires. 91:2.32 Stored gasoline and gasoline-powered yard equipment. vapors from leak ignited by automobile.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Oxygen fuels hospital fire.70 Fractured.33 GAS FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS.36 Ethyl alcohol vapors. TRUCK FIRES Candle.25 High pressure line leaks. 93:6.42 In carburetor ignite.30 Spark.31 Spilled gasoline ignited by catalytic converter or spark in vehicle fire. fuel catastrophic fire.67. 94:6. 95:6. 97:6. 95:5. 66.91 Pipe connection failed.104 Pentane. used to ignite. fire. 93:5.26 Storage tank pipes.89 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 67 . ignited by torch. 93:6. 91:5.30 Molotov cocktails used to ignite incendiary fire. 91:4. 94:6.55 Spark.86 Ruptured.103 Methane buildup ignites mine fire.36 Generator spark ignites fumes. fire.62 Propane Failed. 93:5.29 Ruptured by collapsing structural members.27 GAS STATION FIRES. causes explosion. NATURAL GAS FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS.55 Light fixture.91. 92:4. ignited by spreading fire.27 GAS LINES Hydrogen Contributed fuel to fire. 94:5. 98:5. fire. ignited in truck accident. 94:5. 94:5. 97:5. 91:2.67 In bilge ignite boat explosion. fire ignited by.26 Fuel leaking from vehicle tank ignited by heat from drop light.67 Hexane. gasoline ignited by spark. 97.21.55 Spilled gasoline vapors ignited by space heater. ignited by. .50 Kerosene heater fuel. ignited by hot plate.91 Distribution main over-pressured causes flare-ups. 91:2. 96:5. See also HYDROGEN FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS.50 Vapors Automobile fuel tank vapors ignited by pilot light.39 Boat explosion. See also AUTOMOBILE FIRES. 98:5.66 Methane vapors. 94:5. ignited by. 91:4. 95:5. 91:3.108 Ruptured. 95:6. 98:5. used as. improper handling as factor. See SERVICE STATION FIRES GASOLINE. 98:3.92. 91:4. 92:2. 94:5.36 Natural gas Contributed fuel to fire. 30 Ruptured fuel tank ignites in vehicle fire. 92:3. 96:1. factors in catastrophic fire. causes explosion. explosions.97 Gasoline-soaked clothing used to ignite incendiary fire. 93:5.60. LP-GAS FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS.

1996.106 Manufacturing plant fire. ignited by. 1997. 95:6. 92:2. Aug. 97:6. 14. Jan. Aug. April. 97:2. used to kindle. 91:4.73 Electric generating plant fire. 21. 12. 9. 23.32 Dwelling.52 Office building fire. 91:4. 97:6. 1993. Jan.98 Dwelling. 97:4.92 Manufactured home. ignited fire. 91:4. 1990. 1904.100 Aircraft.50 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. Jan. Jan. 95:2. 97:3. ignited by.29 Dwelling. 1996. 1995.67 Dwelling. 95:5. 94:1.32 Manufacturing plant fire.21 Tank storage facility ignited by. Large-loss-of-life fire.33 Manufacturing plant fire. March.62 Manufacturing plant fire. 1993.68 Well head ignited by spark. 15. 1994.22 GEORGIA Manufactured home. 94:6. 94:5. 94:5. Apr. 12.54 Vacant club. N. 26. 1996. March 11. 92:5. 95:4.52 Storage and recycling facility fire. 93:2. Aug. Jan.29 Vacuum cleaner spark.77 Apartment complex fire.22 Catastrophic Dwelling. Y.50 Manufacturing plant fire.68 GENERAL SLOCUM EXCURSION STEAMER FIRE. Dec. Jan.19 In motor home ignited catastrophic fire. 24.68 College building fire.23 Spilled gasoline vapors ignited by pilot light. 97:6. 96:6. 1996..97 Storage facility fire. 4.26.29 Wood stove.56 Office building. 23.49 Manufacturing plant fire.92 Fatal fires Dwelling. 97:5. 1991. 1993. 96:5. 93:5. Aug. May. 1995. 1995. Feb.28 Victims in incendiary fire ignited by. 91:4. June. 94:6. 1994.99 Board and care facility. 97:5.100 Railroad rolling stock. Dec. 92:6.31 Gas furnace. Dec. Aug. April 11. 1993. Feb. 1994. 1996.. 94:6.97 Storage facility fire.52 Manufacturing plant fire. 1993.. 91:4. 1991. 1993. 95:6.96 Dwelling. 97:3.72 Truck/automobile fire. Jan. March. 1995. 94:5. 97:2. 1993. 96:6.1 990. Sept. 12. 91:4. June 27. 91:3. 1996.97 Dwelling. 1996.68 Store fire.97 Storage facility fire. ignited by. 92:5.23 From heated gasoline ignited by stove burner. 96:5. 12. 1994. N.38 Fuel line leak vapors cause boat fire. 96:1. Y. 92:6. 94:6. ignited by. 95:6. 1993. 1990. 96:5.100 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 68 . 3. 24. 1995. 97:5. 1996.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Cutting torch. 3. March. 1995. 96:5.28 Of gasoline used for cleaning contributed to fire spread. 1995.80 GEORGIA Aircraft/truck fire. 97:5.68 Natural gas heater. 1995. 93:6. 96:6.

Apr.64 Ignites in pan. 96:4.76 GLENDALE. 97:5.22 Ignites on stove in apartment fire.and Portuguese-speaking world.38 Spanish language codes and standards. 98:3.22 Ignites on grill in restaurant fire. Jan. ERNEST Profile of. MOLTEN Combustible deposits ignited by. 91:6.34 NFPA alliances bring codes/standards to Spanish. also raise code questions.28 Warehouse fire. 1992. 97:6.53 GOVERNMENT. 1993. 1991. 97:1. 96:3.54. 1991.35 GLAZING New developments offer alternatives to wired glass. Profile of. 94:3. Washington. 1990. KAY Profile of. 16. 97:4. 1996. 98:1. 96:3. Feb.38 Grease-laden combustibles ignited by fan short-circuit.86 GERMANY Düsseldorf. 11.89 Tank farm fire. 1997. caused by. See INSIDE THE BELTWAY COLUMNS. fatal airport terminal fire. May. 96:1. 1996. 93:6. April.50 Store fire.34 GONDOLA CAR FIRES California. 96:5. 96:6.36 NFPA codes and standards can protect high-rises. Profile of. 98:6. 97:1. fire spreads to wood cabinets. Oct. 95:2. 1996. 96:6.85 Grease-covered structural components ignited. 21. ARTHUR J.36 NFPA role in international aviation fire safety.31 Ignites on portable broiler in restaurant fire. 91:6. 1990. 95:6. Apr. 97:6.106 Grease-laden rafters fuel food processing plant fire.25 Oil deposits ignited by. 98:6. 96:2.50 NFPA works with Asian countries to encourage recognition of codes. 96:5. CALIF.26 GREASE FIRES Cook room fire spreads through ventilation system.66 Warehouse fire.28 GONZALES.34 Spanish-speaking countries using National Electrical Code.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Store fire.59 Texas. standards. 97:4.21 Kansas. June 27. Oklahoma. 93:6.102 Grease-covered toaster oven power terminals cause short circuit. 1990. 96:4. caused by. 92:6. Wildland fire.59 GLOBAL ISSUES COLUMNS High-rise buildings require active fire protection.28 GRANT.25 Ignites on stove in school fire. 98:6.76 Warehouse fire. 26. 96:6. 97:6. 97:6. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT GRAIN DUST Mill and storage facility explosion. 1996. RICHARD L. 92:2.27 GLATFELTER. 95:6. 26. 91:1.21 GOSS.39 GRASS FIRES Idaho.29 Stove heat ignites grease in exhaust system.43 GLASS. 91:4. 93:6. 1995.22 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 69 . 92:4.

1990. 6.65 Time line on control of.23 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 70 .79 Museums and other applications. 96:1. LEONARD R. Oct.76. 94:5.110 Extinguishing system fails in subway token booth fire. 1991. 94:3. 94:6. 93:1. 94:4. 1993. analysis. 92:1. 92:3.52. 97:5. See also ADULT CONGREGATE LIVING FACILITY FIRES. November 18.66 Second International Conference.38 HAWAII Apartment building fire. 1917. See DISABLED PERSONS HAPPY LAND SOCIAL CLUB FIRE Catastrophic.25 Illinois. 96:6.62 Extinguish aircraft fire. 1997. 96:6. 91:1. 91:1. 92:4.31 HAWKINS. NOVA SCOTIA Munitions ship explosion. PENNSYLVANIA Board and care facility fire. 92:6. 1993. 1993. Texas. 1989.26 GUNSHOTS Fire fighter fatalities related to. 97:5. July. 92:3.26 GREENHOUSE FIRES Massachusetts.50 HALIFAX. 95:6. 15. 94:6. OLIN L. 92:6. Arizona.25 GRINDING OPERATIONS Sparks cause fire. 16. 1.30 Warehouse fire. 93:2.46 HANDICAPPED PERSONS. 1991. May 14. 95:6.75 GROSS. analysis.96 HALONS Alternative protection methods to replace halons.40. Tire fire.31 GROUP HOME FIRES. 1993.28 Catastrophic fires Dwelling. 95:2.64 GYMNASIUM FIRES University. 1996.85 GREENE. 97:4. ONT. 1974-91.30 H HAGERSVILLE. 95:6. 1994. March 24. 97:2. 98:5. 1997. Profile of. 94:6.68 HATHAWAY. 91:4. 1996. 1990. Profile of. JASPER STILLWELL Profile of. 95:3. Dec.67 Use continues despite available alternatives. Jan. Washington. 91:1.91 Fatal store fire. 94:2. CAROL Profile of. 6. 92:4. 1990. 91:1. 1991.59 Department store/office building fire. New York.37 New Hampshire. March 25. BOARD AND CARE FACILITY FIRES Catastrophic. 1990. 91:6. 92:5.45 Observatory.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 GREAT BRITAIN Eurotunnel (Channel tunnel) fire.61 HARVEYS LAKE.58 Fire protection for Eurotunnel (Channel tunnel).70 Halfway house.24 Halon phaseout speeded up to Jan.63 Fire fighter injuries related to.38 Manually activated system not a factor in fire. 1994.

80 Classification and containment of hazardous materials. 97:3.30 Copper sulfate runoff diked.93 Metal milling plant fire.41 Response capabilities. pumped. 92:6. 94:6. 98:6.33 Hazardous waste incinerator fire. factor in. 95:1.28 Storage lockers for materials with flammable. 97:3.36 Cost-effectiveness of regional hazardous materials response teams. 93:3. Nova Scotia. 98:6.28 Polychlorinated biphenols at generating plant fire. 95:6. factor in. factor in. 95:3. 6. 1917.63 Software links first responders to databases. 91:6. 91:2.80 General warehouse fire.20 Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act of 1990 (USA 90). 1994. 92:6. 473. 95:5.90 Food plant fire. 97:6. 92:2. See also HAZ-MAT ISSUES COLUMNS Ammonia line bursts.18 Competency is key to responders' performance. 94:4.85 Munition ship explosion.18 Emergency planning is six-part process.94 Community hazards analysis to precede response team formation.36 Sodium exposure at metals processing plant fire. 94:6.25 Fire service applies new training and management skills to incidents.88 Hampered fire fighting. discussion.32 Decontamination programs. 94:1.63 Federal regulations cover intrastate shipments of agricultural chemicals.66 Sprinklers caused paint vats to overflow. 93:6.112 EPA/National Response Teams report critiques federal agencies.74 Plastics plant fire. 97:6. 93:1. 97:1.50.96 Placards can mislead responders. 92:4. 93:2. 98:1. factor in. 92:3. assessment of. poses toxic threat to fire fighters.91 Regulatory reform poses dangers.25 Networking most effective at local conferences. 91:6.23 Chemical properties of hazardous substances critical to decision-making.104 Multigas detectors are required equipment.22 Environmental damage mitigation in incident response.92 Pool and spa chemicals present hazard in warehouse stores.117 Isman. 98:5. factor in. Arkansas.71 HAZ-MAT ISSUES COLUMNS Balancing safety and international economic development. 94:1. Halifax. 95:2. legacy to hazardous materials instruction.136 Limitations of haz-mat equipment. 95:6.27 Federal legislation may affect responders. 92:3. 93:6. Dec. Warren. 98:6. factor in.76 Iron foundry fire. development of. 91:6. 94:2. 92:1.50 Isocyanate smoke requires area evacuation.22 Lifesaving principles.22 Chemical plant fire. 93:2.44 Railroad collisions and fires. 93:5.75 Hampered fire fighting.110 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 71 . standardization. 94:6. chemical laboratory fire. comments sought on.40 Decontamination not taken seriously by fire fighters.85 Asbestos (See ASBESTOS) Asbestos from ducts collected by haz-mat team after fire. 96:2.16 Differentiating emergencies from incidental releases. 91:1.16 NFPA 472. combustible liquid characteristics.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. 98:4. 92:3. factor in.75.19 Federal haz-mat response needs simplification. 94:6.19 Carbon monoxide is top hazard. 91:5. 91:3.38 Heat transfer fluid (HTF) (thermal VP-1) in fire required precautions. 94:6. 94:5.

78 Sprinklers prevent tragedy in two fires. 91:1. 92:3.28 Electric hot plate ignites pentane vapors in lab fire. HEAT HEATING-AND-COOKING EQUIPMENT. CONDUCTIVE Warehouse fire spread by.89 Training programs' effectiveness questioned.31 HEAT DETECTORS. 92:5. 93:2.57. HOSPITAL FIRES. See DETECTORS. Health Care Facilities. 92:4. 68 Ceiling furnace malfunctions ignites wood ceiling. ignites living room contents. 92:6. 93:3.22 HEART ATTACKS Fire fighter fatalities related to. unattended. newspapers in catastrophic fire.24 Fire safety prognosis for '90s.64 HEALTH CARE FACILITIES NFPA 99.33 Electric hot plate ignites table in catastrophic fire.89 New York. and extension cord. 95:4. joined to extension cord. See also HVAC systems Heating equipment.29 Space heater ignites combustibles. ignites draperies. 91:4. 94:3. ignites.23 Commercial cooking operations. July 21. public opinion. 98:1. ignites trash. 60 HEAT. 95:4. 97:1.69 Electric heater ignites mattress. 94:3. 91:4.46 Electric space heater ignites bedding/clothing in catastrophic fire. 93:6.29 Charcoal grill. ignites contents.22 Electric heater possible cause of fatal fire. ignite combustibles. 94:4. NURSING HOME FIRES Clinic fires.32 Charcoal grill trash ignited by. 97:4. furniture. 92:3. 93:6. create high-resistance arc. 93:1.68 Electric skillet. 91:1. 96:6.128 HEATING-AND-COOKING EQUIPMENT FIRES Broiler burners ignite grease. 94:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Technology. overheats. 96:1. and prevention must be considered by response teams. ignites combustibles. risks of. electrical.17 Train responders to have a safe attitude. common questions answered. 96:2.83 Charcoal from grill ignites bag.67 Electric heater overheats. 92:1.22 Butane leaks from portable stove cylinder.35 Charcoal grill unattended. 91:6.33 Cooking food overheats.53 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 72 .29 Electric space heater.64. 97:4. 98:5. 94:5. 96:6. 92:6. ignites.27 HEALTH CARE Home health care increase fire. 1995. California. 95:2.38 Electric heater ignites combustibles in catastrophic fire. ignites combustibles.96 Electric heater ignites bedding. combustibles. 92:4. inside dwelling. 1990. See also GROUP HOME FIRES.30 Catastrophic Hydraulic oil ignited by natural gas burners.25 Electric heater cord.30 Electric heater ignites blanket.28 HEALTH CARE FACILITIES FIRES. 93:5.98 Electric heater ignites clothing.49 HEARING-IMPAIRED PERSONS Fatal fire victim may not have heard smoke alarm.27 Deep fat fryer fire ignites grease in hood and duct work. 94:5. 95:5. safety requirements. 98:4.64 Wood stove as cause. explosion risks. 92:4.28 Deep fat fryer overheats.

operating unattended. 96:5. 98:6.90 Heat trace cable ignites wood framing. 95:5. factor in catastrophic fire. 98:6.27 Gas furnace ignites rubbish in fatal apartment fire.26 Gas stove. 92:6. 93:6. 97:1.58 Electric space heater ignites upholstered materials. 97:5.36 Gas heater ignites paper dust. 96:2. 91:1. 97:6.22 Grill ignites grease. 93:2. 94:1. ignites. 93:5.25 Heat lamps ignite plastic trays.22 Electric stove.68 Gas-fired boiler ruptures.50 Gas oven vent pipe leaks heat. 93:5. ignites combustibles. catastrophic fire factor. 91:4. 97:6.84 Gas heater ignites gasoline vapors. 95:5. 95:1. ignites carpet. ignites cabinets. 97:5.88 Infrared heater ignites natural gas leak.28 Food placed in oven overheats.39 Gas stove pulled from wall fuels apartment fire. 97:5. 96:6.102 Electric space heater ignites love seat in catastrophic fire.120 Hot plate probable cause of recreational facility fire. installed incorrectly.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Electric space heater ignites furniture. food deposits.66 Furnace overheats due to improperly installed limit switch.51 Electric space heater ignites hydraulic oil.23 Gas water heater ignites gasoline vapors in fatal dwelling fire. 94:6.76 Gas heater ignites natural gas from ruptured piping. 95:6.18 Gas water heater ignites accumulated gas.67 Gas water heater conductive heat ignites foam insulation.64 Electric wall heater ignites cardboard box.24 Heating season fire safety tips.25 Gas furnace ignites floor. 95:5.99 Gas burner. fire spreads to wood cabinets.75 Gas heater radiant heat ignites boxes. 97:2. ignites cabinets. severs gas line and ignites fire.52 Gas space heater ignites gasoline vapors. 93:6.22 Frying pan ignites in catastrophic fire.22 Gas stove pilot ignites leaking leaking natural gas. 93:5. used as heat source. ignites roof. 97:6.25 Gas burner ignites grease. 91:1. 96:6.26 Gas stove used for heating. ignites wood framing. 91:4. ignites kitchen wall. 93:6.32 Electrical wall heater ignites wallboard.65 Kerosene heater.53 Gas oven/broiler malfunctions. catastrophic fire factor. 95:6.56 Gas stove heat ignites grease in exhaust system. 95:6. 97:1. 98:2.31 Grill ignites oil. 91:4. 96:5.100 Gas fryer pilot light ignites leaking natural gas. 96:3. food. 91:3. 97:5. 91:6. 94:5. 91:4.23 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 73 .54 Gas-fired heating unit ignites stored combustibles. 95:3. 91:6.65 Gas wall heater malfunctions. 95:2. unattended.57 Gas oven heat ignites wood structural members.21 Gas water heater pilot ignites gasoline.23 Gas heater ignites heat transfer fluid (HTF).96 Gas water hater pilot light ignites gasoline vapors. ignites secondary fire. 94:1. 97:6.34 Gas ceiling heater ignites cardboard.30 Gas heater ignites paper. 92:3. catastrophic fire factor.83 Gas-fired furnace heat ignites upholstered chair.91 Gas water heater pilot light blown out. 97:2.25 Gas heater.62 Gas-fired furnace ignites clothing.34 Grease in pan ignites.36 Heat pump failed. grease in hood and duct. 95:5.50 Kerosene heater fuel spills. 96:6.

95:5. unattended.58 Propane from grill tank released.24.57 Oil-fired furnace vent ignites structural members. 92:2. 96:2. 98:1.36 Natural gas heater. paneling.27 Propane heaters ignite wood sprinkler enclosures. overheats. radiant heat ignites hood filter. overheats. 95:1. unattended. melts.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Kerosene heater ignites combustibles. 96:3. 91:5. ignites wood paneling. 94:3. 96:4. 94:5.38 Wood stove. 97:1. elderly person.62 Pot.36 Natural gas appliance pilot lights surge. 92:4. 91:3. 95:6. overheats. 98:3. 98 Pot. unattended. under repair.96 Space heater ignites chair.51 Space heater ignites gas in catastrophic fire. unattended.34 Pot. 98:2. leaks. 95:5. fire spreads through chimney. overheats. 96:3.51 Pot. unattended. 97:5. 98:1. 95:5. unattended. ignites cooking oil.32 Propane stove fuel contributes to fire spread. 93:5.34 Kerosene heater ignites wood paneling.68 Space heater ignites furniture. 95:5.16 Kerosene heater tips over. ignites bread wrappings. 95:5.49 LP-Gas stove flame ignites clothing of disabled. overheats. portable. ignites oil. possible fatal fire cause.16 Microwave oven malfunctions. catastrophic fire. ignites wood cabinets. wooden cabinets. ignited by spark. 94:6. 94:1. ignites oil. installed incorrectly. 95:5. ignites restaurant fire. overheats. 98:5. 97:2.33 Natural gas water heater ignites stored combustibles.26 Space heater ignites combustible liquids in catastrophic fire.64 Natural gas heater.35 Propane heater ignites explosion and fire. causes heater explosion/fire.22 Space heater used to ignite wood by child in fatal fire. 98:2. overheats.21 Space heater ignites combustibles in catastrophic fire. 97:5. leaks gas. 95:5. contributes to fire spread. unattended. overheats. ignite manufactured homes fire. ignites combustibles. ignites wood structure. 94:3.96. 95:1.23 Stove burner ignites clothing. ignites fatal fire.22 Propane from grill tank released.15.27 Toaster oven cord ignites wood framing in catastrophic fire. unattended. 94:5. ignites fire.26 Space heater ignites lantern fuel.88 LP-Gas grill tank. 96:6. 94:2. ignites paper. 6.49 Kerosene heater using gasoline ignites bedding. overheats oil. unattended. unattended.45 Kerosene heater possibly refueled with alcohol.66 Space heater ignites gasoline vapors.49 Pot. 97:6.53 Pot.28 Propane fuel in barbecue grill ignited by open flame.50 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 74 .62 Oil furnace malfunctions.29 Stove burners ignite book placed on stove. 91:5. ignites catastrophic fire. unattended.22 Pot.28 Kitchen fire statistics. 92:4.28 Space heater ignites structural components. unattended. 94:5. 97:5. improperly installed. 95:6. 96:1. improperly installed.104 Natural gas water heater possible catastrophic fire cause.71 Space heater ignites combustibles. 96:6. 98:5. 92:4. 97:5. melts.36 LP-Gas regulator malfunctions. catastrophic fire factor. 97:1. fails.60 Natural gas water heater pilot ignites lacquer thinner vapors. overheats oil which ignites in catastrophic fire.62 Pot. fire safety information.25 Pot. 98:5.67 Toaster oven short circuits.108 Space heater ignites upholstered materials.22 Pot. 95:1. ignites catastrophic fires.23 Pot.54 Oil-fired hot air heating unit. ignites fatal fire. 98:5. 98:3. 94:5.26 Propane heater. 91:4. ignites grease. causes grease to ignite.29 Pot.

93:1. July. S. 93:3. 1992. 1990. 94:5. Ky.34 Fire protection systems for high-rises. 1992. 98:5.91 Dormitory.35 Catastrophic Office building. 96:2. 92:5. 97:3.35 HIGH-RISE BUILDING FIRES Apartment buildings Florida. March.84 NFPA codes and standards useful worldwide. 94:2.37 HOME FIRES. Feb. 94:5. Pa.32 HISTORIC BUILDING FIRES. New York.29 Fire protection needs revealed by recent fires... N. 91:2. evacuation behavior. 96:6.27 New York.29 Massachusetts. 92:6. 92:5. See also VAGRANTS © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 75 . 91:4. improperly installed. 23.23 Department store/offices.25 Florida. Pennsylvania. 26.52 West Virginia. See also MANSION FIRES California. 97:6.56 Los Angeles. S. 1993.25 Wood stove chimney. systematic tracking system.32 HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS Active fire protection required for high-rises.30 U. 92:5. JAMES F. 1992. 92:5. 92:1. 23. Hawaii. 1990. catastrophic fires caused by.4 Life safety codes and standards for.64.49 Wood stove near fire origin point. RESIDENTIAL FIRES HOMELESS. 95:5. 92:5. 1994.39 U. 1993. Ind.. 93:6. Feb. Calif. 1991.64. ignites paneling and supports. 94:5.74 Philadelphia.28 New York. 95:2. 91:6.. TERRY-DAWN Profile of. 97:5. 1991. 1993. 1991. 91:5.22 Pennsylvania.22 HOEBEL. 15. catastrophic fire factor. Fire Department training program. 1988. 1991.36 Fire safety design. 92:5.. 95:4. 92:2.12 NFPA codes and standards address fire risk concerns. 1996. Profile of. 91:2. 1993. radiant heat from flue ignites stored wood. Y. 92:4. Feb.. 94:2. 92:6. Treasury Building fire indicated life safety deficiencies.26 Los Angeles..56 Massachusetts.58 Wood stove near source of fire origin. 1996. 97:2.59 HIGH-TECH INDUSTRIES Fire protection for.71 Office building complex.47 World Trade Center.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Wood stove. Illinois. 97:6. HEWITT. See DWELLING FIRES. 93:6. 1991. Calif. Arizona.27 Wood stove ignites structural framing. 94:5. 1996. Feb. Indianapolis. 94:6.36 Simulated plane crash into high-rise tests emergency preparedness. 92:6.104. 1990. 3. 1990. 96:6. 94:6. 94:2.46 Wood stoves. high rise fires.55 Office buildings California.78 Iowa.56 Utah. Feb.56 Louisville. 98:2.90 Club/hotel.27 Virginia. 97:6. May 4. 1992. Feb. 91:3.31 Condominium.

March. 98:6.49 Massachusetts. July 11. 92:6. 94:5. 1.27 Tennessee. 93:4. Nov. Dec.33 Michigan. 92:5.108 MGM Grand Hotel fire. March.31 Ontario.31 Illinois.16 New Jersey.53 Grill fire ignites grease prior to suppression system activation. 1997.105 Virginia.24 Massachusetts. 97:6. 96:5. 93:5. POOR Kennel fire. 1992. 1990. 1992. 95:1.30 Ohio. 1996. 96:4. factor in. 1991. March 20. 94:2. 1996. 1997. 1995.55 Florida.25 Dry chemical extinguishing system operates. 97:3. 1994. 1993. 16. 1995. 1997. 1993.31 Maine. 1993.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Catastrophic fires involving. Royal Jomtien Hotel. 93:2. 1994. 1990. 98:2.34 HOUSEKEEPING.29 Florida. 1980. fire investigation report.20 Printing plant fire.25 HOT SEAT COLUMNS. factor in.24 HOODS. 21.25 HOSPITAL FIRES Catastrophic New York. 92:2. 96:5. Sept. 1993. 98:5.28 Catastrophic Florida. 97:4. March 16. 95:5. 1996. 95:1. 92:4. 95:2. Jan. April 6.22 Michigan.70 Michigan.22 HOTEL FIRES.81 Indiana. 91:4. 1992.19 Thailand.17 Ohio. 94:2. 98:5. 92:6. See also RESORT FIRES Alaska. 98:5.26 Massachusetts. 1997. 95:6. 97:6. Oct.67 Favorable hotel fire safety trends lead to change in reporting protocol. Massachusetts.23 Illinois.20 Pennsylvania. July 12. Canada.88 Missouri. 91:4. 97:6. 31. 1997. 1994. 1997. 98:3. 91:6. 98:1. 96:5. 1991. 93:2. 1993.95 Minnesota. 24. 95:2.24 California.53 Fatal truck fire. 1994. 1996.27 HOUSING FOR ELDERLY FIRES © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 76 . 94:5. but fire above system. KITCHEN VENTILATION Blocks sprinklers from deep fat fryer fire.64 Illinois.57 California. 1995. See PROFILE COLUMNS HOT TUBS National Electrical Code prevents accidents. 92:1.41 Mississippi.64 Illinois.67 Catastrophic wharf fire victims. 96:2.25 Sprinkler in hood extinguishes fire. 93:6.19 Texas. 1991. 1993. 92:5. 94:2. 92:4.24 Nevada.29 Florida. analysis. 1991. 97:5. 1994. 1996.

91:4. Oct. 1991. 1992. 95:5. 91:1. 1989. 1995.54 Dwelling. 94:2. 1996.56 Sprinklers blocked by. 27. 93:6. 96:5. 30. Dec. 12.31 Interlocks.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 California.30 Supermarket fire. 91:3.104 High-rise club/hotel fire.67 Barge. 96:4. Dec. 97:4. 97:5. 92:4.27 LP-Gas burner ignites hydrogen. 1990. 94:6.64 Dwelling. factor in.65 Apartment building. March 14. Aug. ignites. July 3. 17. 97:5. 93:4. 1989. 94:5.37 Bus fire. 93:4.100 I IDAHO Catastrophic fires Manufactured home. 95:6.30 Power plant fire ignites hydrogen. 98:5. Aug. 1995.36 Hydrogen from chemical reaction ignites. 92:4. 95:5. Jan. factor in. 98:5. 26. March 20. 22. 93:5.35 Smoke.28 Missouri.23 Fire spread through. Oct. Sept.68 Dwelling.24 Illinois. 92:5. 98:5. 1995. Jan. 9.101 Church fire.102 Friction when line ruptures ignites hydrogen.46 Apartment building. Dec. 96:5.91 Dwelling. 1993.68 Hotel. automatically triggered by smoke in catastrophic fire. 97:5. 1997. 94:6. 1992. 98:5.69 Apartment building.55 Dwelling fire.30 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 77 . 96:5. 96:5. 1997.95 Train. 94:5.46 Apartment building fire. 98:5. 1997.22 Wildland fire.52 Roof-mounted. 1996. 1991.54 Apartment building. 1991. 94:6. 1996. 1993.31 Kansas.46 Motor vehicle. Jan.54 Aircraft. 1992. 91:3. 93:5. fire spread to.30 HVAC SYSTEMS Electric fault in wiring ignites framing. 95:6. 1. 1990. 1994. Jan.21 ILLINOIS Apartment building fire. 1994. July 4. 91:5. 14. 97:5.53 Apartment building. 1995.95 Hydrogen generated by release of sulfuric acid. Sept.26 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. 92:4. 6. 1995.28 HYDROGEN FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS Pipe connection failed. 92:6.31. 1994. 91:2. 1991. 15. 91:1. March 16. 11. 95:4.26 Wildland/urban interface fire. May 30.30 HYDROGEN FIRES Electrical arc ignites hydrogen. 94:6. 94:1.65 Dwelling. 92:5.25 Massachusetts. 1997. combustion products in high-rise office building fire distributed by. Nov. 92:4.93 Gas distribution main fire/explosion. 19.92. 14. 1990. 91:4. 1997.55 Dwelling.

