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EtherNID Administrators Guide

for the EtherNID EE EtherNID OE EtherNID GE MetroNID TE EtherNID DE+

Release 3.1.3 (April 2008)


Accedian Networks, EtherNID, EtherSHELF, MetroNID and Performance Assurance Agent (PAA) are trademarks of Accedian Networks Inc. All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective corporations. The mention of any product does not constitute an endorsement by Accedian Networks Inc. The content of this manual is furnished for informational use only, is subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a commitment by Accedian Networks Inc. Accedian Networks Inc. assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this document. Except as permitted by such lease agreement, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording, or otherwise, without prior written consent of Accedian Networks Inc. Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated into new editions of this publication. Accedian Networks Inc. may make improvements and/or changes in the products and/or software programs described in this publication at any time. If you have comments on this manual or the products it describes, address them to: Accedian Networks Inc. Attention: Publications 4878, Levy street, Suite 202 Saint-Laurent, Qubec Canada H4R 2P1 Tel: (514) 331-6181 Fax: (514) 331-2210 Toll free: 1-866-685-8181 Accedian Networks Inc. may use or distribute whatever information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligations to you. Copyright 2005-2008 Accedian Networks Inc. All rights reserved, including those to reproduce this publication or parts thereof in any form without permission in writing from Accedian Networks Inc.

Contents
Setting the system date and time . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Timezone and Daylight saving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 SNMP settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
SNMP parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Introducing the EtherNID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Features and benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

History buckets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Local Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Remote retrieval of history buckets . . . . . . . . . . . 36


Scheduling and file transfer configuration . . . . . . . . 37

Application scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Session management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Management parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Hardware installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Hardware overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Status lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Rear panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Firmware upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Session configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40


Session parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Session management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Management parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Mounting options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Wall mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Desktop installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Rack mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Session RADIUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
RADIUS parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Management bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Configuration procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Powering the EtherNID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Restarting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Resetting to factory defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Port configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46


Port list and port status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Port configuration and status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Port options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Management and configuration . . . . . . . 22


About the management web interface . . . . . . . . 22
Starting the management web interface . . . . . . . . . 22 Managing web interface accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Configuring port settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51


Port parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Port statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 PHY auto-negotiation configuration . . . . . . . . . . . 55


PHY parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

DNS settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Configuring interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26


Creating or editing an interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Interface parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

SFP information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
SFP information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 SFP thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 SFP memory and monitor memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Adding a route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Route parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Cable verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Testing a cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Syslog options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Syslog parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Monitoring and filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64


Service mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Viewing CoS profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a CoS Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CoS Profile parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assigning a CoS profile to a policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing Bandwidth regulator sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a Bandwidth regulator set . . . . . . . . . . . Bandwidth regulator set parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . Assigning a Bandwidth regulator set to a policy . . . Access policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Traffic filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring traffic forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forwarding parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 65 65 66 67 67 68 69 70 70 70 71 71

Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Alarm settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Alarm configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Customizing an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Alarm status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Chassis alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

Traffic forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Operations, Administration and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98


OAM configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Configuring an OAM instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 OAM instance parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

Traffic policies and monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72


Configuring a traffic policy on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Policy settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Configuring a traffic policy on an EtherNID EE, OE or DE+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Policy settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Loopbacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Adding a loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Loopback parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

OAM events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105


Transmitted and Received event notifications . . . . 106

OAM status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108


Detailed status information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Traffic filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Viewing L2 filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Configuring an L2 filter on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 L2 filter parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Configuring an L2 filter on an EtherNID EE, OE or DE+ 81 L2 filter parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Viewing IPv4 filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Configuring an IPv4 filter on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 IPv4 filter parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Configuring an IPv4 filter on an EtherNID EE, OE or DE+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 IPv4 filter parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

OAM statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111


OAM detailed statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

RFC-2544. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
RFC-2544 flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Viewing RFC-2544 Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Configuring RFC-2544 Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

RFC-2544 configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120


Viewing RFC-2544 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

RFC-2544 measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122


Viewing RFC-2544 Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Detailed view of RFC-2544 Measurements . . . . . . 123

Bandwidth policing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Configuring a regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Regulator settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Assigning a regulator to a policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

RFC-2544 testsuite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126


Viewing RFC-2544 Testsuites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Detailed view of RFC-2544 Testsuites . . . . . . . . . 127

RFC-2544 reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131


Starting an RFC-2544 Testsuite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Viewing RFC-2544 Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Performance Assurance Agent . . . . . . 134


PAA configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Configuring a probe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 PAA parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

PAA status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140


Detailed PAA status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

PAA results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142


Detailed PAA results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

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Command Line Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . 145


Command summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Command syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

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Appendix A - Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148


Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

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Appendix B - MIB support . . . . . . . . . . 151


Public MIBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Private MIBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

1: Introduction

Introducing the EtherNID

Chapter 1: Introduction

Introduction Introducing the EtherNID


The growing demand for Ethernet Services is exploding everywhere. Carriers contending in this competitive market space are faced with several challenges: Setting a clear Demarcation Point between the Customers' and the Carriers' Ethernet Network. Implementing Operations, Administration and Maintenance (OAM), to reduce operational expenses and minimize truck-roll. Offering Carrier-Grade Reliability.

All of this while optimizing end-to-end Network Performance and keeping capital expenses at a minimum. Accedian's EtherNID Demarcation Point offers a solution to address these challenges by implementing standards-based Ethernet OAM and loop-back capabilities as part of the industry's first Line-Powered Ethernet NID (patent pending). By using the EtherNID's 802.3af standard Power over Ethernet (PoE), Accedian's EtherNID extends the reliability of the Carrier's Network all the way to the customer's IT closet, thus, avoiding dependency on end-customer's UPS. Installed in-line on the Ethernet media, the EtherNID implements a transparent fail-safe bypass, meeting the reliability objectives that carriers have come to expect from telecom demarcation units. Furthermore, Accedian's EtherNIDs unique Fast-Thru architecture minimizes packet-jitter and latency, two parameters critical in real-time applications such as Voice and Video over IP, especially when adding cascaded network devices. The EtherNID comes equipped with two Monitor Ports where external test equipment can be connected to perform non-intrusive troubleshooting, thus offering independent Monitoring Access to each direction independently, a function that carriers are used-to with traditional demarcation devices but lacking from current Ethernet service delivery methods. Additionally, the EtherNID allows combining both signal directions on a single Monitor Access port by using a Port Mirroring function. The Performance Assurance Agent (PAA) allows measuring and tracking End-to-End SLA parameters such as Latency, Jitter, Packet Loss and Availability in a continuous manner, while the service is running. The EtherNID interacts seamlessly with Ethernet OAM compliant devices, comes with an embedded Web Server User Interface and can be optionally managed directly via SNMP. Designed cost effectively for volume deployment, the EtherNID allows for systematic installation on every customer Ethernet line and therefore obtaining a consistent look & feel across the network.

1: Introduction

Introducing the EtherNID

Features and benefits

Ethernet OAM & loop-back Increases visibility, management and easier maintenance. Line-Powered via PoE 48V power-plant reliability brought up to the IT closet Fail-safe Bypass No impact on the MTBF of the E-Line Fast-Thru Architecture Minimizes Packet Jitter and Latency, (important for Video & VoIP) Dual Tap/Mirror ports Allows non-intrusive Monitor Access Creates a clear demarcation point between the Carrier's and Customer's Network. Extends the Network's OAM capabilities all the way to the customer's IT closet. Allows offering full NID power responsibility and reliability as a value-added SLA. Increases service reliability and availability. Reduces Carrier's operational expenses by reducing truck-roll. Eliminates finger pointing. Increases end-customer satisfaction.

Applications

Acts as an Ethernet OAM extension for Metro Access Platforms. Adds Ethernet OAM capability to legacy media-converters and Access Platforms. Sectionalizes Multi-Carrier E-lines.

The EtherNIDs ultra-compact form factor also allows for high-density rackmount installation. Its fail-safe bypass architecture allows it to be used as a Modular Intelligent Ethernet Patch Panel, providing non-intrusive Monitor Access to each direction or combined access to both directions using port mirroring.

1: Introduction

Application scenario

Application scenario
The following scenario illustrates how the EtherNID can be used to provide a remotely manageable customer premises demarcation point for the delivery of Ethernet services.
Carrier Site Remote Site Remote Site Customer Site

Remote Management Station Hub Node Test Equipment

Customer traffic

Local Management Station

Management port

Transport Media

Access Node Network port

EtherNIDTM Client port

Customer Device

Demarcation point

Test traffic

Legend
Test traffic

Test traffic looped back

Customer traffic Ethernet connection

About this scenario:


Remote Management station is a computer that is used to remotely manage the EtherNID and to setup loopbacks. Access to the EtherNID management web interface occurs through a secure shell (SSL) via a web browser session and requires a JavaScript-enabled Web browser such as Firefox 1.0 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher. Test equipment provides the test suite that is used to validate the link to the customer premises. Hub node provides network connectivity for the carrier site. Transport media provides connectivity between the carrier site and the customer premises. Access node provides network connectivity for one or more customer devices at a remote location. Local management station is the computer that is used to define initial configuration settings on the EtherNID when it is installed. This station can be eliminated if a DHCP server is available on the network. In this case the DHCP server can be configured to provide a specific IP address to the EtherNID based on its MAC address. Customer device is the customer-owned switch or router residing on the customers network.

2: Hardware installation

Hardware overview

Chapter 2: Hardware installation

Hardware installation Hardware overview


Front panel - EtherNID EE

Front panel - EtherNID OE

Front panel - EtherNID GE, DE+ and MetroNID TE

Rear panel - All units

2: Hardware installation

Hardware overview

Front panel

The front panel features different ports and status lights depending on the model.

Ethernet ports
All Ethernet ports are 10/100/1000BaseT or 10/100BaseT Ethernet, depending on the model, supporting auto-negotiation, auto-MDIX and have RJ-45 connectors. Each port has two indicator lights as follows:

Light
Link/RX TX

Solid
Port is connected at the link layer. N/A

Flashing
Port is receiving data. Port is transmitting data

SFP ports
All SFP ports are compliant with INF-8074 and must be connected to SFP modules that are class 1 lasers and are compliant with IEC825-1.

Port functionality
The following table lists the capabilities of each port.

Model
EE

SFP
N/A

RJ-45
10Base-THD/TFD 100Base-TX/TXHD/TXFD (Auto-negotiation/Auto MDIX)

OE

100Base-BX10D/BX10U/FX/F XHD/FXFD/LX10

10Base-THD/TFD 100Base-TX/TXHD/TXFD (Auto-negotiation/Auto MDIX) 10Base-THD/TFD 100Base-TX/TXFD 1000Base-T/TFD (Auto-negotiation/Auto MDIX)

GE / TE

Fiber SFP 100Base-BX10D/BX10U/FX/F XFD/LX10 1000Base-BX10D/BX10U/LX/L XFD/LX10/SX/SXFD/T/TFD (Auto-negotiation) Copper SFP 10Base-TFD 100Base-TX/TXFD 1000Base-T/TFD (Auto-negotiation/Auto MDIX)

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2: Hardware installation

Hardware overview

DE+

Fiber SFP 100Base-BX10D/BX10U/FX/F XFD/LX10 (Auto-negotiation) Copper SFP 10Base-TFD 100Base-TX/TXFD (Auto-negotiation/Auto MDIX)

10Base-THD/TFD 100Base-TX/TXFD (Auto-negotiation/Auto MDIX)

The following describes the factory default configuration settings for all ports. Use the management web interface to change these settings as required by your installation.

EtherNID EE
Management: For connection of a local management station. By default, this port is set to the static IP address 192.168.1.254/24 and connection is made by using an SSL or SSH Client. Monitor 1: Configured for traffic monitoring. Monitor 2: Configured for traffic monitoring. RJ-45-A: This port is configured for connection to the client network. RJ-45-B: This port is configured for connection to the carrier network and is set to operate as a DHCP client. This is an Ethernet port that provides support for PoE (803.3af).

EtherNID OE
Management: For connection of a local management station. By default, this port is set to the static IP address 192.168.1.254/24 and connection is made by using an SSL or SSH Client. Monitor 1: Configured for traffic monitoring. Monitor 2: Configured for traffic monitoring. SFP-B: By default this port is configured for connection to the carrier network and is set to operate as a DHCP client. RJ-45-A: This port is configured for connection to the client network. This port supports PoE (803.3af).

EtherNID GE / MetroNID TE
SFP-A: By default, this port is configured for connection to the client network. Configuration can be changed using the management web interface. SFP-B: By default this port is configured for traffic monitoring. Management: For connection of a local management station. By default, this port is set to the static IP address 192.168.1.254/24 and connection is made by using an SSL or SSH Client. RJ-45-A: This port is configured for connection to the client network. This configuration can be changed using the management web interface. RJ-45-B: This port is configured for connection to the carrier network and is set to operate as a DHCP client. This is an Ethernet port that provides support for PoE (803.3af).

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2: Hardware installation

Hardware overview

EtherNID DE+
SFP-A: By default, this port is configured for connection to the carrier network-1. Configuration can be changed using the management web interface however this port must remain on NID-1. SFP-B: By default, this port is configured for connection to the carrier network-2. Configuration can be changed using the management web interface however this port must remain on NID-2. Management: For connection of a local management station. By default, this port is set to the static IP address 192.168.1.254/24 and connection is made by using an SSL or SSH Client. RJ-45-A: By default, this port is configured for connection to the client network-1. Configuration can be changed using the management web interface however this port must remain on NID-1. RJ-45-B: By default, this port is configured for connection to the client network-2. Configuration can be changed using the management web interface however this port must remain on NID-2.

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2: Hardware installation

Hardware overview

Status lights

PWR (green): On when power is applied. LPBK (yellow): On when the loopback function is enabled. Flashes when traffic is being looped-back. MIN (yellow): On when a minor alarm condition is present. MAJ (red): On when a major alarm condition is present. CRIT (red): On when a critical alarm condition is present. SFP (green): TX: Flashes when the port transmits data. Link/RX: Solid when the link level is present. Flashes when the port receives data.

Rear panel

The rear panels on all units are identical.

Port/Connectors
+/-40-57V---0.25A connector: For use with the EtherSHELF connectors or a discrete power cord (connector sold separately) providing +/-40 to +/-57 V DC. 5V---2A connector: For use with the DC power adapter. Console: RJ-45 serial connection for access to the console interface. Pin-outs for both ends of the console cable are as follows:

RJ-45 Cable

Console

8 DB-9 Female

1
TERMINAL

6 9 5

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2: Hardware installation

Hardware overview

RJ-45 Connector
Pins # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Signals Not connected Not connected Tx Data Ground Ground Rx Data Not connected Not connected 2 5 5 3

DB-9 Connector
Pins # Signals

Rx Data Ground Ground Tx Data

To establish a connection with the CLI interface on the EtherNID from your computer, use a terminal emulation program with the following settings: Protocol: Serial Port: COM1 to 8 Baud rate: 115200 Data bits: 8 Parity: None Stop bits: 1 Flow Control: None

Status light
5V: On when power is applied via the power adapter.

Buttons
The Bypass and Loopback buttons are used to reset the EtherNID. See "Resetting to factory defaults" on page 21 for instructions.

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2: Hardware installation

Mounting options

Mounting options
Several different mounting options are available as described in this section.

Wall mounting

Optional brackets and screws are available for mounting the EtherNID on a wall. Attach the brackets as follows:

Screw

Screw

Mounting bracket

When mounting the EtherNID on a wall, ensure that: the surface you attach the EtherNID to and the fasteners you use are able to support at least 2 kg (4.4 pounds) cable pull (accidental or otherwise) does not make the unit exceed the 2 kg (4.4 pound) limit

Desktop installation

Attach the included rubber feet to the bottom of the unit for added stability when placing on a desktop or other flat surface.

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2: Hardware installation

Mounting options

Rack mounting

To install the EtherNID in a standard 19 rack, attach the optional 1U rack mount bracket as shown.

An optional 1U bracket is available that can hold two units.