1995.24 Exit access. 1993. 97:6.34 Nuclear energy plant fire.93 Condominium fire.32. Apr.81 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:2.58 Fatal fires Apartment building. store renovations can lead to code-compliance problems. 97:6. 91:3. 94:6.36 Dwelling under construction. 97:6. 1997. Aug. 18. 97:6. 95:6. 1990.46 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 78 . Feb. Sept.. 1994. 93:6. 97:6.. exterior exits. 94:1. 98:5. 97:3. 91:6. Sept.28 Fire protection. 93:6.. 97:6..96 Warehouse fire. 95:1. 98:3. Sept. 94:6. 1992. 1996. 1997. 1990. Dec.23 Condominium fire. Means of Egress. 97:4. Nov.. 1994. 98:6. 93:3.38 Manufacturing plant fire. 91:1. 1991. 96:6.31 Hospital fire.26 Protecting mixed occupancies. 1993. 24. 95:3. 1996. 17. 98:2.. 1994. 1994.59 Store fires. 94:6. Oct.100 Electric generating plant fire.50 Mill fire. 1992. 98:1. 92:1. 1994. 1993. 95:6.88 Restaurant fire. Jan. 1993. 92:6. 95:6. 95:3.94 Manufacturing plant fires. 98:4. 1991.83 Manufacturing plant fire.53 Warehouse fire. 1996. 1993. 1996. 29.31 Dwelling. 3. Oct.108 Manufacturing plant fire.30 Restaurant/country club fire. 1996. 91:4.32 Store fire.77 Coal preparation plant fire. 98:1. 1994. 1994. 1996. 7.27 Electric generating plant fire. Oct.58 Dwelling fire. March.34 Store fire.56 IMPERIAL FOODS PROCESSING PLANT Catastrophic.39 Coal mine fire. Aug. 1994. 1994. 94:1.54 Store fire.. 94:6. 95:6. 1992. 1992.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Club fire.38 School exits require balancing fire safety and security needs. 1997. Oct.25 Apartment building.. Dec.26 NFPA 101B.52 Manufacturing plant fire. 29. 97:6. 1993. 1994. 1993.29 Store fires.24 Hotel fire.38 Warehouse fire. 1989.24 Recreational facility fire. 94:6. 93:3. Sept. 18.37 Hospital. 97:6.29 IN COMPLIANCE COLUMNS Building site plan needs exit discharge from exit to public way.107 Manufacturing plant fire. May. 98:3. Jan.22 Development of performance-based provisions for Life Safety Code. March. 98:1. 1996. May 1.. 95:6. April. 1996.. 1997. 95:6. and exit discharge must be clear of obstructions. Nov.94 Mixed-occupancy fire. 1992.102 Nursing home fire.28 Office.38 Group home. 1990.20 Manufacturing plant fire.96 Warehouse fire. 95:3. 92:5. new document scheduled for 1998 NFPA Fall Meeting.65 Manufacturing plant fire. 93:6. water supply industries discuss sprinkler backflow prevention. 97:6. 1991.

1993. March 20. New York. New Mexico. 91:4. April 11. 27.91 Dwelling.67 Automotive parts warehouse. occupancy classifications.20 Apartment building. 4.64 Dwelling. Ohio. North Carolina. 1997. New York.64 Dwelling. 6. 1992. Dec. April 26. 91:4. July 30. 94:5. Aug. Illinois. 27. 97:5. Oct. Texas. Pennsylvania. 96:5. Nov. 93:5. Oklahoma. 94:5.88 Building under renovation. 12.100 Dwelling. 2. California.96 Automobile. Nov. 1993. 94:5. 1991. 92:6. June 30. 1990. California. 91:4. 98:5. Dec. 1993.66 Dwelling. 1992. 3. 94:5. July 20. Illinois.62 Dwelling. 93:5. 1990. 7.104. 94:5. July 7. West Virginia. 23. Feb. Feb. 1992. 1997.50 Dwelling. Sept. 1994.62 Dwelling. 96:6. Jan.64 Dwelling. 1994. Indiana. 1991. Michigan.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Users' manuals needed to document building fire protection systems. 1993. 92:4. 1993. New York. 92:5. New York. 28. California. March 3. 96:5.28 INCENDIARY (SUSPICIOUS) FIRES.65 Dwelling.53 Apartment building. 1993. 1990. 93:5. 13. Pennsylvania.. California. Illinois. Nov. Feb.45 Dwelling. 1990. 1997. Feb. 95:5. 1994. 97:5. North Carolina. 1991. Pennsylvania.91 Dwelling. Aug. 93:5. Texas.67 Dwelling. Ohio. 3. 26. 1992. 94:6. Aug. 21. 97:4.95 Apartment building. Tennessee. 17. Jan.50 Dwelling.27 Apartment building.62 Dwelling.46 Apartment building. New York.90 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 79 . May 30. 94:5. June 28.60 Dwelling.74 Arsonists use pyrotechnic accelerants in Washington fires. 28.60 Dwelling. 1994. 1996. Oct.58 Dwelling. 94:6. March 31.97 Board and care facility. 1990. May 29. Kentucky. 1990. 26. 91:4. 94:5. Michigan. 1997. May 3. Feb. 95:5. 27. California. 1990. New York. 1995. 1992. 14.66 Apartment building. 1992. 5. Aug. Sept. July.90 Apartment complex fire. Rhode Island. 1997. 98:5. June 28.67 Apartment building.105 Club fire. Oct. Alabama.49 Apartment building. 97:5. Oregon.26 Catastrophic Apartment building. Minnesota. Washington. Illinois. 92:4. Jan. 98:5. 13.62 Dwelling. Colorado. Texas. March 13. Sept. 93:5. 91:4. 95:5.100 Apartment building.55 Board and care facility.69 Apartment building. Feb. 1993.20 Apartment building. 1995. March 25. 98:4. Illinois. 98:6. 98:5. 1996. Alabama. 24. 1995. 1995. 1995. 95:5. California. 98:4. 21. 93:5. Sept. Pennsylvania. 1997.89 Apartment building. New Jersey. 91:4. 94:5. 91:4. 98:6. 1997. Dec.64 Apartment building. 1992. 1993. and alternatives to. Maryland. 15. See also JUVENILE FIRESETTING Apartment building.66 Dwelling. 91:4.102 Dwelling. California. Sept.68 Board and care facility. 93:5. 1997.62 Dwelling.26 Uses of. 1994. 1990.64 Dwelling. 1996. 1992. California. Michigan. 16. 93:5.92 Dwelling.58 Apartment building. 95:5. 1993. 98:5.50 High-rise building complex. 30. 96:5. Texas. 96:5.

94:6. Dec. Jan. 1995. Virginia.21 Church. 5. 1993.31 Hospital. 1997. 97:1. Aug. 97:1.50.71 Wildland/urban interface.94. 95:6. 93:2.. 95:2.33 Detention facility. North Carolina. 1989. 93:3. 2. 1996. March 23.104 Manufacturing plant.66 Vacant store.51 Fire fighter injuries related to. 1995. 1994. 96:4.20 Manufacturing plant. 22. 1990. 95:3. Maine. Feb.94 Store/apartment building. 95:4.87. 1993. 91:1. 1995..34 Manufacturing plant. 98:6.23 Manufactured home. 98:6. 95:6. 1994. Oklahoma.79 Library.74 Government building. Dec. California. 19. 1994. Florida. 96:1.24 Hospital.25 Detention facility.39 Church. Jan. 91:4. New York. April. 31. Massachusetts. Jan. Michigan. 1994. 1991.65 Office building. Arkansas. 96:5. 95:6. 95:5.37 Cotton warehouse. Massachusetts. 1995. 1994.73 Club.49 Manufacturing plant/warehouse. 95:6. 94:5. 96:1. Michigan. 96:6.41 Hotel. Washington. Dec. New York.28 Manufacturing plant. 95:6. Massachusetts. Jan. Connecticut. 93:6. 95:5. Florida.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Hospital.26 Manufactured home. 95:2. 27.106 Manufacturing plant. Pennsylvania.88 Department store.. 92:1. 1993. 22.31 Dwelling. Massachusetts. July. March. Apr. 95:6.152 Dumpster outside warehouse. Oct. 93:2. 1992. 1994. 1991. 24. 96:5. Hawaii. 97:4. Texas. 1994. 93:5. 91:3. Iowa. 1997.31 Hotel. Florida.. Dec. New York. 1995. 98:3. 1994.108 Church. 96:1. 91:5. 1994. 1994. 96:5.72 Detention facility. Delaware.79 Dwelling. 93:6.. California. Missouri. 1992.. Indiana. 8. April. 98:2. Colorado. Georgia.26 Health clinics. 96:6.27 Detention facility. 1992. California. 1992.84 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 80 . 1996.66. Colorado. 93:6. 1994.69 Store. 1992. California. 1994. Massachusetts. 95:1. 1997. New York. Oct. Ohio. 1990.98 College building. 1990. 16. 98:5.1996. 97:6. 1997. 70. Sept. 1994. April. Rhode Island.64 Hotel. 1995.108 Kennel. Oklahoma. Jan. Jan. Arkansas. Indiana. 98:1. 1992.52 Manufacturing plant. 1994.. 1994.22 Hotels. Pennsylvania.. Jan. 1997. California. 1992.22 Department store. Florida. 94:6. Illinois.37 Fire fighter fatalities related to.34 Dwelling. 97:4. Michigan.96 Multiple occupancy. Texas.36 Detention facility. 96:6. Ohio. North Carolina.20 Library.19 Industrial complex. 98:6.104 Manufacturing plant. 1996. 95:6.29 Hotel. 95:5. Nov. 24.106 Manufacturing plant.33 Dormitory fire statistics. California. 95:4. 1991. 97:3.107 Manufacturing plant. Feb. 1997. 1994. 95:3. 1994. 95:5.59. 1997. 92:6. 92:4. 97:6.91 Club/restaurant/office building. California. California.84 Manufacturing plant.

June/July. 97:2.30 School. 1993. 94:6. 1994. 91:1. 1991.. Michigan. 92:4. 92:5.25 Motion picture studio/manufacturing complex. Aug. 94:1. Florida.23 Storage facility. Virginia. New York. 1989.32 Store. 92:6. 1991. 1993. 1992. 98:6.56 Storage facility. 94:2.98 School. Massachusetts. 95:2. 1991.7 Mill fire. Minnesota.84 Manufacturing plant. New York. Mississippi. IL. 94:6.100 Our Lady of the Angels school. 1991.66 Store. 1993. Utah. New York. 1991. California. Rhode Island. 1992. 1996. Michigan. Indiana. North Carolina. 1993. 91:6. Chicago. 1989.104 Manufacturing plant. California. California. 1994. 95:6. Sept. Aug.21 Office building. 1990. 8.. 1994. March. April. Oct.72 Restaurant. 95:4. 96:6.29 Store. 96:6. 92:6.27 Office building. June. 1996. 91:1. 97:6. Dec.103 Manufacturing plant. 92:1. 1991. 1998. Michigan. Michigan. 1990. 1993. 1995. Mississippi. Washington.28 Store..39.77 Storage building. Massachusetts. 1991.93 Manufacturing plant.26 School. 95:6. 96:1. New York. 94:1. 1991. 1996. 1. 97:5. June. 92:5. 96:1. 1995. Massachusetts. Texas. Illinois. 95:2. 1992. Canada. 1994. 28. 1995..30 Office building. 1992. New Mexico. 97:2. May.. 95:6. 1997. Feb. 98:4. t. 1994.. 93:3. 92:6. 93:2. Jan. Ontario. 1996. Massachusetts. Aug.86 Medical center complex. California.24 Tire fire. Ohio. New York.80 Manufacturing plant.50 U. 1958. Canada. Texas.112 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 81 .. 1995. 1992. Ohio. Nova Scotia. Denver. 1992. arson statistics: fire damage and firesetters.25 School. Nov. S. 96:6. 91:3.33 Office building. 1993.85 Manufacturing plant.65 Manufacturing plant... 95:6. New Hampshire. 91:1. Illinois.19 Shopping mall. Florida.32 Manufacturing plant. 95:6.23 Multiple-use occupancies. March. 1996. North Carolina.95 Manufacturing plant.29 Office building/warehouse.99 Office/apartment building. 1992. Utah. Illinois.34 Nursing home.49 Rooming house. 1996. May. Colo. 1994. 94:5. 1993.54 Subway token booth. 91:6. Connecticut. 97:6. 1990.30 Store.98 School. 95:5.22 Restaurant. 1994.29 School. North Carolina.79 Shopping mall. Pennsylvania.30 Restaurant.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Manufacturing plant. 92:2. 1994. 97:1. 13. Oct. 93:6.27 School.21 Retail warehouse store.78 Manufacturing plant. 93:2. 93:6. Jan.74 Multiple-use occupancy.38 Store. 96:2. 1996. Massachusetts. Oct.27 Store. Arizona. 1995. 93:5. 97:1. California.36 Store. 1991. 92:6. March 21. Nevada.25 Store. Massachusetts. Nov. 1993. 93:6. 94:2. 1990. Oregon. 95:6. Massachusetts.27 Storage facility. 94:5.

July.80 Warehouse. June 27. Aug. 1991. 94:6.38 INDIANA Catastrophic fires Bulk storage elevator fire. June. 1993. Calif. New York.54 Warehouse. 96:5. 95:6.73. June 22.74 INCENSE Fatal dwelling fire caused by. 98:6. 93:5. Feb. 1993. 95:5. July 16. 1993. California. California.106 Church fire. 1992. 1992. 61. Nov.. 1994. 1995. 1990. 6. May.. 93:6. March 18. 98:6. Feb.87 Warehouse.102 Manufacturing plant fire. 1996.52 Dwelling. 1994. 1. 94:6. May. 97:6. 93:6. 1994. 8. 95:6.23 Wildland..56 Dwelling.25 School fire. Georgia.86 Warehouse. Rhode Island.. 1994. July.. Oct. 94:4. Oct. 1995. 96:6. 93:6. Indiana. 92:6. 94:6. 95:5. Dec. 75 Wildland/urban interface..66 Truck.39 U.65 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:6.19 INCINERATOR FIRES Arkansas. Pennsylvania. 1995.89 College building fire. 94:5.111 Wildland/urban interface.98 Warehouse fire. 91:1..38 Warehouse. 1994. 1993.93 Electric generating plant. Aug. California. 1992. 1992. 92:1. 97:5. Aug. 93:6. 91:6.60. 1997. 1993. Oct. 1996.26 Warehouse.50 Office building fire. 93:5.35 Dwelling fire.84 Manufacturing plant fire. 98:6.99 Wildland. 95:3. Massachusetts.67 Manufacturing plant.31 Manufacturing plant fires.74 Wildland/urban interface. 1994. Oct. Illinois. 96:5. 96:6. 5. 97:6. Washington. 93:6. 98:4.39 Warehouse.97 Warehouse. 1992. April. 1993. 1991. 96:5. Missouri.. national reporting systems for fire investigations. 1992. 1994. Louisiana.57 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 82 . 93:6.88 Wildland.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 U.103 Manufacturing plant fire. 97:6.96 Warehouse fire. S. 1993.97 Restaurant/hotel. Dec..53 Restaurant fire. Michigan. Sept. 1995. Dec. 1996. May. 24. 1997. 1994.86 Warehouse. 92:6. 98:3. 1993.87 Warehouse fire. 95:6.86 Warehouse/office building. 27. California.56 Warehouse.60 Dwelling. Colorado. 95:6. 1991. Nov. California.88 Warehouse fire.31 Church fire. 1995. 4. Aug. 1994. 97:6. 94:1. Aug..30 Fatal high-rise club/hotel fire. March 21. arson statistics: types of fires and firesetters. 95:6. 96:6. Oct. June 30.. 1995. 1992. 94:6. March 19. 94:6. 97:6. 1996. July. Nov. California.. 96:3. 9. S.96 Warehouse.. 1996. 1994. 1993. 95:6. 95:5. 1996. 92:6. Sept.104 Manufacturing plant fire. 1995. March 20.99 Wildland/urban interface. 5. Oct.65 Manufacturing plant fire. 1992.. 1992. Aug.

59 Fiber board.22 Gas compressor. ignites fiber residue. ignites wiring.29 Technology Transfer Act helps. 92:6. causes explosion/fire. is key to fire safety. 97:6.49 Packaging machine malfunctions. 98:2. 92:6. 98:3. Feb. 97:4.32 Wiring.83 Book binding machine overheats.49 Drying machine overheats. See FIRE INJURIES INSIDE THE BELTWAY COLUMNS Congress considers natural disaster relief policy reform. Life Safety Code.85 Grinding wheel sparks ignite wooden studs.29 Federal haz-mat regulations cover intrastate shipments of agricultural chemicals. Life Safety Code.31 INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY FIRES Air dryer motor malfunctions.25 Federal program trains first responders for terrorist attacks.94 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 83 . 97:2.27 INSPECTIONS Electrical inspections threatened by budget cutbacks. S. 98:1.24 Poloyol pump malfunctions.49 Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 protects volunteers from liability. ignites acrylic sheet. 1992. 96:6. 97:5.40 NFPA 101.16 NFPA 101. 97:6. IND. applied to. 95:6. followed by fire. 97:4. 97:3.27 Conveyor failure causes sugar dust to ignite. Consumer Products Safety Commission addresses fire safety issues. ignites pet food. 92:5. 93:6.49 Waste-handling machine overheats.31 Congressional Fire Services Institute (CFSI) makes fire services/safety visible to Congress. insulation.30 Waxing machine. 98:6.86 INDUSTRIAL OCCUPANCIES. 97:1. 94:6. 94:4. 98:6. Fatal high-rise club/hotel fire. 94:4. ignites combustibles. 98:5. 97:6.31 Dangers of regulatory reform.36 INJURIES. 97:6. 94:4.107 Pulverizing unit explosion.31 Politics of fire safety regulations. 93:6.23 Exposed. 5. 95:2.56. but not all federal regulatory references to standards updated. 97:6.80 INSTITUTIONAL OCCUPANCIES.52 Form machine malfunctions. 98:6. 94:4. fire started in combustibles near. ignited by welding. See also MANUFACTURING PLANT FIRES Causes of fires in. 94:3. See separately listed occupancies INSULATION Cellulose Fire. 57. ignited by cutting torch filings.28 Air-compressor ignites lubricating oil. 98:3.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 INDIANAPOLIS.29 U. 93:4.29 Excelsior.29 Electroforming tank heater overheats. 98:6.84 Leaking oil ignited by furnace.29 Paper ignited by jammed molding machine. ignites glue.41 Production equipment malfunctions.24 Hydrocracker unit pipe ruptures. ignites chaff and dust. ignited by.86 Welding. causes exothermic reaction.79 Bearing box overheats on conveyor belt. ignited by. establishes 311 number. sucked into waste disposal system. 97:6.58 Sawdust in motor above veneer dryer ignites. ignited by. 97:4. contributed to fire spread. 98:6. 98:4. ignites tank contents. 97:5.22 Forging equipment heat ignites cardboard.41 Federal Communications Commission provides emergency radio frequencies. 98:1. ignites combustible materials. 97:6.

60 INTERIOR FINISHES Factors affecting fire hazards of.68 Dwelling.106. 1994. fueled fire. 1995. 98:6. 1991. 86. Dec. 95:5.33 INSURANCE Citizens should be liable for fire-causing actions. 1989.23 Plastic. 1992.54 Dwelling. ignited by.27 Welding. ignited by electric box malfunction. 1995. factor in fire spread. 96:5.68.. 95:5.75 Polyurethane. 1996. 96:3. 91:1. April. 98:6. ignited by welding fire. 95:4.92 Paper-backed. access to. 96:6.40 Rigid plastic. 92:4.19 Pipe. 93:1. 97:5. 96.25 Warehouse fire. 98. 94:5. 1996. in freezer. Nov.35 Fatal fires Dwelling.85. 95:6. 92:4. 69.21 Foil-faced. 98:4. 94:3. April 22. Oct. ignites framing. 17.84 Styrofoam. 97:6.93 Manufacturing plant. 1992.28 Manufacturing plant fire.86 Foam Conductive heat from water heater. 9. 96:6. 1994.52 Manufacturing plant fire. 23.35 Oil-soaked. 1995. 1994. ignites. March 23. 1991.84 Factor in fire spread. 98:1.87 Warehouse fire. 94:6.93 Urethane. 102.66 Restaurant. 96:5.60.44 INTOXICATION. 96:6.104 Vinyl-backed.62. 95:5. 96:6. ignited by. ignited by. factor in fire spread. See ALCOHOL (BEVERAGE) IOWA Catastrophic fires Automobile.52. 1998. 93:5.107. 13.62 Dwelling fire. factor in fire spread. 1997. 93:6. 95:6.38 INTERAGENCY RESPONSE Tire fire. Dec.26 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:5. 97:6. 95:6.93 Wood paneling fuels club/hotel fire. March 24. 95:6. Canada. ignited by welding. 96:6.66 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 84 .95. 1996. 59 Polyurethane.29 Wall paneling fuels catastrophic fires. 93:6. April 9. Feb. 98:6. ignited by heat of fire. 64. 94:6. 95:5. fire investigation report.68 Polyurethane. 95:5.42 High-rise office building fire. 97:3. ignited by welding. ignited by open-flame torch. 1994. 92:6. 105 Fuels board and care facility fire.56.18 Cutting torch.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fiberglass. 1997.49 Warehouse fire. 91:1.22 Foundry. 93:1.107 Polyurethane. ignited in incendiary fire.93.31 INTERNET Fire protection information. 1995. 98:2.. carries ground to roof. 98:6. 93:3. 94:6. 92:4. 91:6. 97:6. Feb.67. March 30. 92:1. 97:1.31 Tank explosion.63 Manufacturing plant fire.33 Fuel catastrophic fires. 6. 96:6. ignited by short-circuit.68 Warehouse fire. 91:6.26 Dwelling fire.

33 Smoke detector questions answered.56 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 85 . 92:4.67 JAVERI. 95:2. Apr. 1997. CHICAGO. questions answered.37 Safe commercial cooking operations.98 Condominium fire cause..52 Mill complex fire cause. 92:5. 1995.27 Social services needed by troubled children. 19.44 National Electrical Code questions answered.25 Carbon monoxide questions answered. Fire Prevention Code. 91:5. October 13. 97:1. 1993.22 School fire cause.25.98 NFPA Champion Award Program discourages firesetting. 94:1. 94:3. Dec. 91:6. 1994.24 Alarm system installation questions answered. July 12. 94:6. ILL.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 IROQUOIS THEATRE FIRE.30 School fire caused by fireworks prank. 98:2.24 Detention facility fire cause. 98:4.22 Private fire service main installation. 98:1.22 J JAPAN Earthquake and subsequent fire. 98:5.23 Store fire cause. 93:2.37 Fatal manufactured home fire cause. 97:5. 95:3.48 JUST ASK COLUMNS Airport gate area requirements.25 Major cause of U. 95:5.89 Fire service technology used by. 97:2.66 K KADER INDUSTRIAL CO.39 Club/restaurant/office building fire cause.26 Sprinkler system installation.25 NFPA 1. SULTAN M. 97:1.75 IRVING.29 Fireworks questions answered. 96:5. Nov. 97:2. 97:3.100 Electric power generating plant. E. 98:6. 24.96 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. TEXAS Stadium fire. 91:3. July.33 Dwelling fire cause. 94:1.26 JUVENILE FIRESETTING Catastrophic apartment building fire cause. program.72. 95:4.27 Sprinkler system requirements to be consolidated in NFPA 13. 91:1.23 Storage building fire cause. 95:3. 97:4.54 Truck. 98:5. arson fires.32. 97:2.34 Phoenix.19. 92:4. 91:3. 22.27 Store/apartment building fire cause. S. 95:6. 1993. 97:6. 92:2. (THAILAND) FIRE Investigative report.51 Tokyo fire service pioneers robot use. 95:4. 94:6. Ariz. questions answered.67 Church fire cause.20 Extinguisher questions answered. 95:5.42 KANSAS Aircraft hangar fire. WARREN Legacy to hazardous materials instruction. 94:4. 1993.49 ISMAN. 97:3. Profile of. 92:2. 98:3.112 Manufacturing plant fire cause. 1997. 98:5. Foy's first person account. 96:6. 97:6.

1991. 92:5. 1990. 1996. 1991. 98:6. HSIANG-CHENG Profile of. 97:3.26 Dwelling. 12.52 Paper ignited by kiln in school fire. 7. without glass. 94:5. 1991. July 2. 97:6. Nov. 91:3. Aug.63 Boat fire.46 Automobile. 1990. 95:6. 92:4. 97:6. 1994. 97:5.57 KILN FIRES Natural gas pipeline to kiln fails.31 Manufactured homes fire. 1997. 1997. June.27 Manufacturing plant fire. 91:5. 1989. gas ignited by pilot flame.39 Wildland fire.30 Michigan.31 L LABAUVE. Sept. 91:5.51 Manufactured home.33 New York..35 Fatal fires Dwelling. 97:5. 91:4. 1994. 95:5.91 Warehouse fire. 1997. Sept.42 Catastrophic fires Apartment building. Profile of. LAMAR Profile of. May 28. 95:4. Sept. 97:5.32. 95:5.20 KENTUCKY Beverly Hills Supper Club fire. 94:5. 27. 96:1.28 Texas. 1993. 1993.34 KUNG. 98:6.37 LABORATORY FIRES California. 98:5. 93:2.27 KENNEL FIRES Massachusetts. 1994. 91:5. 1992.60 Storage tank. 1994. 93:6.30 Vehicle. 1995.21 Manufacturing plant. Feb. 1994. 95:4. 1996.78 Fatal fires Housing for elderly. 1990. 96:2.69 Dwelling. Nov.36 Railroad rolling stock fire. 1997. DONALD J. 1996. 98:4.25 Texas. 1990. 95:5. 1996. 96:3.25 Limited-care facility. 98:4. 1992.55 Coal mine. July 31. 21. 98:3. Canada. 95:5. 9.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 College building fire. ignites combustibles.104 College building fire. 92:6.40 Ontario.36 LARGE VOLUME SPACES © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 86 . 96:3. 1977. 92:3. 1996.59 KANSAS CITY. 1991. MISSOURI SubTropolis underground storage/manufacturing facility. 6. July 2. 97:5. 1997. Feb. 1995.54 Automobile.106 Storage facilities fire.27 Pennsylvania. 94:4.68 KEIGHER.19 Manufactured home. 30. 97:6. 95:2. requires unique fire protection measures. 1996.23 LANTERNS Propane lantern.

94 1995. 97:1.29 Ohio State Penitentiary. 95:6. 96:2.50 Fire fighters work with youth through Big Brothers/Big Sisters program. Canada. 97:1. 95:2.61 Airport security measures jeopardize life safety.26 LIFE SAFETY CODE 1991 edition. 93:6. study of. N.42 LAS VEGAS.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fire spread factor. 94:1. 1903. May 10. 97:3. 1949.87 LARGE-LOSS-OF-LIFE FIRES China (toy manufacturing plant). March 25. Sept.16 Board and care facility protection requirements questioned. study of. fire service leaders can learn from each other. study of.44 1997.75 New York (club). 97:2. 17. 95:5.. 98:1. S.30 Without regulatory authority.22 Development of performance-based provisions by NFPA. 97:1. 95:4.32 Customer service as fire service priority. 94:2. 93:3. 98:5. 95:4. 96:6. changes in. 94:1. Wildland fire. 92:1. 1990.48 General Slocum excursion steamer. 1996.80 History of study.58 Texas (manufacturing plant). study of. 1992. 98:6. 1994. 95:6. 91:5.48 LIBRARY FIRES California. Y. 97:5. 98:4.22 Building site plan needs exit discharge from exit to public way. WASH. study of. S.30 Leadership means taking a stand even on controversial issues. 97:4. 97:3. 98:2. 93:6.30 Future leaders should take responsibility for reaching their goals. 91:6. 91:3.67 North Carolina (food plant). Ill. 19.42 LEAVENWORTH. 1980. 94:6.67 Thailand (toy manufacturing plant).18. Noronic cruise ship. N. Nov. 98:6. 95:5. 98:5.34 Application to industrial occupancies.28 Fire service participation in technical research can aid fire safety. 98:3.40 1992. 91:4. overview.98 LARGE-LOSS FIRES.24 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 87 . 1993. 1990. July 5. Jan.. Sept.26 Risk Watch as safety education tool in effort to mitigate nonfire incidents.37 Worldwide.68 Building security provisions. 3.85 Americans with Disabilities Act spurs code changes. study of. 91:4. 92:5.32 Spanish-language versions of Learn Not to Burn Curriculum for Hispanic/Latino populations.80 Iroquois Theatre fire.. 97:6.84 S. contents and furnishing regulations.73 1993. 98:2. 21.32 Empowerment of fire service employees requires clear communications.72 LEADERSHIP COLUMNS Advice to aid transition of new fire chief.58 1996. April 21. Y. study of. 1993. study of. Chicago.33 Working relationships between fire chiefs and city managers.33 1991 edition. 92:6. 1990.28 1991. 91:4. 1930. 97:6. 42. NEVADA MGM Grand Hotel fire. 1904. 97:5.. U.84 1994. Toronto. 96:6.20 1991 edition.70 Stratosphere Tower design uses performance and prescriptive codes. Nov. 94:4.79 Connecticut. alternative methods can influence fire safety. 1991.

1994.42. 1990. 93:2. Dec. 96:2. 1991. 94:6. handling incidents involving. 94:4. Profile of.70 Drilling platform. 61. 1992.55 LOUISIANA Catastrophic fires Apartment building. 95:5. Feb. 91:4.52 LIFE SAFETY SYSTEMS Microprocessor-controlled system installed at Winterthur Museum. 1997. 98:6. 96:4.16 Existing regulations. 95:1. See ROOMING HOUSE FIRES LONG. 98:1.28 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) egress standards compared.82 Industrial fire safety depends on code compliance.111 LIMITED CARE FACILITY FIRES Catastrophic. 92:5.60 Boat. 97:3. 93:3. 91:6. Profile of. conforms with Americans with Disabilities Act. 93:5. 96:3. 92:4. GERALD Profile of. 92:1. 92:5. 96:6. 5.88 Wildland fire cause. Means of Egress. 92:5.29 LODGING HOUSE FIRES.98 Dwelling fire cause. 92:3. 95:6. 97:3. 62. May 4.63 LIGHTNING Church fire cause.107 LION. 91:4. 91:1.66 Urban search and rescue program meets diverse demands.21 Educational facility fire cause.16 LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS Vehicles fueled by. 94:2. 1988.60. 95:5.39 LINT Carpet manufacturing plant fire. 94:4. Aug. 30. Ohio. Treasury Building fire indicated life safety deficiencies. Disaster response plan of fire department.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Evaluating equivalencies and exceptions. 10. 96:6.12 History of. DOUGLAS R.56 New state-of-the art fire department dispatch center. S. factor in.67 Wildland/urban interface fire cause.31 Warehouse fire cause.70. new document scheduled for 1998 NFPA Fall Meeting.78 Historic mansion fire cause.36.36 New code has user-friendly language. 95:6. Oct. 92:6.56 High-rise office building fire. 95:5.42 U. standards for. factor in. 95:1.33 Textile manufacturing plant fire.45 Overview of.69 Kansas. 98:4. 94:2.39 LOPES.84 LOCK BOXES Value in commercial building fires.89. 15. Feb. CALIF. 95:6.71 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 88 . factor in. ROCKY Profile of. 1990. 91:1.60 Fatal high-rise office building fire.34 NFPA 101B. use of code with. 15.97 High-rise buildings.33 Hosiery manufacturing plant fire. 94:4.78. 92:3. 95:6. MARIAN H.21 LINGENFELTER. 91:4.22 LOS ANGELES. 91:6.

92:6.105. 93:6. 1997. 92:6. 1992. Oct.36 Parts failure ignites gas at exterior wall at food processing plant.79 Grill tank. 1990.28 Gas directed into house. Iowa. 6. 1997. 98:5. March 11. Dec. 98:5. Cold storage warehouse fire. Farm. 94:1.97 Stove pilot light ignites aerosol insecticide.91 Refinery.37 MAINE Apartment building fire. 97:4. 98:6. 26.70 Oil and natural gas drilling well. 1994.13 Fire department training program for high-rise fires.25 Tank car derailment. April 9.22 Manufacturing plant fire. Weyauwega. 9. 96:6.50 Manufactured home. 1992. July. Mississippi.75 Race track fire. possible fire cause. 94:2. 1995. May. 96:3. 1996. 1993. May 3.93 Storage tank.49 Store.68 LUCHT. 91:4. 1997. 199. Apr. Profile of. WIS. March 4.83 Manufacturing plant fire. 1990. elderly person. 93:5. 1996. 1993. ignites restaurant fire.63 Manufactured home. 93:4. 98:6.53.68 Dwelling.24 Fatal fires Manufactured home. 95:5.22 M MADISON.67. 97:6.57 Roofing torch. 1998. Dec.73 Stove flame ignites clothing of disable.16 Manufacturing plant fire. Wisc.68 Fatal apartment fire. 92:4. 94:5. 94:6. Oklahoma. 1991.34 Manufacturing plant fire. 92:4.. See also PROPANE Bulk storage facility. 1997. 2. 98:2. 1995.89 Tank truck. 93:5. March. 1991. Nov. 93:5. April 10. 98:3. DAVID A. 92:4. Aug. Oct. 20. 94:5. ignited in incendiary fire. Aug. leaks.77 Refinery. 94:5. 1996. April 7.89 Sawmill fire.89 LP-GAS FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS BLEVE. 1997. 16.73 LOUISVILLE. improperly installed.56 Distribution facility. 91:6. 96:6.87 Camping trailer. April 15. 96:5. 1997. 24.55 LP-GAS FIRES. 94:3. 91:4. fire investigation report. 98:1. 97:5.54 Wharf/warehouse fire. 1993.42 Bulk storage facility. 98:6. Texas. 98:5. 1994. 1992.68 Storage tank. 91:6. 96:6.29 Warehouse fire. Alabama.84 Manufacturing plant fire. Aug.24 Motel fire. 92:5.108 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 89 . 91:4. June 16. 94:6.65 Manufacturing plant. March 3. 93:6. 1991. 1990. 1997.31 Manufactured home.. Georgia. 1996. 20. May 1. Texas. 1991. 6. 1991. 17.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Dwelling.20 Forklift gas cylinder BLEVEs. Fire department and elderly agencies focus on seniors' fire safety. 98:2. Ohio.16 Stove ignites gasoline residue on clothing. 95:1. March 21. 97:6. 95:6. KY. 93:6. Jan. 1993.86 Pilot light ignites gas from broken valve on LPG-powered cleaner.31 Burner ignites leaking hydrogen. 98:6.70.

50 Georgia. 96:6.35 Leadership requires future goals based on principles. 97:5. 94:4.42 MANSION FIRES Pennsylvania. 1997. 1992. 1990. MONT. 95:6. 4.22 Massachusetts. 27. 95:2. 97:5. April 11. 91:4.32. 93:6. 98:3. Feb.30 MANUFACTURING PLANTS Underground SubTropolis facility.27 Maine. 1995. Dec. 6.64 Ohio.36 Kentucky. 98:2. 1996. 98:5. requires unique fire protection measures. Dec.45 Tennessee. 1997.28 North Carolina.51 Washington.29 Michigan. 96:1. 97:5.28 New Jersey. 1949.93 Louisiana.23 Florida. 96:5. April 13. Kansas City. 97:3. 1997. 98:2. 1. 1990. March 26. 1994..35 MANN GULCH FIRE. 1994. 1990. 1997.56 Georgia. 1995. 1993. 96:2.56 Washington. 91:2. 97:5. 1992. Oct.46 Indiana.33 Urban fire service need greater community service role.90 MANUFACTURED HOME FIRES Alabama.51 Oklahoma. 1994. 92:3.16 North Carolina.62.16 North Dakota. 98:6.26 MANAGEMENT MATTERS COLUMNS Ethnic diversity and cooperation valued in fire service. 1992. 94:4.106 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 90 .52 Iowa. 96:2. 98:4. 95:5.26.23 Ohio.55 South Carolina. 1996. 9. 96:5. 6. 96:6. 1995.33 Metropolitan fire chiefs and the NFPA. March 4. 1997. 1990. April 10.38 Overview of fire experience. 1991.92 Georgia.33 Evaluating fire service from community perspective. 96:5. 94:5. 98:5.92 Arkansas. 96:5. Sept.31 Maine. Missouri.65 Colorado.49 Fire service must be prepared for terrorist attacks.68 MANUFACTURING PLANT EXPLOSIONS Paper.65 Michigan Feb.49 Idaho. 1997.20 Kansas. 1997. 1996.50 California. 96:4. 28. 1995. 1996. 96:2. Jan. 8.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Recreational facility fire. 94:6. 91:5. 17. 91:4. Nov. 93:1.66. Aug. 98:1. Dec. 1990. Dec. 95:5. 1993. 91:4. 1996. 1995. 1997. 19. 96:3. Dec. 96:3. 93:4. 14. 1997. Sept. 91:4. Wildland fire. 1995. 1993. 30. 94:1. 95:5. 1996.25 Catastrophic Arizona. 98:5. 1993. 92:2.28 Florida. Florida. 98:5. 97:5.49 South Carolina.31 Utah.

June 17. 91:3. 93:4. 93:6. North Carolina. 1991. 96:6. Georgia. 98:6. Aug. 92:4. Arkansas. 1996. See also REFINERIES.29 Bottles. 95:1.. 1990. 1994. 93:5. April 20. 92:6. Minnesota.57 Aluminum. 1995. 95:6. 1994. July. May 15.104 Cardboard.93 Composting. Massachusetts. 91:3.39 Chemicals.108 Buses. FIRES Adhesive. 92:6. March. 1996. Minnesota. 1992. 93:6. Dec. 95:6. July.70 Chemicals.31 Aircraft landing gear. Ohio. 1996. April 15. Aug.75 Chemicals. Massachusetts. 94:6.31 Black powder. Utah. New York. Florida.37 Boats. 1991. 95:5.86 Christmas ornaments. New Jersey. 1993. 97:3. 6. 93:6. July 5. 1993. 1994..84 Alcohol distillery. July. 13. Sept. 1997. Aug. North Carolina. 92:6. Iowa.78 Automobile parts. June 6. 1995.85 Chemicals and plastics.75 Chemicals.40 Cardboard boxes. California. South Carolina. 5. Minnesota. 1993. 91:4. 94:6. 96:6. 1992.83 Chemicals. 17. 1992.105 Apparel.29 Agricultural products. 91:6. 1992.64 MANUFACTURING PLANT FIRES. Texas.28.36 Clothing. 91:6. 98:6. Texas. 1991. 1996.25 Bottles.84 Coal preparation. 1992. 1991. 6. 92:6. California. Ohio. North Carolina.. March.86 Cardboard boxes. 93:5. Feb. Massachusetts. 95:6.50 Boats. Dec. 1992.. Pennsylvania. 97:6. Utah. Louisiana. OIL. North Carolina. 1992. Aug. 1990. 98:6. 1997. Nov. 98:6. 1.22 Batteries. Georgia. Louisiana. 1995. 1993. 94:5. Illinois. 1994. Jan. 1994.38 Automotive parts. 95:3. California. Jan. Feb.27 Bowling balls.83 Aircraft. 19. Oct.67.103 Circuit boards. May 1. 1990. Illinois.78 Chemicals. 97:6. 95:5. June. 1996. 93:6. 94:5. 94:4. 94:4. 23. Kentucky. 96:3. South Carolina. Illinois..NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Steel.80 Chemicals.62 Carpets. 91:5.33 Ammonium nitrate mixing. 6. 1991.50 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 91 . 1993. May 27.75 Carpets.64 Chemicals.85 Bathtubs. Oregon. Ohio. 96:6. 92:4. 94:6. 97:1. California. 1994. 92:4. 1997.84 Chemicals. 1991. Nov. 91:6. Jan. 97:4. 1992.28 Brass rolling. Louisiana.66 Chemicals. Michigan. Louisiana. Michigan.64 Chemicals and plastics. 1994.. Texas. 93:6. 1997.102 Aluminum. Indiana. 1994.. May.70 Chemicals. 95:5. August. 1993. July. California. 94:1. 1991. 7. Georgia. May. 1994.40 Chemical fertilizer.33 Causes. 1990.94 Aluminum. Florida. Aug. 93:6. Ohio.66 Chemicals. 1992. 1993.31 Chemicals. 1990.83 Chemicals. Texas. 98:6. 95:6. Michigan.. Texas.71 Boats. 1995.27 Chemicals. 1990. 1997. Virginia. Feb.

91:4. New York. 98:6.. 12.64 Food processing. 1991.93 Furniture refinishing. 95:6. Georgia. Ohio. Pennsylvania. 96:6. 1995.40 Electronics repair. 22. 96:5. Nov. 1997.. 1997. 91:2. 1994.25 Furniture. New York. 97:6. 1997.. 1995. Sept. Minnesota. Nov. 95:6. 93:4. 91:5. 24. 1992. 1994. Wyoming. 1995. 1997.33 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 92 . 92:4. New Hampshire. 1995. California.108 Fiberboard.22 Food processing. Utah. Alaska. 1989. 1992. 1990. 18.50 Food processing. Indiana.. 97:6. March 27.23 Fiberboard/hardboard. Illinois. 98:6.104 Food processing. Oct. 23. 97:6.28 Furniture. Maryland. 5. 97:4. Sep. 92:3. 1992. electronic equipment. March 28. North Carolina.22 Connecticut. 97:6. 1990. 1991. 1990. 95:6. 95:6. 1997. California. 20. March 1. May 16. 1995. 1995. 1993. Michigan. 1997. 1996.92 Food processing. 92:6. Oct. 24. Pennsylvania.21 Foam carpet padding. Oregon. 98:3. 1991. April. Dec. June. 1994. 1996.49 Furniture. North Carolina. 1997. 92:1.29. 1994. 98:6. 92:4. 18. Texas. 91:1.31 Furniture. 95:6. 6. 97:6. 7. 1993. 1996. Dec. Texas. Pennsylvania. 1996. 97:6. Sept. Feb. 98:6. Sept.26 Furniture. North Carolina. 1994. April.24 Furniture.86 Food processing.42 Dairy. 1994. Oct. 1994.31 Furniture.. June. 96:6.86 Fireworks. Virginia..52 Electronics. Virginia. 91:6. 96:6. 3. 1990. April 25. New York. 93:1. California. Washington. 98:6.77 Electronic appliances. Oct. 1. North Carolina.50 Food processing. 1995. 1990. 1991. Arkansas.64 Food processing.49 Food processing.32 Dry cleaning/mixed. New Jersey. 1997. 95:6.30 Foam rubber. Massachusetts. Illinois. May. March. Oct. 95:6. 96:4. Nov. 93:6. 95:6.107 Food processing. Michigan.41. 1997. 95:3.. 96:5. Arizona. Indiana. 93:2. 91:6. 92:3. 1995. California. May 4.50 Firearms.30 Fireworks. 1994. 97:3. California. 96:6.103 Furniture.84 Food processing. Wisconsin. 1994.84 Food processing. 1992. Illinois.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Composting. Oregon.71 High-energy fuel. Tennessee. Dec.108 Electrical appliance.71 Foam.96 Foundry. 98:6. South Carolina.20 Food processing. New Hampshire. Feb. Aug. 1996.80 Food processing. 94:3. 98:3. 96:6.73.52 Connecticut. 97:6.85 Food processing. 97:6. 1996. Iowa. 92:4. Indiana.. Aug. Jan.65 Furniture. 1991.33 Food processing. Georgia. Apr.83 Food processing. New Jersey. 1996. 96:5.70 Food processing. Mississippi.30 Hosiery. 1995. 98:6.103 Food processing. 94:6. 1996. 1996. 1. Missouri.106 Furniture. 1996. April 3.23 Food processing.104 Furniture. July.52 Furniture. Alaska.65 Food processing.

California.. 26.28 Ink and dyes..106 Meat processing. Dec.84 Laundry and dry-cleaning. Minnesota.63 Mixed light industry.85 Machine shop. 98:6.. 1995.106 Medical supplies. 6. Jan. July 10. 98:4.. 1996. 97:6. March 30.62 Paper.95 Maintenance shop. Dec. 98:6. Oct.86 Pens.74 Natural gas and gasoline. 1997. Apr. Michigan.97 Metal milling. Feb. 1990. 1994. Texas. 1997. California. corrugated.20 Plastic auto bumpers. 1994. 95:6. 91:6. New York.94 Paper and pulp products.107 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 93 . 95:6. 1996.34 Magnets. Aug. May. 1996. 1992. March. 1990.85 Metal preparation. 1992. 1992. 94:3. 1993. 1992. 1993. May 1. Texas. Jan. 1996. 1990.95 Methanol production. 93:6. 96:6.75 Knitting mill. 91:6.86 Metal extrusion. 91:6. Arkansas. 1997.52 Metal products machining.. 1994. Massachusetts. Nov. 95:6. 1996.94 Pharmaceutical packaging. 1992. California. 94:6. 1995. 21. Pennsylvania. California. 98:6. Newton. June. South Dakota. Texas. Ohio.63 Metal products. 1991. South Carolina. Nov. June 22.103 Plastic shower doors. Texas. 1995. 1992.74 Iron foundry.28 Incinerators. 93:3. Indiana. 1990.. New Mexico. Jan.. Washington. 93:6. 13.23 Pennsylvania. Virginia. Oct. Jan. 1992. Dec. California. 91:5. 96:6.49 Meat processing. Michigan. 92:4. 1996. 97:2. 1995. 97:6. 93:6. 1993. 91:6. Oklahoma...82 Paint. 1994. 97:6..28 Plastics. 31. 95:6. 1993. Sept. 98:6. 95:6. Illinois. 1991. California. New Jersey. Ohio. Jan.29 Nylon. Massachusetts.65 Metal products. Nov. 94:6.20 Metal foundry. Pennsylvania.50 Jewelry.52 Metal products. 91:5. 96:6. 1992. 98:2. March. Iowa. 1995.75 Metal processing. Nov. March 23. 1995. 91:6. Dec. 1990. Jan. 1990. Iowa. 95:6. 1993. Pennsylvania.107 Pet food. 93:1.63 Paper containers. Massachusetts. California.29 Petroleum products. 1992.93 Plastic auto parts. 97:1. 93:6.. 1997. 92:6.28 Paper.31 Meat packing. 31. 94:6. July 4. 97:5. Sept... New Jersey. Ohio. 1997. Feb. 96:6.. 98:6. Oct. Illinois.. Feb. 5. 1994.95 Metal fabrication. California. 96:5. Sept. 15. April. Florida. Virginia. 94:6. 93:5.28 Ink. 1997. 12.24 Pharmaceutical. Illinois. 94:6. 96:5.. Maryland.83 Magnesium smelting operation. 94:6.84 Motion picture studio/manufacturing plant. Texas.95 Plastics.84 Metal storage lockers.25 Machines. California. Kentucky. Ohio. 93:6.24 Paper and liner board. 1996. 97:6. 93:6. Iowa.102 Mixed industry. 96:6. 1997. 94:4. Iowa.37 Metal. 1990. 1993. Jan. June. Texas. 1995. 1993. Pennsylvania. Indiana. 1993. 94:6. 1993. 25. Utah.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Ice cream.85 Metal building components.79 Meat processing. 1994.

Aug.107 Polyurethane foam. 91:3. 1993. 14. May 10. 95:4. Oregon. Nebraska. 1989. March 19.29 Steel. 28. 27.93 Poultry processing. China. 1996.. 1994. 1995. earthenware. 1994.87 Plastics recycling and shredding. 1995.32 Plastics recycling. 1996. Illinois.85 Textiles. 1995. Arkansas. Ontario. Ohio.52 Sawmill. 1995. Massachusetts. 94:6. Maine. 1995.40 Rubber products. Oregon. 1993. Wisconsin. Ohio. Feb.84 Printing. 95:6.50 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 94 .21 Wire.84 Printing. 1993. Tennessee. Kansas.53 Railroad cars. Missouri.23 Plywood. Wyoming. 93:6..52 Poultry processing. 96:6. 1997.84 Sugar refinery. Arkansas. Sept.107 Textiles. 1997. Washington. 92:1. 96:6. July 29. 1989. 97:6.26 Shingles. Aug..36 Rubber.42 Triangle Shirtwaist Co.83 Plywood. 94:6. 1996. 1994. 94:6.102 Steel processing. Alabama. 94:6. 93:4. china.65 Steel. 1994. 95:2. 1997. 1990. 1996.29 Pottery. 1993. 97:6. 96:5. 1997. 94:6. 98:6. 1994. 93:3. 95:6.62 Textiles. 95:6..34 Pyrotechnics. 1992. 98:1. Oct. South Carolina. June 5. California.27 South Carolina. 1. 91:5. June 29. Nov.26 Shoe manufacturing. West Virginia. 95:3. 1997. July 20. Texas. 1997. Nov. April. 1994. 1994. 95:6. California. 1992.53 Toys. 94:1. 1994. 1993.48 Toys.49 Tannery. 1993. Texas. 91:6. 94:3. California. 1994. Maine. 97:6. 1997. New York.38 Rock processing. 96:6. 1997. 1993. 1994. 4.94 Poultry processing. June 16. Ohio.. Wisconsin. 1994. Michigan. 1993.27 Printing.. Jan. 24. North Carolina. 95:2.94 Printing. 98:5.104 Pottery. 97:6.32 Wood products. 98:6. Illinois.63 Printing. Feb. 93:6. reform. 98:4. 95:2. 93:5. Canada. 1992. Aug. March. Ohio. Nov. 1993.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Plastics.106 Poultry processing. July. Aug. 95:5. 95:6. 94:1. 95:6. 15.. 1992. 94:6. June.87 Steel.24 Winery. 98:6. 1997. 1992..94 Printing.30 Solvent distillation. Dec. British Columbia.98 Soap. 98:6. Ohio. Indiana. 1997.. New York. Texas. Thailand. Dec. Indiana.95 Poultry processing. Pennsylvania. 1993. Arkansas. North Carolina. Arkansas.30 Protective materials. 92:2. 93:6.87 Sports equipment. May. 98:5.49 Polyurethane foam. 1992.65 Vessel filters. Aug. 1991.85 Plastics recycling. June. 97:6. 1994. 98:6. fire stirred outrage.72 Vehicle conversion. July. 94:6. 98:6. Ohio. 19. 1996. Aug. Georgia. 96:6. Jan.24 Texas. Ohio.37 Steel. 93:6.37 Toys. Dec. North Carolina.

1991. 1992. 1997. 95:5.85 Storage facility fire. 92:1. 1997. 1993. 98:5.32 MARINAS Electrical safety requirements. 96:6.38 Dwelling.34 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 95 . 1989. 1997.23 Barge fire. 93:1.50 Dwelling. Georgia. Oct. 91:4. Dec.108 Club fire. 94:1.26 Apartment building fire. 95:5.98 Dwelling.54. 93:6. 91:6. Dec. 1997. 1996. 1994. 97:5.26 Store fire. 1993. 1993.39 Building-under-renovation fire. 1994. 95:4.26 Automobile repair shop fire. 93:2. 1990.26 Washington. 98:4. 9. 1994. 23.21 Dwelling fire. 98:4.28 Apartment building.105 Truck.53 Dwelling. Feb. 92:3. 92:1. 95:5.. 1996.22 Apartment complex fire. 91:3.45 Railroad train. 91:6. March 1.31 Dwelling. 94:5. May 27. 30.67 Dwelling. 24.59 School. 94:5. 1997. 1990. Jan.19 Dwelling-under-construction fire. 98:5.. 95:3.49 Dwelling. 96:4. 94:6. 95:2. March 21. 1991. Feb. Minnesota. 1990.16 Manufacturing plant fire.24 Boat fire. March 3. 24. Dec.22 Barn fire. 1993. 93:5. 95:5. 16. 96:2. 2. 1997. 1994. 95:1. 1995.34 Fatal fires Apartment building. 97:5.26 MARYLAND Catastrophic fires Dwelling. 1992. 1994. 1994. 1992.59 Apartment building. July 7.22 Apartment building fire.87 Yarn dyeing. 6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Wood products. 91:4. 28. 1990. 91:2.40 MARINA FIRES Connecticut.29 Apartment building. 1994. 98:3. Jan. 1992.54 Dwelling. 1995.21 Dwelling fire. 1997. 96:2. Dec. 97:2.62 Dwelling.65 Dwelling. 1996. 1995. 95:5.77 Manufacturing plant fire.42 Catastrophic fire Apartment building. 1994. 93:6. 95:5. 1990. 1990. 94:5. 1996. 26. 1992.89 Fatal fires Apartment.31 MASSACHUSETTS Aircraft fire. March 28. 1993. 1991. 96:1. 1989. 1994.25 Board and care facility fire. 91:3. Aug. 92:3. 98:6. 16.54 Church fire.34 Dwelling. 1995.22 Dwelling fire. 98:5.21. 97:4. Apr. Jan.

34 Dwelling. 94:6. 1992.33.49 Nursing home fire. Wayside Inn. 1991. Dec. 98:1. 98:6.19 Dwelling.31 Multiple-occupancy building fire.28 Hospital fire. 1992. 1994. 95:1. 93:5. 97:1. 1996. 1992.36 Store fire.39. 96:2.104 MATTERN. 92:4. 93:3.33 Office building fires. 91:2.22 Rooming house fire. 1993.97 Draperies ignited by. 93:3.23 Nursing home fire.15 Garage. See also CHILDREN AND MATCHES Bedding ignited by.63 Manufacturing plant fire. June 6.20 Housing for elderly.25 High-rise office building fire. 97:4. Oct.24. 1994. 6. 94:6. 96:6.. 1991. 1996. 1993. 91:1. 94:2. 1992. 95:4.34 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 96 .28 Warehouse fire. JEFFREY Profile of. 97:3. 95:3.21 Motor vehicle repair shop fire. Jan.24 Postal facility under construction fire. 1997. Oct.27 Restaurant fires. 95:1. 25. 94:1. 1996. 1989. Jan.86 Meeting hall fire.24 Government building. 1992. May. 98:1. 1997. 95:5.23 Store fire. 98:5. 1991. 98:5. 1994. 93:2.24 Dwelling. 1991. 1990. 98:4.84 Manufacturing plant fire.27.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Apartment building.70 Store fire. 92:1. 1995. 93:5.88 Kennel fire.22.33 Service station fire. 1991. 94:6.17 Nursing home fire. 16. 1955. 1996. 1995. residential. 24. 97:6.26 Hospital fire. 96:6. 93:6. 94:6. 1995. Feb. analysis.28 Storage facility fire. 1997.28 Manufactured home. Oct. 97:4.29 Truck/repair shop fire.26.21 Storage facility fire.. fire. 96:2.. 1993.62 Manufacturing plant fire. 1990. 96:6. 97:2.36 Store fire. 1995. 91:2.49 Hospital fire. 5. 1990. 30. 97:5. 94:5. 97:1..75 Restaurant fire. 1993.20 Manufacturing plant fire. 91:1. 1996.32 MATCHES. 93:5. 1965.107 Manufacturing plant fire. 1992. 1995. 1993. 1997. 94:5.26 Greenhouse fire. 91:3. 1995. 1993. May 23.27 Storage facility fire.40 Manufacturing plant fire. 92:6. 95:5. 96:5.36 Dwelling. 93:6. Nov. 1996.97 Warehouse fire. 1991. 92:4.19 School fire.27 School fire. 1992. 1997. 92:5.29 Manufacturing plant fire. 1994. 95:6. 92:5. 1989. 1997.27 Dwelling.50 Supermarket fire. 1994. 1995.25 Dwelling. 96:5. 93:1.

98:3. 30.64 Dwelling.58 Dwelling fire. 94:5. 1992. Feb. 1995.. 3. Dec. 1993.102 Dwelling. 92:4. 91:4. Feb.58 Electric generating plant fire. 1991. 95:5.40 Board and care facility. ignited by. 93:3. ignited by. 3. 1990. 1991.70 Apartment building. 91:3. June 2. 94:5. 22. Feb. Nov. 3. 96:3.50 MCCROSSEN.35 Detention center inmate. 1995.96 Dwelling. 93:5. 1993. 1993. 97:6. Feb. 1996.70 MICHIGAN Apartment building fire.28 Dwelling fire.68 Apartment building. 1992. 96:2.56 Manufactured home.34 Mercury vapor light fixture.24 Hotel fire.33 Country club fire. 91:6. See also BEDDING Arcing of electric heater.57 Dwelling. WARREN Profile of. 92:3. 95:5. TENN. 96:3. 1990. 1994. BILL New Orleans fire chief retires. 91:4. 14. 1977.33 MGM GRAND HOTEL FIRE Overview of fire. 6. 1995. 95:1. June 2. ignited by. 6.18 MCDANIELS. July 13. 97:6. 1991. 98:2.64 Dwelling. 1992. 92:4. 1996. 1996.39 MAURY COUNTY. 1994. 95:1. Nov. 95:6.25 Cigarette. 93:5. Dec. ignited by. 28.34 Child(ren) with matches. 1992. ignited by. 92:6.59 Fatal fires Automobile repair shop.67 Kerosene heater. 11. 17. Apr.25 Motel. 1993. 97:6.95 Board and care facility.62 Dwelling.69.28. 94:5. 95:4.70 Child(ren) with lighter. 1997.66 Board and care facility. 1995. ignited by. ignited by. 94:6.28 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 97 . 91:4. 17. June 26. ignited by. 1990. 1990.97 Dwelling. Dec. 97:1. 96:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 MATTRESSES.41 Manufactured home fire.26 Juvenile with rubbing alcohol. 93:1. 1991.64 Chemical laboratory fire.27 Juvenile with cigarette lighter.28 Dwelling. Nov. Detention facility fire.99 Catastrophic fires Aircraft collision. 92:6. 91:5.23 Dwelling fire. 97:1. ignited by. 94:5. 1993. 93:5. Oct.33 Dwelling.22 Hotel fires. 92:4. 26. 1990. 96:5. 95:6.67 Child. ignited by. July 31. Feb. 1992. 93:5. 92:5. 1996. 1991.64 Dwelling.29 Dwelling. 93:6.39 Dwelling. Feb. 91:4. 93:6. 1994.33 Funeral home fire. 28. Jan. 92:4. 92:1.