Grounding the EtherNID


Connect the EtherNID to a ground point on the rack as follows: 1. Turn OFF power to the unit. However, to channel ESD voltages to ground, do not unplug the power cable. Remove all network interface cables. Warning: Before proceeding to the next step, ensure that power is removed from the DC circuit. To ensure that all power is OFF, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the OFF position, and then tape the switch handle of the circuit breaker in the OFF position. 2. Strip one end of a 10-AWG wire to expose approximately 0.75 in. (20 mm). 3. Crimp the ground lug around the exposed wire. 4. Use a Phillips #2 screwdriver to fasten the ground lug to the bottom hole on the left side of the unit (towards the rear) using a 4-40, 3/16 stainless steel screw with an oversized washer. 5. Connect the other end of the wire to a grounding point on the rack.

16

2: Hardware installation

Mounting options

EtherSHELF
The EtherSHELF, an optional 12 unit, 4U shelf is available for large-scale installations.

To mount an EtherNID in the EtherSHELF, L-shaped brackets must be attached to the left and right side of the unit.

Attach brackets before mounting in the drawer.

Grounding the EtherSHELF


Connect the EtherSHELF to a ground point on the rack as follows: 1. Turn OFF power to the shelf. However, to channel ESD voltages to ground, do not unplug the power cable. Remove all network interface cables. Warning: Before proceeding to the next step, ensure that power is removed from the DC circuit. To ensure that all power is OFF, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the OFF position, and then tape the switch handle of the circuit breaker in the OFF position. 2. Strip one end of a 10-AWG wire to expose approximately 0.75 in. (20 mm). 3. Crimp the two-hole grounding lug around the exposed wire.

17

2: Hardware installation

Mounting options

4. Use a small wrench to tighten the bolts around the two grounding screws to secure the two-hole grounding lug to the back of the EtherSHELF 5. Connect the other end of the wire to a grounding point on the rack.

18

2: Hardware installation

Powering the EtherNID

Powering the EtherNID


The EtherNID can be powered using one of the following options:

Power over Ethernet (PoE)


The EtherNID can be powered via the network port using any 802.3af-compliant power injector.

DC power adapter
Connect the supplied power adapter to the 5V/2A DC connector on the rear of the unit.

48V DC from the 12 unit EtherSHELF


You can power EtherNIDs mounted in the EtherSHELF using the shelfs built-in 48 V DC power connector. Slide the EtherNID into the shelf to engage the power connector on the rear of the unit. The EtherSHELFs power feed must be limited with a 5A/48V fuse. Voltage must be in the range +/-40 to +/-57 V DC using AWG 14 gauge or larger cable.

48V DC from the Terminal Block Adapter


In a 1U rack mount bracket installation, it is sometimes preferable to use 48V DC power through directly secured wires as opposed to the DC power adapter.The Terminal Block Adapter fastens to the back of the EtherNID to provide such an installation. To ground the Terminal Block Adapter, use a small wrench to tighten the bolt around the grounding screw, located at the bottom right on the back of the Terminal Block Adapter, to secure the grounding lug.

19

2: Hardware installation

Powering the EtherNID

48V DC via discrete power cord


It is possible to power units with a custom built 48V DC power cable. When powered in this manner, the unit must be installed horizontally to meet all applicable safety regulations. Therefore, supported mounting options are desktop mounting or 1 or 2 unit rack mounting. Wall mounting is not allowed. On older models of the EtherNID, the +/- 48V Return is common to both Feed A and Feed B, whereas other models will have an isolated Return A and Return B. To locate your serial number, please refer to the sticker on the Rear Panel of the unit. If the serial number starts with: I006- or less then the unit has a common +/- 48V Return P004- or less then the unit has a common +/- 48V Return I007- or more then the unit has an isolated +/- 48V Return A and Return B P005- or more then the unit has an isolated +/- 48V Return A and Return B The following diagram depicts the pin-out of the white +/- 48V connector on the rear panel of the EtherNID:
Common +/- 48V Return Isolated +/- 48V Return A and B

If an EtherNID with a Common +/- 48V Return is being used with the Terminal Block Adapter, then the two +/- 48V Return screws corresponding to the RTN FEED A and RTN FEED B on the Terminal Block Adapter must be tied together: Terminal Block Adapter with Return Feeds tied

The power source (+/-40 to +/-57 V DC) must be limited by a 0.25A/48V slow blow fuse or equivalent (Little fuse 0217.250 0.25A). There should be one fuse per power feed. Warning: Disconnect all power sources (feed A and feed B) when servicing. Removing fuses can be used as a disconnect method. Warning: Fuses must be installed on the live wire(s) and not on the grounded wire(s).

20

2: Hardware installation

Restarting

Restarting
To restart the EtherNID: 1. Press and hold the Bypass button. 2. Press and release the Loopback button. The unit will restart. 3. Release the Bypass button. If required, the EtherNID can also be restarted using the command line interface. See Chapter 10 for details.

Resetting to factory defaults


To reset the EtherNID to factory default settings: 1. Press and hold the Bypass button. 2. Press and release the Loopback button. 3. Continue to press the Bypass button until the following lights all flash at the same time: Minor Major Critical Power

4. Release the Bypass button.

21

3: Management and configuration

About the management web interface

Chapter 3: Management and configuration

Management and configuration About the management web interface


The web-based management web interface provides secure access, via an SSL client, to all EtherNID control, management, and monitoring functions. The management station is the computer that you use to connect to the management web interface. To act as a management station, a computer must: have a JavaScript-enabled Web browser installed (Firefox 1.0 or higher, or Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher). be able to establish an IP connection with the EtherNID

Starting the management web interface

To start the management interface, do the following: 1. Use an Ethernet cable to connect the LAN port on a computer to the management port on the front of the EtherNID. 2. Configure the computer with the static IP address 192.168.1.2. 3. Connect the power adaptor or use PoE (802.3af) to power-up the EtherNID. 4. Start your Web browser and specify the following in the address box: https://192.168.1.254 and press Enter. 5. The EtherNID login page opens. Login as admin with the Password admin.

Managing web interface accounts

One administrator account is created by default with username and password both set to admin. The username and password are case-sensitive. It is recommended that you change the default password immediately after installation to safeguard the system. The administrator account provides access to all EtherNID features.

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3: Management and configuration

About the management web interface

Managing accounts
Administrator accounts are managed on the Session > Users page.

Changing the default administrator password


1. Open the Session > Users page and click admin in the list. 2. Specify the new password, confirm it.

3. Click Apply.

Lost administrator password


If you forget the username or password the only way to gain access to the management web interface is to perform a factory reset as described in "Resetting to factory defaults" on page 21.

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3: Management and configuration

About the management web interface

Creating additional accounts


1. Open the Session > Users page and click Add. 2. In the new user setting box, specify the new user name and other details.

3. Click Apply.

24

3: Management and configuration

DNS settings

DNS settings
To define DNS options, open the System > DNS page. You can either choose to use the DNS settings obtained via DHCP on a specific port, or manually set DNS settings.

Use DHCP results

Set DNS manually

In either case, you can define the host name for the EtherNID. Note: The default host name is the serial number of the NID and will be displayed in the banner at the top of the management web interface.

25

3: Management and configuration

Configuring interfaces

Configuring interfaces
The EtherNID lets you define multiple logical interfaces for management purposes that can be active on different ports. This includes defining bridges and VLANs. To see a list of all logical interfaces. Open the System > Interface page.

By default, two interfaces are defined: Management: This is the default interface that enables access to the management web interface via the management port. If you modify this interface you may lose access to the management web interface. Network: This is the default interface active on the network port.

Creating or editing an interface

To create or edit an interface, do the following: 1. Open the System > Interface page. 2. Click the Add button to add a new interface, or click the name of an existing interface to edit its settings. For example, if you click the Management interface you will see:

Note: Different fields will appear depending on the selections you make for Interface type. 3. Define interface parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

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3: Management and configuration

Configuring interfaces

Interface parameters

Note: It is valid to set the IP address for an interface to 0.0.0.0 when the interface is not required to be an IP interface. For example, when the interface is used for OAM or test set interaction.

Interface name
Specify a name to identify the interface.

Interface type
Sets the interface type to use. Select one of the following options: Standard: Standard IP interface associated with a single port. Bridge: Bridged interface than connects two or more ports. VLAN: VLAN interface associated with a single port. VLANinVLAN: VLAN in VLAN (.1q in .1q) interface associated with a single port.

On port(s)
Select the port the interface will be active on. In the case of a bridge, select multiple ports by holding down the control key when you click on port names in the list.

VLAN ID
(Only available when Interface type is set to VLAN or VLANinVLAN.) Specify the VLAN ID (Management VLAN) to assign to the interface.

Ethertype
(Only available when Interface type is set to VLANinVLAN.) Specify the Ethertypes for the first and second VLAN IDs. Valid Ethertypes are: 0x8100 (C-VLAN) and/or 0x88A8 (S-VLAN).

Automatic IP (DHCP)
Select this option to have the interface act as a DHCP client and automatically obtain its IP address, DNS server, and gateway settings from a DHCP server.

Use DHCP route information


If the DHCP server has routing information, it will be applied to the EtherNID.

Manual configuration
Select this option to manually configure IP addressing settings. IP address: Specify an IP address to assign to the interface. Network mask: Specify the network mask associated with the IP address. Gateway address: Specify a default gateway address. This provides a shortcut alternative, to route configuration, to create a default gateway.

27

3: Management and configuration

Routes

Routes
Select System > Interface to open the routes pages, which shows all active routes on the EtherNID. Initially, no routes are defined.

Adding a route

To add a system route, do the following: 1. Open the System > Routes page. 2. Click the Add button in the Routes box. 3. Define route parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

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3: Management and configuration

Routes

Route parameters

Name
Specify the name to assign to the route.

Type
Select a route type: Network Host

Interface
Select the interface to which the route is associated. Note: This field is optional if a matching active route is already associated to the interface.

Destination
Network or host address of the route. Use 0.0.0.0 for default.

Network mask
Specify the mask to assign to the route. Only used for routes of type Network.

Gateway
Specify the gateway associated with this route.

29

3: Management and configuration

Syslog options

Syslog options
To define syslog options, open the System > Syslog page. The syslog page displays all syslog entries with the most recent entry at the top.

Syslog information can be sent to a remote server by setting the options in the Remote Syslog Configuration box. Configure these options as required and then click Apply.

Syslog parameters

Facility configuration
Device facility
All messages are logged using this user defined facility instead of the default ones.

Level configuration
Level threshold
Log all messages with level equal to or above the selected one in the drop down list. For example, If CRITICAL level is selected, then all messages with level CRITICAL, ALERT or EMERGENCY will be logged.

Remote syslog configuration


Remote syslog enable
Enables the sending of messages to a remote syslog server.

Host
Specify the IP address or domain name of the remote syslog server.

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3: Management and configuration

Setting the system date and time

Setting the system date and time


To set the system date and time, do the following: 1. Open the System > Time page.

2. Specify the current date and time and click Apply or to automatically update the system date and time using the Network Time protocol, select the NTP enable option. The following options will be displayed:

3. Select a time server from the list. To add a new server, specify its name or IP address in the Added Server box and then click add. Then select the new server in the list and click Apply. 4. The EtherNID can also act as an NTP server by selecting the NTP server enable option.

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3: Management and configuration

Timezone and Daylight saving

Timezone and Daylight saving


For a list of time zones and daylight saving time rules, please refer to: http://www.worldtimezone.com/.

GMT offset
Offset from Greenwich Mean Time. North America would have negative values while Eastern Europe would have positive values.

Daylight saving enable


For regions of the world implementing Daylight saving time, this can be enabled. Beware that syslog and other services that timestamp events using the current date and time will be affected during transitions of DST periods. There will possibly be an hour gap or duplicate time stamps because the clock was set back.

Daylight saving offset


Time correction to apply to GMT offset during the Dailight saving period. Most of the time it will be one hour.

DST start and DST end


Period where daylight saving time is in effect. The events are described as: "the change will take place on the n'th (week) of (month) on a (day) at (hour) (min)" To describe the last day of the month, use week=5

Examples:
Montreal, Quebec, Canada time: GMT offset=-5, DST enable=check, DST offset=1 DST start: Month=March, Week=2, Day=Sunday, Hour=2, Min=0 DST end: Month=November, Week=1, Day=Sunday, Hour=2, Min=0 Wellington, New Zealand GMT offset=12, DST enable=check, DST offset=1, DST start: Month=September, Week=5, Day=Sunday, Hour=2, Min=0 DST end: Month=April, Week=1, Day=Sunday, Hour=3, Min=0

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3: Management and configuration

SNMP settings

SNMP settings
To configure SNMP options, do the following: 1. Open the System > SNMP page.

2. Define SNMP parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

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3: Management and configuration

SNMP settings

SNMP parameters

Enable agent
Select this checkbox to enable the SNMP agent.

SNMP system name


Specify a name to identify the EtherNID. By convention, this is the node's fully-qualified domain name.

Contact information
Specify contact information for the EtherNID. Generally an email address.

System location
Identify the physical location of the EtherNID.

Agent UDP port


Specify the UDP port the SNMP agent uses for all IPv4 interfaces.

Read-only community
Specify the community string to control read-only access to the EtherNID.

Read-write community
Specify the community string to control read/write access to the EtherNID.

Enable trap host


Enable these options to have the unit send SNMPv1 or SNMPv2c traps to the specified management host(s).

Community string
Specify the community string required to send traps to the management host(s).

Management host
Specify the IP address or host name of the device that will receive SNMP traps (and/or inform notifications). The EtherNID sends a Cold Start trap when it starts up.

UDP port
Specify the UDP port that the EtherNID will use to send traps to the management host(s). By default, the well-known SNMP trap port (162) is used. Note: For a list of Public and Private supported MIBs, see Appendix B.

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3: Management and configuration

History buckets

History buckets
To configure local history bucketing, do the following: 1. Open the System > History page.

2. Define the history parameters as required and then click Apply.

Local Configuration

Enable history
This will start the creation of history files being stored in RAM. These will then be accessible through SNMP.

Enable filing
This will enable the history files to be stored locally instead of storing this information in the RAM. This will enable the remote retrieval of these files as well as protect against losing these statistics history in the event of a power failure or reboot. Unchecking this box will result in the existing history files for this feature to be removed locally.

Period
The frequency, in minutes, of storing the statistics history into files.

35

3: Management and configuration

Remote retrieval of history buckets

Remote retrieval of history buckets


NOTE: The Remote retrieval feature is only available on the MetroNID TE models. To configure remote retrieval of history buckets, do the following: 1. Open the System > History page on the remote NIDs.

2. Ensure filing is enabled for the desired history buckets and then click Apply. 3. Open the System > History page on the local MetroNID TE and add a new remote device. Then enable scheduling at the desired time slot(s) and provide the URL for the file transfer server.

36

3: Management and configuration

Remote retrieval of history buckets

Scheduling and file transfer configuration

Enable scheduling
Enable the history buckets to be retrieved from the local device and/or the list of remote devices. The history buckets will be retrieved according to the Scheduled hours selected. (Hold CTRL key to select more than one hour) This feature is dependant on the Enable filing check boxes in the Local configuration sections of the local and remote devices. Example: If Enable scheduling is checked but the local device has not checked Enable filing, then only the remote history buckets will be retrieved. Example: If Enable scheduling is checked and the local device, as well as the remote device(s), have checked Enable filing, then both the local and remote history buckets will be retrieved.

Server URL
The full URL of the Server on which to send the history bucket files once retrieved. Examples: http://mypc.com ftp://username:password@mypc.com tftp://192.168.1.5 NOTE: The status of the Remote devices can be obtained by clicking on the Remote device name in the Remote device configuration window.

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3: Management and configuration

Session management

Session management
To configure session management options, do the following: 1. Open the Session > Management page.

2. Define session management parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

Management parameters

Writelock session
The management web interface supports multiple concurrent users, therefore to maintain the integrity of the configuration settings, only one user at a time has the ability to make changes. Writelock: Click this button to lock the configuration so you can make changes. Writeunlock: Click this button to unlock the configuration so someone else can make changes.

Current sessions
Lists all sessions currently logged into the EtherNID.