96:6. 97:6. West Virginia. 98:6. 1993. 94:6. Dec. Aug.39 Warehouse fire.25 Office building fire. 98:6. Illinois.25 Store fire. Sept. 1993.. 25. 1994.50 Motor vehicle repair shop fire.29 Sawmill and manufacturing plant. Dec.102 Textiles.87 Warehouse fire..86 Sawmill. 27..29 Vacant building fire. 1997. 1992. 97:6.30 Furniture. 91:2. 98:6.53 Restaurant fire. Jan. 1996. 92:6. 95:3.. 1995. 95:6.32.53 Truck fire. Virginia. 94:6. 96:6.30 MILL FIRES Fiber mill. 1993. 14.34 Pennsylvania. 1990.4 MINE FIRES.85 Manufacturing plant fire. 1997. 1996. 1991. 94:5. 1993. 92:6. 1996. 1997. 96:5.. 92:6. April. 97:5. 94:6. 97:6. GEORGE D. Louisiana. 1993. 1991.24 Store fire. 92:5. 93:5.30 Store fire. 1990. 1996. 1995. 92:3. 1993. 95:1. 1995. 93:6.91 Gas pipeline. 1992. Michigan. March.93 Grain mill.97 Apartment building.30 Nursing home fire.23 Restaurant fire. Oct. 91:2.34 Warehouse fire. 1991.35 Storage facilities fire. Aug. 95:6. Feb. 1990.23 Manufacturing plant fire. 1994. Aug.56 MICKALIDE. 94:5.79 Shoe manufacturing. 28.58 Apartment building. 1994. Dec.84 Paper. 1994. Florida. 16. 94:6.. 1993.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:5.40.38 Manufacturing plant fire. Nov. 92:6.69 Store fire. 5. 1995.95 Manufacturing plant fire. Jan. March 1. 1993. Profile of. 1996. 91:4. July 22. 94:5. 98:6.93 Manufacturing plant fire. New York. 6. Washington.25 MILLER. 94:6. 1995. Connecticut. 1996.108 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 98 . 91:6.28 Knitting. 92:3. July 4. Feb.34 Restaurant fire.78 Manufacturing plant fire. Dec. 92:4. 1997. 96:2. 4. Pennsylvania. 98:5.108 Manufacturing plant fire. April. 1991. 92:2. 1997. 1995.85 Manufacturing plant fire. 10. 96:5.65 Grain mill and storage facility. See COAL MINE FIRES MINNESOTA Catastrophic fires Apartment building. 1991. Interview with.98 Steel. 1991. 96:3. 1991. 98:6. June. 96:3. 97:6.106 Paper mill warehouse. 1994.84 Selection as new president of NFPA. ANGELA D. North Carolina. Jan. 1993.29 Warehouse fire.. California. April 13. 96:6. 1993. 1995. 95:6. Oct. 94:4. Massachusetts.66. 95:5.62 Vacant. 94:6. Aug.24 Warehouse fire.

Dec. 1994. 1992. 96:6. 1997.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Hotel. 1992. 95:5. 92:4. 1997. 97:5. 1994. 19.. 92:4.85 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 99 .85 Manufacturing plant fire. 1992. 1995. 1997.92 Fatal fires Apartment building. 91:4. 92:6.19 Electric generating plant fire.38 Fireworks plant explosion and fire. 1993. 1992.18 Store fire. 98:3.96 Truck. 1993. Sept. 1991. 98:2. 1991.20 Storage building fire. 92:3. 1990.64 Dwelling.34 Storage shed fire. 91:1. 17. 5. 20.95 Dwelling. 1992.83 Manufacturing plant fire. 1996.70 Church fire. 93:5. 1990. 95:3. 2. 93:5. 1994. Kansas City. 95:6.49 Dwelling.105 Dwelling fire. Aug.87 Restaurant fire. 1993. 94:1. April. 4. July 12.32 MISSOURI Catastrophic fires Automobile.28 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:6. July.17 Housing-for-elderly complex fire. 91:4. Nov. 97:6. 98:5. March 13.25 School fire. 1997. 1989. 1994.34 Dwelling.25 Dwelling. 8. 1992. 96:5.26 Warehouse fire. 26.93 Manufacturing plant fire.19 Shopping mall fire. 9. 1993. 93:6. 1997. 1996.22 Underground SubTropolis storage/manufacturing facility. 1994.98 School-under-construction fire. 98:6.37 Dwelling. 1993. 91:4. 93:4. 1992. 98:6.66 MISSISSIPPI Catastrophic fires Apartment building. 1994. 94:6. Apr. 98:6. 92:6. 97:5.45 Prison.67 Truck. 1994.83 Manufacturing plant fire. Feb. 91:3. 1991. requires unique fire protection measures. 1995. 98:2. 95:6. 98:5. 1991.68 Warehouse fire.70 Dwelling. 1997.. June. 1990.24 School building fire.70 Tank storage facility.104 Meeting hall fire.30 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:5. Dec.30 Hotel fire. 95:5. 1991. Sept. 1990.27 Store fire. 3. June. 6. March. Jan. 1997. 98:6. 1995. 96:5. Oct. 92:2.68 Fatal fires Dwelling. August. 93:5. 1991. 95:3. 1997. Dec. 1996. 1997. 95:4. Feb. 94:5. 93:6. April 16. Feb. 98:5. May 4.36 Hospital fire.39 Warehouse fire.50 Nursing home.86 Manufacturing plant fire. Jan. April 3. 14.59 Dwelling. 93:6. 98:2. 1997.67 Manufacturing plant/storage facility.

1990. 92:4. Nov. See FIRE MODELS MONTANA Catastrophic fires Dwelling.86 Chemical plant fire. 93:5. 94:4. THOMAS M. 7. 98:6. 93:1. 93:6. 96:1. 1949. Feb. Mann Gulch.34 Indiana.68 MOTOR VEHICLE FIRES. 95:2. 93:4.85 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 100 . 91:1. 1994. 1990. 1989. 1994. July 30. 92:6.49 Manufacturing plant fires.27 MUSEUMS Life safety system for Winterthur. See AUTOMOBILE REPAIR SHOP FIRES MULTI-AGENCY RESPONSE Ship fire. 92:1. 24. 1994. 1992. Profile of.78 Massachusetts. 1995.38 Tennessee. Feb.66 MOSES. 1992.14 MOTEL FIRES. 6. Sept. 91:1. 1997. 16. 1990. 95:6. 93:3. Profile of. 1994. 107 Metal milling plant fire. General manager and past president of NFPA. June. 93:6. 92:5. New York.36 Catastrophic California. 98:6. 24.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Warehouse fire.98 MULTIPLE-OCCUPANCY FIRES California.29 Illinois. April. 14. Sept.42 MOORE. Missouri. June. See also MANUFACTURED HOME FIRES California. 1996. 98:6. 96:6. 97:3. See VEHICLE FIRES MOTOR VEHICLE REPAIR SHOPS. 1992.73 California.74 MOTOR HOME FIRES. See MULTIPLE-OCCUPANCY FIRES MOBILE HOME FIRES. 97:3.81 Vermont. July.14 Cardboard box manufacturing plant fire.60 Wildland fire.27 Cotton warehouse. 1992.88 Warehouse fire.25 Catastrophic. FIRE.65 Florida. 91:4. WAYNE D.23 MORGAN.23 Protecting mixed occupancies. 91:4. 24.87 MIXED OCCUPANCIES.63 MUSEUM FIRES Oregon.81 Wisconsin. CHARLES S. 98:6.88 Making mutual aid agreements work. 1991. 92:6. 91:2. March 16. 1991.98 MUTUAL AID RESPONSE Apply mutual aid to fire investigations.104.68 Dwelling. 94:6. July. 95:6. Jan. 95:6. 1997. 1991. 1990. 95:5. 95:5.35 Tennessee. 1992. 91:6. See MOTOR HOME FIRES MODELS. See HOTEL FIRES MOTION PICTURE STUDIO FIRES Arizona. 1997. 98:6.72 Tennessee.31 Kansas. Aug. 91:6.

70 Burning rubbish. Chicago Fire Dept. 95:5. 97:5. 96:1.40 Experts answer questions on code. cable/wire manufacturers promote NEC over IEC as European standard.83 Burners ignite hydraulic oil. ignited by.68 Space program technology applied to tank truck fires by NFPA. 98:6.37 NATIONAL FIRE INCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (NFIRS) History and use of data. MARY Profile of.26 Heater. ignites kitchen wall. 92:1. 98:3.91 Rural fire.52 NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE 1993 edition.71 Infrared heater..29 Oven/broiler malfunctions. 93:3.123 NATIVE AMERICANS Navajo Nation and NFPA Center for High-Risk Outreach cooperate for fire safety.28 Global marketplace and. ignited by. 97:5. 96:5. equipment.26 Simultaneous incendiary fires.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Open-air flea market fire.28 U. 97:2.23 Hydraulic oil from split line. NASA partnership. 95:2. 91:3.66 Boat repair safety requirements for wiring. 92:5. leaking gas ignites. 91:6. 92:4. 96:1.22 Interpreting the code. 93:1. 94:4. 95:6.64 Work space requirements for energized electrical equipment. ignited by. ignited when. 91:4.12 Main service disconnect terms and requirements.52 Lines ruptured. ignited by.30 Heater ignites gasoline vapors. 94:5.71 Smoke detector nuisance alarms: field study in Native American community. 91:4. ignited by. S.25 Flame from LP-Gas fire causes natural gas regulator to fail. 91:3.73 1999 edition incorporates technological changes supported by consensus process. 92:4. 97:6. 94:1. 96:1. 98:4.29 Ignition source unknown. 91:3. changes in.36 Flash fire. ignited by.21 NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA) Apollo I spacecraft fire.31 Boiler ruptured. when piping accidentally ruptured. 95:1.25 Spanish speaking countries using code. 98:5.34 Hot tub and spa accident prevention. 98:6.65 Leak in furnace enclosure fuels catastrophic fire.74 Navajo Nation fire safety awareness campaign.52 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 101 .89 Records storage facility fire.88 Questions answered. ignited when.65 NATURAL GAS FIRES Aircraft parts made of resin ignited by gas.80 NATIONAL INTERAGENCY INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (NIMS) Discussion. 93:6. 98:2.25 Cigarette. 92:4.50 1996 edition.34 Wood products plant fire. 96:6. 95:5. 98:6. 94:3.120 High voltage equipment safety. development of. ignited by. 92:5. 98:3. 96:5.87 N NACHBAR. 97:2.103 Oil fire.

94:1. 96:4. 93:5. 1991.17 NEVADA Fatal shopping mall fire.22 Apartment complex fire.94 Windows opened to vent fire leads to gas ignition.68. 93:5.19 Hotel fires. 97:6. Dec. 97:6.91 Gas distribution main over-pressured causes flare-ups. 95:5. 93:1. March 27. 21.68 Lacquer thinner vapors ignited by. 92:1. Aug. 94:5. CANADA Detention facility fire. Apr.69 Dwelling.66 Spark. 13. 22. 1980. 96:6. 92:4.108. 1993. 97:5. 1992. 93:2. 13. 98:6. 91:4.33. 92:5. 92:4. gas ignited by pilot flame. 98:5. 98:5.50 NEW HAMPSHIRE Catastrophic dwelling-under-construction fire.310 Manufacturing plant fire. June 21.69 Dwelling.35 Group home fire.56 NEW JERSEY Amusement center fire.39 Pilot light ignites gasoline. 92:6. 17.35 Space heater.32 Catastrophic fires Apartment building.16 MGM Grand Hotel fire.26 Pipeline supplying kiln fails.79 Apartment building fire.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Pilot light.62 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 102 . ignited by. ignited by. 96:3. explosions. June 11.86 Nursing home fire. 94:5. Jan.62 Leak ignited.22 Fatal boat fire. June 16. 1994. 93:3.104 Leak from service line.69 Apartment building. 92:4.70 NEW BRUNSWICK. 1992. 93:5. Feb. ignited by. 97:6. 95:6. 95:1. 92:4.74 Stove burners. 1996. 1991. May 6. ignited by refrigeration compressor. 1990. 8.69 Warehouse fire. 92:6. July 20. 96:5. 1992. 91:6.64. 12. Profile of. 1991. 97:5. ignited by.25. 97:6. Feb. 96:2. 93:6. 95:3. 1990. 91:4. 97:6.. Nov.55 Dwelling. 93:6. 1992. 91:4. ignited by. March. 94:5. 1995. Profile of. 1996. 1996.29 Storage facilities fire. 93:2. 1996. 1997. 1997.65 NATURAL GAS FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS Electrical equipment ignites gas built up in drilling platform structure.49 Storage facility fire.68 Fatal fireworks display fire. 12. 1996.53. 1991. JENNIFER L.91 Pilot light ignites gasoline vapors.64 NEBRASKA Apartment building fire.26 Manufacturing plant fire. 1977.36 Production and storage facility fire. 1997. 94:6.21 NELSON. 94:6. 98:5. 5. HAROLD E.57 NELSON. Dec.103 Spark. 98:6. 1997. 1996.29 Roof fire.45 Automobile. ignited by. 91:4.52 Pressure surge caused by vehicle accident causes manufactured homes fire.24 Fireworks plant explosion and fire. 1995. Feb.52 Manufacturing plant fire. New Jersey.

21 Hotel/conference center fire. March 22. Sept.68 Club. 1993. 1997.21 Store fire. March 25. 22.26 NEW LONDON. 21. 1995. 96:6. 97:6. Aug. 1991. 1991. 94:5. Dec. 97:2. 92:4. 93:6. April 10. 1992.68 Dwelling.16 Funeral home fire. 96:5.79 Aircraft fire. 94:6. May.20. Dec. 94:5. 93:2. LA. 93:5. 1993. 1990.61 NEW YORK Aircraft fire.90 Apartment building fire. 96:5. 1995. 91:4.37 Manufactured home. Feb. 97:6.89 Warehouse fire. 91:2. March 18. 1997. 96:5. 92:4.21 Store fire. 1996. 91:6. 1991. 98:6. June 7. 1990. 91:4. Dec. 22. 92:4. 98:2. March. 91:4. 5. 93:6.28 Apartment building. March 13. 93:3. 1993. 92:6. 22. Fire department profile. 1990. Aug. 1992.60 Aircraft fire.92 Dwelling. 1996. Oct. 1989. 1994. March.66 Apartment building.67 Board and care facility.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Dwelling. 1991. 25. 1993. 93:5. 95:6.. 1997.30 Manufacturing plant fire. 1937.98 Apartment complex fire. 92:4.69 Dwelling. 1994.53 Dwelling. Jan.67 Dwelling. 92:4. Sept. 27.78 Store fire.74 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:5. 1991. 1994. 98:3.33 Warehouse fire.98 Dwelling.34 Shopping mall fire. 1991. 1992.25 Manufacturing plant fire.85 Catastrophic fires Aircraft.102 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 103 .67. 94:2.100 Dwelling. 93:6.68 Dwelling.82 Manufacturing plant. 92:2. 1995. 1991. 94:6. 21. 1993. 1997. 10. 96:6.68 Wildland fire. Nov. 1996.. 67 Dwelling. 96:2.61. July. March.56 Warehouse fire. 93:2.70 NEW ORLEANS. 1995. Jan. 1992.88 Apartment building fire.85 Store fire. 92:1. 1993. 17. Iron Mountain records storage facility. 1996.94 NEW MEXICO Aircraft fire and crash. South Brunswick. Dec. April 17. TEXAS School explosion. July 22. Jan. 1990. 1991. 92:4.27 Apartment building fire. 95:6. 95:5. 1991. 1990. Sept. 1995. 28. Apr.94 Fatal fires Apartment building. 8. March 28. 98:6. Dec.68 Apartment building. 1990. 1992. 91:4.30. 4.65 Dwelling.68 Dwelling.41 Dwelling. 28. 94:5. April 21. 92:2. 92:6.92 Electric/thermal energy generating plant.44. 1993.. 93:5. 98:2. 1997. May. 91:5.

26 Electric generating plant fire.91 Fatal fires Aircraft. 95:2. 1995. 1991.60 Dwelling.82 Electric generating plant fire. 1990. 96:6.40 Manufacturing plant fire. 8.25 Dwelling. 95:6. 96:5.91.68 Store fire.85 Manufacturing plant fire. 1994. Aug. 1995. Asbestos exposure response policy.23. 16.100 Office building fire.78 Mill complex fire. 26. 93:6. 95:6. Sept. 96:6.94 Store/apartment building fire. N.24 Laboratory fire. 1993.22 Passenger terminal fire. 26. 1991. 94:5.74 Storage facility fire. March. 95:2. 1995. 94:6. 1995.42 Backdraft incident model. 1990. March 25. 1993. Aug. 96:6.88 Apartment building. April. 93:2. 95:5. J. 1995. 94:1..37 Subway token booth.62 Dwelling. 98:5. 1997. 98:2. 1993. 95:5. Dec. 1993. Feb. May. 96:5. 1994. Feb.44 NEWTON. 94:6. 93:6. Y.22 Dwelling.76 Shopping mall fire. Jan.. July. 91:4. 1995. March.27 Manufacturing plant fire. 1994.54 Dwelling. 1996.91 Warehouse fire.98 Office building/apartment building fire...66 Wharf/boardwalk. 10. 93:3.30 Wildland/urban interface fire.92 Dwelling. June 12. 1990. 1995.18 Dwelling. 97:6.65 Store. 93:6.74 NEW YORK. May. 1995. 96:5. 94:6. 4. Aug. 92:6. 1993. Fatal electrical generating plant fire. 94:1.72 Multiple-occupancy/dwelling. MASSACHUSETTS © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 104 . 1995.104.90.59 NEW ZEALAND Fire service operation and code development. 95:5. 1997. Dec. 94:6.20 Apartment building.93 High-rise complex. Nov. 96:3.104. 98:6. apartment building fire. 1992. 95:5. Dec. 96:5. 1993.26 Manufacturing plant fire.69 Storage facility fire. Feb. 1994. 91:6. 28. 18. 94:6. 1. 1992. July 29. 1911. 1992. 95:4. Feb.53 Dumpster fire.105 Motor vehicle. 96:3. 92:5. 1991.77 Storage complex fire. 1994. 1992.72 World Trade Center explosion and fire. 96:6. 92:1.31 Dwelling. 91:6.65 Manufacturing plant fire.90. Jan. 93:6. Aug. 95:5. 96:5. 1993. 1995. 96:5.91. 96:6. May 20. 92:6. 1994. 92:4. Sept.43 NEWARK. 1995. Dec. 1997. 1994. July 21.. 93:2.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Dwelling. 94:5.58 Dwelling. 1991. 93:6. June 28. 97:6. Dec. 96:6.62 Manufacturing plant fire. June 23. 22. 1992. 1995. 94:5. N. 25. 1994. 12. 1996. March 28.. 1993.87 Medical center complex fire. New York. March.59 Hospital.

66 Fire Safety Exhibit. 92:2. 94:6. and evaluation. overview. 92:5. 94:5.79 1992. 92:3. 95:3. 91:1. 95:3. fire departments. 98:5. 17th edition. 97:2.65. 92:1. 95:5.64 Fire Technology and Fire Journal publications.63 Organization must balance tradition.74. 96:3.58 Service to members. 95:4.78 Membership campaign. See also FIRE SAFETY EDUCATION 100th anniversary supplements.122. 96:4. 25. 96:1.116 Fire Protection Handbook.98 Fire service training seminars introduced at 1997 Fall Meeting.77 "Great Escape" promotes home fire drills and escape plans. 96:2. 93:5. 91:1.30 Risk Watch is useful tool as fire service's mission expands. 96:1. 98:2.122 1997. 97:1.75 1994. 98:2. 93:3.67 Founders of NFPA. Oct.74 Commitment to Learn Not to Burn programs. 93:4.120 Fire Inspector Certification program. 4.74. 96:2.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Metals processing plant fire. 97:4.85 1998. 91:3. 93:2. 1993. 95:3. 18th edition. 93:3.5 U. 95:3. survey.47 1994.73 1993. overview. 98:6.115 1995. 94:6.42 1993. 91:1.59 Wildland Fire Management Section survey. selected as new president. 1990-91.68. 98:3.106 Fire Protection Handbook. 94:5. 95:5.77 1995. George D.4 Member Advisory Council. 96:3.32 International outreach by the organization. 97:5..84 Risk Watch demonstrates value of team work for fire safety.108 Board of Directors view of future of fire protection.4 National Fire Protection Research Foundation and Center for High-Risk Outreach support NFPA mission.57 Board of Directors new member profiles.4 Rail Transportation Systems. 94:4.81 Association plans for its second century. S. editorial.33 Miller. 93:4. implementation. 1993. 95:6.92 Financial report 1992.63 NFPA. 97:5.47 Center for High-Risk Outreach and Navajo Nation cooperate for fire safety. transition. 98:5.57 Fire Inspector I Certification Program introduced.4 Fall meeting preview 1991.96 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 105 . rail fires survey. 96:3.69 Long-range plan developed by Board of Directors.4 Defining NFPA's mission for year 2000.4 100th anniversary supplements. 92:1.33 Risk Watch curriculum goals. 95:6. 96:2.65 NFPA joins fight against smoking.33 Metropolitan Fire Chiefs section proposed. 98:3.67 First NFPA public service announcement campaign.66.83. 94:4.74 Foam Technical Committee report on foam and environment.32 Risk Watch's injury prevention curriculum teaches safe fun. 1950. 95:3. 92:5. 93:5.101 Risk Watch addresses eight preventable injuries most threatening to children. 91:5.97 General manager Percy Bugbee's fire safety efforts. 91:3.

96:1. Fire Prevention Code.120 Model building codes.38 NFPA 1.42 NFPA 1.66 Listing of codes and standards being updated.83 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING. standards for.46 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 106 . development and use as national model code. 96:2. Fire Prevention Code. 97:6. 97:2.85 Federal agencies slow to update regulatory references to NFPA standards. 96:5. 92:3. 95:2.75 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING. development of. 1998. ONE HUNDREDTH FIRST Annual meeting documents. 93:4. 95:4.44 Hazardous materials classification and containment issues. 97:4. 96:1. Fire Prevention Code. revision and adoption by communities.51 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING. despite Technology Transfer Act. 96:1.96 Annual meeting documents. 98:2.75 NFPA CODES AND STANDARDS.29 Federal law requires agencies to use voluntary consensus standards. See also LIFE SAFETY CODE. 97:5.110 High-rise building requirements address fire risk concerns. 91:2.22 NFPA 1. 95:4. 97:1.71 Preview. 96:4. 95.73.36 International Code Council/NFPA collaboration on national fire code. ONE HUNDREDTH Highlights of 1996 meeting.40 Fire apparatus standards. NINETY-FIFTH Highlights of 1991 meeting. 96:3. ONE HUNDRED SECOND Annual meeting documents. NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE Alliances bring codes/standards to Spanish.64 Fall meeting documents. 96:1. 96:2.29 Elevator recall and shut down requirements increase safety. 92:1. 96:5.84 High-rise building standards useful worldwide.73. 92:2. 96:5.64 Preview. 92:1. 92:3.42 Consensus requirement can slow adoption of innovations.73 Preview.75 Asian countries encouraged to recognize codes. 97:5. 91:4. 1997. 92:4. standards.71 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING.36 Annual meeting documents.46 International use of codes and standards.and Portuguese-speaking world. 96:2.38 Consensus process central to NFPA code development.68 ICC and NFPA collaborate to develop one national model fire code. 92:2. NINETY-EIGHTH Highlights of 1994 meeting.12 History of first standard.96 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING.41 Fire service role in code-making.36 High-rise buildings. 96:5. development of.27 General questions answered. 91:2. 473.90 Preview.36 Importance of standards to fire service.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING. 97:6.103 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING. 96:6. 96:3. 94:4. NINETY-SEVENTH Highlights of 1993 meeting. 1997. 98:2. 93:2.45 Hazardous materials response standards 472. 94:2. 97:2. NINETY-NINTH Highlights of 1995 meeting. 98:2. 96:3. 96:2. NINETY-SIXTH Highlights of 1992 meeting.49 NFPA ANNUAL MEETING. questions answered.74 Preview.30 Hazardous materials response.94 Preview.

consolidates signaling standards. all sprinkler requirements to be centralized in. 97:1.27 NFPA 25. changes in. current edition. Fixed Guideway Systems. 97:5. 1997 edition. Means of Egress for Buildings and Structures. 98:4. The National Fire Alarm Code. National Electrical Code (See NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE) NFPA 72.12 NFPA 91. Guide for Smoke and Heat Venting.86 NFPA 70.92 NFPA 96. Fire Prevention During Welding. Fire Prevention Code. 91:5.96 NFPA 232A. 93:3. 92:6.28 NFPA 11A. 98:2.86 NFPA 204M. 1997 edition.28 NFPA 130. 97:2. Medium.86 NFPA 295. users like open consensus codes/standards process. fall meeting review. Fire Characteristics of Mattresses and Bedding Assemblies Exposed to Flaming Ignition Source. Flammable and Combustible Liquids requirements for service station design.85 NFPA 30. The National Fire Alarm Code.33 NFPA 99. questions answered.and High-Expansion Foam Systems. 97:5. 97:2.92 NFPA 101B. fall meeting review. common questions answered. Installation of Sprinkler Systems.86 NFPA 72. Alternative Approaches to Life Safety.76 NFPA 51B. 93:5. 1991 edition overview. Installation of Sprinkler Systems.92 NFPA 58. Means of Egress for Buildings and Structures.12 NFPA 13. Portable Fire Extinguishers. Fire Doors and Fire Windows. 1994. Fire Characteristics of Upholstered Furniture Exposed to Flaming Ignition. Automotive and Marine Service Station requirements for station design. combines previous standards. 98:5. questions answered.76 NFPA 30A. 98:2. fall meeting review. Fire Doors and Windows. Protective Signaling Systems. 98:1. Guide for Fire Protection for Archives and Records Centers may need updating for larger facilities. Fire Prevention Code. 96:3.28 NFPA 101 (See LIFE SAFETY CODE) NFPA 101. 1997 edition.26 NFPA 13.92 NFPA 80. Health Care Facilities. 97:5. 98:5. 98:5. The National Fire Alarm Code. Flame Special Effects Before a Proximate Audience. 1997 edition. Portable Fire Extinguishers. 98:5. Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations.25 NFPA 72. 91:5. 97:1. 97:4. Installation of Sprinkler Systems.44 NFPA 299. Exhaust Systems for Air Conveying of Vapors. 98:6. Mists. 1997 edition. Installation of Sprinkler Systems.85 NFPA 10. Cutting.28 NFPA 80. fall meeting review.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 NFPA 1. fire authorities.22 NFPA 101B. common questions answered.68 NFPA 266. 96:6. Installation of Sprinkler Systems. Florida. 93:5.86 NFPA 267. 97:5. Liquefied Petroleum Gases. Life Safety Code (See LIFE SAFETY CODE) NFPA 101A. Protection of Life and Property from Wildfires considered for adoption by Ormond Beach. and UL standards work together.34 NFPA 13.92 NFPA 13. 97:5. 98:5.25 NFPA 72.96 NFPA 299. 94:3. 95:6. use with existing regulations.96 NFPA 160. requirements for safe elevator recall. 96:4. The National Fire Alarm Code. 1997 edition.99 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 107 . common questions answered. 1996 edition. Gases.40 NFPA 10. 1997 edition. 1997 edition.70 NFPA 72. and Other Hot Work. new document scheduled for 1998 NFPA Fall Meeting. 98:4. 98:1.14 NFPA 13. modifications to fire doors under. Wildfire Control. fall meeting review. changes in 1996 edition. Fire Safety Evaluation System. Water-Based Fire Protection Systems. 97:5. 97:2. 1997 edition. Protection of Life and Property from Wildfire. 97:5. and Noncombustible Particulate Solids. 98:4.97 NFPA 1.

Fire and Explosion Investigations. 96:6.34 Sprinkler systems. codes addressing.24 NFPA 497A. 98:2. 95:2. 1997 edition.99. minimum staffing issue. 97:5. 97:2. 1997 edition. Disaster Management. questions answered. 1997 edition.97 NFPA 600.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 NFPA 306.86 NFPA 801. 95:5. 97:2. Manual for Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting Operations.99 NFPA 1051. 1997 edition. performance requirements for structural fire fighting ensemble. development of. 1997 edition. approved. 1997 edition.50 NFPA 415.99 NFPA 1971.41 NFPA 720. Testing Fire Department Aerial Devices.88 NFPA 820. and Loading Walkways.53 Wildfire personnel qualifications. 1997 edition. 95:4.99 NFPA 1914. 95:3. 97:2. Private Fire Brigades. 92:2. Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. 97:2. Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program. 91:1. 1997 edition. 98:3. Fueling Ramp Drainage. 97:5. Fire Officer Professional Qualifications. 98:5.46 Performance-based codes based on existing codes. represents 75 years of marine fire protection.24 Re-engineering the codes-and standards-making process. 1997 edition. 94:3.16.86 NFPA 803. Classification of Class I Hazardous Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas. Airport Terminal Buildings. 1997 edition. consolidates testing.44 NFPA 909. 92:6.88 NFPA 1231.97 NFPA 921. 1997 edition. Recommended Practice for Installation of Household Carbon Monoxide Warning Equipment questions answered. fall meeting discussion. as authoritative treatise for litigation.62 NFPA 1999. 92:4. 94:1. 1997 edition. Service Tests of Pumps on Fire Department Apparatus.44 NFPA 1200. 1997 edition. 96:1.90 NFPA 402. 96:3.27 Standards Council's history. Water Supplies for Suburban and Rural Fire Fighting. Fire Protection for Facilities Handling Radioactive Materials.88 NFPA 921. Guide to Fire and Explosion Investigations. Recommended Practice for the Installation of Household Carbon Monoxide Warning Equipment. 97:5. 95:5. 97:2.99 Performance-based code development. Protection of Cultural Resources.4 Water mist suppression standard under development. and Evaluation of Public Fire Protection and Emergency Medical Services.68 Regional fire code development committees provide input to NFPA. 97:5. Wildland Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. international use. 97:2.49 NFPA 1911. 97:6. Medical Requirements for Fire Fighters.99 NFPA 1021.39 NFPA 1123 and 1124. 96:4. Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations. 98:4. 94:1. Deployment.34. 97:2. 97:2. 1997 edition.44 NFPA 1500. Fire Protection for Light Water Nuclear Power Plants. 97:2.40 NFPA 1001.99 NFPA 1600.74 NFPA 1500. Protective Ensemble for Structural Fire Fighting. questions answered. current edition.36 Spanish language codes and standards. 1997 edition. 4. 96:2. Operation. Fire Protection in Wastewater Treatment Plants. 97:5.96 NFPA 1582.33 NFPA FILMS © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 108 . 96:1.27 Relationship to international standards.20 NFPA 720. 98:1. Organization. 97:2. fireworks codes.89 Voting procedures for NFPA consensus standards. 97:5. Control of Gas Hazards on Vessels. Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program.