Session ID
Unique number that identifies a session. Automatically generated by the EtherNID.

Type
Indicates which interface the session is using.

Username
Identifies the user account that is logged in. An asterisk (*) next to the username indicates the username of the session that is viewing this web page.

Uptime
Indicates how long the session has been active.

Writelock
Indicates which session has the ability to make configuration changes.

Terminate
Select one or more sessions and then click the Terminate button to force a log out.

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3: Management and configuration

Firmware upgrade

Firmware upgrade
To upgrade the EtherNID firmware, do the following: 1. Open the System > Firmware page.

2. Specify the location and name of the new firmware file or click Browse and select it. 3. Click Upload. 4. Once the firmware has been uploaded the unit will restart.

39

3: Management and configuration

Session configuration

Session configuration
To configure session options, do the following: 1. Open the Session > Configuration page.

2. Define session parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

Session parameters

Max CLI sessions


Specify the maximum number of CLI sessions that are supported at the same time.

Max WEB sessions


Specify the maximum number of management tool sessions that are supported at the same time.

Max total sessions


Specify the total number of CLI and WEB sessions that are supported at the same time.

CLI timeout
Specify the maximum number of seconds that a CLI session can remain idle before it is automatically logged out.

WEB timeout
Specify the maximum number of seconds that a management tool session can remain idle before it is automatically logged out.

Authentication
Order
Authentication method to use in order of availability. Refer to RADIUS configuration page for server configuration instructions. This parameter is described in the RADIUS section below on page 35.

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3: Management and configuration

Session management

Session management
To configure session management options, do the following: 1. Open the Session > Management page.

2. Define session management parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

Management parameters

Writelock session
The management web interface supports multiple concurrent users, therefore to maintain the integrity of the configuration settings, only one user at a time has the ability to make changes. Writelock: Click this button to lock the configuration so you can make changes. Writeunlock: Click this button to unlock the configuration so someone else can make changes.

Current sessions
Lists all sessions currently logged into the EtherNID.

Session ID
Unique number that identifies a session. Automatically generated by the EtherNID.

Type
Indicates which interface the session is using.

Username
Identifies the user account that is logged in. An asterisk (*) next to the username indicates the username of the session that is viewing this web page.

Uptime
Indicates how long the session has been active.

Writelock
Indicates which session has the ability to make configuration changes.

Terminate
Select one or more sessions and then click the Terminate button to force a log out.

41

3: Management and configuration

Session RADIUS

Session RADIUS
To configure RADIUS authentication, do the following: 1. Open the Session > RADIUS page.

2. Define RADIUS parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

RADIUS parameters

Authentication method
Authentication method to use. This can be one of the following methods: PAP : Password Authentication Protocol

RADIUS timeout
Time to wait for the RADIUS server to respond before retrying the connection. After the number of retries has been exhausted, a connection to the next configured server will be attempted, in which the same timeout and retry scheme will apply.

RADIUS retry
Number of times to retry the server before trying the next server configured.

Realm
A string to append to the user's name using the "username@realm" method.

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3: Management and configuration

Session RADIUS

Server-1 / Server-2
Host
RADIUS server host-name or IPV4 address.

Port
RADIUS server UDP port to connect to.

Secret
Shared secret for this RADIUS server.

Radius server configuration


When RADIUS authentication is enabled, the unit supports Authentication and Authorization as configured on the RADIUS server. The RADIUS Callback-Id (id=20) attribute is used to provide the Authorization (permissions) info to the unit. If the attribute is not configured then the permissions will be set to viewer only. The permissions are the same as those that can be configured locally on the unit. It is a space or coma separated list of tokens. They can be a mix of either locally defined user permission groups or individial privileges. Notes: - RADIUS assigned permissions cannot be viewed with the CLI or web based interface. - The permissions tokens are case sensitive.

Configuration examples
Callback-Id = "Admin" A userid member of the built-in Admin group. Callback-Id = "Config Firmware Log Management, Users" A list of individual privileges.

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3: Management and configuration

Management bridge

Management bridge
This section describes how to set up a bridged management port using the command line interface. A minimum of two EtherNIDs are required for this setup. An out-of-band EtherNID management port will be used to manage the other EtherNIDs, in-band through a bridged interface. This is useful when the core transport devices do not need to be connected to the internal private management network. Instead, the first EtherNID is connected to the private network and manages the other EtherNIDs in-band through its out-of-band Management port. The following diagram describes the typical setup scenario for a bridged interface:

Configuration procedure

1. Power on EtherNID #1 with factory default settings. 2. Connect your computer to serial port on the back of the EtherNID. 3. Open a terminal emulation session with the following configuration: Bits per second: 115200 Data bits: 8 Parity: None Stop bits: 1 Flow Control: None

4. Login to the CLI with username admin and password admin. 5. If an EtherNID GE is being used, and the setup requires the Client and Network ports to be set as copper medium, type the following command:
media-selection select RJ45-A_RJ45-B

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3: Management and configuration

Management bridge

6. Delete any existing interfaces with the following commands:


interface delete Management interface delete Network

7. The Network port of EtherNID #1 will be used for the in-band management. Configure the Network port with the following command:
interface add net1-10 type vlan 10 port Network address 192.168.1.253 netmask 255.255.255.0

8. Repeat configuration steps 1. to 7. on EtherNID #3 using the following settings when defining the new interface:
interface add net3-10 type vlan 10 port Network address 192.168.1.252 netmask 255.255.255.0

9. Repeat configuration steps 1. to 6. on EtherNID #2. 10. Execute the following commands to add three interfaces on EtherNID #2:
interface add mgmt type standard port Management interface add cli10 type vlan 10 port Client interface add net10 type vlan 10 port Network

The interface 'mgmt' will be used to connect to the management bridge. The other two interfaces will be used to access the other two EtherNIDs remotely. 11. Next, create the bridge interface. Execute the following command to bridge all three interfaces together for access using the Management port.
interface add Bridge type bridge sub-intf mgmt,cli10,net10 address 192.168.1.254 netmask 255.255.255.0

12. Connect the Management port of EtherNID #2 to the private network. 13. Open a web browser on a computer connected to the private network and enter the address 192.168.1.254 to reach the management web interface on EtherNID #2. 14. Connect the Client port of EtherNID #2 to the Network port of EtherNID #3. 15. Connect the Network port of EtherNID #2 to the Network port of EtherNID #1. 16. Open a web browser and enter the address 192.168.1.254 to reach the management web interface on EtherNID #2. 17. Open a second web browser and enter the address 192.168.1.253 to reach the management web interface on EtherNID #1. 18. Open a third web browser and enter the address 192.168.1.252 to reach the management web interface on EtherNID #3.

45

4: Port configuration

Port list and port status

Chapter 4: Port configuration

Port configuration Port list and port status


To view a list of all ports and their status, open the Port > Configuration page. You will see the following page on an EtherNID EE:

46

4: Port configuration

Port list and port status

You will see the following page on an EtherNID OE:

47

4: Port configuration

Port list and port status

You will see the following page on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE:

48

4: Port configuration

Port list and port status

You will see the following page on an EtherNID DE+:

Port configuration and status

Status
Indicates the status of the port. Green: The port is up and running. Red: The port is enabled but the physical link is down. Yellow: The port is not totally functional. Grey: The port is disabled.

Connector
Identifies the physical connector the port is using.

Port name
Identifies the logical name assigned to the port.

Port state
Indicates if the port is enabled (ready to connect) or disabled.

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4: Port configuration

Port list and port status

Speed
Indicates the current port speed and duplex type. If set to Auto-nego the EtherNID automatically negotiates port speed and duplex type with the device it is connected to. For this to work the device must also be configured to support auto-negotiation.

MAC address
Indicates the MAC address of the port.

Port options

Media-selection
(Supported on the EtherNID GE and MetroNID TE only) Lets you select which two media connectors will be used to carry traffic. Four options are available: SFP-A with SFP-B SFP-A with RJ-45-B (PoE) RJ-45-A with SFP-B RJ-45-A with RJ-45-B (PoE)

If you change the setting and then click Apply, all the associations between connectors and ports will be reflected in the Port configuration and status table. The two other connectors on the device will be monitor ports. When used as monitor ports, connectors RJ45-A and SFP-A are mapped to port Monitor-1, and RJ45-B and SFP-B are mapped to port Monitor-2. For example: By default, SFP-A with RJ-45-B (PoE) is selected. This denotes Traffic-A is connected to the SFP-A connector and Traffic-B is connected to the RJ-45-B connector

Fault propagation
Enable fault propagation
Select this check box to enable fault propagation. When this feature is enabled the EtherNID will propagate link faults between the Client and Network ports.

Propagate fault on port


Select the port that the EtherNID will use for fault propagation. Select one of the following options: Client: If the EtherNID detects a link down condition on the Network port it will also bring down the Client port. Network: If the EtherNID detects a link down condition on the Client port it will also bring down the Network port. Two-way: If the EtherNID detects a link down condition on either the Client port or the Network port it will bring down both ports.

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4: Port configuration

Configuring port settings

Configuring port settings


To configure port settings, do the following: 1. Open the Port > Configuration page. 2. Click the name of the port that you want to configure. The port configuration page will open. If you are configuring a copper port it will be similar to the following page:

If you are configuring an SFP fiber port it will be similar to the following page:

3. Define port parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

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4: Port configuration

Configuring port settings

Port parameters

Port enable
Select this check box to enable the port.

Port name
Specify a name to identify the port. By default, ports are named as follows: Management, Client, Network, Monitor-1 and Monitor-2.

Alias
This is an 'alias' name for the port as specified by a network manager.

Port MTU
Specify the maximum transmission unit. By default, this is set to 1522. Example range: 1518 to 10240. Note that this range is platform dependant.

Link Loss Return (LLR)


(SFP fiber ports only) This option determines how the EtherNID notifies its link partner when a valid receive signal is absent on the link. If this option is disabled, then: For 1000BASE-X links, a Remote Fault Indicator using auto-negotiation advertisement is sent to the link partner. For 100BASE-FX links, the FEFI idle pattern is sent to the link partner.

If this option is enabled, then the EtherNID turns off its transmitter for the amount of time defined by LLR period, after which it is re-enabled. This cycle is repeated until the link is re-established. Entering a value of 0, puts the laser into a disabled state waiting for the opposite side to send a light pulse in order to re-establish the link. So for this reason, 0 should not be configured on both sides or the link will never re-establish.

Link speed
(copper ports only) Sets port speed and duplex type. Select Auto-negotiation enable to have the EtherNID automatically negotiate port speed and duplex type with the device it is connected to. For this to work the device must also be configured to support auto-negotiation. If you do not select Auto-negotiation enable, you can manually define port speed and duplex type using the available options. Note: Auto-negotiation is mandatory for 1000BASE-T.

Flow control
Select how pause frames are processed by setting the Pause mode option to local, transparent or disabled. When this option is set to local or transparent and the Auto-negotiation option is also enabled under Link speed, the exact behavior depends on the auto-negotiation result.

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Configuring port settings

Current status
Reports the following for Ethernet ports: Current link speed and duplex type when Auto-negotiation enable is selected. Current connector configuration: If the link partner is also using Auto MDI, the resulting connector configuration is correct but random. A cross-over cable present on the cabling plant will result in both partners using the same connector configuration.

Connector
Identifies the physical connector associated with the port.

MAC address
Identifies the MAC address of the port.

Large packet threshold


Specify the threshold such that all packets above this value will be classified as Large Packets on the Port > Statistics page

Medium dependent interface


(Copper ports only) Select Auto MDI Enable to have the EtherNID automatically adapt the configuration of the connector to the cabling plant and link partner type. If you do not select Auto MDI Enable, you can manually define port settings as follows: MDI: Typical setting for an Ethernet station. Link partner must be set to MDIX or a cross-over cable must be used. MDIX: Typical setting for an Ethernet switch. Link partner must be set to MDI or a cross-over cable must be used.

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Port statistics

Port statistics
To view port statistics, do the following: 1. Open the Port > Statistics page.

2. Click the name of a port to view detailed statistics. For example, if you click the Management port on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE you will see a page similar to the following:

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PHY auto-negotiation configuration

PHY auto-negotiation configuration


To configure PHY auto-negotiation settings, do the following: 1. Open the Port > PHY page.

2. Click the name of a port that you want to configure. For example, if you click the Client port name you will see the following page.

3. Define PHY parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply. Note: Advertised parameters are checked and parameters that are not configurable are greyed-out based on the capabilities of the port.

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PHY auto-negotiation configuration

PHY parameters

Advertisement configuration
Sets the abilities that are advertised to the link partner. Supported options include: 10Mbps Half 100Mbps Half 1Gbps Half 10Mbps Full 100Mbps Full 1Gbps Full Pause Symmetric Pause Asymmetric

Link Partner Ability


Lists the abilities of the link partner. 10Mbps Half 100Mbps Half 1Gbps Half 10Mbps Full 100Mbps Full 1Gbps Full Pause Symmetric Pause Asymmetric

State
The state field corresponds to ifMauAutoNegConfig and ifMauAutoNegRemoteSignaling from RFC3636. The state disabled indicates that auto-negotiation is not supported by the media or disabled by configuration.

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SFP information

SFP information
(Supported only on the EtherNID OE / GE / MetroNID TE) To view SFP information, do the following: 1. Open the Port > SFP page.

2. Click the name of the port for which you want to view detailed statistics. Refer to the following sections for more information. "SFP information" on page 57 "SFP thresholds" on page 59 "SFP memory and monitor memory" on page 61

SFP information

This box displays general SFP information and monitoring information.

SFP information
Connector Type
Indicates the external optical or electrical cable connector provided as the media interface.

Vendor
Indicates the vendor name. This is a 16 character field that contains ASCII characters padded on the right with ASCII spaces (20h).

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SFP information

Wave Length
Indicates the nominal transmitter output wavelength at room temperature in nm.

Part number
Indicates the vendor part number or product name. This is a 16-byte field that contains ASCII characters padded on the right with ASCII spaces (20h).

Serial number
Indicates the vendor serial number for the transceiver. This is a 16 character field that contains ASCII characters padded on the right with ASCII spaces (20h).

Revision
Indicates the vendors product revision. This is a 16 character field that contains ASCII characters padded on the right with ASCII spaces (20h).

SFP present
Indicates the presence of a recognized SFP.

Diagnostics
If bit 6 is set, address 92 is set indicating that digital diagnostic monitoring has been implemented, received power monitoring, transmitted power monitoring, bias current monitoring, supply voltage monitoring and temperature monitoring will all be displayed.

Calibration
The values in this field are interpreted differently depending upon the option bits set at address 92. Internal: If bit 5 is set, the values are calibrated to absolute measurements, which should be interpreted according to the convention Internal Calibration. External: If bit 4 is set, the values are A/D counts, which are converted into real units per the convention External Calibration.

Thresholds
Additionally, alarm and warning thresholds must be written as specified in this document at locations 00 55 on 2 wire serial address 1010001X (A2h).

Monitoring information
Temperature
Internally measured transceiver temperature. Temperature accuracy is vendor specific but must be better than 3 degrees Celsius over specified operating temperature and voltage.

Laser bias current


Measured coupled TX output power. Accuracy is vendor specific but must be better than 3dB over specified operating temperature and voltage. Data is assumed to be based on measurement of a laser monitor photodiode current. Data is not valid when the transmitter is disabled.

Transmit power
Measured coupled TX output power. Accuracy is vendor specific but must be better than 3dB over specified operating temperature and voltage. Data is assumed to be based on measurement of a laser monitor photodiode current. Data is not valid when the transmitter is disabled.

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SFP information

Receive power
Measured received optical power. Absolute accuracy is dependent upon the exact optical wavelength. For the vendor specified wavelength, accuracy should be better than 3dB over specified temperature and voltage.This accuracy should be maintained for input power levels up to the lesser of maximum transmitted or maximum received optical power per the appropriate standard. It should be maintained down to the minimum transmitted power minus cable plant loss (insertion loss or passive loss) per the appropriate standard. Absolute accuracy beyond this minimum required received input optical power range is vendor specific.

Supply voltage
Internally measured transceiver supply voltage. Note that in some transceivers, transmitter supply voltage and receiver supply voltage are isolated. In that case, only one supply is monitored. Refer to the device specification for more detail.

SFP thresholds

Temperature
High alarm
High Alarm transceiver temperature.

Low alarm
Low Alarm transceiver temperature.

High warning
High Warning transceiver temperature.

Low warning
Low Warning transceiver temperature.

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SFP information

Vcc
High alarm
High Alarm transceiver supply voltage.

Low alarm
Low Alarm transceiver supply voltage.

High warning
High Warning transceiver supply voltage.

Low warning
Low Warning transceiver supply voltage.

Laser bias current


High alarm
High Alarm TX bias current in micro-Amps.

Low alarm
Low Alarm TX bias current in micro-Amps.

High warning
High Warning TX bias current in micro-Amps.

Low warning
Low Warning TX bias current in micro-Amps.

Tx power
High alarm
High Alarm TX output power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

Low alarm
Low Alarm TX output power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

High warning
High Warning TX output power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

Low warning
Low Warning TX output power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

Rx power
High alarm
High Alarm Rx input power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

Low alarm
Low Alarm Rx input power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

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SFP information

High warning
High Warning Rx input power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

Low warning
Low Warning Rx input power in dBm (~ -40 to +8.2 dBm).

SFP memory and monitor memory

SFP memory
The SFP serial ID provides access to sophisticated identification information that describes the transceivers capabilities, standard interfaces, manufacturer, and other information. Refer to INF-8074 for detailed descriptions of the individual data fields.

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Cable verification

Cable verification
The EtherNID uses Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) to determine the quality of cables, connectors, and terminations. Some of the possible problems that the EtherNID can diagnose are: opens, shorts, cable impedance mismatch, bad connectors, and termination mismatch.

Testing a cable

To perform a cable test, do the following: 1. Open the Port > Cable page.

2. Click the name the connector you want to test. For example, if you click RJ45-B you will see the following page.

3. Click Perform Test. 4. The status of each channel is updated as the tests are run.

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Cable verification

When completed, test status will be one of the following: GOOD: Normal cable. SHORT: Indicates that the positive and the negative lines of the same cable pair are touching: Possible causes include: Cable wire may be touching the wire closet patch panel. Cable may be worn or broken allowing the positive and negative lines to touch.

OPEN: Indicates that one pair on the cable is not connected at the far end of the cable. Possible causes include: Cable is not connected. Cable was cut.

FORCED: Indicates a persistent noise on the cable. This can be caused by a link partner running forced at 10/100 Mbps. Cable length is not available when the test results indicate FORCED. FAIL: If the remote partner sends traffic at the same time as the test is being conducted, then these packets may interfere with the TDR resulting in a FAIL status. Impedance Mismatch: Indicates that the effective impedance is not 100 Ohms. the TDR can determine an impedance mismatch. Possible causes include: Different quality cables are connected together through a cable extender. A low quality cable is being used.

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Service mapping

Chapter 5: Monitoring and filtering

Monitoring and filtering Service mapping


NOTE: The Service mapping feature is only available on the EtherNID GE and MetroNID TE models. For other models, see the Traffic forwarding section below. The EtherNID can perform EVC mapping (which is essentially a VLAN push), CoS mapping and Bandwidth Policing mapping. These options can be used together or separately. Prior to creating CoS profiles and/or Bandwidth regulator sets, appropriate filters and bandwidth regulators will need to be created. See section Traffic Filters and Bandwidth Policing below for details about creating filters and regulators. A CoS profile is used to map an input packet to an L2 class of service. This traffic mapping (classification) is accomplished using the following fields in the incoming packet: p-bits in 802.1Q / 802.1Q .1Q tags IP precedence bits in IPv4 TOS byte DSCP bits in IPv4 DSCP byte

The class of service value (0-7) assigned to the outgoing traffic is selected based on the conformance level (Green/Yellow) of the incoming traffic.

Viewing CoS profiles

To view a list of configured CoS profiles, open the Traffic > Mapping page. By default, commonly used profiles.

Index
CoS profile's unique identifier.

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Service mapping

Name
CoS profile's name as defined in the configuration page. Click this name for more details.

Type
CoS profile's type. Possible values are: PCP IP precedence DSCP

Reference count
The reference count is the number of policies that are currently using this CoS profile.

Configuring a CoS Profile

Once a Cos profile is created, it can be applied to policies for traffic classification. To configure a CoS profile, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > Mapping page. 2. Click Add in the CoS profiles section, or click a profile name to edit and existing one. 3. Configure CoS profile parameters and click Apply.

CoS Profile parameters

Name
Name of the CoS profile.

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Service mapping

Type
Indicates the type of CoS profile. Possible values are: PCP IP precedence DSCP

Decode DEI
This field is only valid for PCP CoS profiles. If this field is set, the pre-marking color is decoded from the DEI bit (Drop Eligible Indication). Otherwise, the user defined pre-color is used.

Encode using DEI


This field controls the DEI bit in an S-VLAN tag. If this field is set and the outgoing packet is marked yellow then the DEI bit is set to 1. Otherwise, the DEI is set to 0.

Reference count (only visible on existing profiles)


The reference count is the number of policies that are currently using this CoS profile.

Mapping table
The mapping table maps the input traffic to a specific class of service. This table has four columns and N rows, where N depends on the type of the CoS profile. If the CoS profile type is PCP or IP precedence then N=8. Otherwise, the CoS profile is a DSCP profile and N=64. Each row in this table represents a mapping entry and each entry has the following parameters:

PCP/IP precedence/DSCP [IN]


PCP/IP precedence/DSCP input value.

Pre-marking color
The pre-marking color that will be assigned to the input packet that has this PCP/IP precendence/DSCP value.

Green [OUT]
The class of service value that will be used in the outgoing green packets. This value is selected if the result of the bandwidth regulator assigned to this entry is green or if the pre-marking color is green and no bandwidth regulator is assigned to this entry.

Yellow [OUT]
The class of service value that will be used in the outgoing yellow packets. This value is selected if the result of the bandwidth regulator assigned to this entry is yellow or if the pre-marking color is yellow and no bandwidth regulator is assigned to this entry.

Assigning a CoS profile to a policy

Once a CoS profile has been configured you can assign it to a policy. See "Traffic policies and monitoring" on page 72.

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Service mapping

Viewing Bandwidth regulator sets

To view a list of configured Bandwidth regulator sets, open the Traffic > Mapping page.

Index
Bandwidth regulator set's unique identifier.

Name
Bandwidth regulator set's name as defined in the configuration page. Click this name for more details.

Type
Bandwidth regulator set's type. Possible values are: PCP IP precedence DSCP

Reference count
The reference count is the number of policies that are currently using this Bandwidth regulator set.

Configuring a Bandwidth regulator set

Once a Bandwidth regulator set is created, it can be applied to policies for traffic classification. To configure a Bandwidth regulator set, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > Mapping page. 2. Click Add in the Bandwidth regulator sets section, or click a regulator set name to edit and existing one. 3. Configure Bandwidth regulator set parameters and click Apply.

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Bandwidth regulator set parameters

Name
Name of the Bandwidth regulator set.

Type
Indicates the type of Bandwidth regulator set. Possible values are: PCP IP precedence DSCP

Reference count (only visible on existing sets)


The reference count is the number of policies that are currently using this Bandwidth regulator set.

Regulator set
This table has three columns and N rows, where N depends on the type of the regulator set. If the type is PCP or IP precedence then N=8. Otherwise, the regulator set type is DSCP and N=64. Each row in this table allows assigning a traffic regulator to a specific PCP/IP precedence/DSCP > value.

PCP/IP precedence/DSCP [IN]


PCP/IP precedence/DSCP input value.

Bandwidth regulator
The bandwidth regulator that will be used to regulate the traffic flow that has this PCP/IP precendence/DSCP value.

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Service mapping

Enable regulator
Enable or disable traffic regulation for this PCP, IP precedence or DSCP value.

Assigning a Bandwidth regulator set to a policy

Once a Bandwidth regulator set has been configured you can assign it to a policy. See "Traffic policies and monitoring" on page 72.

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Traffic forwarding

Traffic forwarding
NOTE: The description below for Traffic forwarding is only available on the EtherNID EE, OE and DE+ models. For GE and MetroNID TE models, see the Service mapping section above.

Access policies

The EtherNID uses access policies to control the monitoring and filtering of traffic on the Client and Network ports. Up to eight access policies can be configured for Client and Network ports. Each policy defines the settings for: the traffic filter to apply to traffic on the port the action (permit or drop) to apply to traffic Define a traffic filter (if you are not going to use a default filter) Define an access policy. Traffic A policies apply to connectors labeled A. Traffic B policies apply to connectors labeled B.

To set up an access policy, you must:

There are two sets of policies: Traffic A policies and Traffic B policies.

Monitoring

The EtherNID has two external connectors through which traffic can be monitored: Monitor-1 and Monitor-2. Access policies are used to allow monitoring traffic to be received by the EtherNID. Each policy can be configured to monitor incoming traffic from either Monitor-1 or Monitor-2.

Traffic filters

The EtherNID uses traffic filters (which use bit patterns to recognize incoming packets) to control access policies and to monitor traffic on the Client and Network ports. The EtherNID provides VLAN support, permitting either the Network or Client port to be connected to a VLAN trunk.

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Traffic forwarding

Configuring traffic forwarding

To configure traffic forwarding, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > Forwarding page.

2. Define parameters as required by your setup and then click Apply.

Forwarding parameters

Enable VLAN encapsulation


Select this check box to enable VLAN support.

Enable P-Bits preservation


Select this check box to preserve the incoming VLAN priority in the added outgoing VLAN encapsulation instead of using the VLAN priority set in the Forwarding options. Note: If the incoming traffic is not already tagged with a VLAN, then this option has no effect and the VLAN priority on outgoing traffic will be taken from the Forwarding options specified.

Trunk port
Select the port to which the VLAN trunk is connected.

VLAN priority
Specify the VLAN priority. Allows you to provide QoS prioritization by using the standard based 802.1Q priority tag. Possible values are 0 to 7. Interpretation is based on the carriers equipment and administrative policies

VLAN CFI
Specify the Canonical Format Indicator. This should always be set to zero for connection to Ethernet switches. CFI is used for compatibility reasons between Ethernet type networks and Token Ring type networks. If a frame received at an Ethernet port has a CFI set to 1, then that frame should not be forwarded as is to an untagged port.

VLAN ID
Specify the VLAN ID that will be used to encapsulate all traffic forwarded to the port.

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Traffic policies and monitoring

Traffic policies and monitoring


To view a list of all traffic policies and their settings, open the Traffic > Policies page. This page shows the access policy rules that are enabled for a specific port. For example, if the Network port is selected then this is the list of policy rules that are enabled or disabled for the Network port. Access policy rules are ordered by their priority. When rules are applied they are processed from the top down and the first suitable rule that is found is applied. Note: The *default filter is a factory default rule that forwards all traffic. A rule, such as this is required to have traffic forwarded.

Note: The following information is presented for each policy: Entry: Indicates the position of the rule in the access list. State: Indicates if the policy is enabled or disabled. Disabled policies are skipped when the rules are applied to incoming data. Action: Indicates the action that the policy applies to data that it matches. Filter name: Indicates the name of the filter assigned to the policy. Packets good: The number of good packets that matched the policy. A good packet is an error-free frame that has a length between 64 bytes and the maximum frame length. Bytes good: This is the total number of bytes in good packets that matched the policy. Packets bad: The number of bad packets that matched the policy. A bad packet is a packet that has a valid framing but contains an error within the packet, has a bad CRC or either shorter than 64 bytes or longer than the maximum frame length.

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Traffic policies and monitoring

Configuring a traffic policy on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE

To configure a traffic policy, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > Policies page. 2. Click the policy entry that you want to configure. 3. Configure policy settings and click Apply.

Policy settings

Enable policy
Select this check box to activate the policy.

Filter type
Select the filter type that will be used to capture traffic. The filter type is either a Layer 2 or IPv4 filter.

L2 filter / IPv4 filter


The list shows all available filters. To define a new filter, open the Port > L2 Filters/IPv4 Filters page. By default, a catchAll filter is defined. This enables you to monitor all traffic on a port.

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Action
Select the action that will be applied to traffic that matches the filter.

Enable monitoring
Select this check box to activate monitoring.

Monitor port
Indicates the port to which traffic will be forwarded for monitoring.

Encapsulation Push
Add a new VLAN.

Ethertype
The ethertype of the VLAN to be added. Possible values are: C-VLAN=0x8100 or S-VLAN=0x88a8

VLAN ID
A value between 0 and 4095.

PCP action
This section selects the PCP (Priority Code Points) action to perform. Possible values are: Preserve: Keep the PCP bits if the packet is already tagged Direct: Add the default PCP value Map: Use a CoS profile for PCP selection

For each PCP action there is one or two traffic mapping choices and the default PCP bits to use if the packet does not match the first and the second choices. The following tables show the valid selection of the first and second choice for each of the PCP actions

PCP Preservation
If this option is selected, PCP bits are copied from the first VLAN(if any). If the packet is not tagged, the user may select the PCP bits from an IP precedence / DSCP CoS profile. It is also possible to select a bandwidth regulator set for traffic regulation.

Parameter Type CoS profile BWR set

First choice IP Precedence / DSCP CoS profile Optional

Second choice N/A N/A N/A

PCP Direct
If this option is selected, the first and second choices are ignored. The PCP bits are forced to the default green or yellow values based on the result of the bandwidth regulator or the pre-marking color. It should be noted that the pre-marking color red is ignored if the default bandwidth regulator is not enabled.

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Parameter Type CoS profile BWR set

First choice N/A N/A N/A

Second choice N/A N/A N/A

PCP mapping
If this option is selected, the first and second choices can be used to map and regulate traffic based on PCP / IP precedence /DSCP values. The table below shows the valid configurations of the first and second choices.

Parameter Type

First choice VLANinVLAN VLAN IP precedence, DSCP

Second choice VLAN, IP precedence, DSCP IP precedence, DSCP VLAN, VLANinVLAN CoS profile Optional

CoS profile BWR set

CoS profile Optional

Encapsulation None
This option can be used to perform traffic regulation based on PCP / IP precedence /DSCP values. The selected CoS profile in the first and second choices are ignored. The table below shows the valid configurations of the first and second choices.

Parameter Type

First choice VLANinVLAN VLAN IP precedence, DSCP

Second choice VLAN, IP precedence, DSCP IP precedence, DSCP VLAN, VLANinVLAN Ignored BWR set

CoS profile BWR set

Ignored BWR set

Encapsulation Pop
This option can be used to perform traffic regulation based on PCP / IP precedence /DSCP values before removing the VLAN tag. The selected CoS profile in the first and second choices are ignored.

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Parameter Type

First choice VLANinVLAN VLAN IP precedence, DSCP

Second choice VLAN, IP precedence, DSCP IP precedence, DSCP VLAN, VLANinVLAN Ignored BWR set

CoS profile BWR set

Ignored BWR set

Default/Direct Bandwidth regulator


Enable bandwidth regulation
Check this box to activate a default bandwidth regulator.

Pre-marking color
Pre-mark, with a specific color, the traffic that does not match the first and second choices. This option has no effect if the enabled bandwidth regulator is color-blind. In addition, if no bandwidth regulator is enabled, this option selects the default green/yellow CFI & PCP values to be used in the outgoing packets. Green traffic will use buffers from CIR until depleted at which time it will be tagged as Yellow data. Yellow traffic will use buffers from either CIR + EIR or just EIR depending on the coupling flag set in the regulator. Once CIR + EIR buffers are depleted, this data will be tagged as Red data. Red traffic will be dropped. Please note, that it's not possible to pre-mark data as red if there bandwidth regulator is disabled. Traffic color will affect how the regulator handles the traffic. For details see "Color mode" on page 91.

Bandwidth regulator
Choose a default bandwidth regulator that will be associated with the traffic matched by this policy. To define a bandwidth regulator see "Bandwidth policing" on page 89.

CFI/PCP
The default CFI and PCP values to be applied if the Encapsulation is Push. This would only be applied if the traffic does not match the first and second choices.