Oct. 29.74 Texas. 1996.64 Dwelling.27 Fatal fires Aircraft. 95:6. March 17. 28.50 Manufacturing plant. 95:1. 91:2. 1996. 1996.23 Office building fire.22 Warehouse fire. 92:6. 1997. Sept. 95:5. Kentucky. Southgate. Feb. 96:4. 1997. July.109 NORSTROM. 94:6. 95:6.. 1994. 96:3. 95:6.40 Manufacturing plant fires. 93:5.33 Mill fire. 1994.61 Dwelling. 97:4. 92:1.87 Warehouse fire. May 12.21 Warehouse fire.29. 1996. 23. Nov. June.38 NORTH CAROLINA Aircraft fire.58 Dwelling.37 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:3. 1991. 95:5. 1992. 95:4. 1992. 17. 1995.68 Apartment building. 94:3. 91:3.28 Manufactured home. 1994.63 Cocoanut Grove. Boston. May 28. 95:2.39. 98:6.52 Dwelling. 1942.44 NIGHT CLUB FIRES Beverly Hills Supper Club. 91:3.24 Manufacturing plant fire. 1997. 1991. 95:5. 98:5. March 23. 1994. 1994.88 Warehouse fire. 5. 95:5. 95:6. March 17. 97:5. 94:5.25 9-1-1 SERVICE Federal Communications Commission (FCC) establishes 311 non-emergency number. Sept.49 Dwelling. 1995. 98:2.16 Manufacturing plant fire. 1991.32. 1996.49 Fraternity house. 1997.30 Store fire. 28. 93:6. July 2. 1997.88 Restaurant fire. GAIL P. 95:5. 98:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Senior fire safety with Jonathan Winters. 1992. 1994. 13. 1993. 97:5. 97:1. 93:5.34 Manufactured home. 92:4. 1991. 96:2. Feb. April.38. 92:2. 97:5. 98:5. 1992. 7. 93:6.103 Manufacturing plant fire.110 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. 98:6. 3. 1992.67 Aircraft.90 Detention facility fire. 96:2. 97:3. 1994.110 Apartment building. 1994. May. April 19. 96:5..70 Condominium complex fire. 98:6. 1993. Nov.84 Manufacturing plant fires. 1994. 97:5. Sept. 1994.29 9-1-1 SERVICE E911 fails in telephone exchange fire.53 Fatal manufactured home fire. May 12. Oct. 12. 92:5.29 Manufacturing plant fire. Profile of.28 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 109 . Mass.37 College building.. 95:5.38 Warehouse fire.100 Board and care facility. Aug. Feb.34 Board and care facility. 1996. 1997. 1996. 1993.87 NORTH DAKOTA Catastrophic dwelling fire. 1994. 1977. Sep. 93:2. fire investigation report. 1989.

95:3.59 OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATIONS Uses of. Sept.80 Fire safety review urged. May 23.67 Mississippi.24 Knox County. 95:5.100 New York.90. 1994. 97:6.33 Massachusetts. Tenn.24 O OBSERVATORY FIRES Catastrophic. 1995. 12. 23.42 Utah. 1991. 1991. 30. 94:6. 91:2. 1991. 91:4. April. Feb. 1991. 19. 93:2. 96:1. 1993. 1996. 94:5. 92:6. Apr. 1995. 92:6. 94:1. 92:5. CALIF. 1994. 9. 1997. 1997.28 OCCUPANT LOAD Evaluating occupant load for egress.91. 1993 (World Trade Center). 96:1.21 Catastrophic Georgia.26 OFFICE BUILDING FIRES. April 25. 97:3. 94:4. 96:4.94.14 Myths of occupant load calculation. 1990. 26. 91:4. Jan.69 Pennsylvania. 12. 1992. 95:4. 94:5. 96:5. Dec.104.23 California. 97:5. 92:3. 1995. 1994. 98:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Storage facility fire. 96:5. 1990. 1995. See also HIGH-RISE BUILDING FIRES California. 92:4. 1997. 97:4.26 Massachusetts. 96:1.33 Georgia. 96:6. Jan. 97:5.35 California.52 NOVA SCOTIA.30 California.73 Georgia. Oct. Jan. 95:2. and alternatives to.29 Overview.30 NORTHRIDGE. EARTHQUAKE Relief agencies pick up pieces. 6. March 13. 1993.25 Massachusetts. 1993.17 Michigan. 1995.96 School fire. 94:5. 1995. Feb. 95:5.59 Oklahoma. 96:6.58 Illinois. 94:1.. 1982-1987. 96:5. Hawaii. 1992. 92:2. 93:5. 28.52 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 110 . 1994. 6. 95:2.25 New Hampshire.27 Washington. 16.102 NURSING HOME FIRES Arizona.78 California. CANADA Munitions ship explosion.71 Colorado. Apr. 92:1.49 Massachusetts. 1991.85 Massachusetts. 92:1. March.29 Catastrophic Arkansas.52. 95:6.30 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (OSHA) Confined space incidents target of new regulation. 1991.50.. 92:4.51. Aug. 93:6. 1995. 96:6. 96:2. 1917.34 OFFICE BUILDINGS Renovations can lead to code-compliance problems. 1996. 1991.96 Illinois. 98:1.59.30 NUCLEAR ENERGY PLANT FIRES Alabama.

Feb.68 Church fire. March. 1995. 96:6. 5. 96:5. Aug. 1991. 94:5.22 North Dakota.59 OHIO Apartment building fire. 17. 1991. 96:6. 95:6. 1990. 1994. D. 1993. 1997. 1996. 92:2. Jan..69 Manufactured home. 1988. Feb. 11. 1995. July. 1996. Feb. June 26. 97:2. Treasury Building fire.67 Store. 1994. Cincinnati.88 Oklahoma. March. 1991. Jan. Dec. 1992. 95:6.70 Boat. 95:6. 25.64.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Hawaii. 97:6. 94:2.56 Dwelling. 1993. 92:4. 1990.99 Utah. 4.. Dec. 1990. 92:5. 1994.24 Apartment complex and boat fire. 93:1. 1992. 94:2.100 New York. 92:4.52. 97:5. 95:5. 95:2.62 Dwelling. 1994. 95:6. 14.91 Limited care facility. May 27. 1991. 98:3. 1997. Dec. Nov.56 Massachusetts.24 Michigan. Jan..53 Iowa.63 Washington.74 Philadelphia. Nov. Dec. 26. 96:5.56 Texas.66 Dwelling. Nov. 22. 1991. April 19.53 West Virginia. 1993. Oct. 23. 94:5. 97:6. 1994.70 Wisconsin. 95:3. 92:4.26 Los Angeles.52 Truck. 96:2. 11. 21.. July 3. 98:5. Dec. C. 92:5. 95:5. 1991. Calif. 1996. April. 1994. 96:6. 12.81 Building-under-construction fire.. updates fire protection system. 94:5. Oct.91 Indiana. April 20. 92:5.. 1996. 1996.110 Catastrophic fires Apartment building.71 Rooming house. 1993. 1995. 1992.30 Utah. 93:5. Y. S. 1993. 95:3. 1991. Dec. N.66 Dwelling. May 9. 26. Feb. March.56 Dwelling.98 Pennsylvania. 95:5. 93:5. 1994.106 Camping trailer. 92:6.102 Apartment building.29 Apartment building fire. 91:4. 1990. 15. 93:6. Jan. 1994. 92:4. 1996.39 Crown Coliseum. 1991. evacuation behavior.. Pa. 18. May 4. 91:4. Oct.58 Automobile repair shop. 29. Feb. 97:6. 91:4.25 Virginia.28 Massachusetts.56 New York. 94:5. 1994.40 Virginia. 15.66 Oil well. 97:6. Aug. Dec.96 Dwelling. 97:5. 4. 94:6. 1992.29 Washington.23 World Trade Center. 92:5. 1996.. 1992.69 Dwelling.64 Manufacturing plant.98 Dwelling. 28. 10.51 Manufacturing plant explosion. Calif. 98:6. 1995. 95:5. 1994.53 Modern office environments increase fire hazards. 1993. 1995.120 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 111 . 91:2. U. 1993. July 16. 92:5..56 Los Angeles. 91:5.

98 Hot pressurized oil atomizes.38 Manufacturing plant fire. 97:6. 6. 95:6.63 Vapors ignited by cigarette lighter.20 Hotel fire. 98:6.31 Gas distribution facility fire.. 97:6. 91:1. June. 96:5. 94:5. 92:4. 96:6. April 21. 1995.28 Dwelling.31. 94:6. 104 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:6. 94:5. 36. 96:3. 93:5. 1997. ignited by. 1996. 1996. 98:6. 1995. 97:6.70 Overheated transformer. ignited by. 94:2.37 Manufacturing plant fires. 1. 94:5. June 16.97 Cutting oil. 97:5. Nov. 93:5. Aug. 95:6.27. 97:3.63 Manufacturing plant fire. 97:6. 1995. ignited by. 93:6.110 Apartment building.49 Manufacturing plant fire.33 Natural gas burners. 1997. April 21. Oct. 91:6. 1994.22. 97:6. 91:4.36. March. 1930.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Detention facility fire. ignites. 1997.26 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 112 .49 Manufacturing plant fire.31 Hospital. Jan. ignited by hot metal.104 Vapors ignited in catastrophic fire.84 Finishing oil ignited by friction sparks. 96:6.28 Manufactured home fire. Oct. 98:6. 49 Coolant oil ignites. 1989.19 Fireworks explosion. 1996. July 19. 96:6. 1996. 94:5. 97:5. 97:4.29 Manufacturing plant fire. 98:3. 91:3.69 Open flame. 92:1. 96:6.52 Manufacturing plant fire. Ohio.29.20 College building. 95:5. 93:6. 1993. 1996.84 Manufacturing plant fire. 1994.. Sept. 1992. 1996. 1990. 1996. ignited by electric motor.20 Camping trailer. 97:6.. 14.31 Manufacturing plant fire.40 Cooking oil Overheats. Nov. 1990.21. 1993. 1930. 91:4. increased fire spread. 98:5.24 Manufacturing plant fire. 1989. 95:6.35 Restaurant fire. 13. 1996.65 Manufacturing plant fire. 97:6.74 Manufacturing plant fire. 1996. 95:2. 13. 96:3. 93:1.68 Sprayed onto furnace.35. 1993. 93:6.26. Jan. ignites oil residue. 93:4.21 Storage facility fire.82 Floor saturated with. 91:1. 93:2.84 OIL Contaminated waste oil ignited by smoking materials.54 OHIO STATE PENITENTIARY FIRE Columbus. 12. 1994. 96:6.22. 1996. 97:4. 1996. 1994.28 Dwelling. 1992.19 Lumber store fire.62 Hydraulic oil Leak. 1996.94 Crude oil Cigarette lighter. 92:4. 94:1.54 Fatal fires Aircraft.25. ignited by. fuels fire.84 Restaurant fire.27 Store fire. 97:6.15.103.21 Dwelling. ignites. 96:5.52 Manufacturing plant fire.

Apr. Aug. 1993. 92:4. Murrah Federal Building bombing and fire. Apr. 23. Feb.59 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 113 . 91:4. 1995. ignites. Louisiana. 20. 92:4. Apr. June 16. 1995.103 Leaking oil ignited by furnace. Ohio. 1. May 16. OKLA.29 Sprayed onto space heater. 97:5.51.85 Leaks. 1996. 93:6. Oct.59. 1996. 21.40 Oil on electrical cord ignited by spark. 94:6. Aug.102 Leaking oil atomized.72 Oil on compressor ignited by heat. See REFINERIES. 92:6. 19.67. 1990. 95:6. 93:6. fuels fire. 98:6. ignites. 31. 96:1. April 19.68 Dwelling. Murrah Federal Building fire. 95:6.69 Dwelling. 95:5. Feb.98 Vehicle fire.71 OKLAHOMA Catastrophic fires Aircraft.28 Dwelling.100 Spray from failed pipe ignites and explodes. 96:5. OIL.50 USAR task force response to Murrah Federal Building bombing. 1995.92 Petroleum products manufacturing and distribution facility fire.26 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:3.92 Power plant fire. 97:3. 97:2. 96:6. 93:6. 96:5. 95:4.82 From ruptured line ignited by burners.99 Apartment building. 91:4. 95:1. 93:5. 21. 1990.69 Alfred P. 1995. 93:5.82 No.86 Leaked.62 Manufactured home. possible fire cause. 1997. Alfred P. 1997.32 Sprayed onto furnace ignites gas.33 No. 1991.70 Aircraft. 96:5.70 OIL REFINERY FIRES.53 Catastrophic. 92:4.69 Tank storage facilities.27 Fire spread.49 Lubricating oil Deposits ignited by molten glass. 1991.33 OKLAHOMA CITY. 98:3. June.51. 93:6. Sept.79 Rags soaked with ignite.29 Dwelling. 1996. Nov. 1990. 97:6.97 Fatal fires Dwelling. 5. 20. 91:4. 93:6. 1991.21 Superheated oil and water cause steam explosion. 2 fuel oil. 10. 1994. 93:6. 92:4. 21. 95:4. 1997. 96:6. 1995.69 Storage tank facility.37 Overheated oil in transformer explodes. Dec. 96:1. FIRES OIL WELL FIRES Catastrophic.94. 98:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Residue factor in fire spread. 6 fuel oil Fire fueled by. 95:6.49 Office building.44. NFPA documentation of response. leaked. 19.37 Office building fire.24 Rags impregnated with linseed oil ignite. ignites.94. ignites. 1991. 1992. 94:6.100 Dwelling. 94:5. ignited by. 97:3. 96:5. 96:1. ignites. 95:6.49 Dwelling. 94:3. catastrophic fire. 96:1. 1994. 98:5. 96:6. ignited in. 92:3. 93:2.50.38 Grass/warehouse fire. 93:5. Apr.

92:6.86.45. Nov..89 ORLANDO. 97:5. factor in. 1958.30 Catastrophic fires Apartment building. factor in. 1992. 98:4. fire investigation report. 97:6. 18.76 Wildland fire. July. 98:5. 12. Profile of. 93:6. 94:3.34 Fire drills: The Great Escape. 94:1. DAVID Profile of. Oct. 1996. 98:5.64 Manufacturing plant fire. 1990. S. 93:6. 97:3. 1996. JOHN J.72 OUTREACH COLUMNS College students need fire safety education. CANADA Fatal board and care facility fire. 94:6.30 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 114 .28 Store fire. Aug. See also STAIRWAYS Fire spread through.33 Warehouse fire. 46 Child playing with charcoal lighter. Disney World fire protection systems. 96:1. 1994. 98:5. 97:5. including Risk Watch.29 Manufacturing plant fire.96 Motor vehicle. 91:6.86 ORANGE COUNTY. FLA. 1995. 19. 1993.19 Children use gas grill/pilot lighter to ignite cushions in store fire.28 Tire fire. 95:6. 91:1. theme of Fire Prevention Week 1998. 95:5. 1992.. 98:2. Chicago. 1991. 1990.78 Warehouse fire. 1995. 93:2.84 Manufacturing plant fire.22 OPENINGS.55 Fatal wildland/urban interface fire. 96:3.50 OPEN FLAME DEVICES Catastrophic incendiary fire ignited by. 94:5. 96:5. 1992. 1997.75 Manufacturing plant fire. 98:6. 98:4.59 O'SULLIVAN. IL. 97:4. 1991. FLA.119 Orlando Fire Department offers innovative service to tourist center.35 ONG. Orange County Fire and Rescue Service operates as a consolidated force..104.111 Manufacturing plant fire.49 Board and care facility. 97:1. 98:6. 97:6. March 25.42 OUR LADY OF THE ANGELS SCHOOL FIRE Arson fire.49 Incendiary fire ignited by. 98:6. 1989.27 Motor vehicle repair shop fire. 1993. ignites fatal fire.27 Wildland fire. Feb.38 Hospital fire. 93:6. 96:6. Profile of. March 21.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 OLIVER.32 Fire safety education benefits from teamwork. 1992. fire spread through. 1996.20 Manufacturing plant/laboratory fire. 1994. 94:3.33. 95:6. 97:3. 93:2. 95:6. 92 In fire wall. Jan. 93:6. June 28. 93:2. Aug.36 ONTARIO.93.35 School fire. 98:4.92 Through-penetration protection systems.63 OREGON Apartment building fire. July. 92:2.54 Unprotected Store fire. 91:1. 1995.25 School fire.50 Museum fire. Y. 92:6. 1993. 1996.

1993. 1991.33 Residential sprinklers discussed on television talk show. 97:2. ignited by.62 Paper mill fire fueled by. 97:6.34 U. 94:6.104 Generators in cargo hold possibly activated.28 PAPER Cardboard ignited by forging equipment.36 PENNSYLVANIA Board and care facility fire.56 Scrap paper jams forklift. GEORGE T.17 Smoking.68 Building-under-renovation fire. S.97 Incendiary fire started with paper products. 91:1. 92:4. 92:6.76 Oxygen-enriched atmosphere in operating room intensifies fire.24 PARRY.29 Board and care facility fire. 96:1.30 PENDERGRAS.28 OVENS. 96:5. used to ignite.52 Government building fire.54 Oxygen-enriched atmosphere and oxygen container failure fuel fatal fire. 97:5. ignited catastrophic aircraft fire. 97:2.34 Thanks to those who support fire safety education and need for more assistance. DOUGLAS G. 1997. 94:6.45 NFPA members should use their expertise to be safety role models.32 NFPA Risk Watch addresses eight preventable injuries most threatening to children. stored oxygen. 98:6.34 NFPA Champion Award Program provides age-appropriate fire safety education. 94:6. ignites fire.41 PASSIVE FIRE PROTECTION Value in fire control. 98:6. ignited by. 98:4. 96:6. 96:4. 97:6. DRYING Dust and lacquer in vent system. 97:2. 97:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 NFPA Champion Award Program discourages juvenile firesetting.95 Stored Fire fueled by. Profile of. 1990. 98:5. 92:6. 94:5.96 Nursing home fire.94 Warehouse destroyed by fire. 98:5.64 P PAINT MANUFACTURING PLANT FIRES California.19 Oxygen-enriched atmosphere fueled aircraft fire.26 OZONE Second International Conference.95 Light. ignited by Apartment fire. 94:6. 97:1.36 PARSONS. Profile of. Profile of. society needs to shift focus from fire response to prevention.26 Incendiary fire started in shredded paper. 98:3. 98:1.24 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 115 . 94:6. 97:3.33 Board and care facility fire. 97:5. 98:6. 91:2.24 Rolled Electrical malfunction.24 OXYGEN Fuels hospital fire. May 4.52 Teachers as leaders in fire/life safety education. 97:4. DAVIS R.34 Printing plant fire fueled by. 92:2. ignited by heat source. 94:6. 96:6. analysis. 1997. 96:1.63 Warehouse fire fueled by.

71 Manufacturing plant. June. 92:4. 1996. 1992. 1992.26 Board and care facility. 1991. 1991. 98:6.. Feb. 11. 96:6. 1993. 1997. 1997. 1994. 8. May 25.71 Oil refinery. 98:3. 5.28 Historic mansion fire. 1997. 92:2. Aug.92 Community center fire. 1992.92 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 116 . 31.59 Dwelling.. 91:5. 95:5.95 Manufacturing plant fire.46 Dwelling. 92:4. 1997. 92:6.68 Board and care facility.50 Furniture refinishing plant. 92:4.69 Vacant dwelling fire. 96:5. 1997. March 13. 1991.67 Dwelling. 1995. 98:1. July 30.53 Dwelling. 1991. 1994. 96:6.52 Board-and-care facility. 1996. 1991. Dec. 91:4. 1991.80 Public entertainment center fire.85 Manufacturing plant fire. 92:3. 20. 93:5.49 Dwelling. Jan. 23. 5. 93:5. 1997.23 High-rise office building fire.64 Dwelling.95 Manufacturing plant fire.67 Church fire.84 Manufacturing plant/warehouse fire. 1990. 95:6.23 Fatal fires Apartment building.64. March 3.66 Dwelling. 93:5. 1990. Dec. 24.69 Dwelling. 98:6. 98:1. 98:5.27 Manufacturing plant fire. 16. Oct.45 Automobile. 12. fire investigation report. Aug.62 Dwelling. 92:6. July 4.27 Dwelling. April. 1995.. 93:5. 91:4. 93:5. Dec.56.86 Manufacturing plant fire. Nov.37 College building. 1992.71 Manufacturing plant.28 Manufacturing plant fire. 97:5. 1992. 1992. 1991. 21. 95:5.19 Dwelling fire. 1994. 1992. 14. 98:5. Feb. 98:6. Feb. 1993. 28. 95:5. 1992. 1994. 1997. 98:6. 98:5. 20. 94:5. 1997. May 13. 98:5. Oct. Feb. Feb. 1997. Feb.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Catastrophic fires Apartment building. 98:5.62 Dwelling. 91:5. May 14. Oct. 1995.23 Detention facility fire.73 Church fire. 98:5. 1996. Dec. Jan. April 5. 1997. April 6.97 Dwelling. July 24. May 15. 1991. 96:5. 94:6. 93:1.33 Dormitory fire. 1995. July 25. 92:4. 97:4.62 Dwelling. 23. Oct. Dec.64 Dwelling. 94:6. 1997.74 Furniture manufacturing plant fire. 1994. 20. 1990. 1997. 1991. 94:4. 92:5. 92:4. 91:4. 1990. 93:1.58 Dwelling.34 Dwelling. 97:5. 14. 1993.73 High-rise office building. 23. 1997. Dec.31 Hospital fire. 2. 95:1.60 Dwelling.92 Dwelling. 98:6.96 Shanty. 95:5.99 Dwelling fire.38 Dwelling-under-construction fire. 1993. Sept. 91:4. 1.22. 1994. 93:5. Sep. May 24.

ten year analysis. March 13. Wildland/urban interface fire. 98:6. 24. 97:4. 94:6. Aug. Dec. 91:4. Feb. See FOAM RUBBER OR POLYURETHANE. 1991.24 POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) Hazardous materials response at generating plant fire. 1992. WIS.67 PESHTIGO..21 Shopping mall fire. 92:4. 95:6.86 PETERSON. 1990. 27. 1996. OREGON Preschoolers learn fire safety in Head Start program. Dec.67 POSTAL FACILITY FIRES Massachusetts.56 PIER AND WHARF FIRES Louisiana. ignited in incendiary fire.73 New York. 1991. 23. 1990.12 PHILADELPHIA. lined with plastic bag.99 Storage facility fire. 97:6. 96:6. See also HOMELESS Catastrophic fire.56 Zoo fire. Aug. August. 95:6. 95:5.40 Plastic pellets ignited. 93:6. 96:6.91 Store fires. 93:3.27 POVERTY. 91:4. 94:2. 97:5. INSULATION PORTLAND. 1997. factor in. 93:6.17 Performance in wildland fire. Memorial tribute. 96:5. ignites plastic trim. 92:4.51 Fire risk statistics affected by. 91:6.116 POLYURETHANE FOAM. 97:3.29 Store fire. ignited by cigarettes. PA. High-rise office building fire. 91:2. 93:6. 97:6.35 Store fire.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Research laboratory fire. 1871. May 5.53 PILIERO. 21. 1997. 94:1.25 School fire. 1996. 95:5. 12.56 Improved thermal protection increases heat stress. 97:6. 91:3. 95:3. 96:1.99 Store fire.59 Warehouse fire.89 Subway car fire.104 Torch ignites residual plastic in shredder. 1996.33 Heat lamps ignite plastic trays in restaurant fire.31 Tank farm fire. DANIEL J.24 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Firefighter fatalities wearing PASS devices. Feb.27 Warehouse fire.35 PLASTICS FIRES Acrylic sheet ignited by malfunctioning form machine.34 Shopping mall fire. 94:6.36. 1996.23 Trash container. 98:5.22 Embers ignite polyurethane.92 Transformers. 1994. 1994. 1993. 96:3. 98:6. 95:6. WILLIAM E.103 Rigid plastic insulation... Dec. 1997. 98:4.38 Fan motor overheats. 95:6. 96:3. 91:1.36 Insulation ignited by electric box malfunction.104 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 117 .62 Tire fire. 1995. safety of PCBs in.85 Warehouse fire. 1995. 1990. 1992.69 Warehouse destroyed by fire. 96:1. 92:5. 92:2. 1991. Profile of. Oct.

G... Virginia.54 Austin. Wayne H.20 Ewell. Kenneth W. John A.53 Grant.20 Castino.38 Bailey. 94:1.20 Blair.39 Brace. 96:4. Thomas.30 Fleming.35 Gonzales. Sherwood.36 Boyd. 94:2.39 Greene. 94:3. Donald G. See DETENTION FACILITY FIRES PRODUCT LABELS Effectiveness of labeling systems for flammable and combustible products.. Rocco J.21 Goss.. 95:5.23 Carson.. 93:5. D. Donald J.31 PRESCRIBED BURNS Fire spread beyond containment lines.22 Glatfelter. 94:3. 98:4.23 Hewitt..30 Gabriele. 92:3. 98:4. 91:6.14 Forsman.20 Cox. Jasper Stillwell. Feb. 94:5. Leonard R.38 Bukowski.36 Crawford. 96:5.20 Dungan.37 Brannigan.20 Bell. 96:3. 95:4. Robert E. Carol. Hal.23 Daly. Glenn P. 92:4. 93:6.. Sultan M. Dan W. Kathleen H..22 Brice. Frank.. 98:1.. 94:1.71 PROFILE COLUMNS Almand.18 Bliss... Terry-Dawn. P... Ernest. fires caused by (See UTILITIES) POWER PLANT FIRES. 96:2..21 Bruno.23 Breedlove. 95:2.16 Bathurst. Wendy L.27 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 118 ...37 Javeri.72 POWER SAWS Gasoline-powered saw ignites roof fire. 96:5. 98:1.26 Gross. 92:1. Donald P... 97:2. 93:6. Russell P. 95:3. 96:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Utilities shut off for nonpayment. 97:6. 96:1. 1994. Tom. A..31 Hathaway.38 Hawkins. 93:3. See also ELECTRIC GENERATING PLANT FIRES Steam. 96:4. Phil. 91:2.. Herman W. 95:5. Howard F.. Margaret D.48 Keigher.37 Fleming. Philip J. 98:2... Diane.32 Hoebel. James R. Douglas P. Texas.. Jim. 92:3. Kay. 98:3.26 Benarick. Richard L.18 Boyd. Olin L. 95:1. Lamont. 96:6. 92:5.20 DiNenno. 95:2.22 Bernd. 97:3..31 PRISON FIRES. 93:4. 95:2. 95:3. 92:2. Joseph M.. James F. Stephen P.. Arthur J. Richard W. 1995.36 Beyreis.. 94:1.36 Boehlert..

36 O'Sullivan. 94:2. John J.14 Nachbar.28.42 Parry. Walter. 97:1. 98:6. 94:6. fuel catastrophic fire.27 Thomas.. III. ignites dwelling fire. John.14 Witzeman. contributes to fire spread.21 Nelson. 91:4..30 Cylinders. Gerald.19 Grill tank fuel. Philip. Warren. 94:6. 97:3. 91:1. 98:3. 95:1.33 Testa.36 Peterson..21 Vidal. 96:6. 93:1. 93:4..20 Scannell. Harold E.. 91:5. 97:4. George T... See also LP-GAS Burner ignites hydrogen.27 Forklift fuel ignited by engine block.22 Lucht. Marian H. Douglas G.26 Grill fuel tank leaks. 97:4. Henry W.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Kung. 97:6. released. 97:1.. 91:5. ignites distribution facility fire. Emerson. fail.12 Proulx. William E. 92:4. 98:6. Douglas R. improperly stored. David A. Gail P. S. 97:4.23 Moses. 98:5.33 Gas lines fail.100 Cylinders ignited by spreading fire.21 Nelson. Thomas M.. release vapor cloud. Y. 92:6.89 Cylinders BLEVE in fire.20 Grill fuel ignited by open flame. Mary. David J. Lamar. 98:2.39 Lopes. 97:5. 97:2.41 Pendergras. 93:2. Kenneth J.38 Oliver. David. Guylène.20 Sanders.22 Mattern. William L.22 Richardson. 96:4. Davis R. 94:6.55 Sharry. Nancy J. Angela D.39 Trench. 93:2.39 Lion. Art. 95:6.33 Fire and explosion involving. 91:6.. Rocky. 98:5.26 Simmons. 91:3.37 Lingenfelter. 91:3.57 Renfrew.37 PROPANE.23 Smittle. BLEVE.33 Mickalide.. 93:3.35 Ong.70 Gas released from cylinder explodes.22 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 119 .30 Moore. 93:1.23 Cylinders explode in auto repair shop fire..34 McDaniels..36 Cylinders leak. Wayne D. 94:5. 97:4.. 92:5.. 91:1.. 94:3. 95:4. 96:2. 96:1. 97:5.16 Long.36 Parsons. 91:2. Lou. Jerry.31 Labauve..... 94:4.. Jeffrey.47 Pullan. Jennifer L. 97:3. Hsiang-Cheng. Russell E.28 Cylinder ruptures when overfilled. Curt.17 Norstrom. H. 93:5. 98:6.20 Stronach. 96:3. Ian. 94:4.19 Weldon.