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Traffic policies and monitoring

Configuring a traffic policy on an EtherNID EE, OE or DE+

To configure a traffic policy, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > Policies page. 2. Click the policy entry that you want to configure. 3. Configure policy settings and click Apply.

Policy settings

Policy enable
Select this check box to activate the policy.

Filter type
Select the filter type that will be used to capture traffic. The filter type is either a Layer 2 or IPv4 filter.

Layer 2 filter / IPv4 filter


The list shows all available filters. To define a new filter, open the Port > Filter page. By default, a catch-all filter is defined. This enables you to monitor all traffic on a port.

Actions
Select the action that will be applied to traffic that matches the filter.

Enable monitoring
Select this check box to activate monitoring.

Monitor port
Indicates the port to which traffic will be forwarded for monitoring.

Enable bandwidth regulation


Select this check box to activate bandwidth regulation.

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Pre-marking color
Select the color this port will use to pre-mark all traffic before it is sent to the selected bandwidth regulator. If a bandwidth regulator is not defined, then pre-marking has no effect. Traffic color will affect how the regulator handles the traffic. For details see "Color mode" on page 91.

Bandwidth regulator
Select the bandwidth regulator that will be associated with the traffic matched by this policy. To define a bandwidth regulator see "Bandwidth policing" on page 89. Note: Since many policies may share the same bandwidth regulator, the bandwidth limitation imposed by the regulator applies to the sum of the traffic of all policies sharing the same regulator.

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Traffic filters

Traffic filters
To develop specific access policies and to make traffic monitoring more efficient and effective, custom (layer 2 or IPv4) filters can be applied to the traffic before it is presented on the monitor ports. This reduces overhead and enables access policies and monitoring to be targeted at specific types of traffic only. By default, commonly used filters are defined for both layer 2 and IPv4.

Viewing L2 filters

To view a list of active L2 traffic filters, open the Traffic > L2 Filters page. By default, commonly used filters are defined.

The following information is presented for each filter: Filter name: Unique name assign to the filter. MAC destination: Indicates the destination MAC address assigned to the filter. The filter will only process frames being sent to this address. The address is specified as six pairs of hexadecimal digits separated by colons (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). MAC source: Indicates the source MAC address assigned to the filter. The filter will only process frames received from this address. The address is specified as six pairs of hexadecimal digits separated by colons (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). Ethertype: Identifies the Ethernet frame type that this filter will process. Other frame types are ignored. VLAN1: Indicates the VLAN ID assigned to the filter. The filter will only process frames tagged with this VLAN ID. VLAN 2: Indicates the second VLAN ID assigned to the filter. Used to process VLAN in VLAN traffic.

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Traffic filters

Configuring an L2 filter on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE

To configure an L2 filter, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > L2 Filters page. 2. Click Add to create a new file, or click the filter name to edit and existing one. 3. Configure filter parameters and click Apply.

L2 filter parameters

L2 filter name
Specify a name to uniquely identify the filter.

Ethernet header settings


The following characteristics can be defined.

MAC destination / mask


Specify the destination MAC address and mask. Specify the address as six pairs of hexadecimal digits separated by colons (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored.

MAC source / mask


Specify the source MAC address and mask. Specify the address as six pairs of hexadecimal digits separated by colons (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored.

Ethertype
Select a well-known protocol from the list or specify a value manually (hexadecimal).

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"VLAN" and "VLAN in VLAN" settings


You can specify several VLAN fields for the first VLAN (VLAN 1) as well as the second level VLAN (VLAN 2). Note: If a check box is not checked, then the value is ignored.

Ethertype
Specify the VLAN Ethernet Type. The Ethernet type identifies if the following VLAN is a C-VLAN an S-VLAN or if we accept both types.

CFI/DEI
Specify the Canonical Format Indicator or the Drop Eligibility Indicator. This should always be set to zero for connection to Ethernet switches. CFI is used for compatibility reasons between Ethernet type networks and Token Ring type networks. If a frame received at an Ethernet port has a CFI set to 1, then that frame should not be forwarded "as is" to an untagged port.

Priority
Specify the VLAN priority. Allows you to provide CoS prioritization by using the standard based 802.1Q priority tag. Possible values are 0 to 7. Interpretation is based on the carrier's equipment and administrative policies. Priority operator VLAN priority operator. Valid operator types are: Greater than, Less than, Equal to or Range (inclusive range).

VLAN ID
Specify the VLAN ID that will be used to filter traffic. VLAN ID operator VLAN ID operator. Valid operator types are: Greater than, Less than, Equal to or Range (inclusive range).

DSCP/IP precedence
Specify the DSCP/IP precedence that will be used to filter traffic. DSCP/IP precedence operator DSCP/IP precedence operator. Valid operator types are: Greater than, Less than, Equal to or Range (inclusive range).

Note:
A limitation exists for the operators. Only one of the VLAN operators can be set to a range, the other needs to be set to Equal to. For instance if you select a Range for the second VLAN ID operator you need to select Equal to for the first VLAN ID operator.

Configuring an L2 filter on an EtherNID EE, OE or DE+

To configure an L2 filter, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > L2 Filters page. 2. Click Add to create a new file, or click the filter name to edit and existing one. 3. Configure filter parameters and click Apply.

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L2 filter parameters

L2 filter name
Specify a name to uniquely identify the filter.

Ethernet header settings


The following characteristics can be defined: MAC destination / mask: Specify the destination MAC address and mask. Specify the address as six pairs of hexadecimal digits separated by colons (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored. MAC source / mask: Specify the source MAC address and mask. Specify the address as six pairs of hexadecimal digits separated by colons (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored. Ethertype: Select a well-known protocol from the list or specify a value manually (hexadecimal).

VLAN and VLAN in VLAN settings


To match VLAN traffic you must select VLAN for Ethertype. You can specify three VLAN fields for the first level VLAN (VLAN 1) as well as the second level VLAN (VLAN 2). Note: If a check box is not checked, then the value is ignored.

VLAN priority
Specify the VLAN priority. Allows you to provide QoS prioritization by using the standard based 802.1Q priority tag. Possible values are 0 to 7. Interpretation is based on the carriers equipment and administrative policies

VLAN CFI
Specify the Canonical Format Indicator. This should always be set to zero for connection to Ethernet switches. CFI is used for compatibility reasons between Ethernet type networks and Token Ring type networks. If a frame received at an Ethernet port has a CFI set to 1, then that frame should not be forwarded as is to an untagged port.

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Traffic filters

VLAN ID
Specify the VLAN ID that will be used to filter traffic.

Viewing IPv4 filters

To view a list of active IPV4 traffic filters, open the Traffic > IPV4 Filters page. By default, commonly used filters are defined.

The following information is presented for each filter: Filter name: Unique name assigned to the filter. IP source: Indicates the source address assigned to the filter. The filter will only process packets received from this address. The address is specified in dotted decimal notation. Note: Filtering source or destination IP address assigned by Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) can cause problems. You should ensure that all IP addresses specified in a filter are static or reserved. Otherwise you must have to manually update your filter every time the addresses change. IP destination: Indicates the destination address assigned to the filter. The filter will only process packet being sent to this address. The address is specified in dotted decimal notation. Note: Filtering source or destination IP address assigned by Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) can cause problems. You should ensure that all IP addresses specified in a filter are static or reserved. Otherwise you must have to manually update your filter every time the addresses change.

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Protocol: Identifies the protocol type that this filter will process. Other protocol types are ignored. Common protocol are TCP (6),UDP (17) and ICMP (1) TCP is used by HTTP, FTP, Telnet, SMTP, UDP is used by DNS, SNMP, RIP, ICMP is used by Ping,

Src port: Identifies the source port that will be used to match this rule. This setting is only valid when the protocol field is set to TCP (6) or UDP (17). Dst port: Identifies the destination port that will be used to match this rule. This setting is only valid when the protocol field is set to TCP (6) or UDP (17).

Configuring an IPv4 filter on an EtherNID GE or MetroNID TE

To configure an IPV4 filter, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > IPV4 Filters page. By default, commonly used filters are defined. 2. Click Add to create a new file, or click the filter name to edit and existing one. 3. Configure filter parameters and click Apply.

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Traffic filters

IPv4 filter parameters

IPv4 filter name


Specify a name to uniquely identify the filter.

IPv4 header settings


The following characteristics can be defined:

IPv4 source / mask


Specify the source address and mask. Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored.

IPv4 destination / mask


Specify the destination address and mask. Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored.

TTL
Specify the time-to-live value to match.

DSCP
The DiffServ Code Points (DSCP) value may be selected from a list of predefined values or a decimal value between 0 and 63 may be defined.

Protocol
Select a well-known protocol from the list or specify a port number manually (decimal).

ECN
Explicit Congestion Notification. Specify either 0 or 3.

Header length
Specify the header length in 32-bit units. Specify a value in the range of 5 - 15.

UDP/TCP port settings


Specify the UDP or TCP port number used by the IPv4 source and IPv4 destination port fields. These settings are only valid when the Protocol field is set to TCP (6) or UDP (17).

ICMP settings
Specify the ICMP message type that this filter will match. These settings are only valid when the Protocol field is set to ICMP (1). Some well-known ICMP types are: Echo Reply (0) Destination Unreachable (3) Redirect (5) Echo (8) Time Exceeded (11) ICMP Code: See www.iana.org for current values

"VLAN" and "VLAN in VLAN" settings


You can specify several VLAN fields for the first VLAN (VLAN 1) as well as the second level VLAN (VLAN 2). Note: If a check box is not checked, then the value is ignored.

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Ethertype
Specify the VLAN Ethernet Type. The Ethernet type identifies if the following VLAN is a C-VLAN an S-VLAN or if we accept both types.

CFI/DEI
Specify the Canonical Format Indicator or the Drop Eligibility Indicator. This should always be set to zero for connection to Ethernet switches. CFI is used for compatibility reasons between Ethernet type networks and Token Ring type networks. If a frame received at an Ethernet port has a CFI set to 1, then that frame should not be forwarded "as is" to an untagged port.

Priority
Specify the VLAN priority. Allows you to provide CoS prioritization by using the standard based 802.1Q priority tag. Possible values are 0 to 7. Interpretation is based on the carrier's equipment and administrative policies. Priority operator VLAN priority operator. Valid operator types are: Greater than, Less than, Equal to or Range (inclusive range).

VLAN ID
Specify the VLAN ID that will be used to filter traffic. VLAN ID operator VLAN ID operator. Valid operator types are: Greater than, Less than, Equal to or Range (inclusive range).

DSCP/IP precedence
Specify the DSCP/IP precedence that will be used to filter traffic. DSCP/IP precedence operator DSCP/IP precedence operator. Valid operator types are: Greater than, Less than, Equal to or Range (inclusive range).

Note:
A limitation exists for the operators. Only one of the VLAN operators can be set to a range, the other needs to be set to Equal to. For instance if you select a Range for the second VLAN ID operator you need to select Equal to for the first VLAN ID operator.

Configuring an IPv4 filter on an EtherNID EE, OE or DE+

To configure an IPV4 filter, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > IPV4 Filters page. By default, commonly used filters are defined. 2. Click Add to create a new file, or click the filter name to edit and existing one. 3. Configure filter parameters and click Apply.

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IPv4 filter parameters

IPV4 filter name


Specify a name to uniquely identify the filter.

IPv4 header settings


The following characteristics can be defined: IPv4 source / mask: Specify the source address and mask. Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored. IPv4 destination / mask: Specify the destination address and mask. Only the bits specified by the mask are used. The other bits are ignored. TTL: Specify the time-to-live value to match. DSCP: The DiffServ Code Points (DSCP) value may be selected from a list of predefined values or a decimal value between 0 and 63 may be defined. Protocol: Select a well-known protocol from the list or specify a port number manually (decimal). ECN: Explicit Congestion Notification. Specify either 0 or 3. Header length: Specify the header size in bytes.

UDP/TCP port settings


Specify the UDP or TCP port number used by the IPv4 source and IPv4 destination port fields. These settings are only valid when the Protocol field is set to TCP (6) or UDP (17).

ICMP settings
Specify the ICMP message type that this filter will match. These settings are only valid when the Protocol field is set to ICMP (1). Some well-known ICMP types are:

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Echo Reply (0) Destination Unreachable (3) Redirect (5) Echo (8) Time Exceeded (11) ICMP Code: See www.iana.org for current values

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Bandwidth policing

Bandwidth policing
Traffic regulators enable you to limit the flow of traffic for a specific policy. A total of 15 traffic regulators can be defined. To view a list of all defined regulators, open the Traffic > Regulators page. Initially this page is empty as no regulators are defined by default.

The following information is presented for each filter: Name: Unique name assigned to the regulator. CIR: Committed Information Rate. CBS: Committed Burst Size. EIR: Excess Information Rate. Range. EBS: Excess Burst Size. Range: < 2 to 62 > Color mode: Indicates if the regulator reacts to data color. Coupling Flag: Modifies the way in which the regulator processes yellow traffic.

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Configuring a regulator

To configure a traffic regulator, do the following: 1. Open the Traffic > Regulators page. 2. Click Add to define a new regulator.: 3. Configure settings and click Apply.

Regulator settings

Traffic regulator name


Specify a name to uniquely identify the regulator.

Committed Information Rate (CIR)


Specify the maximum average bandwidth for traffic declared green by the regulator. Green traffic in excess of this maximum will be declared yellow by the regulator and will be submitted to EIR regulation. Range: 0 to maximum port speed (in kbps)

Committed Burst Size


Specify the maximum burst size for traffic declared green by the traffic regulator. Range: 2 to 62 kBytes Note: Burst size must be greater than the port MTU.

Excess Information Rate (EIR)


Specify the maximum average bandwidth for traffic declared yellow by the regulator. Yellow traffic in excess of this maximum will be declared red by the regulator and will be dropped. Range: 0 to maximum port speed (in kbps)

Excess Burst Size


Specify the maximum burst size for traffic declared yellow by the traffic regulator. Range: 2 to 62 kBytes Note: Burst size must be greater than the port MTU.

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Color mode
Specifies how the initial color of traffic should be attributed. color-aware: Traffic enters the traffic regulator with the color set by a policy. color-blind: All incoming traffic enters the traffic regulator initially green.

Coupling Flag
Modifies the way in which the regulator processes yellow traffic. False: Yellow data is limited by the setting of the Excess Information Rate. True: Yellow data is limited by the setting of the Committed Information Rate plus the Excess Information Rate.

Assigning a regulator to a policy

Once a regulator has been configured you can assign it to a policy. See "Traffic policies and monitoring" on page 72.

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Alarm settings

Chapter 6: Alarms

6
Alarm settings

Alarms

General alarm settings are defined on the Alarm > General page. Note: For a list of all supported alarms, see Appendix A.

Notification
There are four mechanisms for alarm reporting: LED, syslog, SNMP, and 802.3AH. Enable LED reporting: Reports alarms by activating the appropriate EtherNID LED corresponding to the severity of the alarm. Enable syslog reporting: Reports alarms by creating syslog entries. Enable SNMP reporting: Reports alarms via SNMP traps from Accedians private MIB. Enable 802.3AH reporting: Reports alarms via 802.3AH organization specific OAMPDUs.

Thresholds
Threshold on (soaking time in msecs): Delay after an event is detected before the alarm notification occurs. Threshold off (soaking time in msecs): Delay after an event clears before the alarm clear notification occurs.

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Alarm configuration

Alarm configuration
The Alarm > Configuration page lists all defined alarms.

For a description of each field see "Customizing an alarm" on page 94.

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Customizing an alarm

To customize an alarm, click its Identifier.

Identifier
Unique number that identifies this alarm. Assigned by the EtherNID. The alarm identifier is compose of 3 fields, the module number, the instance number and the error number. The alarm number look like this AAA.BBB.CC and is express in decimal. AAA: Module number (1-999). BBB: Instance number (1-999). CC: Error number (1-99). A module number is assigned for each source of alarm in the system. For instance the port module is set to 1, the SFP module is set to 2, the PAA is set to 3 and the environmental is set to 8.

ID
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Description
Port module for link down and others related alarms. SFP module for Rx/Tx power, temp, vcc and lbc alarms and warnings. PAA module for CC, Packet Loss and others related alarms. Unassigned Unassigned Unassigned Unassigned Environmental module for fans, power supplies and temperature sensors. Unassigned Unassigned

Enable
Indicates if the alarm is enabled (true) or disabled (false). If enabled, the alarm will be reported

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Severity
Indicates the severity level for the alarm. If LED reporting is enabled on the Alarm > General page, the Minor, Major, and Critical alarms will be indicated on the EtherNID front panel LEDs. Informational: No effect on service. Provides status information. Minor: A error condition has occurred that does not seriously affect system functionality. Major: A serious disruption of service or hardware malfunction has occurred which requires immediate attention to restore system functionality. Critical: A service-affecting condition has occurred that requires immediate corrective action.

Service affecting
Specify if the alarm will be displayed as service affecting or non-service affecting.

Description
Textual description of the alarm.

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Alarm status

Alarm status
The Alarm > Status page presents a summary of all alarms.

For a description of each field see "Customizing an alarm" on page 94. To view detailed information on an alarm click its Identifier. For example:

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Chassis alarms

Chassis alarms
The Alarm > Chassis page presents chassis-related status, alarms, and alarm settings.

Power supply status


Indicates the status of the various power sources. A green light indicates that the power source is connected and is operating normally. A red light indicates that the power source is not connected or is not operating normally.

Temperature sensor status


Indicates the current temperature inside the unit.

Temperature sensor thresholds


First threshold: Indicates the temperature that will activate a first overheat temperature alarm. Second threshold: Indicates the temperature that will activate a second overheat temperature alarm.

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OAM configuration

Chapter 7: Operations, Administration and Maintenance

Operations, Administration and Maintenance OAM configuration


To view a list of all OAM instances and their settings, open the OAM > Configuration page.

The following information is presented for each instance: Name: The instance name as defined in the configuration page. Click this name to configure the instance. OAM state: Indicates if an instance is enabled or disabled. This field does not indicate a successful discovery of an OAM peer. See the status page for details. OAM mode: The OAM instance may be active or passive. When passive, the instance will only listen and reply to received information type length and value (TLV) frames during the discovery phase. An active instance actively transmit unsolicited information TLV frames. Port: Indicates the port used by this OAM instance. Encapsulation: Indicates if OAM packets are tagged with a VLAN or not.

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Configuring an OAM instance

To configure an OAM instance, do the following: 1. Open the OAM > Configuration page. 2. Click Add to add a new OAM instance. 3. Configure OAM instance settings and click Apply.

OAM instance parameters

OAM instance name


Specify a name to identify the OAM instance.

Port name
Indicates the port used by this OAM instance.

Encapsulation
Indicates if OAM packets are tagged with a VLAN or not.

Enable OAM protocol


Enable the passive or active OAM 802.3AH protocol for this OAM instance. An active instance will immediately start to send information OAMPDUs associated with the discovery process.

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Active Mode / Passive Mode


Select the mode of operation for the OAM instance. Passive: Listens for OAMPDUs and replies once it starts receiving them. Active: Immediately searches for an OAM peer by sending OAMPDUs.

Max OAM PDU size


Specify the maximum frame size the OAM instance will use. This enables you to limit the impact of the extra OAM traffic on a link that is already heavily loaded.

This unit supports loopback


Enable this option to react to loopback requests from the OAM peer.

This unit supports events


Enable this option to issue event OAMPDUs when needed.

This unit supports variable responses


Enable this option to respond to OAMPDUs requests.

Number of Events re-transmitted


Specify the number of times an event is re-transmitted to ensure its reception by the peer. This setting is only valid if This unit supports events is enabled.

Errored Frame Event (EFE) Threshold and window


Specify the threshold setting that defines the number of frame errors that must be detected in a given period to trigger the transmission of an event. The window setting defines the time, in seconds, of the period. A frame error is an error detected at the layer 2, or MAC level. This can be caused by various types of errors including, but not limited to, CRC errors, short frames, long frames, etc.

Errored Frame Period Event (EFPE) Threshold and window


Specify the threshold setting that defines the number of frame errors that must be detected in a given period to trigger the transmission of an event. The window setting defines the number of frames that make up a period. Using a number of frames instead of a time period, as in EFE, means that this event is generated based on the ratio of bad frames versus good frames. A frame error is an error detected at the layer 2, or MAC, level. This can be caused by various types of errors including, but not limited to: CRC errors, short frames, long frames, etc.

Errored Frame Seconds Summary Event (EFSSE) Threshold and window


Specify the threshold setting that defines the number of frame errors that must be detected in a given period to trigger the transmission of an event. An errored frame second is a one second period in which at least one frame was bad. In other words, this event is generated when the number of seconds with any number of bad frames is greater than or equal to the threshold during a period defined by the window. The window setting defines the time, in seconds, of the period.

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A frame error is an error detected at the layer 2, or MAC, level. This can be caused by various types of errors including, but not limited to: CRC errors, short frames, long frames, etc.

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Loopbacks

Loopbacks
The EtherNID supports in-service loopbacks on either the client or network ports. To view a list of all loopbacks and their settings, open the OAM > Loopback page.

The following information is presented for each loopback: Name: This field reports the loopback instance name, as configured in the loopback configuration page. Click on an instance name to configure it. Lpbk state: Reports the enable/disable state of the loopback. An enabled loopback may not necessarily loopback traffic; this depends on the location setting. An instance enabled to react on external loopback commands is not shown in this field. Lpbk mode: The loopback control logic, once enabled, may be using the standard IEEE 802.3ah mode or may be using a private or proprietary mode. When using the private mode, the user can select filters and can allow other traffic to flow through, effectively doing an in-service loopback. Location: A loopback instance may be local or remote. Once enabled, a local loopback immediately applies the loopback to the unit as programmed. An enabled remote loopback will instruct the unit to transmit a loopback request to its OAM partner. Filter type: For private loopback mode, a filter must be selected. See the loopback configuration page for details.

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Loopbacks

Adding a loopback

To add a loopback, do the following: 1. Only one loopback is supported per OAM instance. Therefore, before you can add a new loopback, you must first add an OAM instance on the OAM > Configuration page. 2. Open the OAM > Loopback page. 3. Configure loopback parameters and click Apply.

Loopback parameters

Name
The OAM instance name as defined in the OAM configuration page.

State
The current state of the loopback.

Loopback enable
Enables the loopback function.

Type
Iometrix L1: Iometrix cNode level 1. Loopback all packets that have a destination address equal to 00:30:79:FF:FF:FF Exfo L2: Loopback all packets that have a source MAC OUI equal to 00:03:01 Exfo L3: Loopback all UDP echo service packets. Custom: Loopback all traffic that matches the user defined filter.

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Loopbacks

Persistent
Enable or disable loopback at startup time. This option can only be set for Manual loopbacks with no timeout.

Filter type
Select the filter type that will be applied to the loopback traffic. For more information on filters, see "Traffic filters" on page 79.

L2 filter
If Filter type is set to L2 filter, select the L2 filter that will be applied to loopback traffic.

IPV4 filter
If Filter type is set to IPv4 filter, select the IPv4 filter that will be applied to loopback traffic.

Actions
Swap MAC addresses: Swaps the source and destination MAC addresses. Swap IP addresses: Swaps the source and destination IP addresses. Swap TCP/UDP ports: Swaps the source and destination TCP/UDP ports.

Drop opposite traffic


Drops traffic originating from Client port when looping back to the Network port and vice versa. Warning: Enabling this option will interrupt the Ethernet service in one direction.

Loopback timeout
Specify the number of minutes that the loopback will remain enabled. When the timeout expires the loopback is automatically removed.

Remote loopback enable


These options allow loopbacks to be activated remotely using the following devices/protocols: JDSU/ActernaTM Enable discovery loop commands: Accept or discard JDSU/Acterna discovery loopback commands.

SunriseTM: The EtherNID supports tests on layers 2 and 3. OAM 802.3AH

Note: This option is not affected by the setting of Loopback enable.

Accept VLAN loop commands:


When enabled, VLAN loopback commands will be accepted. This option is only valid for untagged OAM instances. Tagged OAM instances only accept loopback commands from a specific VLAN. Note: This option is not affected by the setting of Loopback enable.

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OAM events

OAM events
The OAM > Event page, lists a summary of all the events exchanged on an OAM connection.

The following information is presented for each event: Name: The name of the OAM instance. Txm event: The number of OAM events transmitted. Txm duplicate: The number of transmitted OAM events that were duplicated. Rcv event: The number of OAM events received. Rcv duplicate: The number of received OAM events that were duplicated.

For complete details on transmitted and received events, click a Name.

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OAM events

Transmitted and Received event notifications

OAM Local Error Symbol Period Event


A sequence of six integers corresponding to the respective fields in the most recently transmitted Errored Symbol Period Event TLV in an Event Notification OAMPDU. This sequence is updated when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAMPDU Code field value equal to the Event Notification code and Event TLV Type field equal to the Errored Symbol Period Event value. The first INTEGER represents the Event Time Stamp field. The second INTEGER represents the Errored Symbol Window field. The third INTEGER represents the Errored Symbol Threshold field. The fourth INTEGER represents the Errored Symbols field. The fifth INTEGER represents the Error Running Total field. The sixth INTEGER represents the Event Running Total field.

OAM Local Error Frame Event


A sequence of six integers corresponding to the respective fields in the most recently transmitted Errored Frame Event TLV in an Event Notification OAMPDU. This sequence is updated when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAMPDU Code field value equal to the Event Notification code and Event TLV Type field equal to the Errored Frame Event value. The first INTEGER represents the Event Time Stamp field. The second INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Window field. The third INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Threshold field. The fourth INTEGER represents the Errored Frames field. The fifth INTEGER represents the Error Running Total field. The sixth INTEGER represents the Event Running Total field.

OAM Local Error Frame Period Event


A sequence of six integers corresponding to the respective fields in the most recently transmitted Errored Frame Period Event TLV in an Event Notification OAMPDU. This sequence is updated when a CTL:OAMI:request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAMPDU Code field value equal to the Event Notification code and Event TLV Type field equal to the Errored Frame Period Event value. The first INTEGER represents the Event Time Stamp field. The second INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Period Threshold field. The third INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Period Threshold field. The fourth INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Period Threshold field. The fifth INTEGER represents the Error Running Total field. The sixth INTEGER represents the Event Running Total field.

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OAM events

OAM Local Error Frame Seconds Summary Event


A sequence of six integers corresponding to the respective fields in the most recently transmitted Errored Frame Seconds Summary Event TLV in an Event Notification OAMPDU. This sequence is updated when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAMPDU Code field value equal to the Event Notification code and Event TLV Type field equal to the Errored Frame Seconds Summary Event value. The first INTEGER represents the Event Time Stamp field The second INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Seconds Summary Window field The third INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Seconds Summary Threshold field The fourth INTEGER represents the Errored Frame Seconds Summary field The fifth INTEGER represents the Error Running Total field The sixth INTEGER represents the Event Running Total field

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OAM status

OAM status
The OAM > Status page presents a summary of the status of each OAM instance.

The following information is presented for each instance: Name: OAM instance name. Discovery: Identifies the current state of the OAM Discovery function. The enumerations match the states within the Discovery state diagram (see Figure 57-5 of IEEE802.3). LINK_FAULT ACTIVE_SEND_LOCAL PASSIVE_WAIT SEND_LOCAL_REMOTE SEND_LOCAL_REMOTE_OK SEND_ANY

Local flags: A string of seven bits corresponding to the Flags field in the most recently transmitted OAMPDU. The first bit corresponds to the Link Fault bit in the Flags field. The second bit corresponds to the Dying Gasp bit in the Flags field. The third bit corresponds to the Critical Event bit in the Flags field. The fourth bit corresponds to the Local Evaluating bit in the Flags field. The fifth bit corresponds to the Local Stable bit in the Flags field. The sixth bit corresponds to the Remote Evaluating bit in the Flags field. The seventh bit corresponds to the Remote Stable bit in the Flags field.

Remote flags: A string of seven bits corresponding to the Flags field in the most recently received OAMPDU. The first bit corresponds to the Link Fault bit in the Flags field. The second bit corresponds to the Dying Gasp bit in the Flags field. The third bit corresponds to the Critical Event bit in the Flags field. The fourth bit corresponds to the Local Evaluating bit in the Flags field. The fifth bit corresponds to the Local Stable bit in the Flags field.

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The sixth bit corresponds to the Remote Evaluating bit in the Flags field. The seventh bit corresponds to the Remote Stable bit in the Flags field.

Local revision: The value of the Revision field in the Local Information TLV of the most recently transmitted Information OAMPDU. Note: The revision number indicates the number of times that the configuration for the local OAM instance has been modified.

Remote revision: The value of the Revision field in the Local Information TLV of the most recently received Information OAMPDU. This value is updated on reception of a valid frame.

For detailed status information, click a Name. For example:

Detailed status information

Local
Info TLV revision
The value of the Revision field in the Local Information TLV of the most recently transmitted Information OAMPDU.

Parser state / Mux state


A string of three bits corresponding to the State field of the most recently transmitted Information OAMPDU. The first and second bits corresponds to the Parser Action bits in the State field. The third bit corresponds to the Multiplexer Action bit in the State field. Note: These states will change when a loopback is enabled.

Vendor OUI
The value of the OUI variable in the Vendor Identifier field of the most recently transmitted Information OAMPDU. This value is updated on reception of a valid frame.

Vendor specific info


The value of the Vendor Specific Information field of the most recently received Information OAMPDU. This value is updated on reception of a valid frame, with: DestinationField equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols LengthOrType field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM The OAMPDU code equal to the Information code The frame contains a Local Information TLV

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OAM status

Remote
Info TLV revision
The value of the Revision field in the Remote Information TLV of the most recently received Information OAMPDU.

Parser state / Mux state


A string of three bits corresponding to the State field of the most recently received Information OAMPDU. The first and second bits corresponds to the Parser Action bits in the State field. The third bit corresponds to the Multiplexer Action bit in the State field. Note: These states will change when a loopback is enabled.

Vendor OUI
The value of the OUI variable in the Vendor Identifier field of the most recently received Information OAMPDU.

Vendor specific info


The value of the Vendor Specific Information field of the most recently received Information OAMPDU.

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OAM statistics

OAM statistics
The OAM > Statistics page, presents a summary of the statistics for each OAM instance.

The following information is presented for each instance: Name: OAM instance name. Rcv OAMPDU: Number of OAMPDUs received by this instance. Include all types: info, var request, var response, loopback etc. Txm OAMPDU: Number of OAMPDUs transmitted by this instance. Include all types: info, var request, var response, loopback etc. Rcv Info OAMPDUs: Number of Info OAMPDUs received by this instance. Txm Info OAMPDUs: Number of Info OAMPDUs transmitted by this instance.

For complete detailed statistics, click a Name. For example:

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OAM statistics

OAM detailed statistics information

Name
The name of the OAM instance.

Receive
Unsupported codes
A count of OAMPDUs received that contain an OAM code that are not supported by the device. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame with: Destination Field equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. Length Or Type field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. An OAMPDU code for a function that is not supported by the device.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Information
A count of OAMPDUs received that contain the OAM Information code. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame, with: Destination Field equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. Length Or Type field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the OAM Information code and is supported by the device.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Unique event
A count of the OAMPDUs received that contain the Event Notification code. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame, with: DestinationField equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. LengthOrType field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the Event Notification code. The Sequence Number field is not equal to the Sequence Number field of the last received Event Notification OAMPDU and is supported by the device.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

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Duplicate event
A count of the OAMPDUs received that contain the Event Notification code. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame, with: DestinationField equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. LengthOrType field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the Event Notification code. The Sequence Number field is equal to the Sequence Number field of the last received Event Notification OAMPDU.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Loopback control
A count of OAMPDUs received that contain the Loopback Control code. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame, with: DestinationField equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. LengthOrType field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the Loopback Control code and is supported by the device.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Variable request
A count of OAMPDUs received that contain the Variable Request code. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame, with: DestinationField equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. LengthOrType field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the Variable Request code and is supported by the device.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Variable response
A count of OAMPDUs received that contain the Variable Response code. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame, with: DestinationField equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. LengthOrType field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the Variable Response code and is supported by the device.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

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Organization specific
A count of OAMPDUs received that contain the Organization Specific code. This counter is incremented on reception of a valid frame, with: DestinationField equal to the reserved multicast address for slow protocols. LengthOrType field value equal to the reserved Type for slow protocols. A slow protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the Organization Specific code and is supported by the device.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Transmit
Unsupported codes
A count of OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that are not supported by the device. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAM code for a function that is not supported by the device. Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Information
A count of OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that contain the OAM Information code. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAMPDU code indicating an Information OAMPDU. Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Unique event
A count of OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that contain the Event Notification code. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer. A Slow_Protocols subtype value equal to the subtype reserved for OAM. The OAMPDU code equals the Event Notification code. The Sequence Number field is not equal to the Sequence Number field of the last transmitted Event Notification OAMPDU.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

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Duplicate event
A count of OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that contain the Event Notification code. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer. The OAMPDU code equals the Event Notification code. The Sequence Number field is equal to the Sequence Number field of the last transmitted Event Notification OAMPDU.

Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Loopback control
A count of OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that contain the Loopback Control code. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAM code indicating a Loopback Control OAMPDU. Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Variable request
A count of OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that contain the Variable Request code. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAM code indicating a Variable Request OAMPDU. Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Variable response
A count of OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that contain the Variable Response code. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAM code indicating a Variable Response OAMPDU. Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

Organization specific
A count of Organization Specific OAMPDUs passed to the OAM subordinate sublayer for transmission that contain the Organization Specific code. This counter is incremented when a request service primitive is generated within the OAM sublayer with an OAM code indicating an Organization Specific OAMPDU. Generalized nonresettable counter. This counter has a maximum increment rate of slow protocol frames (No more than 10 frames shall be transmitted in any one-second period).

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8: RFC-2544

RFC-2544 flows

Chapter 8: RFC-2544

8
RFC-2544 flows

RFC-2544

NOTE: The RFC-2544 feature is only available on the EtherNID GE and MetroNID TE models.

Viewing RFC-2544 Flows

To view and add flows to use in RFC-2544 tests, open the RFC-2544 > Flows page.

A total of 15 flows can be defined. Once defined, the flow can be selected under the Configuration tab in the Traffic flow settings pull down menus. To add a new flow, click the Add button. To edit any existing flow, click the flow name in the list.

Note:
Supported values for 100Mbps products: 1 to 100 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps). Supported values for 1Gbps products: 1 Mbps to 1 Gbps (step of 1 Mbps).

Name
Unique name assigned to the flow.

Description
Description configured to identify the flow and its characteristics.

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Configuring RFC-2544 Flows

Once an RFC-2544 Flows is created, it can be selected to run in the RFC-2544 > Configuration page. To configure an RFC-2544 Flow, do the following: 1. Open the RFC-2544 > Flows page. 2. Click Add, or click a flow name to edit and existing one. 3. Configure the flow parameters and click Apply.

Note:
Supported values for 100Mbps products: 1 to 100 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps). Supported values for 1Gbps products: 1 Mbps to 1 Gbps (step of 1 Mbps).

Flow name
Unique name assigned to the flow.

Flow description
Description to identify the flow and its characteristics.

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Flow traffic settings


Traffic type
Select between burst or constant rate traffic.

Constant
The constant traffic type consist of sending a specific number of bits per second.

Burst
The burst traffic type consist of sending a configured number of packets at every period. The period is a number of milli-seconds between each burst of packets.

Bit rate
The rate, in Kbps, at which to send this flow.

Size type
Select between fixed or random size. The fixed configuration requires a packet Size to be specified. The random configuration requires a Minimum size value and a Maximum size value to be specified.

Payload pattern
Select between fixed-data, incremental or random patterns in the payload part of the transmitted frames. For the random configuration you need to select one of the supported patterns.

Flow duration settings


Duration type
Choose between the following duration types: continuous : Stops only when user manually stops the test. seconds : Stops after a specified amount of seconds. bytes : Stops after sending a specified amount of bytes. packets : Stops after sending a specified amount of packets.

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RFC-2544 configuration
NOTE: The RFC-2544 feature is only available on the EtherNID GE andMetroNID TE models.

Viewing RFC-2544 Configuration

To view the RFC-2544 configuration, open the RFC-2544 > Configuration page.

Test packet settings


MAC destination
This is the peer MAC address.

Enable VLAN 1 header


This is to encapsulate all packets with 1 VLAN header.

VLAN 1 ID
First VLAN ID. When enabled, all test packets are encapsulated into the specified VLAN ID.

VLAN 1 Ethernet type


First VLAN Ethernet type. Applies only when VLAN 1 header is enabled.

VLAN 1 Priority
First VLAN priority bits. Applies only when VLAN 1 header is enabled.

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VLAN 1 CFI
First VLAN canonical format indicator (CFI). Applies only when VLAN 1 header is enabled.

Enable VLAN 2 header


This is to encapsulate all packets with 2 VLAN headers. (.1Q in .1Q)

VLAN 2 ID
Second VLAN ID. When enabled, all test packets are encapsulated into the second specified VLAN ID. Applies only when VLAN 1 header is enabled.

VLAN 2 Ethernet type


Second VLAN Ethernet type. Applies only when VLAN 2 header is enabled.

VLAN 2 Priority
Second VLAN priority bits. Applies only when VLAN 2 header is enabled.

VLAN 2 CFI
Second VLAN canonical format indicator (CFI). Applies only when VLAN 2 header is enabled.

Test port settings


Port name
Name configured for the port on which to send the flow(s).

Traffic flow settings


First flow
Name of the first flow to send.

Second flow
Name of the second flow to send.

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RFC-2544 measurements

RFC-2544 measurements
NOTE: The RFC-2544 feature is only available on the EtherNID GE and MetroNID TE models.

Viewing RFC-2544 Measurements

To view the RFC-2544 measurements, open the RFC-2544 > Measurements page.

Flow measurements
With the RFC-2544 measurements feature you can perform specific testcases to pinpoint device or network problems or to measure current latency and jitter on a specific network segment. The trial can contain one or two specific flows and can last for a specified amount of time, packets, bytes or run until you stop it.

Flow name
Unique name assigned to each flow.

Transmitted packets
Total packets transmitted by this flow.

Received packets
Total packets received by the associated inspector.

Flow state
Indicates the flow's current state. Possible values are: Waiting : Waiting to be started by the tester. Failed : The flow was deleted before the test was started. Running : The flow is currently running. Stopped : The tester stopped the flow before it completed. Completed : The flow reached its duration limit.

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Average delay
Average two-way delay (latency) in microseconds.

Average DV
Average two-way delay variation (jitter) in microseconds.

Test times
Test started at:
Starting time, shows when the test was started.

Test stopped at:


Ending time, shows when the test was completed or stopped.

Detailed view of RFC-2544 Measurements

To view the deatiled view of RFC-2544 measurements, click on the details link for the specific flow.

Transmit statistics
Transmitted packets
Total packets transmitted by this flow.

Transmitted bytes
Total bytes transmitted by this flow.

Rate
Data rate in Mbps. This is the amount of Mbits received in the last second.

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State
Indicates the flow's current state. Possible values are: Waiting : Waiting to be started by the tester. Failed : The flow was deleted before the test was started. Running : The flow is currently running. Stopped : The tester stopped the flow before it completed. Completed : The flow reached its duration limit.

Receive statistics
Received packets
Total packets received by the associated inspector.

Received bytes
Total bytes received by the associated inspector.

Rate
Data rate in Mbps. This is the amount of Mbits received in the last second.

OOO or duplicates
Out of order or duplicate packets received by this inspector.

Number of gaps
Number of gaps in the sequence number.

Maximum gap
Maximum size of the received gaps.

Two-way delay
Instantaneous
Two-way instantaneous delay value in microseconds.

Average
Average two-way delay in microseconds.

Minimum
Minimum two-way delay in microseconds.

Maximum
Maximum two-way delay in microseconds.

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Two-way delay variation


Instantaneous
Two-way instantaneous delay variation value in microseconds.

Average
Average two-way delay variation in microseconds.

Minimum
Minimum two-way delay variation in microseconds.

Maximum
Maximum two-way delay variation in microseconds.

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RFC-2544 testsuite

RFC-2544 testsuite
NOTE: The RFC-2544 testsuite feature is only available on the MetroNID TE models.

Viewing RFC-2544 Testsuites

To view the RFC-2544 testsuites, open the RFC-2544 > Testsuite page.

A total of 8 testsuites can be defined. Once defined, the Testsuite can be run to determine the conformance of a network section or a specific device. To add a new testsuite, click the Add button. To edit any existing testsuite, click the testsuite name in the list. Note: 100Mbps product supported values: 1 to 100 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps). 1Gbps product supported values: 1 Mbps to 1 Gbps (step of 1 Mbps).

Name
Unique name assigned to the testsuite.

Description
Description configured to identify the testsuite and its characteristics.

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RFC-2544 testsuite

Detailed view of RFC-2544 Testsuites

To view the deatiled view of RFC-2544 testsuites, click on the testsuite name from the testsuite configuration list.

Suite configuration
Note: 100Mbps product supported values: 1 to 100 Mbps (step of 1 Mbps). 1Gbps product supported values: 1 Mbps to 1 Gbps (step of 1 Mbps).

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Suite name
Unique name assigned to the testsuite.

Suite description
Description configured to identify the testsuite and its characteristics.

Test to run
Select all conformance tests you want to run in this testsuite.

Peer settings
Information relative to the remote peer and the test packet contents. VLAN protocol IDs are set to 0x8100 for 802.1Q network when VLAN is chosen. Test packets are Y.1731 LBM and the MEG (ME Group) level is configurable.

MAC destination
The peer MAC address.

Y.1731 MEG level


The Maintenance Entity Group level.

VLAN ID
VLAN identifier, possible values are 0 to 4095. Applies only when the specific VLAN is enabled.

VLAN priority
VLAN priority bits, possible values are 0 to 7. Applies only when the specific VLAN is enabled.

VLAN CFI
Specify the Canonical Format Indicator. This should always be set to zero for connections to Ethernet switches. Applies only when the specific VLAN is enabled.

Port name
The port in which direction the NID can reach the peer.

Throughput settings
These settings are used to define the Throughput test, which searches for the maximum rate for which there is no frame loss. The Trial duration parameter defines the length during which throughput will be analyzed and during which no frame loss shall occur. The Maximum rate and Minimum rate define the range of rates to search for while the Step size defines the granularity of the range. For example, if the user wishes to measure the quality of a wirespeed GigE circuit, he would enter a range of 800 Mbps and 1000 Mbps with a step size of 10 Mbps. The NID would then test at full GigE speed, 1000 Mbps and perform a dichotomist algorithm between 800 and 1000 (and a granularity of 10) to find the highest rate for which there is no frame loss. The frame loss setting defines the acceptable difference between measured frame loss. For example, a setting of 1 would mean a 0.1% frame loss would be acceptable and considered as no frame loss by the test. The default value is 0, which means absolutely no frame loss is the target for defining full throughput. The Frame Size parameters let the user choose which frame sizes are to be tested. By default, the 10000 byte frame size (Jumbo frame) is unselected as it was not a frame size defined by the RFC-2544 standard, but which Accedian supports nevertheless.

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Trial duration
The Trial duration parameter defines the length during which throughput will be analyzed and during which no frame loss shall occur.

Maximum rate
The Maximum rate defines the upper bound of rates to search for while the Step size defines the granularity of the range.

Minimum rate
The Minimum rate defines the lower bound of rates to search for while the Step size defines the granularity of the range.

Step size
The Step size defines the granularity of the range.

Frame loss
The frame loss setting defines the acceptable difference between measured frame loss.

Delay and delay variation settings


Once a wirespeed rate with no frame loss has been defined by the throughput test, the delay and delay variation test will measure the latency and jitter at that specific rate. If the throughput test has not been run prior to the delay test, the NID will perform a short throughput test first (based on the throughput settings). The frame loss setting defines the acceptable difference between measured frame loss. For example, a setting of 1 would mean a 0.1% frame loss would be acceptable and considered as no frame loss by the test. The default value is 0, which means absolutely no frame loss is the target for defining full throughput. The Frame Size parameters let the user choose which frame sizes are to be tested. By default, the 10000 byte frame size (Jumbo frame) is unselected as it was not a frame size defined by the RFC-2544 standard, but which Accedian supports nevertheless.

Trial duration
The Trial duration is the duration for which the test will be run.

Frame loss
The frame loss setting defines the acceptable difference between measured frame loss.

Frame loss settings


The Frame loss test will verify that no frames are being lost for a duration of time, at two consecutive rates. The test will run for each Frame size selected, for a duration defined by Trial duration. The Step size indicates the step between each rate being tested. The NID will start at the Maximum rate defined in the throughput settings and step down by the value set in the Step size parameter of the Frame loss settings. Two consecutive rates must be frame loss less in order to successfully pass this test. For example, if the DUT is able to perform full wirespeed at GigE, the test will run at 1000 Mbps and 980 Mbps (for a Step size of 20 Mbps). Both tests must yield no frame loss to be successful, or a lower rate will then be tested.

Trial duration
The Trial duration is the duration for which the test will be run.

Step size
The Step size defines the granularity of the range.

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Back to back settings


The Back-to-back test performs a burst for a duration of time. The NID will again perform a Back-to-back test for each one of the Frame sizes selected. To be successful, the DUT must not create any frame loss for each burst. A burst will have a duration specified by the Total duration parameter, and the NID will perform a number of bursts as defined by the Repeat parameter. A pause of 2 seconds will be done after each burst.

Trial duration
The Trial duration is the duration for which the test will be run in milli-secs.

Repeat
Indicates the number of bursts perform for each packet size.

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RFC-2544 reports

RFC-2544 reports
NOTE: The RFC-2544 reports feature is only available on the MetroNID TE models.

Starting an RFC-2544 Testsuite

To start an RFC-2544 testsuite, click on the Start new testsuite button in the RFC-2544 > Reports page. Configure the report then click the Run button to start the testsuite.

RFC-2544 report configuration


File name
Unique name assigned to the report.

Description
Provide a description to identify the report and its characteristics.

Technician name
Who executed the testsuite.

Testsuite configuration
Select the testsuite you want to run in this report.

Special note
Information relative to the report not included in the previous fields.

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Viewing RFC-2544 Reports

To view the RFC-2544 reports, open the RFC-2544 > Reports page and click on the name of the report to view.

Testsuite Report
Name
Unique name assigned to the report.

Status
Indicates the report's current status. Possible values are: Failed : An error occurred during the testsuite execution. Running : The testsuite is currently running. Stopped : A user stopped the testsuite during its execution. Completed : The Testsuite has completed.

Description
Provide a description to identify the report.

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Report contents
Once a test suite has finished running, the bottom of the report will look similar to the below screen shot.

The entire report is displayed below.

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9: Performance Assurance Agent

PAA configuration

Chapter 9: Performance Assurance Agent

Performance Assurance Agent PAA configuration


The EtherNID Performance Assurance Agent can be used measure the jitter, latency and packet loss of a given network. Two EtherNIDs with matching settings will communicate with each other to collect data. The PAA can be configured in a point-to-point or point-to-multi-point fashion, either allowing a single PAA instance to exchange data with another PAA instance or enabling it to communicate with several PAA instances simultaneously. To view a summary of all PAA probes, open the PAA > Configuration page.

The following information is presented for each probe. Index: A unique identifier assigned to the probe. Probe name: Unique name assigned to the probe. Click the name to configure the probe. Type: Indicates the type of probe. Possible values are: layer-2: Probes occurs at layer 2. UDP: Probe occurs using UDP. Disabled: This probe is disabled. To enable it, click the probe name and then select the PAA state checkbox. Associating: Probe is looking for peer. Associated: Peer was found. Running: Running one time measurement.

State: Indicates the probe's current state. Possible values are:

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Idle: Idle after one time measurement completed. Locked IS: Locked traffic in service. Locked OOS: Locked traffic out of service. Destination: For layer-2 probes this is the peers MAC address. For UDP probe this is the peers IPV4 address. Sampling period: Interval at which measurement packets are issued.