19 Tank trucks at fire site hampered fire fighting. Aug. 98:5. 92:6.44 Fire investigation report. wood trim. 95:4. 98:3. 98:5. 94:1.21 Meeting hall fire. 98:2. starts fire. 93:5. portable. 94:6. See also FIRE SERVICE COMMUNICATIONS Ham radio operators' role in emergency communication. 97:2.19 PULLAN. 98:3. 1993. 97:6. Jan. 98:2.21 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING Rescue worker without clothing killed. 1997. FIRES IN. 96:5. 97:1. 95:1. updates fire protection system. 95:6.. 94:3.67. causes explosion. 91:6. 91:2. Dec. 1997.36 Tank truck leak ignites fatal truck/clubhouse/storage tank fire.28 Juveniles inhaling propane inadvertently ignite residual gas.19 Space heater ignites gasoline vapors. CANADA Fatal board and care facility fire.28 Heater. 98:2. 91:1.26 RADIO COMMUNICATIONS.73 Tanks protected in manufacturing plant fire. forcing fire fighters to evacuate building fire.19 Torch ignites roof framing. Tennessee.92 Meeting hall fire. 1994.26 Stove fuel contributes to spread of catastrophic fire. 94:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Grill tank fuel released.94 PROULX. Cincinnati. 28. ignited by electrical arc. 31. ignites paper.32 Isobutyl propane. GUYLENE Profile of.46 RADIO STATION FIRES California. 97:1. 1997.120 PUBLIC ASSEMBLY OCCUPANCIES.35 Heaters ignite wood sprinkler enclosures. Pennsylvania.38 Tire fire. 1996 Analysis of fire.32 Torch ignites roof. 98:1. 97:6.47 PUBLIC ASSEMBLY OCCUPANCIES Crown Coliseum arena. 97:6.55 R RACE TRACK FIRES Louisiana. June 5.53 Q QUEBEC. 97:3.96 Tank explodes. Missouri. 93:4.28 Torch ignites shingles. 1990.21 Vapor cloud ignites.30 Water heater pilot light ignites spilled gasoline vapors. FIREWORKS Catastrophic storage and manufacturing facility explosion and fire.53 Torch ignites restaurant fire. See also EXPLOSIVES. 93:6. 94:6.96 Tank vents.73 Torch ignites couch. Massachusetts. 91:6. ignited by spark. See also specific occupancies Entertainment center. Ohio. ART Profile of. 1997. 98:6. 93:2. 94:6.89 RACK STORAGE Fire in.19 Torch ignites school fire.95 Torch ignites combustible crates and plastic.30 Tank truck fuel leak ignited by open flame. 96:6. 96:2.57 PYROTECHNICS. 93:3. 93:2.40 RAILROAD ROLLING STOCK FIRES © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 120 .22 Torch ignites fire in roof drain.

89. CONDOMINIUM FIRES. Jan. 1997. FIRES California. Inc. 93:6. DWELLING FIRES. vacant. May 5.75 Utah. 98:6. Calif. 97:5. key to safety efforts.91 Hazardous materials database software for responders.29 Building-under-construction.87 Fire statistics and safety information. 98:6. 92:2. 92:6. NFPA Rail Transportation Systems Section. 21. OIL. 98:6. 92:4. Oct.63 California. See also APARTMENT BUILDING FIRES.89 Jet ski. 1990. fire.49 Texas.101 Passenger train collision. Utah.66 Locomotive collision.22 RESCUE.72 Freight train collision. 1991. 1991. Tennessee. Oct. 16. 1996. 98:6. 19. 1991. 91:1. Aug. 92:1.70 Carburetor floods. 1997.84 Catastrophic Louisiana. 98:3.. 92:5. April. 1992. 1996. Profile of. earthquake. 25. 98:6. 1995. 94:6. Nov. 1995. Jan. Florida. Dec. 12.160 Fire fighter fatalities related to. 94:5. Oct. Ohio.106 Passenger train collision. 97:3. spotlights problems of large records-retention facilities.101 Technological advances.88 Gymnasium. 2. 98:1. 98:5.68 Pennsylvania.. 1992. March. Rhode Island. 1997. 96:5. 1997.30 Bowling alley. Illinois.59 Freight train collision. training. Maine. 1992. Jan. 16. Texas. 1995.70 Freight train collision.26 Bowling alley. Georgia.112 Home health care safety risks. Aug. March 3. 96:6. 97:6. See FIRE SERVICE RESCUE AND EXTRICATION RESEARCH LABORATORY FIRES Pennsylvania. Illinois. vacuum cleaner ignites gasoline vapors. June 19.. March 4. March 17. 1996. LP-Gas tank car derailment. March. 1992.93 Pennsylvania. 95:4. MULTIPLE-OCCUPANCY FIRES Candles as cause of. 1991. South Brunswick. Arizona. 92:4.52 RENFREW. 22. statistics and fire safety information. 91:4. Wisc.60 RECORDS STORAGE FIRES Iron Mountain. 92:4. releases gasoline vapors which ignite. New Jersey. 91:4.96 Louisiana. 6.. 94:5. 1993.91 RECREATIONAL FACILITY FIRES. 1991. 1990. 93:6.79 National Park Visitors Center.82 California.70.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Catastrophic Freight train and tractor trailer-tanker collision. Oct.54. 97:3. catastrophic.88 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 121 .28 REFINERIES. Kansas.77 Ohio. 98:1. 1991. 1993. fire safety information.64 Weyauwega. 98:2. 96:3. 94:4.91 Rail fires survey.25 RESIDENTIAL FIRES. 94:5.36 RELIEF AGENCIES Efforts after Northridge. See also AMUSEMENT CENTER FIRES. 93:6. Feb. 94:6. 95:3. MANUFACTURED HOME FIRES.23 RECREATIONAL VEHICLE FIRES Camper van. 1993. 92:6. July 2. Maryland. 11. Michigan.105. HENRY W. AMUSEMENT PARK FIRES Athletic complex. 97:6.64 Kitchen fire statistics. APARTMENT COMPLEX FIRES. 1997. 1993. 93:1. 96:5.

92:5. 1994. 96:4. 5. Oct. 95:3. 1992. Dec.35 Minnesota. 1995.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 NFPA "Great Escape" promotes home fire drills and escape plans. 97:3. 1997.34 California.25 RESTAURANT FIRES California. 1995.28.67 ROCKET FUELS © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 122 . 93:6.34 Michigan. 97:6. Jan. 6. 95:3. 94:3. 1991. 1955.36 Virginia.25 New York. 93:6. 1993. 96:5. 91:5.18 Virginia. 93:4. 97:1. 18. 98:3. 93:5. 1993.32. 98:5. 93:5..79 Store fire. 1992. 1995.35 Ohio.59 Indiana. 4.55 Residential sprinkler ordinances hurt by public's misconceptions. 1995.74. 96:5. 1990.33 Tennessee. 96:3. 1994. 1990. 97:6. Oct.35 California. 1996.28 Ohio. 1995.86 Warehouse fire.72 Reporting protocol for non-dwelling fires revised.39 RICHARDSON.22. May.39 Warehouse fire. 96:3. Jan.75 Massachusetts. 98:3.21 Oklahoma.79 School fire.66 Iowa. 93:6. 91:5. Aug. 93:2. 1992.32 Products ignited in. 1995. 27. 94:3. 92:3.98 Safe commercial cooking operations.99 Apartment building.22 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. 95:2. 1996. 98:3. 98:2.22 Michigan.29 Illinois.23 Michigan. 1994. KENNETH Profile of. 4. 95:6. 1996. 93:1. 92:6. Wayside Inn fires.20 ROBOTS Tokyo fire service pioneers use.22 Florida.58 Residential sprinklers discussed on television talk show. 97:4. 1997. 96:3.22 North Dakota.93 College building fire. 94:6.. 96:5.96 Apartment building. 23. 1992.31 Florida.22 Catastrophic Indiana.22 Gymnasium fire. Feb. 1993.30 Illinois. 1995. 98:6. 1996.52 RESORT FIRES Colorado. 1965. 1996.25 Massachusetts. 97:2. 95:3. J. 1996. Feb.29 RHODE ISLAND Apartment building fire.62 Connecticut.36. 91:2. 1994. 94:5. 26.37 Dwelling fire. 97:4. 1992. 1994. March. 96:6. 17. 1004. 1992. 95:5.21 Wisconsin. 92:2. 1997. 95:1. 1991. 1994. 91:6. 1992.

91:4. 94:6.70. 96:6. ignited by. 94:6.23 Water supply cut off by.30 Building supply store fire.83 Concrete thickness delays venting.78 Trusses. 98:6.35 Gasoline-powered saw.54 Fire fighting hampered by. 97. 108.28 Sprinkler system damaged by. 53. 93:6. SHAKES Asphalt layers factor in fire spread.94 Layer ignited. in. 92:6. 95:6. 97:1.38 Fire spread to. 92:3.31 Grass fire.21 Snow.21. 98:2. 96.27 Catastrophic dwelling fire. 57.30.94 Fire fighter fatalities related to. 93:5. 91:3.95 Hotel fire.104 Second roof installed over existing roof conceals fire.64 Shopping mall fire.20 Fireworks.29. 98:4. 70.93. in apartment building fire. ignited by. 94:4. causes test facility explosion.97 Plywood subroof spreads fire. 97:6. See also CONCEALED SPACES. 6. 92:5.18 Store fire. 91:6. tar ignite roof framing. 97:4.40 Multiple layers. 97:6. 92:4. 94:6. cause of fire fighter fatalities. 97:4. 92:4. 92:6.49.21. 94:6.40 Roofer's torch ignites roof. 95:5. ignite fire. 98:6.109.98 Metal roof installed over existing roof created concealed spaces. WOOD SHINGLES. 98:6. in. 75. 97:2. 97:6. collapse of.57 Trusses.35.98.27.19 Roofer's torch possibly ignites roof.70 Fire spread by. in. 3.83. 96:6.73 Sawtooth roof design channeled fire to assembly area.50 Defensive attack required. in.73. 94:6. 98:2.95 Lightning. 96:2. ignited by.99 Roofer's torch. collapse of.19 Manufacturing plant fire. ignited by.78 Lightning travels along metal roof. 94:4. 95:6.31. 94:6. 93:6.21. 93:6. 91:4. 95:3.95. 96:3. 94:3.35 Fire spread across/through. 95:4. ignites rafters. 107. 98:5.57. 95:4. 95:6.62 Sprinkler system rendered inoperable by. limited fire spread. 94:6. 95:6.29.23.19 Roofer's torch ignites insulation. 92:4. ignited by. 91:4. in automobile repair shop fire. 97:1.54 Building-under-construction fire.107 Collapse Apartment building fire.74. in. 91:6. 96:6. 98:1. 95:6.59 Fire vented through.80.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Mixture ignites.69 Fire started in. 98:2. framing fails and collapses. 95:6.89 Equipment damaged by. 91:5.84 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 123 . 94:6.40 ROOFS. 94:6. in.18. ignites manufacturing plant fire. 6. 97:6.84. 49. 85. 97:5. 106. 92:6. 95:6.98.28. ignited by.59 Fire fighter injuries related to. damages electrical panel. 93:6. collapse of. 97:2.106 Electrical grounding. fire. 97:3. 97:6. 100.67.22 Trusses. 6. 96:6. 97:2. in.29. 94:5. 6.21.87 Storage facility fire. 52 Rescue prevented by.26 Insulation ignited by welding. hamper fire service operations. 5.37.27 Gas-fueled fire. in.94 Roofers run screw through electrical conduit.21.21 Noncombustible.

25 Trash container.30 Cigarette(s) ignite fire in trash barrel. 97:1. 97:3.25 Wood shingles ignited by fireworks.26.29 Lighter ignites trash in catastrophic fire. CALIF. ignited in. 1989. fire ignited in. 94:6.20 SAWMILL FIRES California. 95 Tar paper ignited by torch. government. 93:1.89 Tar.98 Burning paper in waste disposal system ignites stored waste.24 RUGS. 98:6. delayed sprinkler activation. fire ignited in.52 Trash. March.90 Wood. 97:1.99 Wood shake shingles factor in wildland fire spread. JERRY © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 124 . 94:5.68 Manufacturing plant fire. fire ignited in. Feb.88 Fire department peer mediation program. 1991. Earthquake and subsequent fires.35 Smoking materials ignite trash in catastrophic fire. 94:5. 91:1. 96:3. ignite waste products. 92:1. fire ignited in.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Sloped.95 ROOMING HOUSE FIRES Catastrophic.26 SCANNELL. 94:3. 91:4.38 Shredded trash.35 Cigarette(s) ignited trash in catastrophic fire.119 SANDERS. 95:6. 93:6. 1991. 92:4.62 Fire fighting challenges of city fire department.27 Apartment fire spread. 97:5. 98:6. 96:5. RUSSELL E. 96:4. 92:6. Profile of. 97:3. 94:5.53 Dumpster. 94:6. 94:6.19 RUBBER FIRES. See also FOAM RUBBER OR POLYURETHANE Hot rubber waste ignited in waste hopper.40 RUBBISH AND TRASH. 94:6.33 Tar on roof contributes to fire spread.24 Cigarette lighter used to ignite dumpster trash. See CARPETS AND RUGS RURAL FIRES Prevention is shared responsibility of citizens. 91:4. 95:2.21. 97:5.31 Electric skillet ignites trash container.69 Waste chemicals in dumpster react. 6. involves warehouse. 18. 1991. 98:5. 91:3.27 Trash on loading dock. factor in.67 Massachusetts. 94.25 Basement debris. 94:6.79 Wyoming.24 Debris used as shelter by homeless burned in catastrophic fire.30 Wood-and-tar roof ignited by torch. 97:3.20 Cigarette(s) ignite construction debris.96 "Tudor" soffit allowed fire spread. 95:4. 96:2. 97:5. 94:3. ignited by. 94:6. 93:6. fire service. fire ignited in.93. 96:5. 92:4.87 Rags soiled with stain ignite other trash. See also DUMPSTER FIRES Aerosol can used to ignite trash.35 S SAN FRANCISCO. 1996.89 Wood shingles ignited by cigarette. 92:4. 98:4.82 Smoking materials ignite fire in trash container. fire ignited in. factor in wildland fire spread.23 Tar kettle ignites propane leak. 93:6.84 Unknown source ignites trash in catastrophic fire.69 Cigarette(s) ignites fire in trash bag. Ohio. 91:6. October 17.

91:3. 95:6. 1994. 24. cause of fire fighter fatalities. 97:4. 96:3.93.24 Natural gas explosion.29 Secondary. 92:6.80 SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS Air supply used up. 94:2.73 Middle. Oct.64. 1997. Texas. 1993.105 Under construction.110. 1993.70 Fire safety implications of home security systems. 98:4. Tennessee. 96:5. 1992.29 Catastrophic. D. elementary. Florida.32 SERVICE STATIONS Station design must consider technology. 93:1. 92:2. 92:6. factor in storage facility fire.25 Elementary.30 Secondary. Mississippi. 97:5.95. 1991. 93:6. Dec. California. 1937.72 Secondary. planned programs for.4 Gates. 1995. 1992. Chicago.39 Elementary. 96:5. code and federal requirements.21 Elementary. 1991. Sept. IL. Massachusetts. factor in school fire. 1990. 96:6.51. March. 96:6.104 SCHOOL FIRES California. 1994. 92:5.33 Elementary. 94:5.28 Our Lady of the Angels school.94 School fire safety holds lessons for other occupancies. 92:6. market demand. 98:5. 93:5. Oregon.28 Elementary.30 Vacant school complex.37 Locked exits (See EXITS) School exits require balancing fire safety and security needs.48 SECURITY PROVISIONS Airport security measures jeopardize life safety.27 SCOTTSDALE. 1958.40 SEATTLE. 1994. 92:4. 98:3.29. 97:3. Indiana. 96:1. 91:2. 95:3.23 Washington. 16.76 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 125 . 91:4. Maryland.C airports equipped with state-of-art security systems. Indiana. April.46 Fire drills.55 Ship fire. Pennsylvania. 96:1. California. 95:2.62. 93:6.85 Building security measures contribute to fire deaths. 1995. factor in. 94:3. 1996. Utah. Nova Scotia. Virginia. 1992. March.26. Canada. 91:4.79 Gates. 1991. 1991. 94:3. 98:1. Massachusetts.28.34 Secondary.110 Chain and lock on fenced area.. chains. Rhode Island.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Profile of.98 Secondary.27 Secondary. 94:5. factor in fatal fire. 92:2. ARIZONA Required residential sprinklers increase fire safety. 95:3.79 Secondary.96 SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING Fire protection for. 96. 1991. 94:3.55 SCHOOLS Exits require balancing fire safety and security needs. 1993.56 Electronic locking devices hindered rescue in catastrophic prison fire.45. Oregon. 94:5. 98:3. Minnesota. 93:3. March 18. 93:5. 92:4. 98:4. 50 Fatal fires. WASHINGTON Fire alarm system installer certification required by. 1993.46 Security bars Catastrophic fires.25 Vacant. 94:1. 96:5. New London. 95:6.98 Secondary. 97:5. factor in. 93:4. 97:6.

Missouri. 91:4. 30.21 New Jersey. 16.58 NFPA's 75 years of marine fire protection. Alaska. 97:6. 98:6. 92:4. 92:6. 14. 93:2. 94:6.23 SINCE YOU ASKED COLUMNS Electrical experts answer questions on /iNational Electrical Code/I. 94:6.28 Public fire protection's most asked questions. 1949. 91:1. 1904. 11. 97:6. See also BARGE FIRES.. 1992.80 S.44 SMITTLE. 97:5. Halifax. 92:6. See WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS SHANTY FIRES Catastrophic.96 SHIP FIRES.53 Missouri.30 NFPA 99.108 Cruise vessel fires raise questions about regulations. 1996.29 SIGNALING SYSTEMS. Sept. Health Care Facilities. 97:2.69 SHARRY.. 94:2.28 Fire extinguisher questions. 6. May. See DETECTORS. Noronic. Sept.28 Hazardous materials classification and containment. 94:6. 95:4. 93:2. 1996. Sept.21 California. 1990.26 Catastrophic.. N. Oct. WALTER. 1989. 92:6. 1990. 96:1. 1917. Oct. Louisiana.19 New Jersey. 1991. March 24.70 Passenger cruise ship. N.54 Tanker. 98:3..99 Pennsylvania. 1993. S. 1993. 97:1. 92:6.70 Texas.48 Florida. BOAT FIRES Catastrophic Barges. 1991. 98:6. Seattle. 98:3. 1991. 92:1. Y. 95:6.26 SHED FIRES California. Toronto. JOHN Profile of. July 27. 1997.70 Wisconsin. Pennsylvania. 1990.35 Florida. 98:2.30 Questions on various codes answered.20 SMOKE DETECTORS. 92:3. Nov. 1993. Nova Scotia. 96:6. 91:4. 1996.66 Fish-processing vessel. Sept. Canada. PHILIP Profile of. Dec. March. 17. 9. Y. 96:4. 94:5. questions. 1995.. III Profile of.70 Texas.20 Nevada.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 SERVICE STATION FIRES Massachusetts. See ALARM SYSTEMS SIMMONS. 96:3. 1995. 96:5. 96:6. 6. 1997. 97:4. Wash.77 Pennsylvania.20 SHIP EXPLOSIONS Munitions ship. 1992.90 Tanker fire safety. 1994. Aug.91 SHOPPING MALL FIRES Arkansas. 96:6. 96:2.21 SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS. Texas. Dec. SMOKE SMOKE INHALATION © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 126 .21 New York. 1997.21 West Virginia. 1991. 1996.98 Large-loss-of-life General Slocum excursion steamer.

96:3. 91:6. 98:5. 91:1.30 Passenger terminal fire cause. possible. 93:5.111 Careless use of Catastrophic apartment building fire cause.30 Fatal dwelling fire cause.50 Dwelling fire cause. 98:5. 96:4.50 Incendiary fire started by.77 Board and care facility fire cause.52 Catastrophic dwelling fire cause.46 Catastrophic board and care facility fire cause. 96:5.56 Catastrophic fire cause. 97:6. COLO.67.4 U. 95:2.29.53 Catastrophic apartment building fire cause. 1980-88. 95:6. 95:2.40 Manufacturing plant fire cause. 96:5.62. 95:6. 1994. 95:2. 97:5.21 SMOKE VENTS Satisfactory performance. 94:5.52. 92:4. use on. 92:6. 97:5. 64 Catastrophic fraternity house fire cause. 92:2. possible.38 SMOKE REMOVAL SYSTEM Polyurethane foam manufacturing plant fire.39 Printing plant fire fueled by.64 NFPA joins fight against smoking.46 Catastrophic limited care facility fire cause.15 Fatal hotel fire cause.64.66. 96:5.27 Hotel fire cause.69. 93:1. possible.24 Motor vehicle repair shop.64. ignited by. fire deaths caused by.28 Hot engine.102.53 Catastrophic dwelling fire cause. 94:5. marijuana cigarette. 93:5. 93:5.21 Funeral home fire cause. 95:1.34 Fatal dwelling fire cause. ignited by. 98:6. used as solvent. 1995 statistics. 96:6. 98:6. overview of. 98:1. 93:5.23 SMOKING MATERIALS. warehouse fire. 95:5. 97:5. 91:4. 95:3.56. 91:4. explode. 92:6. 91:5.35 Warehouse fire cause.30 Wildland/urban interface fire cause.96.50. 95:5. Wildland fire. See COMPUTER SOFTWARE SOLVENTS Aerosol solvent containers damaged by forklift.102 Catastrophic board and care facility fire cause.86 SOFTWARE. ignited by torch. 96:4. S. 98:5.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fire fighter injuries related to.63 PVC.24 Hospital fire cause. 91:6. ignited by gas furnace. 96:6. 96:5. 91:2. 96:6.92. catastrophic fire cause.75 Smoke and burns compared as fire death causes. 98:5. 97:5. 96:3. 95:1. 91:4. 96:5.56 U.23 Fatal oil-change facility fire cause. 94:4.23 Spark from forklift. 94:6.91.35. 97:6.91. 96:5.66.76 Restaurant fire cause.103 Gasoline .23 Drums of solvent ignited. 95:5. See also CIGARETTES Careless disposal of Apartment building fire cause. S.68. fire deaths caused by.51 SOUTH CAROLINA © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 127 . 95:5.22 Barracks fire cause. 93:5.97. 97:5. 97:6.62 Dwelling fire cause.28 SOUTH CANYON FIRE.26 Fraternity house fire cause.

1997.27 Stain-soaked paper towels. Jan. 92:4.75 From steel wool ignited varnish remover.24 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:6.56. 93:6.95 Store fire. Jan. 92:6. 7. May 23. Nov. See TRUCK FIRES SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. 22. Nov.80 Manufacturing plant fire.64. 1993. 97:6.75 SOVIET UNION Fire prevention and suppression programs in.79.50 SPAS National Electrical Code prevents accidents. 1997. 95:6. 19.32 Manufacturing plant fire. 93:6.64 Dwelling. 98:5.100 Fatal truck/storage tank fire. 98:6.31 Fire department pumpers supply system. Feb.24 From tool ignited gasoline. 96:5.87 Manufacturing plant fire.26 Chemicals (CMDP) in laboratory. 93:6. 91:4. 13. 98:6.69 Dwelling.26 Board and care facilities use.31 From grinding operation ignited building materials. Sept.45 Manufacturing plant. 91:5.30 Hydrogen peroxide.74 Gasoline ignited by.88 SOUTH DAKOTA Catastrophic dwelling fire. 1994. 94:3.38 Varnish-saturated paper towels. 91:5. 94:5.21 Stain-soaked rags. 98:6..21 Solvent soaked rags. 91:4. 94:6. 92:3.29 SPORTS UTILITY VEHICLE FIRES. Jan. 1992. 92:4.26. 98:4. May 8. 91:4. 1991. 98:6. 91:6.32 Manufacturing plant fire..67 SPARKS Electrical conduit ignited natural gas. June 17. 91:6. 1997..102 Manufactured home. 97:6.71. 91:6.21 Oil-soaked rags.31. 6. water supply industries. 10. 1990. Dec. 7. 93:4.27 Design-related problems. 1992.22 SPONTANEOUS IGNITION Boxed adhesive materials. 94:5. 91:6.75 Backflow prevention assemblies protect public water supply. Jan.27.21 Polyurethane foam bungs.65 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 128 . 1990. 91:2. 94:3.12 Energized electrical/electronic equipment.23 Catastrophic fires Board and care facility.74. 93:5. 97:4.83 Manufacturing plant fire.30 Wood fibers ignited by. 97:5. 93:6. 4.68 Backflow prevention discussed by fire protection. 1995. high-rise building fire. 92:4. 91:2. Nov. See also DELUGE SYSTEMS Advances in systems and codes over thirty years. 1991. 98:6. 1996.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Automobile repair shop fire. 1991. 91:5. 1996. Nov.51 Manufactured home. 91:6.66 Fatal fireworks display accident. 93:2. 28. 91:6. 94:4. 98:5. 1993. 92:6. 1993. use above.34 Community marketing strategy for residential sprinklers. 91:6. 92:5.96 Dwelling. June.89 Warehouse fire. 1990.25. 96:4. 96:4. 91:1. 97:5. 1997.70 Electric generating plant fire.

limits fire. 97:6. 93:6.94 Manual system not activated. 108 Fire above reach of system. 91:6.85. 94:6.52 Sample training exercise for sprinkler placement. 93:6.31.97.26. experience with sprinklers. review of literature. 95:1.108.31 Rendered inoperable by collapse of support. 86.30 Disconnected. 93:1. changes in 1996 edition. 93:6.22 Heat not sufficient to activate. 96:5. 6. 97:6. 96:5. 93:5. 56 Local systems only. Installation of Sprinkler Systems. 93:4.28. 57. 1991 edition overview. 94:3. 95:6. 91:4. 52.32 Water supply ruptured by metal fragments. systems prevent tragedy in.88 Installation incomplete. 85. 93:5. 93:2.35. 94:6. 93:6. 82 Not located in area of origin. 93:5.15 New technology of sprinkler systems.44 Warehouse sprinkler system design. 96:6. 98:1.26.53 Health care facility fires.57 Shut off prior to fire. 92:4.104 Not operational due to previous fire.94 Not operational due to earlier roof collapse. 98:6. 94:6. 98:5.22 Fire extinguished quickly. 96:6.74 Rendered inoperable by explosion.89 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 129 .52 Water pipes frozen. 92:5.44.82. 98:5. 97:6. 95:6. 57 Disconnected for ongoing construction. 91:3.94.23.25.35. 94:6.40 Specialized sprinklers provide more protection at less cost. 97:5.67 Closed valve.26.83. 98:3. 95:6. but create new challenges. 91:6.84.87 Rendered inoperable by tank BLEVE.108 Not operational due to closed valve.62.73. Arizona.69 Rendered inoperable by roof collapse.59 U.87 Rendered inoperable by explosion.93. 97:5.107.49 Heat/flames cause sprinkler pipe elbow to fail. Installation of Sprinkler Systems. 95:1.27. 98:6.38 NFPA 13. 98:1. 56 Not operational due to poor maintenance.68. 98. 96:5. 96:5.34 NFPA 13. 54.58 Residential sprinklers discussed on television talk show. 97:5.26 Nursing home fire verifies authority having jurisdiction/engineers joint design. 97:4. 97:6. 92:5.72 Water supply shut off. 95:5.59 Fire burns through PVC sprinkler supply pipe. Installation of Sprinkler Systems.52. 98:2. changes in.14 NFPA sprinkler system requirements to be consolidated in NFPA 13.65. 93:6. 97. 1994 edition. 96:6. 92:2. 95.22.92. experience with required residential sprinklers. 95:6.86. 91 Not operational. building collapse.74. 97:6. 98:6. 96:4. 88 Inoperable while undergoing repair.33 Inoperable at time of fire. 98:6. 97:6.63 Shut off for winter.56.67.27 Residential sprinkler ordinances hurt by public's misconceptions.54 Partial system only.58 Did not cover area of fire. 94:6.29.50.24 Fire extinguished prior to activation.49. 98:5. 6. 96:6.70.49 Scottsdale.54. 94:3. 96:5. 97:6. 93:6. 96:6. 97:1. 91:6.71. 91:5.91. 91:4. S. 93:6.12 NFPA 13.17 Fire on exterior of building.16 SPRINKLER SYSTEMS NOT A FACTOR IN FIRE Branch line disconnected. 94:3.72 Training for fire fighters on system operation. 95:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fire safety importance of sprinkler systems. 96:5. 95:2. 96:5. 96:2.37. 92:4.85 Questions on installation answered. 97:5. 89. 91:6.

27. 4.17. 96:6. 97:6. 94:6. 94:6.53.25. 91:1. 92:6. 6.15.94 STADIUM FIRES Atlanta and Texas fires demonstrate unique protection problems. 2.25. 93:6. 60.28. 91:4.34. 96:6. 88. 97:5.23. 28. 42. 30. 2.62. 30. 96:1. 98:6. 39. 4. 94:5. 6. 67.26.25. 98:5. 24. 93.25.25 System damaged by explosion.23. 17. 95. 30. 93:1.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. 29. 29. 30. NEW BRUNSWICK Detention facility fire. 4. 92:1. 92:3. 89 Storage arrangement caused unnecessary sprinklers to activate.54. 6. 3.53 Limited egress from second floor in large loss of life club fire. 100. 22. 6.33. 30. 96:6.96 Failed to control fire. 98:6. 98.49 Fire spread up. 96:6. 32.107.24 Fire spread to concealed spaces. 37.25. 28. 2. 97. 54 Exterior wooden. 94:5. due to faulty booster pump.103 Sloped roof delayed sprinkler activation. 93:6.21.41. UNSATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE Corroded valve prevents operation. 25. 86 Overpowered by fire. fire spread up.24.49 Overpowered by fire. 4.29. 25.67. 2.91 ST.34. 40. 92:5. 94:2. 34. 93. 91:6.67 STANDARDS. 22. 49. 97.62 No in-rack sprinklers. 54.49. 89 Overpowered by dust explosions.70. 91:4. 93:1. 26. 30. 96:6. 91:4. 98:6.25. 84.36.50 Heat and smoke spread up.23. 22. 91:2. 85.88 Dry-pipe system failed to operate. 2.75. 5. 104. 35. 54.96. 104. See CODES AND STANDARDS STANDPIPE SYSTEMS Handline used to extinguish equipment fire. 87. LOUIS. 23. 98. 5. 69.29.33.30 Inadequate for hazard. 28. 18. 105. 30.90.75.36. 5. 98:1.28. 50. 26.87.33. 24. 66. 94:6.54 Shut down prematurely. 81. 93:6.20. 95:5.27. 3. 4. 26. 65. 64.89 Interior partitions obstructed spray pattern. JOHN.49 STAIRWAYS Catastrophic fire spread up. 94:1. 93:5. 24. 6.88. 5.85 Plywood shelving interfered with system operation. 3. 97:6. 67.92 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 130 . 24. MISSOURI Fire service facilities renovation.22. 95:6. 98:5. 96:5.53.84. 5.68 Water supply inadequate. 29. 38. 98:6.26. 26. 49.45. 29. 66. 96. 3. 4. 5. 98:6. 98:6. 94:6. 64. 93:6. 31. 85. 38. 24.64. 6. 98:1. 95:1. 6.24. June 21. 93:1.29. 3.91. 93:5.22 HVAC equipment blocked sprinklers. 95:6. 91:6. 97:6.35.27.21. 86.20. 85.29.37. 4.21.62 Water supply inadequate.106. 40. 94. 102. 98:5.35 No fire department connection. 58. 96:6. 5.78. 94:6. 5. 59. 92:4. 27. reason unknown. 5.88. 27.62. 5. which did not operate. 98:6. 95:6.37.22. 3.28. 20. 2. 30.40. 30. 94:6.29. 96:4.21. 93:5. 34.90 Did not operate promptly. 91:1. SATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE. 98:1.22. 91 Fire shielded from sprinkler system.95. 23. 92:6.84 Did not operate. 4. 97:1.62 Inadequate for storage configuration. 3. 97:6.33.22.32 Did not function properly.27. 89 SPRINKLER SYSTEMS. 94:4. 92 Ventilation hood blocks water from fire. 5. 93:4.92. inadequate design.39.18. 1977. 24.26.29. 97:6. 32. 6. 28. 31.29. 79. 56.89 Solid shelving interfered with system operation.62. 26.84. 98:6.54.24 Lack of connections hampers fire fighting. 97:6. 29.50 ST.33. 93:6. 31. 86.25. 76.