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PAA configuration

Configuring a probe

1. Open the PAA > Configuration page. 2. Click Add to create a new probe or click the probe name to edit an existing probe. 3. Configure parameters and click Apply.

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PAA parameters

General
Name Specify a unique name to identify this probe.

Type
Select the type of probe. layer-2: Probes occurs at layer 2. UDP: Probe occurs using UDP.

Packet size
Size of PAA sample packets. Does not include protocol headers (UDP, IP,Ethernet) nor the 4 CRC bytes. Minimum value is 61. Layer-2 maximum value is 1500. UDP maximum value is 1472.

Sampling Period
Set the interval (in milliseconds) at which the probe issues measurement packets.

PAA state
Select this checkbox to enable the probe.

Layer-2 Parameters
Destination MAC address
Specify the peers MAC address. When set to FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF, Layer-2 peer address discovery will be done to automatically find the peer MAC address.

Port name
Select the outgoing port.

VLAN 1 Encapsulation
Select this checkbox to enable encapsulation on VLAN 1.

VLAN 2 Encapsulation
Select this checkbox to enable encapsulation on VLAN 1.

VLAN 1 ID
Set the ID to use for VLAN 1.

VLAN 2 ID
Set the ID to use for VLAN 2.

VLAN 1 Priority
First VLAN priority bits. This applies only if the outgoing interface is encapsulated over a VLAN.

VLAN 2 Priority
Second VLAN priority bits. This applies only if the outgoing interface is encapsulated over two VLANs.

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UDP parameters
Destination IP address
The peers IPv4 destination address.

Diff-Serv Codepoint (DSCP)


The Diff-Serv CodePoint value.

Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN)


The Explicit Congestion Notification value.

VLAN 1 Priority
First VLAN priority bits. This applies only if the outgoing interface is encapsulated over a VLAN.

Continuity
Packet loss reference period
Packet loss reference period.

Packet loss threshold


Packet loss threshold in %.

Continuity check threshold


Continuity check threshold. Number of consecutive sampling periods without receiving peer packets before declaring loss of continuity.

One-way
Reference period
One-way reference period.

Maximum delay
Maximum one-way average delay.

Delay threshold
Maximum one-way delay allowed in samples.

Average delay threshold


One-way average delay threshold.

Maximum delay variation


Maximum one-way delay variation allowed.

Delay variation threshold


One-way delay variation threshold in samples.

Average delay variation threshold


One-way average delay variation threshold.

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Two-way
Reference period
Two-way reference period.

Maximum delay
Maximum two-way average delay.

Delay threshold
Maximum two-way delay allowed in samples.

Average delay threshold


Two-way average delay threshold.

Maximum delay variation


Maximum two-way delay variation allowed.

Delay variation threshold


Two-way delay variation threshold in samples.

Average delay variation threshold


Two-way average delay variation threshold.

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PAA status

PAA status
To view the status of all PAA probes, open the PAA > Status page.

The following information is presented for each probe. Index: A unique identifier assigned to the probe. Probe name: Unique name assigned to the probe. Click the name to view detailed status information. State: Indicates the probe's current state. Possible values are: Disabled: This probe is disabled. To enable it, click the probe name and then select the PAA state checkbox. Associating: Probe is looking for peer. Associated: Peer was found. Running: Running one time measurement. Idle: Idle after one time measurement completed. Locked IS: Locked traffic in service. Locked OOS: Locked traffic out of service. CC: Continuity Check EPL: Excessive Packet Loss ODV: One-way Delay Variation OAV: One-way Average Delay Variation TD: Two-way Delay TAD: Two-way Average Delay TDV: Two-way Delay Variation TAV: Two-way Average Delay Variation

Status codes

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PAA status

Detailed PAA status

Clicking a probe name on the PAA > Status page presents more detailed information on a probe.

The following information is presented for the probe. Probe name: Unique name assigned to the probe. Click the name to view detailed status information. Index: A unique identifier assigned to the probe. State: Indicates the probe's current state. Possible values are: Disabled: This probe is disabled. To enable it, click the probe name and then select the PAA state checkbox. Associating: Probe is looking for peer. Associated: Peer was found. Running: Running one time measurement. Idle: Idle after one time measurement completed. Locked IS: Locked traffic in service. Locked OOS: Locked traffic out of service.

Alarms and status


Indicates the state of each probes alarm.

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PAA results
To view the results of all PAA probes, open the PAA > Results page.

The following information is presented for each probe. Index: A unique identifier assigned to the probe. Probe name: Unique name assigned to the probe. Click the name to view detailed results information. State: Indicates the probe's current state. Possible values are: Disabled: This probe is disabled. To enable it, click the probe name and then select the PAA state checkbox. Associating: Probe is looking for peer. Associated: Peer was found. Running: Running one time measurement. Idle: Idle after one time measurement completed. Locked IS: Locked traffic in service. Locked OOS: Locked traffic out of service.

PLNE: Packet Loss ratio Near-End. PLFE: Packet Loss ratio Far-End. OADV: One-way Average Delay Variation. TAD: Two-way Average Delay. TADV: Two-way Average Delay Variation.

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Detailed PAA results

Clicking a probe name on the PAA > results page presents more detailed information.

Current results for probe: Unique name assigned to the probe. Index: A unique identifier assigned to the probe. State: Indicates the probe's current state. Possible values are: Disabled: This probe is disabled. To enable it, click the probe name and then select the PAA state checkbox. Associating: Probe is looking for peer. Associated: Peer was found. Running: Running one time measurement. Idle: Idle after one time measurement completed. Locked IS: Locked traffic in service.

Period: Interval at which measurement packets were issued.

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Packet loss
This section provides Packet loss statistics for the near-end probe and the far-end probe. Near End: Represents the statistics of a specific probe. Far End: Represents the statistics as seen by the peer probe.

One-way delay variation Two-way delay variation


Instantaneous DV: Instantaneous delay variation value in microseconds. Minimum DV: Minimum delay variation in microseconds over one period. Maximum DV: Maximum delay variation in microseconds over one period. Average DV: Average delay variation in microseconds over one period. Nbr threshold exceeded: Number of times the threshold was exceeded.

Two-way delay
Instantaneous delay: Instantaneous delay value in microseconds. Minimum delay: Minimum delay microseconds over one period. Maximum delay: Maximum delay microseconds over one period. Average delay: Average delay in microseconds over one period. Nbr threshold exceeded: Number of times the threshold was exceeded.

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10: Command Line Interface

Command summary

Chapter 10: Command Line Interface

10

Command Line Interface Command summary


Note: For a list of all CLI command descriptions, use the help command in the CLI. The CLI provides the following commands.

Ethernet port commands


cable-test: Perform time domain reflectometry diagnostics. fault-propagation: Manage the link fault propagation between ports. media-selection: Select the ports' media type. port: Manage the link and physical level port settings. sfp: Display the SFP information, including digital diagnostics.

User traffic/flow through commands


bandwidth-regulator: Manage bandwidth regulator database. cos-profile: Manage class of service profiles for service mapping. filter: Manage the filter database. forwarding: Manage user traffic encapsulation. policy: Manage policy entries applied on ports. regulator-set: Manage bandwidth regulator sets for service mapping.

System management commands


console: Manage the serial (RS-232) console port. date: Print or set the system date and time. dns: Manage the DNS settings. interface: Manage the interfaces used to access the management plane. motd: Manage the MOTD of the unit. mtr: Manage management traffic regulation settings. ntp: Manage the network time client and server functions. permission-group: Manage the user privilege profiles. radius: Manage RADIUS authentication methods. route: Manage the IP routes and gateways. session: Manage the session settings or active sessions. snmp: Manage the SNMP agent settings.

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Command summary

syslog: Manage the remote syslog settings. user: Manage user account settings including privilege profile.

OAM commands
alarm: Manage the alarm settings. loopback: Manage the loopback settings associated with an OAM instance. oam: Manage the OAM instances (802.3ah). paa: Manage the Performance Assurance Agent instances.

Utilities
configuration: Export, import or factory reset the device configuration. firmware: Install a new firmware or display current firmware version. ping: Send pings to a specified host. reboot: Restart the device, equivalent to a power up boot. statistics: Clear all statistics. (port,policies,regulators,OAM) traceroute: Display the hops used to reach a given host.

Miscellaneous commands
board: Manage assembly and environmental information. exit: Terminate the current CLI session. help <command-name>: Display this help or for a specific given command. quit: Terminate the current CLI session. syntax: Display the general command syntax. version: Display cli version.

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Command syntax

Command syntax
To see the syntax conventions used for all help commands, type syntax to display the following information:
Description: Display CLI syntax explanations. Syntax: syntax

Syntax metacharacters {} [] * + | \ _ <> - Matches one in the set - Optionally matches one in the set - Repeat 0 or more times - Repeat 1 or more times - Matches one in the range - Separates options in a set - Escape a metacharacter - Single space character - Syntax variable - <command-name> <command-modifier>* [[<target>] <attribute-specifier>*] - <attribute-name> <attribute-value-list>

<command> <attribute-specifier>

<attribute-value_list> - <attribute-value> [, <attribute-value-list>] <command-name> <attribute-name> <attribute-value> <key-word> <string> <quoted-string> <characters> <number> <decimal> <hexadecimal> <ip-addr> <mac-addr> <url> <path> <file-name> <dns-name> <port-name> <connector-name> - <key-word> - <key-word> - {<key-word> | <number> | <string>} - {a-z} [{a-z} | {0-9} | {\-}]* - {<characters> | <quoted-string>} - {"} <characters> [[ _ | <characters>]* <characters>] {"} - {a-z | A-Z} [{a-z | A-Z |0-9 | : | ! | $ | % | ^ | & | \-}]* - <decimal> | <hexadecimal> - {0-9}+ - 0{x | X}{0-9 | a-f | A-F } [0-9 | a-f | A-F]* - <0-255>.<0-255>.<0-255>.<0-255> - <0-FF>:<0-FF>:<0-FF>:<0-FF>:<0-FF>:<0-FF> - <ip-addr>/[<path>]<file-name> - {<string>/}+ - <string> - <string>[.<string>]+ - <string> - <string>

Getting help
To get help on any CLI command type help command_name

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11: Appendix A - Alarms

Alarms

Chapter 11: Appendix A - Alarms

11
Alarms

Appendix A - Alarms

The following alarms are supported:

Port module for link down and others related alarms.


1.001.01 -> link down on Management port 1.002.01 -> link down on Monitor-1 port 1.003.01 -> link down on Monitor-2 port 1.004.01 -> link down on Client port 1.005.01 -> link down on Network port

SFP module for Rx/Tx power, temp, vcc and lbc alarms and warnings.
2.001.01 -> SFP-A temperature high alarm 2.001.02 -> SFP-A temperature low alarm 2.001.03 -> SFP-A temperature high warning 2.001.04 -> SFP-A temperature low warning 2.001.05 -> SFP-A supply voltage high alarm 2.001.06 -> SFP-A supply voltage low alarm 2.001.07 -> SFP-A supply voltage high warning 2.001.08 -> SFP-A supply voltage low warning 2.001.09 -> SFP-A laser bias current high alarm 2.001.10 -> SFP-A laser bias current low alarm 2.001.11 -> SFP-A laser bias current high warning 2.001.12 -> SFP-A laser bias current low warning 2.001.13 -> SFP-A transmit power high alarm 2.001.14 -> SFP-A transmit power low alarm 2.001.15 -> SFP-A transmit power high warning 2.001.16 -> SFP-A transmit power low warning 2.001.17 -> SFP-A receive power high alarm 2.001.18 -> SFP-A receive power low alarm 2.001.19 -> SFP-A receive power high warning 2.001.20 -> SFP-A receive power low warning

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Alarms

2.001.21 -> SFP-A not present 2.002.01 -> SFP-B temperature high alarm 2.002.02 -> SFP-B temperature low alarm 2.002.03 -> SFP-B temperature high warning 2.002.04 -> SFP-B temperature low warning 2.002.05 -> SFP-B supply voltage high alarm 2.002.06 -> SFP-B supply voltage low alarm 2.002.07 -> SFP-B supply voltage high warning 2.002.08 -> SFP-B supply voltage low warning 2.002.09 -> SFP-B laser bias current high alarm 2.002.10 -> SFP-B laser bias current low alarm 2.002.11 -> SFP-B laser bias current high warning 2.002.12 -> SFP-B laser bias current low warning 2.002.13 -> SFP-B transmit power high alarm 2.002.14 -> SFP-B transmit power low alarm 2.002.15 -> SFP-B transmit power high warning 2.002.16 -> SFP-B transmit power low warning 2.002.17 -> SFP-B receive power high alarm 2.002.18 -> SFP-B receive power low alarm 2.002.19 -> SFP-B receive power high warning 2.002.20 -> SFP-B receive power low warning 2.002.21 -> SFP-B not present

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Alarms

EtherNID Performance Assurance Agent alarms.


Note: These alarms are dynamically created based on the PAA probes configured. xxx : PAA instance number <probe-name> : PAA probe name 3.xxx.01 -> <probe-name> PAA_CC_ALERT 3.xxx.02 -> <probe-name> PAA_PL_ALERT 3.xxx.05 -> <probe-name> PAA_OW_DV_ALERT 3.xxx.06 -> <probe-name> PAA_OW_AVG_DV_ALERT 3.xxx.07 -> <probe-name> PAA_TW_DELAY_ALERT 3.xxx.08 -> <probe-name> PAA_TW_AVG_DELAY_ALERT 3.xxx.09 -> <probe-name> PAA_TW_DV_ALERT 3.xxx.10 -> <probe-name> PAA_TW_AVG_DV_ALERT

Example: With only 1 PAA probe created, called paa_probe_1, these alarms will be created: 3.001.01 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_CC_ALERT 3.001.02 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_PL_ALERT 3.001.05 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_OW_DV_ALERT 3.001.06 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_OW_AVG_DV_ALERT 3.001.07 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_TW_DELAY_ALERT 3.001.08 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_TW_AVG_DELAY_ALERT 3.001.09 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_TW_DV_ALERT 3.001.10 -> paa_probe_1 PAA_TW_AVG_DV_ALERT

Environmental module for fans, power supplies and temperature sensors.


8.000.01 -> First overheat threshold 8.000.02 -> Second overheat threshold 8.000.03 -> Power supply +5V DC 8.000.04 -> Power supply on -48V feed A 8.000.05 -> Power supply on -48V feed B

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12: Appendix B - MIB support

Public MIBs

Chapter 12: Appendix B - MIB support

12

Appendix B - MIB support Public MIBs


The following public MIBs are supported:

RFC-1213-MIB
system group interface group snmp group

Note: Some groups have been removed for security reasons of the standard MIB-II.

IF-MIB
ifXTable

EtherLike-MIB
dot3StatsTable dot3PauseTable dot3HCStatsTable

RMON-MIB
etherStatsTable etherHistoryHighCapacityTable historyControlTable etherHistoryTable

MAU-MIB
ifJackTable ifMauAutoNegTable

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12: Appendix B - MIB support

Private MIBs

Private MIBs
The following private Accedian MIBs expose EtherNID configuration and status information.

ACCEDIAN-SMI.mib
This MIB contains all the information related to Accedian private tree and principal branches.

ACD-ALARM-MIB.mib
This MIB contains the general setting of the alarm manager and the tables for alarm configuration and status.

ACD-DESC-MIB.mib
This MIB contains the NID description, information and environmental values and status.

ACD-FILTER-MIB.mib
This MIB contains the Layer 2 and IPV4 filter tables.

ACD-PAA-MIB.mib
This MIB contains all the information about PAA configurations and measurement results.

ACD-POLICY-MIB.mib
This MIB contains the policies configuration table and the counters table for policy entries.

ACD-REGULATOR-MIB.mib
This MIB contains all the information about the bandwidth regulator configurations and statistics.

ACD-SFP-MIB.mib
This MIB contains all the information related to the SFP present in the NID.

Alarms format
The alarm format is defined in the ACD-ALARM-MIB.mib file. The alarms are in SNMPv2 format and include the following fields. acdAlarmCfgID acdAlarmCfgSeverity acdAlarmCfgDesc acdAlarmStatusLastChange acdAlarmCfgServiceAffecting

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