92:5. Texas.66 LP-Gas underground bulk storage.25 Catastrophic Ammonium nitrate storage silos.97 Polyurethane storage. WAREHOUSE FIRES Agricultural products. 1992. 95:6. April 7. California. March.57 Barn.68 Records storage. 98:3. 93:5. 96:6. Washington. 7. 97:5. Alberta.18 Shoe distribution and storage facility. Nov.68 STORAGE FACILITIES FIRES. Michigan.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Pressure-regulating devices in. 94:5.69 Furniture storage. 96:6. 1991.30 Propane storage tank.19 Automobile repair (See AUTOMOBILE REPAIR SHOP FIRES) Automobiles © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 131 . 1997. 1990. 1996. 1994. Pennsylvania. Sept.24 Pyrotechnics. 1994. Massachusetts. 1993. New Jersey. 1994. Indiana. 1993. New Jersey. 95:6. Kentucky. Minnesota.31 LP-Gas underground bulk storage. 91:5. 8. 94:2. 1996. 96:6. Georgia. 1996.27 Miscellaneous. California.105 Chemical storage. Missouri.68 Agricultural products (grain elevator). See also TANK STORAGE FACILITIES FIRES. 1991. March. California. 96:6. 17.59 Vehicle storage and workshop building. New York. requires unique fire protection measures. 1995. Georgia. Massachusetts.68 Roofing supplies storage. 1997. 1993. Missouri. 1994. 1996.36 Natural gas and gasoline storage. 1993. Massachusetts. 1995. 1992. 1995. 98:6. Washington. 97:5. 1995. March. 95:1. 95:5. 95:5.66 Commercial warehouse. 97:1. 98:5. 92:4. 96:2. 94:4. 92:6.69 Motor home. Oct. 1995. Oct. March 13. Pennsylvania. April.29 Plastic storage and recycling. 1992. May 5.107 Food products.28 Self-storage facility.20 Agricultural products (grain elevator). Tennessee. 1991. 1996. 97:6. 94:1. Ohio. 1997. Nov. 1996. July. 91:5. Maryland. April. 94:6.67 Chemical storage. 98:5. 98:2. Kansas City. Missouri.28 Heavy equipment.68 LP-Gas bulk storage. 97:6.106 Garage. 1997. 98:5. Pennsylvania. 97:2.26 Food products. 97:4.56 Lumber storage shed.27 Tires.30 Public works building.26 Grain mill and storage facility.104 Food products.24 STORE FIRES. Texas. 95:6. Texas. 1996.. 1992.53 Chemical storage. 98:6. Texas.36 Rolled paper storage. 93:1. 93:6.104 STORAGE FACILITIES Underground Hunt Midwest SubTropolis facility.. Missouri. Arkansas. May 27. 93:2. New Hampshire.70 Water supply damaged by explosion.87 Lumber. 96:6. 95:6. March. Ohio. Nebraska. 1994. 1993. 1992. 1995. Texas. 96:6. California.26 Mini-storage facility. 1997. Canada. 1995. 1997. 1994. See also SHOPPING MALL FIRES Appliances. 1996. California. 97:6.52 Alcohol. New York. Georgia. 93:6.91 Residential storage shed. 1.53 Records storage. Jan. June/July. North Dakota. 1995.23 Self-storage facility. 94:2. March. March. June 5.38 Zoo. Colorado. May 8. 1994. 96:6.

97:6.50 Massachusetts.25 Mississippi. 97:6. 92:3.70 Massachusetts. 92:1.89 Block of stores Illinois. 1996. 96:5. 98:6.78 New York. 1992.54 Liquor. 1995. 92:3. 93:3. 1995.32 New York.35 Electronics Florida.36 Laundry/linen supplies. May 23. 1993. 1991. 1989. Pennsylvania.30 Georgia. Jan.. April. 96:6.21 New Jersey. 1996.91 Texas.54 Building materials Alaska.21 Florida. 1993.28 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 132 . 1993. 1996. 16. 1997. Wisconsin.24 Gifts.50 Clothing California. 94:1. Dec. 1993. May 23.32 North Carolina.94 Department California. July 3. 1994.91 Minnesota. 94:6. 1993. 95:6. 26. 97:6. 98:4.66 Hardware California. 1995. Apr.53 Laundromat. Massachusetts. Oct. 94:5. 21. 1993. 1993. 22. 1992. 1993.99 Tennessee. 94:4.31 New Jersey.52 Fishing supplies. 24. Ohio. 98:1.. July. Tennessee. 1992.72 Drug.32 Flea market. 1993. 94:3. 93:3. April. 92:6.91 Furniture repair. 93:3. Jan.33 Pennsylvania.. 96:6. April. 1992. 1997. 1991. July.100 Florida. 98:6. 92:6.30 Michigan. 96:5. 1997. Jan. May.30 New York. 94:6. 1992. 98:6. Washington. 1993. 1995. 1994. Oct. 1996. 98:6. Apr.. 1996.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Illinois. 97:5.89 Florida. Sept.22 Oregon. 97:6. 1991.36 Pennsylvania. 1993. 26.34 Illinois. 94:4. 97:1. Tennessee. 97:3. 93:6. 1997. Florida.89 Hawaii.100 Ohio.27 Georgia. 1996. 97:6.91 Pennsylvania. 95:6.81 Grocery Florida.30 Hawaii. 1997. 1996. 97:5. Massachusetts. 93:5. 25. 94:3. Oct. Oct. 98:1.29 Lumber Alaska. 95:5.38 California. 95:6.26 Maryland.54 Fireworks. 1996. 1991. 94:6. 1990. Aug. 25. 1994. 94:6. 91:1. 8. 1996. 1994. Dec. Dec.. 1993. 1995. 94:6.54. 94:1.

64. 98:1. 95:4. 1997.84 SUBWAY CAR FIRES Pennsylvania. 97:4. IAN Profile of.53 Mixed use.71 Fire fighter fatalities related to. 92:6. 1998.29 Toys Illinois. 91:4. 1989.22 Texas. 91:1. See STORE FIRES SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS. 93:6. 98:5. Jan. Michigan. 52.94 Carbon dioxide shipboard system discharges.25 Electrical generating plant large-loss fire spread limited by. 91:1.33 STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE Allows fire spread. 96:5. South Carolina. 98:4. 58.63.69.30 New Jersey.75 Carbon dioxide. furnishings and interior finishes. 92:6. 94:4.89 Open air flea market. 94:6. 1994. 97:6. 29.98 Fire hazards of contents. 92:4.69 Sporting goods.94 Warehouse fire. 1989. July. April 17. 1994. 74.05.104 Dry chemical hood.49 Warehouse stores present special hazards. 91:2. 91:6. 91:1. Illinois.83 Catastrophic fires.23 Manufacturing plant fire. 98:6. See also SPRINKLER SYSTEMS Advances in systems and codes over thirty years. 97:5.89 Renovations can lead to code-compliance problems. 94:1.45. 97:4. 96:2.39 Secondhand goods.27 Mixed use.66.18. 1995. 96:6. 70. 65. 98:6. overpowered by fire.61. 96:5. 94:4. 94:4.26 Rental. 96:6. 1996.30 Automobile repair shop fire.73. 1996. 98:5. 6.54. 93:4.54 Trucks. Vermont. need special attention.59 Fire fighter injuries related to.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Manufactured home parts. 94:4. 97:6. 94:6. Texas. 1997.44 STRONACH. 1993. 1995.35 Supermarket California. Rhode Island.. 1990. Oct. 93:6. Michigan.28 Massachusetts. 1992. 1996. 95:4.39 Mixed use. Nov.50. Dec. 1990. 97:6. 98:5. Virginia. 7. Connecticut.36 Pennsylvania. 1995.30 Massachusetts. 1993. 64. 94:6. 4. 1994.29 Variety Missouri. Arizona.49.75. 94:5.33 STRUCTURES Fire fighter fatalities while operating inside. Massachusetts. 1995. 97:6. kills two. March 21. 95:3.56 Hampers fire fighting. 96:6. 91:2.84 Athletic complex fire. New York. 97:6. 95:6. 94:6. 98:4.56 STRUCTURAL FIRE SAFETY Fire barriers in structural joints.31 SUBWAY FIRES Token booth. 94:6.57. 92:4.29 Ohio.70 Warehouse store.24 SUPERMARKET FIRES. April. 1993. 67. 96:6.100 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 133 . 6. activated after fire spread to duct. 62.63 Natural gas refueling station. 13. 95:5.36.

106 Mississippi. 1991. 25. 1990.62 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 134 .68 Missouri.19 Michigan. Wisc. 1990. 93:5. Sept.30 TANKER VESSELS Fire safety. 91:6. 93:3. March 9. 92:6. 98:3.70 New York. 91:4. 1997.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Manual water spray system limits fire spread in chemical plant fire. Feb. March 31.66 Pennsylvania.36 Space program technology applied to tank truck fires by NASA. May 27.97 Colorado. July. 1990. 98:2.19 Residue in floor boards spreads fire. 93:6.93. 95:5. Jan. 8.23 Hot tar ignites roof framing. 1991.21 California. July 2. March 17. 96:6. 98:2.. 23. Nov. 1995. 95 TAR KETTLE FIRES Illinois. 98:3.33 TAVERN FIRES. 1995. 91:4. 1990.52 Catastrophic fires Dwelling. 94:6.. 1991. 1992.60 Fatal. 1994. 96:1.89 TANK STORAGE FACILITIES FIRES Catastrophic Iowa. 1994. 94:5.64 Water cannons control refinery fire.96 Water mist systems. 1992. 1990.68 Missouri. 1993.83 Roofing tar spreads fire. 20. 96:6.62 TANK TRUCK FIRES Catastrophic Florida. March 11.70 TANKS.66 Kentucky. April 16. 97:3. 1996. 96:5. June 19. 1992. 91:6. 92:4. 1992.29 Oregon. 93:6. 91:6. 94:5.70 West Virginia. partnership. DIPPING Bonderizing tank liquid overheats. 1992. NFPA. 91:4. 1995.52 Tennessee.72 Tennessee. 8. 95:5. Chicago Fire Dept. See RESTAURANT FIRES TENNESSEE Board and care facility fire. 92:1. Florida.42 TAR Hot tar ignites roof. 1993.29 Georgia. 93:5. 1992.108 Fatal California. 96:5.104 Louisiana. Oct.69 Oklahoma. 1995. 1993. May 16. 94. May 11. 97:5. 93:5. LP-Gas tank car derailment. 91:4.46 T TANK CARS. 13. 91:3. 1990. March 4. 1996.67 Dwelling. Dec. RAILROAD Weyauwega.73. 94:3. 1996. 96:6.84 Pennsylvania. ignites. 96:3. Apr. 94:5.67 Ohio. May 20. 1990. 92:4.23 Oklahoma. 93:6. 98:2.66 Oklahoma. April.

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Dwelling, Apr. 13, 1996, 97:5.49 Manufactured home fire, March 4, 1994, 95:5.56 Motor home fire, Aug. 14, 1992, 93:5.68 Motor vehicle/railroad rolling stock fire, June 19, 1990, 91:4.70 Motor vehicle fire, Dec. 11, 1990, 91:4.70 Motor vehicle fire, Nov. 11, 1994, 95:5.68 Motor vehicle, Apr. 3, 1997, 98:5.55 Storage and manufacturing facility, June 5, 1997, 98:5.53 Church fire, 1992, 93:6.30 Detention facility fire, June 26, 1977, 94:5.50 Fatal board and care facility fire, February 8, 1996, fire investigation report, 98:5.38 Hospital fire, 1991, 92:5.25 Manufacturing plant fire, Sep. 18, 1997, 98:6.85 Nursing home fire, April 25, 1994, 95:2.85 Restaurant fire, 1997, 98:5.18 Secondary school fire, 1993, 94:2.30 Stores, museum, amusement center fire, July, 1992, 93:6.81 Store fire, Oct., 1993, 94:6.91 Store fire, May 23, 1996, 97:6.54 Warehouse fire, 1990, 91:5.25 TERMINAL FIRES New York, Sept., 1991, 92:6.76 TERRORISM Airport security measures jeopardize life safety, 96:6.85 Bomb site, fire fighter injuries related to, 98:6.54 Emergency response preparedness for, 96:1.54 Emergency response training funded by Domestic Preparedness Act, 98:1.38 Explosion and fire caused by, Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, Okla., Apr. 19, 1995, 96:1.50, 59, 96:5.94, 96:6.69 Explosion and fire caused by, Sandy Springs, Georgia, Jan. 12, 1997, 97:3.52 Explosion and fire caused by, World Trade Center, New York, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1993, 93:6.91, 94:5.104, 94:6.90, 95:2.59 Federal program trains first responders for terrorist attacks, 98:6.31 Fire service preparation for attacks, 97:3.52 Fire services must be prepared for terrorist attacks, 96:2.35 USAR task force response to Murrah Federal Building bombing, 96:1.59 TEST FACILITIES FIRES Rocket fuel propellants, California, 1994, 95:4.40 TESTA, WILLIAM L. Profile of, 94:6.27 TEXAS Aircraft crash fire, April, 1993, 94:6.98 Apartment building fire, 1996, 97:2.22 Apartment building fire, Jan. 16, 1997, 98:6.90 Catastrophic fires Aircraft explosion, Sept. 11, 1991, 92:4.72 Apartment building, Aug. 21, 1993, 94:5.100 Automobile, July 12, 1993, 94:5.108 Board and care facility, Apr. 11, 1993, 94:5.105 Dormitory, Apr. 19, 1993, 94:5.95 Dwelling, Oct. 7, 1991, 92:4.68 Dwelling, Feb. 2, 1995, 96:5.92 Dwelling, July 22, 1995, 96:5.92 Dwelling, Oct. 21, 1995, 96:5.93 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 135

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Group home, March 24, 1991, 92:4.70 Manufacturing plant, July 5, 1990, 91:4.67 Motor vehicle, Jan. 18, 1994, 95:5.68 Ship, Oct. 9, 1993, 94:5.108 Storage facility, April 7, 1992, 93:5.67 Vacant dwelling, Nov. 12, 1990, 91:4.68 Chemical warehouse fire, 1990, 91:6.26 Church fire, 1992, 93:6.30 Church fire, 1996, 97:1.27 College laboratory fire, 1996, 97:5.23 Condominium fire, Dec. 14, 1996, 97:6.58 Dwelling fire, 1995, 96:5.25 Dwellings, multiple, fire, 1995, 96:4.21 Dwelling fire, March 20, 1997, 98:6.90 Fatal fires Board and care facility, Aug. 13, 1990, 91:4.68 Dwelling, 1994, 95:2.29 Dwelling, 1997, 98:5.17 Hotel, 1996, 97:4.19 Laboratory, 1991, 92:5.28 Manufacturing plant, 1996, 97:2.24 School explosion, March 18, 1937, 93:5.94 Shed, 1992, 93:2.20 Storage facility, April, 1992, 93:6.87 Grass fire, 1991, 92:2.28 Ink manufacturing plant fire, 1992, 93:1.28 Manufacturing plant fire, 1990, 91:6.24 Manufacturing plant fire, July 5, 1990, 91:6.78 Manufacturing plant fire, March, 1991, 92:6.75 Manufacturing plant fire, June, 1991, 92:6.79 Manufacturing plant fire, Jan., 1992, 93:6.83 Manufacturing plant fire, July, 1993, 94:6.94 Manufacturing plant fire, Oct., 1994, 95:6.102, 108 Manufacturing plant fire, 1995, 96:6.23 Manufacturing plant fire, July, 1995, 96:6.64 Manufacturing plant fire, Aug., 1995, 96:6.64 Manufacturing plant fire, Apr. 23, 1996, 97:6.49 Manufacturing plant fire, Jan. 31, 1997, 98:6.86 Manufacturing plant fire, June 29, 1997, 98:6.85 Manufacturing plant fire, Aug. 28, 1997, 98:6.87 Motor vehicle repair shop fire, 1990, 91:2.31 Nightclub fire, 1991, 92:6.25 Office building/warehouse fire, Oct., 1994, 95:6.99 Prescribed burn spreads beyond containment, 1994, 95:2.31 Railroad rolling stock fire, Oct. 25, 1997, 98:6.91 Refinery fire, April, 1991, 92:6.75 Ship fire, Nov. 11, 1997, 98:6.91 Special property fire, 1993, 94:4.29 Storage facility fire, 1994, 95:1.31, 95:6.38 Storage facility fire, June/July, 1995, 96:6.66 Store fire, July, 1995, 96:6.70 Store fire, Sept., 1995, 96:6.72 Utility company transformer fire, 1997, 98:1.22 Warehouse fire, 1993, 94:4.32 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 136

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Warehouse fire, June, 1993, 94:6.96 Warehouse fire, Nov., 1993, 94:6.95 Warehouse fire, July, 1994, 95:6.108 Warehouse fire, 1997, 98:5.18 Wildland fire, 1994, 95:2.31 THAILAND Catastrophic manufacturing plant fire, May 10, 1993, 94:1.42 Royal Jomtien hotel fire, July 11, 1997, fire investigation report, 98:2.34 THEATER FIRES California, 1995, 96:1.24 California, 1996, 97:3.29 Florida, 1995, 96:2.26 Iroquois Theatre fire, Chicago, Ill., Dec. 30, 1903, 95:4.75 THERMAL ENERGY GENERATING PLANT FIRES Catastrophic, New Jersey, Dec. 25, 1992, 93:5.67 THOMAS, H. EMERSON Interview with, 95:5.86 Profile of, 98:6.39 THROUGH-PENETRATION PROTECTION SYSTEMS Update on systems, 94:1.54 TIRE FIRES Hagersville, Ont., 1990, 91:1.50 Pennsylvania, March 13, 1996, 97:6.59 Saint Amable, Que., 1990, 91:1.55 TORCHES ABS piping ignited by, 91:6.73 Acetylene Concealed space fire ignited by, 94:6.93 Ethyl alcohol vapors ignited by, 93:5.67 Plastic greenhouse cover ignited by, 92:4.25 Butane, ignites insulation materials, 96:1.22 Cutting Ammonium nitrate powder ignited by, 94:5.105 Cardboard, plywood ignited by, 95:6.104 Cardboard ignited by, 94:6.97 Carpets ignited by, 94:6.97 Ceiling material ignited by, 95:6.108 Foam insulation ignited by, 98:6.84 Gasoline vapors ignited by, 95:6.38 Hot metal filings ignite insulation, 97:2.23 Methane gas vapors ignited by, 93:5.67, 93:6.82 Slag and hot metal ignite combustibles, 97:3.29 Slag ignites paper and insulation, 97:5.52, 6.59 Wood ignited by, 95:5.35 Hot slag from torches ignites plastic modules, 93:5.67 Hydraulic oil residue ignited by, 92:3.32 Newspaper, ignites wood joists, 94:5.96 Oil well explosion and fire, possible cause of, 92:4.71 Open-flame, ignites pipe insulation materials, 91:6.23 Plumber's, ignites structural wood framing, 98:3.42 Propane Combustible crates and plastic ignited by, 91:6.73 Restaurant fire ignited by, 91:2.32 Roof drain fire ignited by, 97:6.53 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 137

NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Roof framing ignited by, 98:2.19 Roof ignited by, 97:6.19 Shingles, trim ignited by, 97:2.21 Roofing Insulation ignited by, 95:3.40 Roof ignited by, 94:3.29, 94:6.95, 95:6.98, 96:6.73, 97:2.21, 6.19, 53 Wooden roof members ignited by, 94:6.96 Spark ignites rubber seal, 93:6.85 Welding Electric, ignites residual plastic in shredder, 96:5.23 Polyurethane mats ignited by, 94:5.30 PVC solvent vapors ignited by, 96:6.23 TORONTO, CANADA Hazardous materials response teams, 92:1.38 Large-loss-of-life fire, S. S. Noronic, Toronto, Canada, Sept. 17, 1949, 97:1.58 TOWNHOUSE FIRES. See APARTMENT BUILDING FIRES TOXICITY, COMBUSTION Review of major issues concerning toxicity, 96:6.90 TRAILERS, CAMPING. See CAMPING TRAILER FIRES TRAINS. See RAILROAD ROLLING STOCK FIRES TRANSFORMER FIRES Texas, 1997, 98:1.22 TRANSFORMERS Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in, 91:1.116 TRASH. See RUBBISH AND TRASH TRENCH, NANCY J. Profile of, 93:3.21 TRIANGLE SHIRTWAIST CO. FIRE Outrage, reform as results, 93:3.72 TRUCK FIRES. See also TANK TRUCK FIRES California, 1991, 92:6.26 Catastrophic Arkansas, Jan. 9, 1995, 96:5.99 California, Jan. 23, 1990, 91:4.70 California, Dec. 25, 1991, 92:4.73 California, March 3, 1994, 95:5.68 California, June 23, 1995, 96:5.100 California, June 27, 1995, 96:5.100 California, Sept. 9, 1995, 96:5.100 Georgia, Apr. 3, 1996, 97:5.54 Indiana, March 20, 1993, 94:5.106 Maryland, Jan. 16, 1993, 94:5.108 Missouri, April 16, 1990, 91:4.70 New York, May 20, 1991, 92:4.72 Ohio, Dec. 4, 1992, 93:5.68 Tennessee, June 19, 1990, 91:4.70 Tennessee, Nov. 11, 1994, 95:5.68 Texas, Jan. 18, 1994, 95:5.68 West Virginia, July 26, 1990, 91:4.69 Wisconsin, Nov. 11, 1994, 95:5.67 Catastrophic fires California, May 4, 1997, 98:5.55 Idaho, July 4, 1997, 98:5.55 Kansas, Dec. 22, 1997, 98:5.56 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 138

The National Fire Alarm Code.29 Michigan.59 Fire fighter fatalities 1990. 95:6. U. requires unique fire protection measures.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Oregon.21 Massachusetts.48 1995.55 1994.60 1991. 92:6. 97:2. 91:4.55 Fatal California. 1995. Missouri.40 1992. 91:2. 97:5. 96:4. 1997.56 1993.96 Michigan.50 Fire fighter injuries 1990. 1993. 98:4. 1993.42 1991.56 1992. 96:1.68 UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES. 93:1. 1996. 94:4. April 3. NFPA 72. 95:4. 92:4. analysis.55 Tennessee. 97:3.. tractor trailer. 98:5. 94:6.28 South Carolina.58 Fire protection for Eurotunnel (Channel tunnel).) Fire departments. 98:6. Kansas City. 97:4. 94:6. 96:6. November 18. 98:6. 93:4.44 1993. S.56 1993. March 25.58 Catastrophic fires 1990. 1997. 94:4. 91:6. 1996.32 Texas. 92:4. 96:5.85 U UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES.34 Oklahoma. 97:5. 93:5.92 Eurotunnel (Channel tunnel) fire.83 1995.33 Pennsylvania. 91:4. catastrophic fire in. 93:6. 1992.66 1997. Aug.42 Fire deaths (See FIRE DEATHS. INC. 1991. pickup truck crash triggers fuel storage fire.63 1995.63 1996. 93:5.62 1992.46 1997.46 1991. 98:6. alternative fuel pick-up. See also TUNNELS Electrical vault. 97:6. and UL standards work together. 1996.86 1996. 92:6.29 TUNNELS In entertainment facility. 1993. 95:5.25 UNITED STATES Arson fires: types of fires and firesetters.69 SubTropolis storage/manufacturing facility. 94:6. 91:4. 98:5. 93:4. 1990. 98:6.46 1997.57 1994.88 1994. 94:5.48 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 139 .24 Illinois. 96:1. 98:5. NFPA survey.103 1996. fire spread through.

98:3.76 1997. July 9.31 Contract with America's effect on fire service and fire safety.80 History of study. 18. 95:5. standardization. 95:1.44 1997. 91:6.19 Federal haz-mat response needs simplification. 97:4. agencies required to use voluntary consensus standards. 97:1. 95:5.46 National reporting systems.78 1993.72 Fireworks.79.52 1996.78.61. Nov. 97:5. 97:5. 97:3. and Firearms National Response Teams aid in catastrophic fire investigations. 1994.52 UNIVERSITY BUILDING FIRES. 97:6. 93:6. 92:6. 94:5.58 1996. 93:5.40 1992. 96:6.23 Catastrophic fires Aircraft. 95:6.44 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 95:3.29 Federal haz-mat response critiqued. 98:6. 1995. 1992. including NFIRS. establishes 311 number.32 1992. 96:5.73 1993.27 FEMA's disaster management role.41 Technology Transfer Act helps.28 1991. See also INSIDE THE BELTWAY COLUMNS Bureau of Alcohol.55.87 Smoke detector experience of. 92:4. losses and casualties caused by. 93:4. 96:6. 97:4.92 Congress considers natural disaster relief policy reform.94 1995. 98:3. 1992.68 Dwellings. 95:6.40 U. 94:5. 96:2. 97:2. 92:5.33 URBAN FIRE FORUM Global trends discussed at fifth forum.56. but not all federal agencies update regulatory references to NFPA standards.36 Apartment building fire.30 Revised sprinkler standard has more information in an accessible format.46 Department of Energy adopts performance-based codes.29 U. 93:6.94 Federal Communications Commission provides emergency radio frequencies. 98:5. 93:5. losses and casualties caused by) 1990.64 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 140 .80 Regulatory reform poses dangers.57 1994.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Fire losses (See also subentry: Fireworks.93 1995. See COLLEGE BUILDING FIRES UP TO CODE COLUMNS Passive fire protection systems. 96:4. S. 94:4.84 1994.78 Large-loss fires 1990. 94:6.104 UTAH Apartment building fire. for fire investigations. 93:5.34 UPS (uninterruptible power supply) Fighting fires in system. 97:6. 91:5. 95:3. 95:1. Treasury Building fire indicated life safety deficiencies. S. 95:4. Tobacco. 96:6. 94:5. 95:4. 97:3.36 Sprinkler use.36 1991.

1996. 93:6.92 Manufacturing plant.96 V VACANT BUILDING FIRES Bowling alley. 91:4. 95:5.86 Nursing home fire. 91:2. California. 92:4.59 Gas shut off for nonpayment. 94:5.. 1990. 1993. California.69 VAN FIRES.30 Office building fire. 94:6.97. Texas. Virginia.30 VAPORS. 91:4. 1993. fire. 94:6. cause of explosion. 1991. 91:1. 1997.87 Ignited by unknown source. catastrophic fire factor. April 25. 97:5.96 Illegally supplied power to dwelling. 12. Aug. 1990.67 Dwelling. 1990.36 School fire.67 Dwelling. 1. Nov.68 Department store. Texas. New York. 91:5. 94:3. WASH. 94:5.31 Manufacturing plant fire.29 Manufacturing plant fire. 91:4. 96:5. 91:4. catastrophic fire factor. 91:6.68 Manufacturing mill complex. 94:5.106 Crude oil vapors ignited by cigarette lighter. Alaska. catastrophic fire cause.71 Dwelling. 92:4.23 Refinery fire. 1990. cause of explosion.27 Office building fire.68 Ignited by heat source. 91:4. FLAMMABLE.17 Electricity shut off for nonpayment. 93:5. Dec. 96:6. 1992.. 22. catastrophic fire factor. fatal fire factor. 93:5. factor in fatal fire. fire. Dec. 98:5. March 1. 95:5. Pennsylvania.67. fire. 93:6. Michigan. 1990.68 Cutting operation ignited. Georgia. 94:6.73 UTILITIES. See also GAS FIRES Aircraft fuel vapors ignited by molten copper. 91:2. 93:5. Dec.74 Ignited by unknown source. New York. See TRUCK FIRES VANCOUVER.26 School.68 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 141 . 1990.40 Public assembly building fire. Feb. catastrophic fire cause. cause of explosion.22 Electricity shut off for repair.29 Catastrophic Club.69 Crude oil vapors ignited by open flame. factor in catastrophic fire. 1991. 96:5. 1993. 96:6.22 Water shut off for nonpayment. 1. 1991.82 Ignited by utility pole transformer. catastrophic fire factor. July 22. 98:6. 94:5. Maryland.25 VAGRANTS Victim of catastrophic fire. 98:6. 1994.23 Furniture manufacturing plant fire.28 Manufacturing plant fire. POWER PLANT FIRES Electricity shut off. 1997. 1993.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Dwelling fire. 92:2. 1995. 1990. 12. 1995.51 Transformer fire.21 Dwelling.98 Manufacturing plant. 97:5. 93:6. 91:4. Oct. 1991. cause of fire.90 Fatal fires Apartment building.78 VAPOR CLOUD Ignited.53 Electricity shut off for nonpayment. See also ELECTRIC GENERATING PLANT FIRES. 1997. 92:1. fire. 98:6. cause of explosion. March. 1995. 1997. 92:4. Emergency response system analysis and enhancement program. 95:3.67 Dwelling. 91:4. 98:1.

95:5. 97:4. 91:3. 95:4. 96:6. 96:6. 94:4. SHIP FIRES. 93:6. 1995. AUTOMOBILE FIRES. 93:5. 94:5. 91:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Ethyl alcohol vapors. 98:4. 94:6.107. 91:4.27 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 142 . 92:4.72.36 Fatal apartment building fire.49 Inadequate Boat fire factor.84 VEHICLE ACCIDENTS. 92:3.31 Warehouse fire factor. 96:4. 93:6. 96:5. 76. 73.69. 98:6.104 Methane vapors.28 Statistics compared to aircraft fire statistics.65 Vehicles ignite wildland fires.26 Catastrophic. 94:4.104 Pentane vapors.23 Gondola car. 97:6. 93:6.89 VENTILATION Closed windows allow vapors to accumulate. 94:3.85 VENTS Fire spread through. 74. 98:2. 94:5.90 Bus. 94:6. 91:4. ignited by torch in tank storage fire. 91:6. California.33 Fire spread through. roof vents hampered ventilation.24 VAULTS Electrical arc fire. TRUCK FIRES Alternative-fuel vehicle.26 Pentane vapors ignited by hot plate.35 VEHICLES Natural gas fueled. 105 Fire spread by. 98:6.21 Window fan.19 Window lexan layer hard to penetrate. 93:5. RAILROAD ROLLING STOCK FIRES. June 23. 96:6.28 Varnish remover vapors ignited by spark.27 Oil vapors ignited by cigarette lighter. TRUCK FIRES Fire fighter fatalities related to.100 Fire losses show significance of vehicle fires.64 VERMONT Board and care facilities fire. 93:6. cause of fire/explosion at tank/storage facility. 94:5.105 Gasoline vapors. HVAC SYSTEMS Air handler units factor in fire spread. ignited by torch in mine fire. 97:3.33 Solvent vapors ignited by spark from forklift. 96:4. causes flash fire. 94:5. 1996. 96:6.67 Flammable liquid vapors ignite flash fire. 94:5.104.87 Lack of sidewall openings. 94:5. 1995.91 Smoldering fire intensified by. RAILROAD ROLLING STOCK FIRES.89 VENTILATION SYSTEMS. 96:5.55 VEHICLE FIRES.72.104. See also AIRCRAFT CRASH FIRES. 98:4. 92:4.29 Lacquer thinner vapors ignited by pilot light. FORKLIFT FIRES.22 Multiple-occupancy/dwelling fire. 98:5.120 Subway car. helps spread fire. 98:4. in operation.51. 94:5.29 Floor stripper vapors ignited.29 Bomb explosion ignites multiple vehicles.67.79 Fire statistics and fire safety information. 62 Fire fighter injuries related to. in belowgrade room. See also DUCTS.97. ignited by electrical arc from forklift controls. See also AUTOMOBILE FIRES. 1989.61.82 Methyl t-butyl ether vapors ignite.88 Forklift hits aerosol containers which explode. 97:2.31 Vehicle ignited at vehicle conversion facility. handling incidents involving. 96:3. 98:6. 91:1.

1996. 96:5.66. 1996. Sept.90 Recruiting and retaining volunteers. 1995. 95:2. 93:1.25 Power plant fire. 1994. 95:1. 97:5.25 Warehouse fire. 1992. 1997. 1993.99 Dwelling. 10. 98:5. See CONCEALED SPACES VOLUNTEER FIRE SERVICE. DAVID J. 19. but necessary. July. 1995. 1994. 93:3. 1991. 1996. Austin. May 15. 93:1. 1994.22 Catastrophic fires Aircraft.33 VIDAL. Dec. 97:5.12 Are professionalism and fun compatible?.30 VOIDS. See also STAIRWAYS Catastrophic fires spread up stairway.114 Changes in fire services difficult.. 91:2. 91:5. 95:5. 91:1.25 Warehouse fire.82 Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 protects volunteers from liability. 93:6. 1992. Nov.21 School fire. 95:5. 1.66 Dwelling.21 Fire service leaders should lead by example.51 Dwelling.21 Apply mutual aid to fire investigations. 10.64 Church fire. 96:5. 91:4.82 Manufacturing plant fire. Sept. 94:3.36 Restaurant fire. 93:4. 92:6. 95:6. 1992. 93:4..114 Analyze risk before risking lives. Sept. Profile of.46 Hospital. 1996.35 Apartment building fire. 1.22 Manufacturing plant fire.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 VERTICAL FIRE SPREAD High-rise office building fire. 7. 92:2. 95:6. April..27 VOLUNTEER VIEWS COLUMNS Administrative officer's role. 93:3.72 Restaurant fire. 98:5. N. Nov. 1992. 93:5. July 8. 96:6.50 Dwelling. Feb.36 Discipline promotes effective performance. 31. 95:5.85 Encouraging participation in fire service organizations.28 Apartment building fire. 97:4. 97:2.50 Dwelling.19 VIRGINIA Apartment building fire. April.50 Office building fire. 1995. 1996. 97:5.104 NFPA's Volunteer Firemen magazine.20 Combination career/volunteer departments. 1997. 1995. 91:3. 95:2..136 Financial incentives to improve recruitment. 6. 1996. Jan. 96:3. Feb.63 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:5. Tex. 96:5.22 Change required for survival.93 Manufacturing plant fire. 93:6.86 Warehouse fire. 1993. 97:6.26 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 143 . 94:6. 96:5. 1990.98 Manufacturing plant fire. 91:5. 20.64 VERTICAL OPENINGS. 91:2. 93:2. 93:5. 1994.92 Fire spread through. Y. 1995. Elsmere Volunteer Fire Department. Aug. 1996. retention.99 Automobile.83 Fireground behavior after fire is out. Dec.68 Coal mine.29. 98:2. See also VOLUNTEER VIEWS COLUMNS Contracting with municipal fire department. 96:6. 94:4..15.

24. 92:6. 93:6.68 WAREHOUSE FIRES.28 Recruiting a new generation of volunteers. 91:6. 95:3. 98:2.26 Lack of.79 Lack of. 94:2.78.18 Future of fire service funding. 93:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Flexibility.. 92:6. 91:4. 94:6. Congressional testimony. 94:6.23 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 144 . in catastrophic dwelling fire.. 1990.56 Penetrations in wall. 95:6. 95:6.26 Agricultural products. 98:6. 95:4. causes floor collapse. 91:6. factor in fire spread. 1992. hamper fire fighting.26 Automotive parts Michigan.18. 1992.103. 98. report on. 93:6.36 Insurance Services Office rates alternate water supplies.50 Collapsed. 97.87. technology meet increased need for training.28 Membership input to department decisions. 102. 97:5.83 Lack of.83 Membership evaluation of fire department.16. 92:1. allowed fire spread in manufacturing plant fire. July.93 Inadequate.70 Combustible.120 Importance of NFPA standards to fire service.86. fire spread to roof. 91:5. 6. 95:5. Missouri.88 Bottles. 67 Concrete. 91:6. 95:5. fire spread through. 94:1. TEXAS Branch Davidian complex fire investigation. 91:6. 93:4. 96:2.82. 92:1.24 Michigan.28.88 Fire spread over. 93:6. 105. allowed fire spread.30.16 Underground SubTropolis facility. 95:6. 91:6. 1991.37. allowed fire spread in sawmill fire. fire spread through. 92:6.107. 93:6.20 Unprotected openings allowed fire spread.87 California.96 Fiberglass. 94:5. Missouri.91 WALLS Collapse.20 Participatory management enhances morale.20 NFPA Volunteers in Transition Conference.24 Recruiting and retaining volunteers.56 Explosion rips open. 1997.75 Cripple wall burns. 96:6.38. Nov.34. 94:6. 98:6. Kansas City.79. 12. 98:6. fire spread through doors in. 98:6. requires unique fire protection measures. 1995. 94:6. 91:6.90 Failed.75 Fire spread within. factor in fire spread.20 W WACO. 91:5.17 Pride keeps morale high. See also STORAGE FACILITIES FIRES Adhesive materials.20 Reconciling fire fighter safety and customer service needs.68 Aircraft parts. 97:5.93.96 Personal protective gear's improved thermal protection increases heat stress. 1997. 93:5.75 Contained fire spread.18 Public information officer can improve media coverage.24 WALLS. 96:5. 104. 98:2. 93:6. fueled fire. 93:1. 1990.87 North Carolina. 92:6.. 96:6. 94:3.64.86 Records and department historian preserve the past. 93:6. 92:3. Dec. 95:6. California. FIRE Catastrophic fire contained by. 98:6. 1991.103 WAREHOUSES Sprinkler system design. Aug. Jan. 5. 97:6. 92:4. 95:6. 94:5.92 Damaged. Colorado.

66 Fertilizer.32 Chemicals North Carolina. 95:2.85 Oregon. 98:1. 97:6.54 Massachusetts. 96:6.96 Furniture Georgia. 1995. 1997.28 California. 1992. April. Feb. 24. May.32 Michigan. 1992.68 Flooring. 1997. 93:1.86 California. 94:6. Iowa. 1996. 10. Jan. 97:6.37 Cosmetics New York. 94:4. 96:6. Virginia. 97:6. Pennsylvania. 1992.26 Clothing. March.97 Georgia. April. 97:6.75 Wisconsin. 95:3.96 Missouri.38 North Carolina.32 Foam products.73 Washington. 91:6. 98:6. May. Oct. Jan. 1992.56 New Jersey. March 16. March 21.97 Texas. Texas. 95:6. 1992. 93:4. 93:6. 1992. Oct. Aug. 1993. 93:6. 95:6. 91:2.30 Virginia.87 Coupon clearing house products. 1994. 1991. Jan. 24. 91:6. 1996.84 Massachusetts. 93:6. 98:6. 1993.56 Pennsylvania. 1990. 1994. 1996.108 Washington. 1997.. May 3. 1990.33 Flammable and combustible liquids tanks. 1992. April.86 Fiberglass products Alabama. 1996. 1992. Iowa. April. 1991. 2.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Carpet Georgia. 94:6.39 Virginia. 1991. 94:6.85 Wisconsin. 1993.25 Cotton Missouri. 1993.38 General Alabama.88 Indiana. 95:1. 1993. 25. Sept.27 Cold storage California.97 Illinois. Nov. 93:6. 1992. Oct.85 Rhode Island. Oct. 91:6. Iowa.88 Missouri. 97:3. 1993. Aug. March. Aug.27 Texas. 93:6. 1993.57 Illinois. 5. 98:6. 93:6. 1995. 94:1. 93:2. 8... 1994.57 Louisiana. 1992. 1994.34 Louisiana.30 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 145 .86 Rhode Island.. 91:5.25 Food Arizona.26 New Jersey. Feb. 97:6.. 1993. 1990. 1996. 1994. 93:6. 94:3. 94:4. March.21 Texas. 1994. 1995. 94:6. 92:2.. 1996. 93:6. 95:3. 16. 1997. 1989. 92:6. 96:5.87 Indiana.

Texas. Louisiana.99 Tobacco North Carolina. 98:1. 1994. Sept. Aug. 1993. Washington.68. 1996. March 18. 96:1. 1995.91 Dwelling. New York.23 Arsonists use pyrotechnic accelerants to ignite series of fires.26 Paper Florida.18 Texas.87 North Carolina. 94:6. 1992. 1993. 1990. 91:4. 27. 1993. 1997.86 WARMING FIRES Catastrophic fire cause. 1989. paper records. 1993.73 Secondhand goods. Apr. 91:1. 1990.96 Plastics Florida.86 Promotional items. 96:6.57 Hops. 7. Feb. Nov..66 Ohio. 94:6. April 22. need special attention.87 Vehicles. 91:6. Dec. 1997. 91:4.30 Picture tubes. 93:6. 29. 1997. 1995. 1994. 94:1. 94:6. 97:5. 98:5. 91:5.95 Peanuts. 10. Sept. 1990.24 Pennsylvania. 1993. Aug. July.. 1995.97 Household goods. 94:4. 92:6.34 Texas. 98:6.24 Illinois. 8.88 Indiana. May 11. 95:6. 29. 1997. 1996. 1996. 91:6.39 Washington.56 Plumbing and electrical supplies. 97:6.. Apr. Iowa. 1997.110 Paint.44 Wood products. May. 1993.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Hawaii. 94:6. California.77 Catastrophic fires Dwelling.49 Manufactured home. Georgia. 1992. 1995. 91:4. Oct. 1995.69 Siding. 17. 1993.65 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 146 . 97:6.. 1992. 93:6. 1996. 94:6. Nov. Washington. 1990.25 Apartment building fire. Jan. Nebraska. 98:6. 96:1. Indiana. 96:4.31 Heating and air conditioning supply. 94:6.67 Barracks/club fire. 96:1. 94:6. 93:5. 1993. 1996. Tennessee.87 Retail goods Kansas.23 Rubber. 1995. 96:6.22 Apartment building fire.88 Leather.56 Massachusetts. Colorado. 98:6. 24.39 Minnesota.87 Refrigerated. 1994. 96:3. Texas. 1990. 97:6. 69 WASHINGTON Apartment building fire. 97:6. 1992. 1993. 93:6.25 Michigan. 1997. 95:4. California. Sep. July 23. 98:6. South Carolina. Aug. 1997.50. June. July. 12. May 31. Oct.23 Warehouse stores present special hazards. 98:6. 98:6. 4. 96:5. 1992..66 Dwelling. 95:6.26 Magazines. April. 97:1. 1995. Michigan.96 Pharmaceuticals.96 Metal products.. 1996. Illinois.. Dec.. 93:4.32 Texas. 1995. Jan.97 Michigan. Oklahoma.

16. 57. Jan.61 Fire service operations hampered by (See FIRE SERVICE OPERATIONS HAMPERED) Fire service response to Florida tornadoes.26. 1993. Sept.95 Manufacturing plant fire. 95:6. 96:4.34 Dwelling.24 Office building fire. 98:4.73 Water supply disrupted by explosions hampered fire service operations.28. 1990. 97:5. 1998. Sept.111 WASHINGTON. 1990. preventing contamination by sprinkler system backflow. 1991. 95:6. 94:6. Sept. 97:6. 54.23 Warehouse under renovation fire. 94:6. 91:5. 1996. 6.60 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 147 . 91:4..25. 1994. June 26. 92:1. 96:6. 1995. April 27. 98:6.29 Ship fire.26 Public.27. 1993. 1994.90 Automobile repair shop. 94:6.37 Public. 94:2. 1990. 26. 91:6. 6. 93:1. 93:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Manufacturing plant/warehouse.53 WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS Fire protection. 91:1. 96:6.48. 1998. 91:6. 5. March. 98:4. suppression devices were installed. 96:4. 91:1. 1995.64 WATER SUPPLY Alternative supplies rated by Insurance Services Office. 97:6. July. 1997. 1995. 91:4. 95:6.26. 1992.86 Warehouse fire. D. Feb. 97:4. 92:6. 98:3. 95:2.49 Marina fire. Nov. 1991. 1.44 WATER MIST SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS Design principles of system. 1992. 1993. 93:6.96 Fatal fires Apartment building.80 Catastrophic dwelling fire.89 Wildland/urban interface fire.26 Nursing home fire.25 Manufactured home fire. 1994.75 WEATHER Drought (See DROUGHT) Fire fighter fatalities related to. 1995. 92:4. 1992.97 Warehouse fire. 96:6. 1995. 94:3.. July.24. fire investigation report.68 Remote supply hampered fire service operations.83 Inadequate supply hampered fire service operations. 93:6.21 Board and care facility.28 Wildland/urban interface.52.74 WAYSIDE INN FIRES After two fires. 1996. water supply industries.74.97 Dormitory fire. 75. 1993. 91:4. 1990. Jan. 97:3. 1996. 92:2.111 Group home fire. Oct. Airports equipped with state-of-art fire protection and security systems. C. 96:5.68 Store fire. Sept.85 Warehouse fire. 96:6.30 Manufacturing plant fire.48 Storage facility fire. 56.. 92:4. 94:5. backflow prevention discussed by fire protection. 92:3. Jan.32 Warehouse fire. 91:6.59 Water storage problems hampered fire service operations. 97:3.25 United States Treasury Building fire. Sept. 22. 97:6. 98:5. 97:1. 91:3. 1992.31 Wildland/urban interface fire.36 Grain mill and storage facility..27..50. 13. 58 Private fire service main installation. 7.46 WATER SPRAY SYSTEMS Manual system limits fire spread in chemical plant fire.

94:2.84 Leaking gas from welding equipment ignites explosion.70 University building fire.97 Torch ignites ceiling material.93 Tank farm fire ignited by.56 Sawdust ignited by sparks.30 WET CHEMICAL EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 148 .96 Foam insulation ignited by. 96:5.64 Hot slag ignites nut hulls in warehouse fire. 96:6. March.21 Hot slag ignites food processing plant fire. 95:6. 97:6.68 Coal mine.14 WELLS. Oct.85 Heat transferred to decaying plywood deck. 91:4. 95:4. 21. 94:5.108 Torch ignites foam insulation. 94:6.20 Grease residue ignited by. March 7. 93:5. 97:6. 96:6.67 Dwelling. 1997.97 Torch ignites cardboard. 94:6.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Wind (See WIND) WELDING AND CUTTING OPERATIONS. See also TORCHES Apartment complex fire cause.69 Truck. 94:5. 95:5.28 Cellulose insulation ignited by. 97:6. insulation. 1992.50 Hot slag from torch ignites paper. 91:4. 98:5.31 Sparks ignite scenery. 1995. 95:6. plywood.108 Historic building fire. 94:5. 1990. March 19. 96:6. 95:6. 93:6.35 Warehouse fire. 91:3.39 Rubber curtain. 94:5.104 Torch ignites carpets.30 Torch ignites PVC solvent vapors.85. 94:6. 1993. 7. 98:6.105 Torch ignites cardboard.64 Grain elevator fire cause. 98:6. dock seal ignited by. 91:4.32 Conveyor belt ignited by sparks. 1993. possible cause of.22 Manufacturing plant fire. 98:4. 95:6.23 Torch ignites wood. 96:6.68 Flammable vapors in refinery fire ignited by.92 Styrofoam insulation ignited by. 98:6.59 Hot slag ignites foam insulation shavings. 97:6.84 Fiber board insulation ignited by. 94:6. May 11. July 26. 93:5.96 Dwelling. CURT Profile of.94 Flammable vapor ignited by. 1996. 98:6. 97:4. 1994.62 Torch ignites ammonium nitrate powder.34 Hot slag on conveyor belt ignites food processing plant fire. 94:4. Nov.84 Torch ignites gasoline vapors.86 WELDON. 95:2.106 Food processing plant fire ignited by. 95:3.102 Office building fire. 97:3.97 WEST VIRGINIA Catastrophic fires Aircraft. 1993.38 Torch ignites polyurethane mats.68 Cutting oil ignited by hot metal. 95:3. 98:6.86 Paper wrapping ignited by. 1992. 96:6. JACK Interview with. 93:6. April. 96:6.50 Motor vehicle. 95:6.

46 1997. 95:6.99 California.99 California.20 WILDLAND FIRES. Aug..45 1996. 95:6. 93:6. June 2. 1992. Aug. Nov. and panic. 1992. 95:4. June 27. 1993. 95:6.33 Hantavirus poses health threat to fire fighters. 1993. 94:2.78 California. 27. 91:1.61 California. Glendale. 94:2. 93:6. 1991. and public relations addressed at meeting.123 NFPA 1051.28 California. 91:4. 1996.49 WHARVES. wildland/urban interface. 92:5.. Sept. 1996. 93:4. 98:2.74 California.41 Wildland fire fighting rules to prevent fire fighter fatalities. fear. 91:1. 91:6. wildland/urban interface. national issues. 92:2.36 1993.59 1991. 6. 94:1.116 National Interagency Incident Management System (NIMS). See PIER AND WHARF FIRES WILDFIRE MANAGEMENT COLUMNS Brazilian delegation learns from Montana hotshot team. 93:3.36 1995.. Oct. Oct.111 California. 93:6. 91:3. Hospital fire.66 NFPA survey identifies wildfire concerns.33 NFPA survey. Tonto National Forest. 91:1. wildland/urban interface.41 Laughter as workplace morale booster.118 Wildland/urban interface. 93:6. 95:5. 94:6. 1994. MASS. Aug.103 Rural fire protection: a shared responsibility. 1993. 98:6. wildland/urban interface. 94:3.83 NFPA survey. 96:3.54 1992.31 Internet's fire protection applications.88 California. College Hills Fire.34 WEYAUWEGA. 97:2.108 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 149 . Sept. 93:2.70.. Nov. 92:4. 94:4. 1994. 93:1. managers top concerns.74 California. 92:3. 1991.74 Politics. public safety education. wildland/urban interface. 1993. 91:6. wildland/urban interface.89 WEYMOUTH.72 California.. 92:6.92 California. See also WILDFIRE MANAGEMENT COLUMNS Fire season overview 1990.59 California. approved.42 Alaska.60.39 NFPA standard for wildfire personnel qualifications. 94:5. 92:1. wildland/urban interface. 94:6. fire fighting problems at. WISC.35 Training needed to counteract stress. 1990. 98:6. media.96. 2. 1992. Aug. 1990.32 Fire. 1997. 97:6. 1992. 91:1.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Nozzles blocked. Jan. 89 California. wildland/urban interface. ecological friend or foe of forests. March 4. 92:1.89 California.32 Working with the public to change policy.92 Catastrophic Arizona. 13.. Aug.88..79 1994. 91:4. Wildland Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. 91:2. 93:5. 1990. 93:5. 96:2. June. 24. 1997.111 California. 20. 91:1. Oct. failed to extinguish fire.33 Wildland/urban interface. Los Padres National Forest.60 California. 1990. 95:2. June 27. LP-Gas railroad tank car derailment. 94:5. discussion.

96:6. 57.85 Fire fighter fatalities related to. 98:6.59 Montana. wildland/urban interface. suppression. 1994.40. 91:4.70. July. 92:4. 99.44 Oregon. door. 70.49 Firewise landscaping.50.29.111 Oregon.89 Wildland/urban interface.48 Washington.76 Peshtigo. also raises code questions. fire fighting problems at. 56. 1992.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Colorado.21. wildland/urban interface.57 High..67 Failed. 95:4.25. 54. 92:4..86 Surviving a wildland burnover. 1994.36. 93:6. 96:3. 52.21. wildland/urban interface. 95:2. 75.94 WIND Fire generated. 90. 1991.66 Homeowner responsibility for wildfire protection efforts.28.50 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 150 .28. 95:2. 92:4. catastrophic fire factor.4 Idaho. 96:2. 88. 105.51 Evacuations for California fires. 98:5. 1995.110 Failed. 74. 96:5. 53.89 Nailed shut. 95:6.47 Texas. hinders escape in fatal fire. 90 WINDOWS Blocked by air conditioner.111 Washington.21 Kansas. July. unbreakable. intensified fire spread. 95:2.26 Idaho. 97:2. 97:6. 1996.25. 91:6. 96:6.26. contributes to wildland fire spread.74 NFPA codes and standards. 98:5. 96:2. South Canyon. 95:5. 58. 76. 1994. 21. 94:5. 97:6.. Sept. Mann Gulch. 6. 94:2. 98:2. 67. 98:2. 93 Fire fighter injuries related to. 105 Conflict between security and fire safety. 98:2.89 Oregon. 97:5. Aug. 54. 98:6. 94:5. wildland/urban interface.72.118 Wildland/urban interface fire threat requires vigilance from homeowners and agencies.96 Broken by heat.42 New Jersey. 92:6.54.74. 1994.111 High. wildland/urban interface.34.26 New York. 97:4. caused wall collapse in building-under-construction fire.53 Fire vented through.20. 94:2. Aug. 56. 87. 98:5.62.108. 69. factor in catastrophic fire. 96:2. 93:6.76 Firefighter's first person account of Australian wildfire.93. 94:6. 94:6. catastrophic fire factor. factor in catastrophic fire. 97:5. 64. 96:5. 95:6. 1871. 95:6. 94:3. 94:5. 96:2. Aug.104. 94:2.73. 91:1. 94:6. 100. 59. 89.45 Blocked by furniture. 1996. 68. 1996. 95:5. 97:6.33 Blocked by storage. 92:4. 1949. 74. 1994. hampered fire fighting operations. 95:5. 64. 81.53. 1992.18 Furniture blocks access in catastrophic fire. 94:5.54 Lexan layer hampered ventilation.66 Closed windows allow vapors to accumulate. 1994. July.. 93:4.36 Historical overview. 93:6. 94:3.30. 94:2. 102. Oct. 49. 51. 95:2.91. Feb. 94:2.. Fish Hatchery Complex.76 Inoperable. factor in catastrophic fire. 98.67.24. 95:6. 98:6. 96:6. 1992. 91:3. 59.84 Florida. factor in catastrophic fire. 1995. 92:5..62. 94:6. fire spread to interior through. 93:5. Wis. 1992. 93:3.67 Colorado. 97:4.86.99. 92:6. 1994.27 High. July 3.31 Washington. 86.85. 91:4. 6.69 Glazing developments offer alternatives to wired glass.

94:6. Oct.64 WISCONSIN Catastrophic fires Aircraft.29 Railroad rolling stock fires. S. 98:4. 97:3. June. ignited by.66 Dwelling.71 Truck .98 Board and care facility. 1994. 28. 11. See also ELECTRICAL FIRES Faulty wiring short-circuits. ignited by.28 WINTERTHUR MUSEUM.45. 96.75 Warehouse fire.68 Dwelling.34 Malfunctioning or frayed wire ignites fire. 91:4. 93:6.26. 1990. Dec. 1993. 1991. 91:4. 94:5. 91:6.23 Processing plant fire. 94:6. Nursing home fire. 97:2. 96:5. 4. 1993.106. DELAWARE Life safety protection system. 1996. cable/wire manufacturers promote NEC over IEC as European standard.93.52 Fire-retardant treatment.30 WOOD FRAMING Ignited by electric cord. 91:4. 1989. 1996.30 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 151 . 97:6.65 Dwelling.51.67 Joist ignited by. 92:4.66 Dwelling.37 WITZEMAN. 95:5. 1991. ELECTRICAL.63 WIRING. 50 Security bars.49 Dwelling.28 U.60 Shopping mall fire. May 10. 30. 94:4.98 Office building fire.24 Fireworks. 97:5. 95:2. May. Feb. Nov. 93:5.62 Transom windows failed. SHAKES Cigarette. ignites wood framing.37 WOBURN.29 Warehouse fire. 98:5.107 Fire starts in sawdust.56 Pile of removed shakes ignited by cigarette. 92:4. 1990. 92:4. May 16. 94:3. effectiveness of. LOU Profile of. 93:5. catastrophic fire factor. 91:1.30 Museum fire.30 Fireworks. 97:6. factor in catastrophic fire. March 4. 10. 91:4. 1991. 92:2.89 Manufacturing plant fire. 94:3.67 Short circuit ignites paneling. 91:4. in dwelling fire.68 WOOD SHINGLES. 1994. 97:6.95. Oct.72 Dwelling. 97:5. in dwelling fire. 96:3. 92:4. 1994. 92:4. March 10. ignites wall. 1996. 1991.21 Incendiary fire spread to. factor in fatal fire. MASS.67 LP-Gas railroad tank car derailment. 1990. 96:5.69 Drilling rig. 1993.64.68 Inadequately sized. 92:4. 92:3. May 3. 97:5. April 22.67 Ignited by electrical wiring. spreads to combustibles. 96:3. 97:5. Dec. ignited by.110. 94:5.36 Public assembly mixed use building fire. March 4. catastrophic fire factor. 1996.29 Steel screens hinder escape in catastrophic fire. factor in fire spread. March 13. 1992.49 WOOD AND WOOD PRODUCTS Aged plywood interior contributes to fire spread. 92:6. 92:5. 1990. 95:6. 91:1. July 9. 1991.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Security bars. 92:4. 96:4. 91:4. 95:2. 91:4. 31.89. 97:3. 95:6. 1996.50 Manufacturing plant.25 Fire spread to shingles under metal siding.

ignites fatal fire.26 Manufacturing plant fire.64.51 Point of fire origin in area of stove. which ignites joist.49 WOODEN STRUCTURAL MEMBERS Damage service cable.91. 92:1. Y. 92:5. 92:4. 97:5. 91:4. 12. in catastrophic fire.24 © 1998 National Fire Protection Association Page 152 . 92:5. 91:4.93 WORLD TRADE CENTER. 93:4. Nov. 94:3. 95:2. Y.46 Radiant heat from flue ignites stored wood. 1990. N. N.30 Sawmill fire. 93:6. 94:6. 97:1. 98:5. 1991. 1993..59 Large loss fire. 94:5.. ignited catastrophic fire. Manufacturing plant fire.104 Human behavior during evacuation. 1992. ignites catastrophic fire. 97:6. 97:5.90 WYOMING Fatal dwelling fire. 1995.NFPA Journal 10 Year Index 1987-1997 Produced flaming brands in wildland fire.26 Y YUMA.68 Heat from faulty stove pipe connection of homemade stove. 68 Gasoline used to kindle. ARIZ.27 Wildland fire spread factor. EXPLOSION AND FIRE Catastrophic fire.33 Z ZOO FIRES Pennsylvania.89 WOOD STOVES Camping stove fuel used to kindle.72 Spotlight ignites shingles.20 Catastrophic fire caused by.25 Structural framing ignited by. 93:6. 96:6. 96:5.